Re: [Alpine-l] Gentiana lutea

2015-09-11 Thread lilactreefarm
Sharon,
   How lovely to have Gentiana lutea self-seeding in the garden. I have not had 
more than the one plant (though it has formed three 'rosettes')' and it took 
several years from seed to flowering. So I shall make an effort to move the 
plant, though I suppose its roots may go a very long way down, but, yes, I 
would very much appreciate some seed 'just in case.' If I can get it to 
germinate, there will be an interesting race to see if it will flower before...
   This last consideration applies to one of the trees we have grown from seed, 
Cladrastis sinensis, the Chinese version of the North American yellowwood. It 
is now about 12'; the flowers do not appear on young trees, so my chances of 
seeing it in flower, always assuming it survives our winters, are shrinking. 
But at Hillier this July I was lucky enough to see a 40' (?) version in full 
flower.
   Good to hear from you, and thank you for responding to my questions.
Brian


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> On Sep 10, 2015, at 10:09 AM, S. & R. Illingworth  
> wrote:
> 
> Brian, I have never attempted to move Gentiana lutea of any size.  A few 
> years ago Marion Jarvie dug up a small seedling from our garden, but it 
> didn't make the move to hers.
> Our plants sometimes take a year or so off from blooming, but their bold 
> beautiful foliage makes them an asset even then. They are tough plants 
> and have survived many hard winters.  They grow in well-drained mostly 
> clay soil, some with gravel mixed in, and in sun for most of the day.
> 
> Ours self-seed freely, so I try to deadhead before that happens, but I 
> do have one with seed on it right now.  I could send you some if you 
> like, in case yours fails to make the move.  Easiest way would be to sow 
> the seeds now,  in situ.
> Sharon, near Thunder Bay, in north-western Ontario.
> 
>> On 08/09/2015 10:08 AM, Brian Bixley wrote:
>>   Several years ago I managed to grow Gentiana lutea from seed - it's 
>> probably easy - and it eventually flowered for a few years. Then it 
>> stopped flowering, perhaps because its situation became increasingly 
>> shady. Is it possible for me to move it? Advice would be much appreciated.
>> 
> 
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Re: [Alpine-l] Gentiana lutea

2015-09-08 Thread Brian Bixley
  Many thanks for your comments. I, too, moved the plant when it was small. 
What I desperately need to know, however, is how deep the roots may go after 
many years, what kind of renewed conditions I should try to give the plant 
(where is your plant growing?) and whether all of this is pointless given the 
size and age of the plant. Can you offer me some help with these questions?

Brian

Sent from my iPad

> On Sep 8, 2015, at 13:05, Harold Peachey  wrote:
> 
> I grew G. lutea from seed about ten years ago, it has survived a half dozen 
> moves when still small and bloomed beautifully this year.  I will be 
> contributing seed to the NARGS seed Ex this year.
> 
>> On Tue, Sep 8, 2015 at 10:08 AM, Brian Bixley  
>> wrote:
>>Several years ago I managed to grow Gentiana lutea from seed - it's 
>> probably easy - and it eventually flowered for a few years. Then it stopped 
>> flowering, perhaps because its situation became increasingly shady. Is it 
>> possible for me to move it? Advice would be much appreciated.
>> 
>> Brian Bixley
>> Southern Ontario 
>> 
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> 
> 
> -- 
> One-of-These-Dayze
> Harold L. Peachey
> 
> 
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