Send sanskrit mailing list submissions to
        sanskrit@cs.utah.edu

To subscribe or unsubscribe via the World Wide Web, visit
        http://mailman.cs.utah.edu/mailman/listinfo/sanskrit
or, via email, send a message with subject or body 'help' to
        sanskrit-requ...@cs.utah.edu

You can reach the person managing the list at
        sanskrit-ow...@cs.utah.edu

When replying, please edit your Subject line so it is more specific
than "Re: Contents of sanskrit digest..."


Today's Topics:

   1. Re: sanskrit Digest, Vol 52, Issue 1 (Srinivasakrishnan ln)
   2. I want to know about us. (Siva rama krishna T)
   3. Re: sanskrit Digest, Vol 52, Issue 6 (Jay Vaidya)
   4. Re: Panini Story (Shreyas P. Munshi)
   5. Re: sanskrit Digest, Vol 52, Issue 6 (Vidya R)
   6. Re: sanskrit Digest, Vol 52, Issue 6 (Karthikeyan Madathil)
   7. Re: Upanishad Shabda (anupam srivatsav)
   8. Kali Dhyanam (Srinivasan)
   9. Re: Kali Dhyanam (ganesan iyer)
  10. Re: Kali Dhyanam (Shreyas P. Munshi)
  11. Re: Kali Dhyanam (Naresh Cuntoor)


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Message: 1
Date: Mon, 24 Aug 2009 18:50:44 -0400
From: Srinivasakrishnan ln <lns25...@gmail.com>
Subject: Re: [Sanskrit] sanskrit Digest, Vol 52, Issue 1
To: Sanskrit Mailing List <sanskrit@cs.utah.edu>
Message-ID:
        <5bec98530908241550j11b6af78v1bdbf17bde8ed...@mail.gmail.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="windows-1252"

I would like to commend Sri Naresh and his colleagues for reviving this
group which used to give me a great deal of reading pleasure a few years
ago.
A propos the exchange of views between Ramesh Mahoday , Vimala Sarma
mahodaya and Munshi mahoday , one notices there's a slight difference in
degree in cultural emphasis in their presentation. While Sarma Mahodaya and
Munshi Mahoday would like Panini to get due credit as genius and scientific
researcher,  Sri Ramesh wanted to highlight a traditional story that is well
worth telling even if some of us already know it.

I think myth is a valid component of cultural understanding and also of
preservation of knowledge. One need not get very western or westernized (if
that's a better word) and dismiss it totally out of court ascribing to such
myths an unreal realm and therefore not worth considering.

Here I would like to bring up the case of the famous mathematician Srinivasa
Ramanujan who told Prof Hardy, a dyed in the wool atheist, that the Namagiri
(the goddess in the Vishnu temple at Namakkal, Tamilnadu) came in his dreams
at night and that's how he got some formulae which he wrote in the morning.
Here Prof Hardy is put in the exact position of Sri Ramesh in this
discussion thread. Of course Prof Hardy made some editorial comments to Prof
Littlewood indicating fascination with Ramanujan's thought processes. It is
not clear if Prof Hardy remained completely and unwaveringly atheistic after
his meeting with Ramanujan.

Coming to the 'wholly unrelated' topic of the siva sutras, I would like to
quote what an eminent professor of linguistics very knowledgeable on
Paninian grammar once said on the topic of Panini's inspiration from Siva
himself. This professor  was born in northern Europe, spent half his life in
Europe and the other half in the US. He can not be considered Indian at all.
He's as 'scientific' as any eminent professor.

He considers the economy of the Siva sutras in his lecture and then
considers if Panini had before him an earlier perhaps less efficient version
of Siva sutras. He infers that the phonetic (grammar) and phonological
treatises (pratisakhya) arrive at a closely resembling inventory of Sanskrit
sounds because of the very nature of language itself.

He then concludes with the following paragraph. I quote this at length to
make the point that 'myth'  in traditional societies is a way of passing on
important insights:


It is said that god  Siva revealed these fourteen classes of sounds to
Panini to get

him started on the Astadhyayi. We might now want to see a deeper point in
this

legend. Our conclusions imply that if we did not possess the text of the
Astadhyayi,

but merely a pretheoretical description of Sanskrit phonology, the main
principles

of Panini?s grammar could be inferred just from the way the phonemes of
Sanskrit

are organized in the Sivasutras.



