OK, i see now.

For me, the best option is to do a bash script "myscript.bash" :

while read line
do
    echo "$line"
done < <(ping netpd.org & echo $!)


Then with pd :

[bash myscript.bash(
|
[shell]

You should be able to terminate the process with the pid return by echo $!

++

Jack



Le 01/12/2016 à 11:52, Roman Haefeli a écrit :
> On Thu, 2016-12-01 at 11:37 +0100, Jack wrote:
>> Le 01/12/2016 à 11:30, Roman Haefeli a écrit :
>>>
>>> On Thu, 2016-12-01 at 11:09 +0100, Jack wrote:
>>>>
>>>> Hello Roman,
>>>>
>>>> Did you try :
>>>>
>>>> [command & echo $!(
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>> [shell]
>>>>
>>>> It will return the pid of 'command'.
>>> Yes, you're right: It's not even necessary to put that into an
>>> extra
>>> script (I thought I had to because of the dollar sign).
>>>
>>> However, the problem remains: When I send 'command' to background,
>>> [shell] won't output its stdout to the left outlet anymore.
>> Hmm, weird, did you get something with ? :
>> (start Pd from a directory where there are files and directories).
>>
>> [ls & echo $!(
>>>
>>>
>> [shell]
> 
> Yes, that works for me, too. But it's not a good example, since ls is a
> one shot command and exits immediately.
> 
> Try this:
> 
> [ping netpd.org & echo $!(
> 
> The actual command I'm interested to work with is 'jacktrip'.
> 
> Roman
> 
> 
> 
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