Apologies for including the photos instead of the links- I forgot which group 
and rules I was replying to

Mike Cooper

Sent from my iPhone

> On Aug 27, 2018, at 6:43 PM, Mike <mike...@optonline.net> wrote:
> 
> I was more inclined to think that if it’s one or the other,  it might be an 
> oddball Western rather than Semi.  I’ve never seen a Semi with anywhere near 
> the extent of markings on the underparts that this bird shows.  It has well 
> defined chevrons along the flanks and spotting and streaking onto the 
> undertail coverts.  The bill is short, but not particularly blob- tipped. 
> Two photos below from John Gluth and Lisa Nasta showing the bold chevrons and 
> marked UTC
> 
> Mike Cooper
> 
>  <image1.jpeg>
> 
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
>> 
>>> Hi Steve,
>>> 
>>> Whenever, I see “hybrid” in any reports I am always tempted to immediately 
>>> take a peep. Despite looking at the images from the field on my phone I 
>>> have to respectfully disagree with the “presumed” hybrid call on the bird 
>>> you referenced. 
>>> 
>>> This to me, is just a Semipalmated Sandpiper (SESA). I agree it is  a tad 
>>> heavily marked below but nothing in the structure or bill is suggestive of 
>>> a Western hybrid with a SESA.
>>> 
>>> I certainly claim no expertise; however, my time having Semipalmated 
>>> Sandpipers in the hand and field observations, I have learned to appreciate 
>>> variation in plumage and size. The plumage on this bird in my opinion is 
>>> within the range of just a straight up Semipalmated Sandpiper.
>>> 
>>> When I have a chance, I will take a look on a bigger screen and perhaps 
>>> provide more details.
>>> 
>>> Cheers,
>>> 
>>> --------
>>> "I prefer to be true to myself, even at the hazard of incurring the 
>>> ridicule of others, rather than to be false, and to incur my own 
>>> abhorrence." ~ Frederick Douglass
>>> 
>>> 風 Swift as the wind
>>> 林 Quiet as the forest
>>> 火 Conquer like the fire
>>> 山 Steady as the mountain
>>> Sun Tzu  The Art of War
>>> 
>>>> (\__/)
>>>> (= '.'=)                                            
>>>> (") _ (")                                     
>>>> Sent from somewhere in the field using my mobile device! 
>>> 
>>> Andrew Baksh
>>> www.birdingdude.blogspot.com
>>> 
>>> On Aug 27, 2018, at 3:09 PM, Steve Walter <swalte...@verizon.net> wrote:
>>> 
>>>> I’ve posted pictures of an interesting Calidris sandpiper that has been on 
>>>> the East Pond at Jamaica Bay. It was first photographed by Peter Post on 
>>>> Saturday and observed by Kevin Karlson (co-author of The Shorebird Guide). 
>>>> I was able to relocate and photograph the bird on Sunday, then discuss it 
>>>> with Kevin. He’s of the opinion that it’s a hybrid between Western and 
>>>> Semipalmated Sandpipers. In simplest terms, he described it as having the 
>>>> upperparts of a Semipalmated and the underparts of a Western. The bird is 
>>>> extensively marked underneath, not only along the flanks, but on the 
>>>> belly. Semipalmated would never be like that. And actually, neither 
>>>> species should be so extensively marked this late. The bill looks like 
>>>> that of a Semipalmated, while the head shows a squared look more typical 
>>>> of a Western. Pictures can be seen at my web site 
>>>> http://stevewalternature.com/  under Birds, Recent Work.     
>>>>  
>>>> For the record, other weekend birds at Jamaica Bay other than the much 
>>>> ballyhooed Hudsonian Godwit, include 1 Caspian Tern on the pond Saturday 
>>>> and 2 fly bys Sunday, at least one juvenile Western Sandpiper both days, 
>>>> many White-rumped Sandpipers, and Stilt Sandpiper now starting to appear 
>>>> in the juvenile form. A Common Raven was seen by many, soaring over the 
>>>> visitor center Saturday.
>>>>  
>>>> The water level is decidedly on the high side, but there’s enough room for 
>>>> birds and people. Getting to the raunt requires walking through water in 
>>>> places. Note that the safest passage is sometimes well away from the edge 
>>>> of the pond. There are two deeper puddles that reach the phragmites in the 
>>>> southeast corner. Do not walk along their edges. And also watch out for 
>>>> the Salt Marsh Fleabane, if you can. These plants are in full bloom now 
>>>> and adding a touch of beauty to the pond. And if you pay  close enough 
>>>> attention to the bright pink flowers, you just might be rewarded with the 
>>>> sight of a Salt Marsh Skipper.
>>>>  
>>>>  
>>>> Steve Walter
>>>> Bayside, NY
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