One Last thing,

I'll be happy to provide a sample file for anyone who's interested in
trying to Parse a message for themselves.

Jon

On Aug 11, 10:03 pm, Kenton Varda <ken...@google.com> wrote:
> In your C++ code, are you storing the message as a NUL-terminated string
> (i.e. as char*)?  Protocol Buffers are arbitrary byte arrays and may contain
> NULs, so this won't work.  You must either store the message in a
> std::string or you must keep track of the length of the message separately.
>
>
>
> On Tue, Aug 11, 2009 at 9:01 AM, multijon <multi...@gmail.com> wrote:
>
> > Hi,
>
> > I'm seeing a strange behaviour of the protobuf library in the
> > following situation:
>
> > I have a message which contains an optional field uint32
> > 'uploadLimit'.
> > I have created and serialized a message containing the value 0 in this
> > field.
>
> > When reading this message in Python and C#, I have the value 0 stored
> > in the field, as expected.
>
> > When reading this message in C++, however, has_uploadlimit() returns
> > 0, instead of 1. uploadlimit() itself returns also 0, but I'm not sure
> > whether I can count on it, since it is not set.
>
> > Is this really unexpected? Have I misunderstood the usage of the has_
> > method?
>
> > Jon
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