Hope this helps,



Lakshmi Srinivasakrishnan


On Mon, Aug 24, 2009 at 2:59 PM, Shreyas P. Munshi <
shreyasmun...@rediffmail.com> wrote:

>
> I totally agree with Dr Vimala Sarma. Respecting our mythology is one
> thing; and scientific analysis another.
>
> My humble submission is that while studying the subtle aspects of a
> language (or of any subject), it is not good to mix it up with mythology,
> lest it may reduce the importance of the researcher?s work. A similar story
> goes round for the great poet Kalidasa and goddess Kali also.
>
> Lord Shiva is also associated by admirers of Aadi Shankaraachaarya calling
> him a ?rebirth? of Lord Shiva; and seeing the work has done, it would
> virtually seem to be the fact!
>
> As Swami Chinmayanand has explained, Shiva (Lord Shiva) is the embodiment,
> a personification of the 'Absolute Consciousness' principle. Every
> experience of every living entity is illuminated by this Principle; and it
> gets reflected variously according to the constitution of the object on
> which the Principle 'throws' light.
>
> Respected KNR can analyse the subtle aspects of the language much better
> than an uninitiated person like me because the constitution of his
> body-mind-intellect equipment is more evolved; in this sense Lord Shiva
> dances before him also; and probably before me also; but my equipment is not
> fine-tuned as NRK's. Panin's equipment was probably very highly fine-tuned;
> otherwise not only these 12 sounds but the brilliant ashtaadhyaayi would
> also not have found ?form'.
>
> Like what NRK?s story describes as a dance of Shiva, there is a story about
> the scientist Kekule who discovered the closed ring compounds in organic
> chemistry. Toeing the line of open chain compounds, Kekule was not able to
> answer his own questions. He thought and thought and thought, and when he
> fell asleep he dreamt of a snake catching his own tail! And that is how he
> discovered Benzene as the ring compound, and then rationalized the alternate
> double bonds of the tetravalent carbon in Benzene?s molecular formula C6H6.
> It would seem, Lord Shiva,came in Kekule?s dream also! And yes, I believe,
> Lord Shiva will always come to anyone in the world if his intellect is fully
> immersed in his enquiry.
>
> Towards the same thinking, the following is just one of the selected
> extracts of copy-paste transfers from pages of (Indian) REPORT OF THE
> SANSKRIT COMMISSION 1956-57, which says that Professor Renou, concluding his
> recent review of Indian Studies, says:
> Quote:
> ? the rigour of the scientific method is something to which the average
> Pandit does not submit himself easily or with enthusiasm. This leads to a
> ?dilution of the standard', and when persisted in, brings into being a body
> of pseudo- scientific workers and scholars.
> Unquote
> Care needs to be taken for not reducing PANINI?s genius as a grammarian and
> perhaps the world?s first (known) phonetician.
>
> Submitted in all humility?Shreyas
>
>
>
>
-------------- next part --------------
An HTML attachment was scrubbed...
URL: 
http://mailman.cs.utah.edu/pipermail/sanskrit/attachments/20090824/12a825bf/attachment-0001.html
 

------------------------------

Message: 2
Date: Tue, 25 Aug 2009 11:59:22 +0530
From: Siva rama krishna T <srkturlap...@gmail.com>
Subject: [Sanskrit] I want to know about us.
To: sanskrit@cs.utah.edu
Message-ID:
        <7c37b9f10908242329o582c12e2je4b1169235135...@mail.gmail.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1

what we are doing here ? which are being sent mails are very good. Thanq


------------------------------

Message: 3
Date: Tue, 25 Aug 2009 07:22:58 -0700 (PDT)
From: Jay Vaidya <deejayvai...@yahoo.com>
Subject: Re: [Sanskrit] sanskrit Digest, Vol 52, Issue 6
To: sanskrit@cs.utah.edu
Message-ID: <548146.55779...@web37902.mail.mud.yahoo.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"

I agree with the sentiment and research-related thought regarding folklore 
expressed by Vidya R, below, and those that wrote before, Vimala Sharma, and 
Shreyas Munshi. 

Also the quoted shloka seems quite non-Rgvedic. This is a epic-style anuShTubh 
meter. (Is there any ancient commentary on the Rgveda written in this meter?)

