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On 6/27/20 12:10 AM, Ken Hiebert via Marxism wrote:
"When even people
with college education talk about cinema,
we post movie reviews from pedestrian
hacks like James Agee…”

It seemed clear to me when Louis posted the Agee review, it was not to further 
our understanding of the movie, or intended to serve as a review, but rather to 
illustrate the racist support for the movie.  With that purpose in mind, it was 
useful to post it.

James Agee was no pedestrian hack.

From Wikipedia:

After graduation, Agee was hired by the Time Inc. as a reporter, and moved to New York City, where he wrote for Fortune magazine in 1932-1937, although he is better known for his later film criticism in Time and The Nation. In 1934, he published his only volume of poetry, Permit Me Voyage, with a foreword by Archibald MacLeish.

In the summer of 1936, during the Great Depression, Agee spent eight weeks on assignment for Fortune with photographer Walker Evans, living among sharecroppers in Alabama. While Fortune did not publish his article, Agee turned the material into a book titled Let Us Now Praise Famous Men (1941).[6] It sold only 600 copies before being remaindered. Another manuscript from the same assignment discovered in 2003, titled Cotton Tenants, is believed to be the essay submitted to Fortune editors. The 30,000 word text, accompanied by photographs by Walker Evans, was published as a book in June 2013. John Jeremiah Sullivan writes in the Summer 2013 issue of BookForum that, "This is not merely an early, partial draft of Famous Men, in other words, not just a different book; it's a different Agee, an unknown Agee. Its excellence should enhance his reputation."[7] A significant difference between the works is the use of original names in Cotton Tenants; Agee assigned fictional names to the subjects of Famous Men in order to protect their identity.[8]


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