Greg,

I would say that it is an occasional occurrence, and based on work in the 
cranberry area of central Wisconsin, it wasn't unusual to encounter maybe a 
half-dozen juveniles during the spring nesting season.  I would assume the same 
for northern Minnesota.  I think the tendency is for them to forage almost 
exclusively in neutral waters and avoid territorial interactions, if they 
should venture back close to natal areas.  Overall though, the general pattern 
of them staying on coastal waters holds true, and based on radio-telemetry 
work, even there they display vagrant tendencies.

Steve        
----- Original Message -----
From: Gregory Munson <naturenu...@gmail.com>
To: MOU-NET@LISTS.UMN.EDU
Sent: Thu, 12 Apr 2018 22:06:37 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: [mou-net] Juvenile plumage Loon in Rochester

A presumably migrating group of three Common Loons were spotted on a small lake 
behind a dam on the Zumbro River in downtown Rochester yesterday.  

One of them appeared to be in full juvenile plumage.

Wondering how unusual this is.  


Greg Munson
Nature Nut Columnist
Rochester Post Bulletin
Rochester, MN
(507) 261-2985




----
Join or Leave mou-net: http://lists.umn.edu/cgi-bin/wa?SUBED1=mou-net
Archives: http://lists.umn.edu/archives/mou-net.html

----
Join or Leave mou-net: http://lists.umn.edu/cgi-bin/wa?SUBED1=mou-net
Archives: http://lists.umn.edu/archives/mou-net.html

Reply via email to