Dhananjay

--- On Mon, 8/24/09, sanskrit-requ...@cs.utah.edu 
<sanskrit-requ...@cs.utah.edu> wrote:

2.? Folklore is neither to be trivialized, nor to be glorified.? True 
scientists should observe, and retain in the back-burner any unanswered 
phenomenon associated with what is being studied.? Intuition itself is not a 
(fully explained) science, even though scientists resort to it, consciously, 
or, subconsciously.? 

...

By condemning folklore / religious works and getting defensive over it, we are 
handicapping ourselves from true understanding.? We have to learn to be 
tolerant and respectful of the traditional knowledge holders - they carry the 
puzzles into future generations for scientists to decipher.

Was Professor Renou's study based on feedback received from 'pundits' who were 
so-called because of their knowledge of English and ability to communicate, or, 
because of their true understanding of the Sanskrit works.? I suspect it is the 
former.

(
yojanAnAM sahasram dve dve shate dve cha yojane |
ekena nimiShArdhena kramamANa namo&stu te ||
This is either from the Rig Veda, or, a commentary on the Rig Veda, supposedly 
providing the means to calculate the speed of light to a good 
approximation.???- Reference - Pride of India, Samskrita Bharati Publication.? 
It is because we don't acknowledge the science behind religious works, we are 
where we are.

)




      
-------------- next part --------------
An HTML attachment was scrubbed...
URL: 
http://mailman.cs.utah.edu/pipermail/sanskrit/attachments/20090825/4aadc4ea/attachment-0001.html
 

------------------------------

Message: 4
Date: 25 Aug 2009 07:23:18 -0000
From: "Shreyas P. Munshi" <shreyasmun...@rediffmail.com>
Subject: Re: [Sanskrit] Panini Story
To: <imarch...@yahoo.com>
Cc: sanskrit@cs.utah.edu
Message-ID:
        
<1251144449.s.20848.21081.f5mail-236-229.rediffmail.com.1251184998.60...@webmail.rediffmail.com>
        
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"

Vidya's brilliant response is admirable. I must admit that Vidya has been able 
to bring out the essence of what I meant to say more penetratingly when 
compared to my 'primary school level' writing because, obviously, her 
body-mind-intellect equipment is more evolved. Certain misgivings from my 
writing, however,must be cleared by responding to Vidyas statements:

1. "condemning folklore / religious works"; no, we should never do that;but we 
should and must ack that we dont understand or explain the hidden significance, 
if there is some, in those 'works', like the sutra that perhaps attempts to 
calculate the speed of light not easily understood.
2. "By condemning folklore / religious works and getting defensive over it, we 
are handicapping ourselves from true understanding". Well stated extension of 
Vidya's point (no 1 stated above).
3...."they carry the puzzles into future generations for scientists to 
decipher". The important prase is "for scientists to decpher".
4.'pundits' ??and ability to communicate' (In fact it was, perhaps, their 
'inability' to communicate!.. Instead of resorting to mytholgy or reveretly 
held belief,if they had to say "yes, this needs to be investigated" the pundis  
would have given a different picture of 
themselves. It was inablity of such so called knowledgeble people to explain 
the validity of Vedantic assertions of "Atma" etc that Buddhism and Jainism 
took birth. Prince Siddhaarth and Mahaavir Vardhamaan could not accept the 
validity of the Vedas blindly. Well done, ancient Rishis insisted that nothing 
should be accepted unless experiencially realized, and they announced the ways 
they and others had succssfully tried out;the final decision is of course 
'Arjun's', they do not hesitate in saying!). 
5. "It is because we don't acknowledge the science behind religious works, we 
are where we are". The imporant point brilliantly made by Vidya is 'acknowledge 
the science behind religious works". No one
can dispute that.
...Submitted...Shreyas




