Hi David and all,

There was some discussion of this topic in this forum back in September 2018, 
in relation to early fall dates of Hermit Thrush in the NYC area--and the 
possibility that these might relate to dispersal by local breeders vs. regular 
migrants from the boreal. I have an excel file in which I have coded a crude 
mechanism for deconcatenating eBird line items, and I was pleasantly surprised 
to see that I had, at that time, already broken out my Suffolk County records 
for Hermit Thrush.*

But first, to give a shout-out to my colleagues on the Captree June Count, I'll 
note that we have recorded Hermit Thrush only once since 2015: 2 birds in 2016, 
which I believe were at Connetquot River SP. That site has lost a lot of Pitch 
Pines since then and we have not recorded Hermit Thrush 2017-19.

Regarding our own records, Patricia's formal surveys in the Northwest Woods of 
East Hampton in June 2004 revealed quite a few Hermit Thrushes (e.g., singing 
at 5/20 stations on 13 Jun). Apart from these, I can only find 8 eBirded 
records of 1-2 breeders each, all from Hunters Garden and surrounding areas, 
and the most recent was as long ago as 2011:

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S27022174 

Searches should be conducted in and near these places, and elsewhere where 
dense pine cover co-occurs with swampy conditions (e.g., around the Maple Swamp 
in Flanders). I would not be at all surprised to find a few territorial birds 
persisting even now, but sustainable populations seems to be a thing of the 
past. This is a shame because the LI populations were spatially and 
ecologically quite apart from the nearest breeders in mainland southeastern New 
York (where they are also, incidentally, quite scarce and local, but preferring 
very different habitats). In contrast, Hermit Thrushes were (at least in my 
youth!) abundant and widespread in a great variety of forest types in Rhode 
Island and eastern Connecticut, from the interior hills right down to the 
Charlestown Moraine, near the coast. There, they aren't/weren't picky at all 
about micro-habitat and tend(ed) to be among the most common forest birds, even 
in horrible-looking third-growth oak woods with a few scattered pines.

But things change fast. The new atlases will hold some painful lessons, I'm 
sure.

Shai Mitra
Bay Shore

*For those wishing to extract sortable counts and Julian dates from sets of 
eBird line items, this is how I do it:

1. In eBird, carefully select and copy a block of line items, including the 
following columns: item number, common-name-scientific-name-count, location, 
state-country, date.
2. Paste this into an excel spreadsheet.
3. To de-concatenate the counts, create the following series of functions in 
new columns, referring back to the (annoyingly concatenated) 
common-name-scientific-name-count column. That column should be Column B; I 
create five new columns (F through J) with the following functions:

=RIGHT(B2,LEN(B2)-SEARCH(" ",B2,1))
=RIGHT(F2,LEN(F2)-SEARCH(" ",F2,1))
=RIGHT(G2,LEN(G2)-SEARCH(" ",G2,1))
=RIGHT(H2,LEN(H2)-SEARCH(" ",H2,1))
=RIGHT(I2,LEN(I2)-SEARCH(" ",I2,1))

This will yield the count for the first checklist in cell J2 and can be applied 
down for all rows.

4. To de-concatenate day-month-year dates, create three new columns with the 
following functions referring back to the date column:

=TEXT(E2,"mm")
=TEXT(E2,"dd")
=TEXT(E2,"yy")

These will yield sortable, numeric values for month, day, and year, allowing 
you to see, for instance, how many records of Hermit Thrush you have in June 
and July in Suffolk County, and together with the sortable counts, to examine 
patterns of maxima, etc, by month or by year.

________________________________________
From: bounce-123710374-11143...@list.cornell.edu 
[bounce-123710374-11143...@list.cornell.edu] on behalf of TURNER 
[redk...@optonline.net]
Sent: Friday, June 28, 2019 10:01 AM
To: David Nicosia; NY Birds
Subject: Re: [nysbirds-l] Does the Hermit Thrush still breed on Long Island???

Hi David: As a person who does a fair amount of hiking and birding in the LI 
Pine Barrens, it has been many years since I've heard Hermit Thrush singing; 
this is somewhat surprising given the success conservationists have had in 
preserving tens of thousands of acres of suitable habitat.

John Turner

On June 28, 2019 at 8:56 AM David Nicosia <daven102...@gmail.com> wrote:

Does the Hermit Thrush still breed in the pine barrens of Long Island?  I 
noticed on the ebird map for June 2019 no HETH reports for LI.  Curious.
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