Thanks for those comments, Igor

That was a great day we had with you, Jane & Rob - can't believe it was 8 years
ago!

We also have turtles that have to be rescued from roads - not often, fortunately
although with the current very dry conditions we're experiencing it could be
more common this year as they try to find new water holes.

Thanks to everyone else who looked and commented.


Cheers, Brian

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++


> On 13 September 2018 at 03:40 Igor PDML-StR <pdml...@komkon.org> wrote:
> 
> 
> 
> That's a very interesting creature. It looks like a young, unopened pine 
> cone, or rather that from a "cedar pine" (in which pine nuts are found).
> Thanks for sharing it with us, Brian!
> 
> 
> There are some very interesting animals in your "neck of the woods".
> We still have very fond memories from the visit to your continent, and 
> especially from the tours that you and Rob gave to us and the interaction 
> with all of you (and your wife).
> 
> One of the most vividly remembered encounters was in the stones near 
> the ocean with yet another lizard (was that a monitor?) that was just 
> about a meter away from me when I was trying to photograph it. I believe 
> it was Rob who photographed me photographing that lizard.
> Unfortunately, the photographs I took then are on the older computer. I've 
> shown some of them in my class, but I've never posted them on the web.
> 
> 
> 
> We also have armored creatures in our area, what I call "armored rats": 
> armadillos. Most of the time I see them as a road kill, but I've seen them 
> a few times crossing the road or running through the front yard.
> So, they don't sunbath (or even moonshine) on the road.
> 
> 
> I feel for you and your efforts of removing these creatures from the 
> road.
> We have turtles that frequently cross the road in our subdivision. We have 
> two ponds on two sides of the road, and a lot of time water turtles that 
> live in these ponds cross the road. One of the problems is that often they 
> have hard time climbing onto the curbstone once they cross the road. And 
> then they get stuck. Over the years, I've removed plenty of them from the 
> pavement.
> 
> 
> But on two occasions, I've helped to small land-dwelling, 
> what I'd call "prairie"- (or desert-?) type turtles on 
> the road as well (just within some 100-200 meters from that ponds area).
> They are either "Emydidae":  desert or ornate box turtles (most likely)
> http://www.texasturtles.org/Emydidae.html
>   or Texas tortoise: 
> http://www.texasturtles.org/Gopherus_berlandieri.html
> 
> 
> I've also seen a few places with a massive turtle crossing on a 
> relatively major, high-speed highway. That's where it also becomes a 
> potential road hazard.
> 
> Cheers,
> 
> Igor
> 
> 
> 
> Brian Walters Wed, 12 Sep 2018 04:51:02 -0700 wrote:
> 
> I haven't PESOed for quite a while...
> 
> Shinglebacks - I love these guys.  They are the most endearing creatures 
> but they have the unfortunate habit of deciding that the warm bitumen of 
> country roads is a great place to soak up heat - with predictable 
> consequences.  I often stop and move them off to a safer location but they 
> don't always appreciate my efforts.  One or two have even peed on me :-)
> 
> 
> Not a great photo but maybe a creature many of you wouldn't have seen 
> before. I
> hope this link works...
> https://www.dropbox.com/s/0zw37k6rf1cshdc/shingleback.jpg
> 
> 
> Cheers
> Brian
> 
> -- 
> PDML Pentax-Discuss Mail List
> PDML@pdml.net
> http://pdml.net/mailman/listinfo/pdml_pdml.net
> to UNSUBSCRIBE from the PDML, please visit the link directly above and follow
> the directions.

-- 
PDML Pentax-Discuss Mail List
PDML@pdml.net
http://pdml.net/mailman/listinfo/pdml_pdml.net
to UNSUBSCRIBE from the PDML, please visit the link directly above and follow 
the directions.

Reply via email to