There is something quite serene and enjoyable during those slow periods in 
getting to know your common birds. Robins are still cool birds for me; 
especially those spotted ones ;-)

The reality is, we live in the age of instant gratification. We want our birds 
now! Fast and lined up for us.

--------
"I prefer to be true to myself, even at the hazard of incurring the ridicule of 
others, rather than to be false, and to incur my own abhorrence." ~ Frederick 
Douglass

風 Swift as the wind
林 Quiet as the forest
火 Conquer like the fire
山 Steady as the mountain
Sun Tzu  The Art of War

> (\__/)
> (= '.'=)                                            
> (") _ (")                                     
> Sent from somewhere in the field using my mobile device! 

Andrew Baksh
www.birdingdude.blogspot.com

> On Jun 26, 2019, at 2:26 PM, ArieGilbert <ariegilb...@optonline.net> wrote:
> 
> Re doldrums:  one cannot appreciate a great day of birding without bad days. 
> Yin/Yang
> 
> Also  its important to have LOOB
> 
> ( life outside of birding )
> 
> Arie Gilbert
> No. Babylon NY
> www.PowerBirder.Blogspot.com
> www.QCBirdClub.org
> 
> Sent from my T-Mobile 4G LTE Device
> 
> -------- Original message --------
> From: Shaibal Mitra <shaibal.mi...@csi.cuny.edu>
> Date: 6/26/19 11:11 AM (GMT-05:00)
> To: "NYSBIRDS (NYSBIRDS-L@cornell.edu)" <NYSBIRDS-L@cornell.edu>
> Subject: [nysbirds-l] Purposeful Birdwatching
> 
> Judging from many, many recent conversations with fellow birders, it seems 
> that people are having a tough time of it during these June doldrums. From 
> independent sources over the past week, I've heard: "crushing 
> disappointment;" "why is it so bad?;" "is it going to get better?" "something 
> could show up, right?;" "didn't birding used to be good?;" "this place used 
> to be good, I think" and more. And this has mostly been in the context of 
> ordinary, local birding, not directly related to the more ominous big-picture 
> concerns expressed by Chris recently.
> 
> My usual response, admittedly slightly sadistic, is that birding excitement 
> has always been relative. We modern observers can't begin to imagine how bad 
> it was before the legal protection of birds was implemented a century ago, 
> and yet the observers of that time still found birdwatching exciting--and 
> were motivated enough to achieve protective legislation in the face of forces 
> as ruthless and malevolent as those confronting us now. Imagine the 
> excitement experienced by Harry Hathaway, the father of Rhode Island 
> ornithology, when in 1894 he saw his first Great Blue Heron, after ten years 
> of field work! It was Hathaway's ongoing work that eventually revealed that a 
> unique, seemingly outlying, 19th Century winter record of White-throated 
> Sparrow in RI was not an accident. He documented two more winter records and 
> lived long enough to see RI's plundered and deforested landscape recover 
> sufficiently to harbor the lisping flocks of White-throats we now take for 
> granted on the CBCs.
> 
> On Long Island, Ludlow Griscom scolded over-exuberant birders who tossed off 
> sight records of Ring-billed Gulls in winter and summer, citing a countable 
> number of such specimens as the gold standard of documentation for that 
> species in that context. Chafing at this discipline, Cruickshank and Peterson 
> figured out how to find and identify Ring-billed Gulls better then their 
> predecessors--proving again the eternal pleasure of purposeful birdwatching.
> 
> Yesterday I saw my first adult Ring-billed Gulls of the season at Robert 
> Moses SP, Suffolk County. I'm not sure of the date for my last spring adult, 
> but I did manage to record that none were present by 17 April:
> 
> https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S55097294
> 
> And I am able to pull up the date of the late-June return of adults in at 
> least one other year:
> 
> https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S17210602
> 
> [note to eBird: please enable sorting of checklists by Julian date!]
> 
> A little sleuthing subsequently revealed that two of my colleagues beat me to 
> it this year, documenting an adult Ring-bill at Cupsogue two days before my 
> exciting find (though it required some follow-up work to obtain their photos 
> and a definitive age):
> 
> https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S57623401
> 
> Hypothesis: Ring-billed Gulls whose breeding efforts fail after early June 
> abandon the colonies and disperse, some reaching the coast.
> 
> Shai Mitra
> Bay Shore
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