I don't think "level of abstraction" as used in your first question makes
much sense. I also don't understand why the answers in A and B contain
hints as to the idea A should always be ranked higher than B.

Sequence Diagrams and Class Diagrams abstract different, unrelated things.
For example, Sequence methods are not meant to show things like private
methods. Sequence Diagrams provide definition to the flow of control. In
this sense, they hard wire sequences of logically indivisible operations -
and if the system is only built to allow that one sequence we say there is
"temporal coupling" between the operations.

Also, good designers usually use Sequence Diagrams to aid in finding
suitable classes. In this way, every diagram has an exploratory abstraction
purpose and an "as built" final abstraction. Put another way, you would not
ask an algebrist to rank an algebra and it's final co-algebra. It just
doesn't make sense.

Also, some exams I have seen conflate Sequence and Collaboration diagrams.
Collaboration diagrams are useful because they implicitly assume
coordination mechanisms that ensure two object state machines interact
safely.

It's also not clear to me where you stand on pedagogy and what the purpose
of testing a student is.
On Apr 10, 2015 2:18 PM, "oritha" <ori...@techunix.technion.ac.il> wrote:

> Dear Psychology-of-Programing interest group members,
>
>
>
> Following the Communications of the ACM publication *Is abstraction the
> key to computing?* <http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=1232745>* (Jeff
> Kramer 2007)*, we are hoping to construct a test that measures students'
> ability to use abstraction in problem solving situations in computer
> science and software engineering.
>
>
>
> As a starting point, we have formulated a set of 8 question patterns that
> might serve as a means to teach and test abstraction. We would very much
> appreciate your help in assessing their suitability. The question patterns,
> as well as a request for information on your background experience, appear
> here:
>
>
> https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1XkAfnIiS-eQsO95iUa7yjDMAo8X9FsR5gxOXI7V4zDs/viewform
>
>
> The questionnaire can be filled in anonymously (if preferred) and should
> take about 15-20 minutes to complete.
>
> We intend to share the results with all those that contribute, but would
> not want to swamp your mail. Please let us know if you wish to get updates.
>
>
>
> Thanks very much for your cooperation.
>
>
> Jeff Kramer, Imperial College London
> Orit Hazzan, Technion - Israel Institute of Technology
>
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
>
> Prof. Orit Hazzan, Head
>
> Department of Education in Science and Technology
> <http://edu.technion.ac.il/>
>
> Technion - Israel Institute of Technology
>
> Haifa 3200003
>
> ISRAEL
>
>
>
> Tel: 972 – 4 – 829 3107       972 –  4 – 8293449
>
> Skype: orit.hazzan
>
> Department's website:   http://edu.technion.ac.il/
>
> Professional website: http://edu.technion.ac.il/Faculty/OritH/HomePage/
>
>
>
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