LCTL to my understanding puts the language in an instructional context, and
could refer to a major national or regional language that just isn't taught
that much in other places. Less widely spoken languages (as opposed to
languages of wider communication [which have the acronym LWC]) is another
possible formulation.

Don Osborn, Ph.D.         [EMAIL PROTECTED]
*Bisharat! A language, technology & development initiative
*Bisharat! Initiative langues - technologie - développement
http://www.bisharat.net



Quoting Sergei Nirenburg <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>:

> The politically correct way of saying this,
> as far as I can tell, is "less commonly taught languages"
> or "low density languages".
> 
> Or maybe somebody wanted to honor our colleague
> Victor Lesser of UMass. Though as far as I know
> he has been using exclusively English...
> 
> On Feb 10, 2005, at 9:27, Somers, Harold wrote:
> 
> >  
> > This posting on behalf of YW, whose posting bounced.
> >
> >
> > From: Yorick WIlks <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
> > Date: Thu Feb 10, 2005  2:23:17 PM Europe/London
> >
> > I cringe too but I think it may be right as "lesser" is (necessarily)
> > an adverb modifying an adjective. The only guide I can remember in
> > these things is the old adage  (seeing as English doesnt have proper
> > rules like French and German) that "it is important to remember that
> > the lesser spotted finch is actually larger than the greater spotted
> > finch". It probably wasnt "finch" either and was a letter to the Times
> > not a real adage.
> > Yorick Wilks
> >
> >
> > _______________________________________________
> > Mt-list mailing list
> 


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