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The top Klansmen didn't have white robes, but brightly hued ones.  I discovered 
this when my grandfather died in the summer of 1953 and I was deemed old enough 
at 11 to help my dad and uncle clear out his huge old house.  I was allotted 
the task of seeing what was in the attic.  I opened a closet door and 
discovered hanging there a dust-ridden orange Klan robe complete with pointy 
top.  My deeply embarrassed dad, over my supposedly childish objections that 
this was important to history, immediately burned the robe along with most of 
the other effects of my grandfather in a bonfire in the yard.  I now muse about 
the irony that, the more important the rank of the Klansman, the more colored 
his robe was.  Wythe
PS -- John, when I landed the job at the University of Alabama and got to 
Tuscaloosa in September 1966, there were signs on public water fountains 
designating the proper race of a drinker therefrom.  When I left Alabama in 
2007 a group of us were working on getting actually desegregated elementary 
school classes in the state's Black Belt (the school boards were grouping the 
pupils by supposed ability, and lo and behold! almost all the most "able" 
children turned out to be white!).  Given the doggedness of continued racist 
intransigence, the symbols of segregation NEED to be in museums today, such as 
the one in Selma founded by Rose Sanders (one of my heroes, a friend, and a 
fellow worker in the desegregation trenches) which shows Selma's struggles -- 
desegregation, the marches, the bridge-crossings, the demonstrations, and the 
federal legislation such as the Voting Rights Act which has resulted from 
continuing mostly-black activism centered in Selma.

> On June 18, 2020 at 10:18 PM John A Imani via Marxism 
> <marxism@lists.csbs.utah.edu> wrote:
> 
> 
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> 
> << Indeed I can imagine a world in which these symbols are removed while
> the racist conditions that gave rise to them remain.>>
> 
> And indeed I can imagine a world in which the racist conditions are gone
> while these 'symbols' remain: in books and museums where they belong.
> 
> What is the effect of the sight of a Klan hood, masked conic hat and
> chewing tobacco-stained flowing was-white robe?  What comes to mind when a
> noose is tied from a prominent tree, the grace of its Spanish moss belied?
> The burning of a cross?  The signs  "Colored",  "Whites Only" on the
> restrooms, the water fountains, the lunch counters, the bus depot, the
> trains?  The Confederate flag?  More than signs.  Warnings.
> 
> 'Symbols' speak more than the picture's words.
> 
> Socially recognized, socially understood, socially enforced conventions.
> Southern blacks were almost born knowing where the back of the bus was.
> Which school to attend.  Who to let pass on the sidewalk by stepping onto
> the unpaved easement:  "Yes, Suh", "No, Ma'am".
> 
> Yes, I can imagine a world where historians' can comment in pages and
> inscribe their analyses of such 'symbols' on plaques; where students can be
> taught in our schools; where the merely curious can leaf through a book or
> walk hallowed galleries and pause and think and shake their heads in amazed
> disgust in a land where skin color itself has ceased to be the symbol.
> 
> I join comrade Wythe as a child of the South, fleeing Mason and Dixon's
> line, at the age of 15 but having seen much, enough.  I differ with and
> from the comrade only by being born black.
> 
> JAI
> 
> On Thu, Jun 18, 2020 at 6:03 PM A.R. G <amithrgu...@gmail.com> wrote:
> 
> Very much appreciate Wythe's insight as a Southerner...
> Indeed I can imagine a world in which these symbols are removed while the
> racist conditions that gave rise to them remain.
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