Blistering Barnacles!

I had heard the bird in question was first thought to be a Pectoral Sandpiper. 
Subsequently, I did see Angus’s questions on the ID and thought about asking 
for the checklists with photos but alas I procrastinated.

Are the photos available?  I would have loved to see what the confusion was 
about if only to learn.

--------
"I prefer to be true to myself, even at the hazard of incurring the ridicule of 
others, rather than to be false, and to incur my own abhorrence." ~ Frederick 
Douglass

風 Swift as the wind
林 Quiet as the forest
火 Conquer like the fire
山 Steady as the mountain
Sun Tzu  The Art of War

> (\__/)
> (= '.'=)                                            
> (") _ (")                                     
> Sent from somewhere in the field using my mobile device! 

Andrew Baksh
www.birdingdude.blogspot.com

> On Jul 8, 2019, at 10:03 PM, Shaibal Mitra <shaibal.mi...@csi.cuny.edu> wrote:
> 
> It seems that in this age of hyper-connectivity, false information travels 
> more easily than true. Whereas the good-news story of a Baird's Sandpiper at 
> Nickerson Beach, Nassau County, Long Island, propagated quickly and 
> decisively, the uncomfortable awareness that the bird in question was 
> actually a Sanderling is spreading too slowly.
> 
> Conflicting descriptions aside, photos in the various checklists show an 
> adult Calidris sandpiper with a robust bill, boldly patterned back feathers 
> with extensive rufous color in the interior of each feather, warm color on 
> the face and bib, and boldly pale-edged coverts and tertials. All of these 
> are characteristic of Sanderlings, which furthermore also have long wings 
> that extend beyond the tertials when folded.
> 
> Note that this is early July and that juveniles of Arctic-breeding shorebirds 
> will not reach us for several weeks. Thus, a Baird's Sandpiper at this date 
> would be an adult (very rare), not a scaly-backed juvenile.
> 
> Lone shorebirds are difficult to identify, and the grassy habitat chosen by 
> this individual was admittedly atypical for a Sanderling, so an error is 
> understandable. But it has been two days, so I would have thought that the 
> gears of the social media mill would have mulled this grist by now.
> 
> Distinguishing rare birds requires thorough familiarity with the common 
> species. An identification article in the most recent Birding magazine 
> emphasizes this point but unfortunately features a photo that confuses two of 
> the most common species (yes, one is Sanderling)! I've pointed this out to 
> about a dozen active birders, none of whom was aware of the gaffe. Is it only 
> good news that goes viral nowadays?
> 
> Shai Mitra
> Bay Shore
> 
> 
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