>
> Have you looked at Neil Toronto's paper Practically Accurate 
> Floating-Point Math (
> https://www.cs.umd.edu/~ntoronto/papers/toronto-2014cise-floating-point.pdf). 
> It is an excellent paper that discusses the use of Racket to analyze the 
> accuracy of floating-point computations.


No, I have not! I did a quick browse through it and it seems to be exactly 
the kind of work I want to do.

Thanks for the link!

-Dale Kim

On Wednesday, April 11, 2018 at 2:50:32 PM UTC-7, m.douglas.williams wrote:
>
>
>> To be clear, I was just mentioning that I use single precision floats in 
>> our main application that is all written in C++, which is where the 
>> performance is critical/required. I'm trying to use Racket as a tool for 
>> understanding how we can maximize accuracy of our numerical algorithms 
>> under the restriction of single precision floats and the Racket code can be 
>> significantly slower since it is all intended to be run offline for the 
>> purposes of understanding how the floating point numbers behave against a 
>> reference implementation.
>>
>
> Have you looked at Neil Toronto's paper Practically Accurate 
> Floating-Point Math (
> https://www.cs.umd.edu/~ntoronto/papers/toronto-2014cise-floating-point.pdf). 
> It is an excellent paper that discusses the use of Racket to analyze the 
> accuracy of floating-point computations.
>
> Doug
>
> -- 
>> You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
>> "Racket Users" group.
>> To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an 
>> email to racket-users...@googlegroups.com <javascript:>.
>> For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
>>
>
>

-- 
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"Racket Users" group.
To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email 
to racket-users+unsubscr...@googlegroups.com.
For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.

Reply via email to