I see.  The java RPC implementation has to be async via call back, is
that right?

Jie

On Sep 18, 2:15 pm, "Kenton Varda" <[EMAIL PROTECTED]> wrote:
> Use the callback:
>
>   Message response =
> responsePrototype.newBuilderForType.mergeFrom(data).build();
>   done.run(response);
>
> On Thu, Sep 18, 2008 at 12:07 PM, Java Jogger <[EMAIL PROTECTED]> wrote:
>
> > I just started looking at implementing RPC service in Java.  In my
> > implementation class of RpcChannel interface, one method to be
> > implemented defined as:
>
> > public void callMethod(Descriptors.MethodDescriptor method,
> > RpcController controller, Message request,
> >                           Message responsePrototype,
> > RpcCallback<Message> done) {
>
> >    // my implementation goes here...
>
> > }
>
> > My understanding is the implementation of the above method is where
> > the remote request/response should be hooked in.  The question is: how
> > does it return the response message and make it available to the
> > caller of this method?
>
> > From the C++ example code in Language Guide, the responseProtoType is
> > passed by reference (pointer), thus making it possible to carry the
> > output of the method.  Since arguments to java method call are always
> > passed by value, how does one get hold of the response message after
> > "callMethod" returns successfully.
>
> > Deeply puzzled and need help.
>
> > Jie
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