José Romero <jose.cyb...@gmail.com>
writes:

> On Tue, 08 Nov 2011 21:47:04 +0100
> Thorsten <quintf...@googlemail.com> wrote:
>
>> José Romero <jose.cyb...@gmail.com>
>> writes:
>> 
>> > 'text also uses @ http://software-lab.de/doc/refT.html#text
>> > It's also useful to note that in short-circuit evaluation style
>> > functions like 'and, @ always holds the result of the previously
>> > evaluated argument, as you can see in this typical PicoLisp line:
>> >
>> >   (and and (@ (min @ 5) (prinl @) (gt0 (dec @)) .))
>> >
>> > ;)
>> 
>> ok, I added these two cases to the table (see below).
>> 
>> Could you give a little 'walk-through' for the example line, its not
>> that obvious (to me) how this works (but it does) ;)
>> 
>> min, prinl, gt0 and dec are obvious.
>> the double 'and and' and the '.' at the and are a bit strange. Where
>> does the initial @=5 come from - because @ is initially T and T is
>> greater than everything else?
>> 
>> cheers
>
> Pretty silly and badly written explanation of what goes on there:
>
>  I'm eval. I see a list, look inside, i see a symbol called 'and. i
>  look at it's val. It's a number, thus a function pointer, i call it
>  with the rest of the list unevaluated.
>
>  I'm doAnd, i look at the list i was passed, i see a symbol called 'and,
>  i evaluate it, a number came out, it's not NIL, so i shove it in @ and
>  look at the next cadr. It's a list, i evaluate it, has a symbol called
>  @ in it's car, that symbol resolves to a number, a pointer to doAnd, i 
>  call it with the rest of the list unchanged.
>
>  I'm doAnd, i look at the list i was passed, the first argument,
>  evaluating it results in a function call that returns 5, it's not nil,
>  so i shove it to @ and go on. The next element is another list, a call
>  to prinl happens, it returned 5, it's not nil, so i shove it to @ and
>  go on. Look at the next element, a call to (gt0 (dec @)), returns 4,
>  that is not nil, so i shove the 4 in @ and go on. Looking at the next
>  cadr i see @ again (but i don't realize, because i don't know wether a
>  list is circular or not), it evaluates to 4, so i shove it to @ keep
>  going. I see (min @ 5) again.........
>  ... 3
>  ... 2
>  ... 1
>  ... (gt0 (dec @)) returns NIL here, so i stop evaluating and return NIL
>
>  Back in the first doAnd, i see the previous call returned NIL, so i
>  stop evaluating right there and return NIL.

great, thank you - thats probably what one would call "dense code". 

what I did not understand (or remembered) in the beginning was that symbols
evaluate to their VAL, a number (the second 'and') and that a final '.'
immediatly followed by a closing parenthesis indicates a circular list. 

a lot of things going on in one single line of code. in picolisp its
really helpfull to be aware whats going on under the hood. 

> Then I realized that it could be written with only one 'and using
> the right syntax (and losing part of it's rube-goldberg appeal):

that looks a bit easier ...

>   (and 5 . ((prinl @) (gt0 (dec @)) .))

let me try this one: 

I'm eval. I see a list, look inside, i see a symbol called 'and. i
look at it's val. It's a number, thus a function pointer, i call it
with the rest of the list unevaluated.
I'm doAnd, i look at the number i was passed, i see a number 5,
i evaluate it, a number came out, it's not NIL, so i shove it in @ and
look at the next cadr. 

here I get stuck - this looks like a dotted pair cell, but thats a list
and not an atom in the CDR? or is this list evaluated until it return an
atom as an result? otherwise its clear that doAnd evaluates the circular
list until NIL is returned.  

Cheers
-- 
Thorsten

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