On Tue, 25 Aug 2009 01:37:29 +0530  wrote
>Before we diverge too much:1.  I would like to highlight that, with all due 
>respects, KNR has reported on something he has heard.  He has not made sure 
>the sutras are spelt correctly and so on... That indicates to me that - KNR 
>seems to have just entered the realm of Panini. The novelty and the 
>fascination has caused him to share the story with the group. Let us 
>acknowledge his sentiments. Even if Siva gave the Maaheshvarasutrani to 
>Panini, the whole Ashtadhyayi has to be credited to Panini's genius. So, we 
>don't have to try to protect Panin's IP.2. Folklore is neither to be 
>trivialized, nor to be glorified. True scientists should observe,
 and retain in the back-burner any unanswered phenomenon associated with what 
is being studied. Intuition itself is not a (fully explained) science, even 
though scientists resort to it, consciously, or, subconsciously. If all the 
sounds are generated naturally, why cannot it be that, Pnini, in his heightened 
emotional state, heard natural sounds around him -> wind blowing / howling, 
birds singing / screeching, river gurgling, ... in the order in which the 
Maheshvarasutrani eventually took shape. Being a devout person, Panini 
attributed this perception to Siva.By condemning folklore / religious works and 
getting defensive over it, we are handicapping ourselves from true 
understanding. We have to learn to be tolerant and respectful of the 
traditional knowledge holders - they carry the puzzles into future generations 
for scientists to decipher.Was Professor Renou's study based on feedback 
received from
 'pundits' who were so-called because of their knowledge of English and ability 
to communicate, or, because of their true understanding of the Sanskrit works. 
I suspect it is the former.(yojanAnAM sahasram dve dve shate dve cha yojane 
|ekena nimiShArdhena kramamANa namo&stu te ||This is either from the Rig Veda, 
or, a commentary on the Rig Veda, supposedly providing the means to calculate 
the speed of light to a good approximation. - Reference - Pride of India, 
Samskrita Bharati Publication. It is because we don't acknowledge the science 
behind religious works, we are where we are.)VidyaFrom: Shreyas P. Munshi To:
 vsa...@bigpond.comcc: sansk...@cs.utah.edusent: Monday, August 24, 2009 
2:59:58 PMSubject: Re: [Sanskrit] sanskrit Digest, Vol 52, Issue 1
I totally agree with Dr Vimala Sarma. Respecting our mythology is one thing; 
and scientific analysis another.

My humble submission is that while studying the subtle aspects of a language 
(or of any subject), it is not good to mix it up with mythology, lest it may 
reduce the importance of the researchers work. A similar story goes round for 
the great poet Kalidasa and goddess Kali also.

Lord Shiva is also associated by admirers of Aadi Shankaraachaarya calling him 
a rebirth of Lord Shiva; and seeing the work has done, it would virtually seem 
to be the fact!

As Swami Chinmayanand has explained, Shiva (Lord Shiva) is the embodiment, a 
personification of the 'Absolute Consciousness' principle. Every experience of 
every living entity is illuminated by this Principle; and it gets reflected 
variously according to the constitution of the object on which the Principle 
'throws' light.

Respected KNR can analyse the subtle aspects of the language much better than 
an uninitiated person like me because the constitution of his 
body-mind-intellect equipment is more evolved; in this sense Lord Shiva dances 
before him also; and probably before me also; but my equipment is not 
fine-tuned as NRK's. Panin's equipment was probably very highly fine-tuned; 
otherwise not only these 12 sounds but the brilliant ashtaadhyaayi would also 
not have found form'.

Like what NRKs story describes as a dance of Shiva, there is a story about the 
scientist Kekule who discovered the closed ring compounds in organic chemistry. 
Toeing the line of open chain compounds, Kekule was not able to answer his own 
questions. He thought and thought and thought, and when he fell asleep he 
dreamt of a snake catching his own tail! And that is how he discovered Benzene 
as the ring compound, and then rationalized the alternate double bonds of the 
tetravalent carbon in Benzenes molecular formula C6H6. It would seem, Lord 
Shiva,came in Kekules dream also! And yes, I believe, Lord Shiva will always 
come to anyone in the world if his intellect is fully immersed in his enquiry.

Towards the same thinking, the following is just one of the selected extracts 
of copy-paste transfers from pages of (Indian) REPORT OF THE SANSKRIT 
COMMISSION 1956-57, which says that Professor Renou, concluding his recent 
review of Indian Studies, says:              
Quote:
 the rigour of the scientific method is something to which the average Pandit 
does not submit himself easily or with enthusiasm. This leads to a dilution of 
the standard', and when persisted in, brings into being a body of pseudo- 
scientific workers and scholars.
Unquote
Care needs to be taken for not reducing PANINIs genius as a grammarian and 
perhaps the worlds first (known) phonetician.

