I agree with T.J. We shouldn't be simply teaching just how to use a
certain tool but when to use them. And then learning JavaScript as a
language rather than merely being exposed to it via libraries is
beneficial because then your students will understand what the
libraries are doing. I think this is similar to the difference between
low and high level languages.

As for there being multiple libraries to choose from: why can't we use
both Prototype and jQuery libraries at the same time? They are both
useful in different situations, and jQuery's noConflict helps resolve
issues it can have with Prototype.

I haven't tested other library combinations, though, and can only
attest to the ability to successfully use Prototype and jQuery
together in the same project.

I feel that I should point out that one cost often cited when
discussing the usage of multiple libraries or components is the
increased size and bandwidth required due to including more components
in any given project. With web applications that cost is often offset
by caching and only a concern on initial page/website loads.

Regardless, I wish you the best in finding topics you can teach in a
field that is constantly changing. I am concerned with college
programs that churn out "IT" type graduates with skills that can
easily be replaced through outsourcing or a 6-week seminar focused
solely on learning best use practices for a certain tool set.

On Mar 19, 6:10 am, "T.J. Crowder" <t...@crowdersoftware.com> wrote:
> Hi,
>
> I find that either/or choices tend to be false choices. Not always,
> but frequently enough that I've taught myself to stop and ask whether
> it's really either/or. (Especially since my brain tends to default
> that way -- either/or, black/white, right/wrong -- and so I have to
> keep reminding myself that the world is more interesting than that...)
>
> Perhaps a both/and solution? Teach the fundamentals of JavaScript and
> DOM manipulation, then as an adjunct, do a section on how you can use
> libraries to smooth out browser differences and get useful utility
> functions, and that's when you introduce jQuery, Prototype, possibly a
> couple of the others as well. There are a *lot* of libraries out there
> besides jQuery and Prototype:
>
> * YUI:http://developer.yahoo.com/yui/
> * Closure:http://code.google.com/closure/library
> * Dojo:http://dojotoolkit.org/
> * Any of several 
> others:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_JavaScript_libraries
>
> You can even point out how they solve the same problems differently
> (and how they solve other problems much the same way). You could
> discuss the technical pros and cons of each, and talk about how
> technical pros and cons do not always dictate project decisions like
> we engineers tend to think they should -- e.g., there are other
> factors to consider, like stability, pace of development, style of
> development, etc.
>
> That would (to my mind) more thoroughly prepare the students for going
> out in the world and doing useful work, even if they end up using a
> library that you hadn't shown them at all.
>
> From a crass commercial standpoint, I have to agree with Yuval that
> out in the marketplace, in today's world, right this minute, your
> students will get more utility out of being familiar with jQuery than
> being familiar with Prototype. *IF* you had to teach just one library,
> but again, teaching one library isn't what I'd recommend anyway.
>
> FWIW,
> --
> T.J. Crowder
> Independent Software Engineer
> tj / crowder software / com
> www / crowder software / com
>
> On Mar 19, 8:53 am, yuval dagan <dag...@gmail.com> wrote:
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> > Hi
>
> > Although I used and will use prototype,
> > It looks (to me) currently like JQuery is much more popular than prototype
>
> > I say stick to JQuery but let them know about other frameworks.
>
> > But thats only my opinion
>
> > Yuval
>
> > On Sat, Mar 19, 2011 at 4:58 AM, Ali.MD <alimihando...@gmail.com> wrote:
> > > Hi every1
> > > I'm teacher of NIIT university
> > > and teach web technology in our web department
> > > I want to change and update some our courses
> > > For example in section of javascript framework
> > > We usually recommend jquery because its easy to learn.
> > > But i thing Prototype & script.aculo.us are better in core and api
> > > What exactly is the difference between these two in future
> > > In support, popularity, features, developers ...
> > > Do you recommend me to switch our web team developers to this ?
> > > and/or students to learn this framework ?
>
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