Well there you go, signs they are continuing to invest... as now it's moved
from an organic form into solid form ... i.e., it was a virus last time I
saw it, now its an actual physical metal object (bullet).

*drops mic*

---
Regards,
Scott Barnes
http://www.riagenic.com

On Tue, Sep 20, 2016 at 2:00 PM, Greg Low (罗格雷格博士) <g...@greglow.com> wrote:

> When I posted on Facebook about it the other day, another Microsoft friend
> noted that he was going to be the product manager for EF, but commented
> that he managed “to dodge that bullet”.
>
>
>
> Regards,
>
>
>
> Greg
>
>
>
> Dr Greg Low
>
>
>
> 1300SQLSQL (1300 775 775) office | +61 419201410 mobile│ +61 3 8676 4913
> fax
>
> SQL Down Under | Web: www.sqldownunder.com | http://greglow.me
>
>
>
> *From:* ozdotnet-boun...@ozdotnet.com [mailto:ozdotnet-bounces@
> ozdotnet.com] *On Behalf Of *Scott Barnes
> *Sent:* Tuesday, 20 September 2016 1:42 PM
> *To:* ozDotNet <ozdotnet@ozdotnet.com>
> *Subject:* Re: Entity Framework - the lay of the land
>
>
>
> Entity Framework was born out of many attempts to solve the DAL tier to
> enable developers to have to avoid talking to DBA's directly. The amount of
> churn its gone through and the level of pain it rewards doesn't seem imho
> to justify its adoption.
>
>
>
> As for forgotten child. I can't speak to the program management level but
> when I was in the product management side of things we avoided that clump
> of code as much as possible. It was too hard to build a narrative around
> and even when we managed to wrangle the mess into a coherent strategy
> they'd turn and flip the table over with "i have a better idea on how to
> solve this pattern.." and sure as your google search for "CRUD
> EntityFramework" the entire blogosphere would leave you in the corner,
> confused and wondering aimlessly as if to say out loud "I trusted them,
> they...they have cheated me for the last time".
>
> I recently watched a Unity3D dev switch to using web-centric .net dev, and
> he died a miserable painful death on Entity Framework code-first. To quote
> "I went to use the migration strategy it left me a broken man, it just
> doesn't work as its advertised".
>
> Its time to put this and PRISM in the "GitHub" graveyard. Say out loud you
> support it but block any future pull requests.
>
>
>
>
> ---
> Regards,
> Scott Barnes
> http://www.riagenic.com
>
>
>
> On Tue, Sep 20, 2016 at 1:33 PM, Craig van Nieuwkerk <crai...@gmail.com>
> wrote:
>
> To give more info, 99% of the CUD was done via NHibernate. For simple
> select queries like for lookup lists was also done via NHibernate, using
> the built in caching and Redis cache, but more complicated queries were
> straight SQL and PetaPoco.
>
>
>
> Craig
>
>
>
>
>
> On Tue, Sep 20, 2016 at 1:30 PM, Craig van Nieuwkerk <crai...@gmail.com>
> wrote:
>
> Not EF but have used NHibernate in application, in conjunction with
> optimised SQL where required, and easily supported 1000+ users. But it is
> very easy to stuff it up and find you can't support 5 simultaneous users.
>
>
>
> Even StackOverflow before it used Dapper used LinqToSql. Of course, they
> had to optimise and go to Dapper but the LinqToSql version still supported
> heaps of traffic.
>
>
>
> Craig
>
>
>
> On Tue, Sep 20, 2016 at 1:22 PM, David Apelt <d...@signmanager.com.au>
> wrote:
>
> Thanks everyone for their contributions to my original questions.   I am a
> little surprised about how poor people’s real world experience has been
> with the EF and other ORMs.
>
>
>
> A little poll;
>
>
>
> Is anyone successfully using EF in a production environment for a
> non-trivial application?  And if yes, then why has yours worked where
> others have failed.
>
>
>
> Regards
>
> Dave A
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>

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