Submitted in all humilityShreyas 

On Mon, 24 Aug 2009 18:18:41 +0530  wrote
>

Thanks for that story, but I prefer to think the Grammar was due
to the genius of Panini, but I respect the traditional view .
When this e-mail to my last e-mail on 

From: sanskrit-boun...@cs.utah.edu
[mailto:sanskrit-boun...@cs.utah.edu] On Behalf Of K.N.RAMESH
Sent: Monday, 24 August 2009 6:27 PM
To: sanskrit@cs.utah.edu
Subject: Re: [Sanskrit] sanskrit Digest, Vol 52, Issue 1


Story of Pannini


You may know the interesting story as to how Panini, the originator of
Sanskrit grammar, received knowledge from Lord Siva. He was supposed to be the
dullest of the students in a group that was studying from a Guru in Taxila,
Taksha Shila. The other boys were very intelligent. Panini was the most stupid,
the least intelligent, very much belittled and made fun of by the students in
the class. He was deeply hurt that he was being cowed down by other students
and that he could not understand anything that the teacher said. Almost in a
desperate mood of disgust with everything, he went to the forest and deeply
contemplated on Lord Siva. He prayed, "O Lord! Bless me with
Knowledge." It is said that Lord Siva appeared before him, danced and revolved
His Dakka or Damaru fourteen times, and the following fourteen sounds were
made: 1. Aiun, 2. Rlrk, 3. Aowng, 4. Ai ouch, 5.
Ha ya va rat, 6. Lan, 7. Na ma nga na nam, 8. Jha
bhanj, 9. Gha dha dhash, 10. Ja ba ga da das, 11. Kha
pha chha tha tha cha ta tav, 12. Ka pay, 13. Sa sha sar, and
14. Hal. All this constitutes the very essence of Sanskrit grammar.
These sounds, meaningless as they may appear to us, became the foundation of
Sanskrit grammar and Sanskrit literature.
So, God can teach us without books and without the usual medium of instruction,
by a thought, a sound, a look, a touch or a benign gesture.


Pranaama:

knr



      
_______________________________________________
To UNSUBSCRIBE or customize your subscription or topics of interest, visit
http://mailman.cs.utah.edu/mailman/options/sanskrit
and follow instructions.



____________________________

Shreyas Munshi
shreyasmun...@rediffmail.com
C202, Mandar Apartments, 120 Ft D P Road,
Seven Bungalows, Versova, Mumbai 400 061
Tel Res: (22) 26364290 Mob: 981 981 8197
-------------- next part --------------
An HTML attachment was scrubbed...
URL: 
http://mailman.cs.utah.edu/pipermail/sanskrit/attachments/20090825/82ab50fc/attachment-0001.html
 

------------------------------

Message: 5
Date: Tue, 25 Aug 2009 09:14:24 -0700 (PDT)
From: Vidya R <imarch...@yahoo.com>
Subject: Re: [Sanskrit] sanskrit Digest, Vol 52, Issue 6
To: Sanskrit Mailing List <sanskrit@cs.utah.edu>
Message-ID: <291486.55071...@web36706.mail.mud.yahoo.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

SM, I am vain and am much flattered :)  My BMI, though, is average, if that!

Regarding Speed of Light:
There are 2 quotes.  I will try to reproduce as given in the book:

taraNirvishvadarshato jyotiShk^Ridasi sUrya | 
vishvamAbhAsi rochanam |


Oh Sun!  (You) overwhelm all in speed, visible to all, source of light.  (You) 
shine pervading the Universe.

tathA cha smaryata
yojanAnAM sahasram dve dve shate dve cha 
yojane |  ekena nimiShArdhena kramamANa namo&stu te ||

It is remembered (that) Salutations to Thee (sun), the traveller of 2.202 
yojanas in half a nimiSha.

Source: 
Rg-veda-samhitA, maNDalam 1, sUktam 50, mantraH 4 (6000 DCE)
sAyanAchArya's commentary (14th century AD)

(Pardon earlier inaccuracies).



________________________________
From: Jay Vaidya <deejayvai...@yahoo.com>
To: sanskrit@cs.utah.edu
Sent: Tuesday, August 25, 2009 10:22:58 AM
Subject: Re: [Sanskrit] sanskrit Digest, Vol 52, Issue 6


I agree with the sentiment and research-related thought regarding folklore 
expressed by Vidya R, below, and those that wrote before, Vimala Sharma, and 
Shreyas Munshi. 

Also the quoted shloka seems quite non-Rgvedic. This is a epic-style anuShTubh 
meter. (Is there any ancient commentary on the Rgveda written in this meter?)

