This species is seen nearly every Fall near Seattle, but Minnesota!! That's a 
wow.

Richard Carlson
Tucson & Lake Tahoe
Sent from my iPhone


> On Sep 22, 2016, at 7:00 AM, MOU-NET automatic digest system 
> <lists...@lists.umn.edu> wrote:
> 
> There are 5 messages totaling 170 lines in this issue.
> 
> Topics of the day:
> 
>  1. Sharp-tailed Sandpiper present Wednesday morning, Carver County (3)
>  2. MRVAC Program thisThursday
>  3. Sharp-tailed Sandpiper information
> 
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> 
> Date:    Wed, 21 Sep 2016 07:36:57 -0500
> From:    Bob Dunlap <bob.dunlap...@gmail.com>
> Subject: Sharp-tailed Sandpiper present Wednesday morning, Carver County
> 
> Several of us are looking at the sandpiper right now, Wednesday morning
> 7:30.
> 
> Bob Dunlap
> bobthebirdman.com
> 
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> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Wed, 21 Sep 2016 11:02:29 -0500
> From:    Steve Weston <swest...@comcast.net>
> Subject: MRVAC Program thisThursday
> 
> Minnesota River Valley Audubon Chapter
> Program September 22, 2016 - 7:30 pm
> Social Learning, Signaling, and  Deception in Blue Jays
> Virginia Heinen - University of Minnesota
> 
> Being in a social group has advantages: by watching others, you can learn
> where the food is and save time searching for it yourself. But social
> learning is not always the best option: what if your social partners are
> wrong, or what if they're trying to deceive you? Research from the Stephens
> Experimental Ecology Laboratory explores how blue jays balance social and
> personal information, manage cooperative feeding and what happens when a
> signaler wants to lie.
> 
> *When:*  Please join us on the 4th Thursday of the month from 7:00-7:30 pm
> to socialize over cookies.  A brief business meeting and the featured
> speaker begin at 7:30 pm. The meeting will conclude before 9:00 pm.
> 
> *Where:* Minnesota Valley National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Center 3801
> American Blvd E, Bloomington.  Accessible by Hiawatha Light Rail line, get
> off at the American Blvd. stop.  Driving, take Hwy 494 to 34th Ave – go
> south to American Blvd; turn left, go 2 blocks. Use the staff entrance in
> the middle of the building.
> 
> *MRVAC meetings are free and open to the public.*
> 
> Steve Weston
> On Quigley Lake in Eagan, MN
> swest...@comcast.net
> 
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> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Wed, 21 Sep 2016 19:09:20 +0000
> From:    Warren Woessner <wwoess...@slwip.com>
> Subject: Re: Sharp-tailed Sandpiper present Wednesday morning, Carver County
> 
> ST Sandpiper still present at noon Wed
> Warren
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Minnesota Birds [mailto:MOU-NET@LISTS.UMN.EDU] On Behalf Of Bob Dunlap
> Sent: Wednesday, September 21, 2016 7:37 AM
> To: MOU-NET@LISTS.UMN.EDU
> Subject: [mou-net] Sharp-tailed Sandpiper present Wednesday morning, Carver 
> County
> 
> Several of us are looking at the sandpiper right now, Wednesday morning
> 7:30.
> 
> Bob Dunlap
> bobthebirdman.com
> 
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> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Wed, 21 Sep 2016 17:58:40 -0500
> From:    Liz Harper <harp0...@umn.edu>
> Subject: Re: Sharp-tailed Sandpiper present Wednesday morning, Carver County
> 
> Still present 550 pm
> 
>> On September 21, 2016 2:09:20 PM CDT, Warren Woessner <wwoess...@slwip.com> 
>> wrote:
>> ST Sandpiper still present at noon Wed
>> Warren
>> 
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From: Minnesota Birds [mailto:MOU-NET@LISTS.UMN.EDU] On Behalf Of Bob
>> Dunlap
>> Sent: Wednesday, September 21, 2016 7:37 AM
>> To: MOU-NET@LISTS.UMN.EDU
>> Subject: [mou-net] Sharp-tailed Sandpiper present Wednesday morning,
>> Carver County
>> 
>> Several of us are looking at the sandpiper right now, Wednesday morning
>> 7:30.
>> 
>> Bob Dunlap
>> bobthebirdman.com
>> 
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>> Join or Leave mou-net: http://lists.umn.edu/cgi-bin/wa?SUBED1=mou-net
>> Archives: http://lists.umn.edu/archives/mou-net.html
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> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Thu, 22 Sep 2016 02:42:37 +0000
> From:    Jason Caddy <j.ca...@hotmail.com>
> Subject: Sharp-tailed Sandpiper information
> 
> Since most NA field guides only give a short blip about the Sharp-tailed 
> Sandpiper being a vagrant to the US mostly found on the Pacific coast and 
> casual inland that is similar to the Pectoral Sandpiper, I thought I would 
> share a bit more information on this interesting bird.
> 
> Like many sandpiper species, the most intriguing thing about the Sharp-tailed 
> Sandpiper is its incredible migration. The birds "winter" (austral summer) in 
> Australia, New Zealand, and many South Pacific islands. They then migrate 
> along the east Asian coast and fly overland to get to their Arctic Siberian 
> breeding grounds. The adults head back south overland but a large number of 
> juvenile birds are theorized to stage in Alaska. These juvenile birds then 
> fly over the open Pacific Ocean to their "wintering" grounds. Thus, it is 
> likely that the individual found in Carver county was born in Siberia after 
> its parents had come all the way from the South Pacific. It traveled east to 
> Alaska, got mixed up with some Pectoral Sandpipers and headed on their 
> southward migration, perhaps eventually ending up in South America. Quite a 
> journey for a bird that was just born over the summer.
> 
> Also, showing the flexible abilities of shorebirds, the Sharp-tailed 
> Sandpiper prefers to stay inland in Australia during the winter if there are 
> adequate rains. This provides energy savings by shortening their migratory 
> journey to the southeastern Australian coast.
> 
> The Birdlife Australia website describes the Sharp-tailed as the most 
> dinky-di of all shorebirds in Australia. Apparently, a well deserved 
> compliment!
> 
> 
> Jason Caddy
> 
> Minneapolis
> 
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> ------------------------------
> 
> End of MOU-NET Digest - 20 Sep 2016 to 21 Sep 2016 (#2016-89)
> *************************************************************

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