At the risk of picking a fight, I'd like to understand this a bit better.

As long as the database supports minimum functions, such as transactions, 
joins, datatypes, etc., why should an application care about the underlying 
storage engine?

Are you trying to imply that ndbcluster simply isn't production-ready?  If so, 
then end of conversation.

Otherwise, what are some of the issues the OP will have to look forward to?

Thanks.

Mike.


On Tuesday, December 13, 2016 09:05:11 PM Alex Vandiver wrote:
> On Tue, 13 Dec 2016 12:25:37 +0100
> 
> Pescoller Reinhold <reinh...@aiding.it> wrote:
> > Thanks for your informations.
> > 
> > I tried to do so but rt give me an error that innodb is required and
> > that I should upgrade my tables.
> > Have I to change this direct in the code?
> 
> lib/RT/Handle.pm:
> https://github.com/bestpractical/rt/blob/095caac2a4b4fc7baba0d7878a79f8b4865
> 79854/lib/RT/Handle.pm#L291
> 
> I'll reiterate that while RT may appear to work in trivial
> conditions, you're setting yourself up for a world of both poor
> performance and nasty race condition bugs. You get to keep all of the
> pieces when it bursts into flames in production -- NDB is in no way a
> supported, suggested, or sane backing engine for RT.
>  - Alex
> ---------
> RT 4.4 and RTIR training sessions, and a new workshop day!
> https://bestpractical.com/training * Los Angeles - January 9-11 2017

-- 
Mike Diehl
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