Dhananjay

--- On Mon, 8/24/09, sanskrit-requ...@cs.utah.edu 
<sanskrit-requ...@cs.utah.edu> wrote:


>2.  Folklore is neither to be trivialized, nor to be glorified.  True 
>scientists should observe, and retain in the back-burner any unanswered 
>phenomenon associated with what is being studied.  Intuition itself is not a 
>(fully explained) science, even though
> scientists resort to it, consciously, or, subconsciously.  
>
>...
>
>By condemning folklore / religious works and getting defensive over it, we are 
>handicapping ourselves from true understanding.  We have to learn to be 
>tolerant and respectful of the traditional knowledge holders - they carry the 
>puzzles into future generations for scientists to decipher.
>
>Was Professor Renou's study based on feedback received from 'pundits' who were 
>so-called because of their knowledge of English and ability to communicate, 
>or, because of their true understanding of the Sanskrit works.  I suspect it 
>is the former.
>
>(
>yojanAnAM sahasram dve dve shate dve cha yojane |
>ekena nimiShArdhena kramamANa namo&stu te ||
>This is either from the Rig Veda, or, a commentary on the Rig Veda, supposedly 
>providing the means to calculate the speed of light to a good approximation.   
>- Reference - Pride of India, Samskrita
> Bharati Publication.  It is because we don't acknowledge the science behind 
> religious works, we are where we are.
>
>)
>
> 



      
-------------- next part --------------
An HTML attachment was scrubbed...
URL: 
http://mailman.cs.utah.edu/pipermail/sanskrit/attachments/20090825/48c494a3/attachment-0001.html
 

------------------------------

Message: 6
Date: Tue, 25 Aug 2009 09:39:43 -0700 (PDT)
From: Karthikeyan Madathil <kmadat...@yahoo.com>
Subject: Re: [Sanskrit] sanskrit Digest, Vol 52, Issue 6
To: Sanskrit Mailing List <sanskrit@cs.utah.edu>
Message-ID: <844478.67777...@web39701.mail.mud.yahoo.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"

>yojanAnAM sahasram dve dve shate dve cha 
>yojane |  ekena nimiShArdhena kramamANa namo&stu te ||

This is a reasonably (and remarkably, given the period) accurate estimate by 
the measures of Yojana and Nimisha I could find. Wonder how it was measured, or 
what use an accurate estimate like that was put to.  Can somebody who studied 
the Rgveda the traditional way confirm the shloka?


Karthik


________________________________
From: Vidya R <imarch...@yahoo.com>
To: Sanskrit Mailing List <sanskrit@cs.utah.edu>
Sent: Tuesday, 25 August, 2009 9:44:24 PM
Subject: Re: [Sanskrit] sanskrit Digest, Vol 52, Issue 6


SM, I am vain and am much flattered :)  My BMI, though, is average, if that!

Regarding Speed of Light:
There are 2 quotes.  I will try to reproduce as given in the book:

taraNirvishvadarshato jyotiShk^Ridasi sUrya | 
vishvamAbhAsi rochanam |


Oh Sun!  (You) overwhelm all in speed, visible to all, source of light.  (You) 
shine pervading the Universe.

tathA cha smaryata
yojanAnAM sahasram dve dve shate dve cha 
yojane |  ekena nimiShArdhena kramamANa namo&stu te ||

It is remembered (that) Salutations to Thee (sun), the traveller of 2.202 
yojanas in half a nimiSha.

Source: 
Rg-veda-samhitA, maNDalam 1, sUktam 50, mantraH 4 (6000 DCE)
sAyanAchArya's commentary (14th century AD)

(Pardon earlier inaccuracies).



________________________________
From: Jay Vaidya <deejayvai...@yahoo.com>
To: sanskrit@cs.utah.edu
Sent: Tuesday, August 25, 2009 10:22:58 AM
Subject: Re: [Sanskrit] sanskrit Digest, Vol 52, Issue 6


I agree with the sentiment and research-related thought regarding folklore 
expressed by Vidya R, below, and those that wrote before, Vimala Sharma, and 
Shreyas Munshi. 

Also the quoted shloka seems quite non-Rgvedic. This is a epic-style anuShTubh 
meter. (Is there any ancient commentary on the Rgveda written in this meter?)

Dhananjay

--- On Mon, 8/24/09, sanskrit-requ...@cs.utah.edu 
<sanskrit-requ...@cs.utah.edu> wrote:


>2.  Folklore is neither to be trivialized, nor to be glorified.  True
> scientists should observe, and retain in the back-burner any unanswered 
> phenomenon associated with what is being studied.  Intuition itself is not a 
> (fully explained) science, even though
> scientists resort to it, consciously, or, subconsciously.  
>
>...
>
>By condemning folklore / religious works and getting defensive over it, we are 
>handicapping ourselves from true understanding.  We have to learn to be 
>tolerant and respectful of the traditional knowledge holders - they carry the 
>puzzles into future generations for scientists to decipher.
>
>Was Professor Renou's study based on feedback received from 'pundits' who were 
>so-called because of their knowledge of English and ability to communicate, 
>or, because of their true understanding of the Sanskrit works.  I suspect it 
>is the former.
>
>(
>yojanAnAM sahasram dve dve shate dve cha yojane |
>ekena nimiShArdhena kramamANa namo&stu te ||
>This is either from the Rig Veda, or, a commentary on the Rig Veda, supposedly 
>providing the means to calculate the speed of light to a good approximation.   
>- Reference - Pride of India, Samskrita
> Bharati Publication.  It is because we don't acknowledge the science behind 
> religious works, we are where we are.
>
>)
>
> 


      See the Web&#39;s breaking stories, chosen by people like you. Check out 
Yahoo! Buzz. http://in.buzz.yahoo.com/
-------------- next part --------------
An HTML attachment was scrubbed...
URL: 
http://mailman.cs.utah.edu/pipermail/sanskrit/attachments/20090825/2997eb03/attachment-0001.html
 

------------------------------

Message: 7
Date: Wed, 26 Aug 2009 13:41:33 +0530
From: anupam srivatsav <anupam.srivat...@gmail.com>
Subject: Re: [Sanskrit] Upanishad Shabda
To: Sanskrit Mailing List <sanskrit@cs.utah.edu>
Message-ID:
        <e13be6000908260111o4fc43873kcdcbb89ecaed6...@mail.gmail.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1

Dear Friends,

Thanks to you all, who replied me.

With regards,
Anupam.


------------------------------

Message: 8
Date: Wed, 26 Aug 2009 15:15:15 -0700 (PDT)
From: Srinivasan <srini_sa...@yahoo.com>
Subject: [Sanskrit] Kali Dhyanam
To: sanskrit@cs.utah.edu
Message-ID: <470226.61227...@web30807.mail.mud.yahoo.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Dear Group,

Namaste!

I am working on the word-for-word translation of a dhyanam of Kali. Here is the 
first verse.

khadgamcakra gadesu caapa parighaan choolambhusundimsirah 
sankhamsamdadhatimkarais trinayanaamsarvaanga bhushavrtaam|

Translation follows:
  
Bearing in
Her hands the sword, the discus, the club, the bow, the iron bar, the pike, the 
sling, the head, and
the conch,
she has three eyes and
displays ornaments on all her limbs. (word for word translation below)



My question is related to gadesu. Gada (mace) has been modified as gadesu. I 
understand that this is the locative case
for the plural number. Am I correct?


If so,  why is only gada, and not the other weapons that Kali bears in her 
hands, expressed in locative case. 


Thank you!


khadga:
sword
chakra:
discus
gada:
mace, club, or bludgeon
chaapa:
bow
parigha:
iron bar or bludgeon or club studded with iron
shoolam:
a weapon which has a pointed dart on its end, pike, lance
bhushundi:
sling
shira:
head
shanka:
conch
samdadhateem: dadhais to hold and samis with or together, bearing
karaih:
hands
trinayanaam:
three eyes
sarvaanga:  all the limbs
bhushavritaam:
displays ornaments
respectfully,
Srinivasan
-------------- next part --------------
An HTML attachment was scrubbed...
URL: 
http://mailman.cs.utah.edu/pipermail/sanskrit/attachments/20090826/5d277e75/attachment-0001.html
 

------------------------------

Message: 9
Date: Thu, 27 Aug 2009 08:26:57 +0530 (IST)
From: ganesan iyer <ganesan515...@yahoo.co.in>
Subject: Re: [Sanskrit] Kali Dhyanam
To: Sanskrit Mailing List <sanskrit@cs.utah.edu>
Message-ID: <585465.93855...@web8405.mail.in.yahoo.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"

Dear Sir,Gadeshu - seventh tense / Plural.( in gadas )
A.Ganesan Kapeyar


      Love Cricket? Check out live scores, photos, video highlights and more. 
Click here http://cricket.yahoo.com
-------------- next part --------------
An HTML attachment was scrubbed...
URL: 
http://mailman.cs.utah.edu/pipermail/sanskrit/attachments/20090827/33f88999/attachment-0001.html
 

------------------------------

Message: 10
Date: 27 Aug 2009 04:18:05 -0000
From: "Shreyas P. Munshi" <shreyasmun...@rediffmail.com>
Subject: Re: [Sanskrit] Kali Dhyanam
To: <ganesan515...@yahoo.co.in>
Cc: sanskrit@cs.utah.edu
Message-ID:
        
<1251341895.s.5042.42993.f5mail-236-225.rediffmail.com.1251346685.24...@webmail.rediffmail.com>
        
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"

Shri Ganeshanji,
Srinivasan very well understands what you have said. His question is very 
specific: that why only 'gada' is in plural and not the other weapons that the 
goddess holds...Shreyas

On Thu, 27 Aug 2009 08:28:15 +0530  wrote
>Dear Sir,Gadeshu - seventh tense / Plural.( in gadas )A.Ganesan Kapeyar
       Love Cricket? Check out live scores, photos, video highlights and more.  
Click here.
_______________________________________________
To UNSUBSCRIBE or customize your subscription or topics of interest, visit
http://mailman.cs.utah.edu/mailman/options/sanskrit
and follow instructions.



____________________________

Shreyas Munshi
shreyasmun...@rediffmail.com
C202, Mandar Apartments, 120 Ft D P Road,
Seven Bungalows, Versova, Mumbai 400 061
Tel Res: (22) 26364290 Mob: 981 981 8197
-------------- next part --------------
An HTML attachment was scrubbed...
URL: 
http://mailman.cs.utah.edu/pipermail/sanskrit/attachments/20090827/77a29a73/attachment-0001.html
 

------------------------------

Message: 11
Date: Thu, 27 Aug 2009 00:32:13 -0400
From: Naresh Cuntoor <nares...@gmail.com>
Subject: Re: [Sanskrit] Kali Dhyanam
To: Sanskrit Mailing List <sanskrit@cs.utah.edu>
Message-ID:
        <f4ce5f9f0908262132s1a642de4x5aeffe079002e...@mail.gmail.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"

It is not gadeShu chaapa etc.,  but gada-iShu-chaapa-parighaan
iShuH = bANaH = arrow
The guNa sandhi (within the samastapada) makes it gadeShuchaapaparighaan.

The samastapada is formed by iteretara-dvandva.

Naresh



On Thu, Aug 27, 2009 at 12:18 AM, Shreyas P. Munshi <
shreyasmun...@rediffmail.com> wrote:

> Shri Ganeshanji,
> Srinivasan very well understands what you have said. His question is very
> specific: that why only 'gada' is in plural and not the other weapons that
> the goddess holds...Shreyas
>
> On Thu, 27 Aug 2009 08:28:15 +0530 wrote
> >Dear Sir,Gadeshu - seventh tense / Plural.( in gadas )A.Ganesan Kapeyar
> Love Cricket? Check out live scores, photos, video highlights and more.
> Click here.
> _______________________________________________
> To UNSUBSCRIBE or customize your subscription or topics of interest, visit
> http://mailman.cs.utah.edu/mailman/options/sanskrit
> and follow instructions.
>
>
>
> ____________________________
>
> Shreyas Munshi
> shreyasmun...@rediffmail.com
> C202, Mandar Apartments, 120 Ft D P Road,
> Seven Bungalows, Versova, Mumbai 400 061
> Tel Res: (22) 26364290 Mob: 981 981 8197
>
>
> <http://sigads.rediff.com/RealMedia/ads/click_nx.ads/www.rediffmail.com/signatureline....@middle?>
> _______________________________________________
> To UNSUBSCRIBE or customize your subscription or topics of interest, visit
> http://mailman.cs.utah.edu/mailman/options/sanskrit
> and follow instructions.
>
>
-------------- next part --------------
An HTML attachment was scrubbed...
URL: 
http://mailman.cs.utah.edu/pipermail/sanskrit/attachments/20090827/a2cfa121/attachment.html
 

------------------------------

_______________________________________________
To UNSUBSCRIBE or customize your subscription and email delivery, visit
http://mailman.cs.utah.edu/mailman/options/sanskrit
and follow instructions.

End of sanskrit Digest, Vol 52, Issue 7
***************************************

Reply via email to