Re: Apple-Crop: Medical question

2006-12-17 Thread Maurice Tougas

Con

So sorry to hear of your friends condition.  While doing a quick  
internet search I came across this site that may provide leads?


http://www.nutriwatch.org/07PublicHealth/foodsafety.html

Best to you and you friend
Mo Tougas
Tougas Family Farm
Massachusetts, USA

On Dec 17, 2006, at 11:19 AM, Con.Traas wrote:


Hello all,
I have the unfortunate task of asking you what might turn out to be  
a life and death question.
An apple growing friend of mine contracted cancer some time ago,  
and was getting chemotherapy and other treatments. As a result of  
his suppressed immune system, he subsequently contracted what  
appears to be an unusual fungal infection of his lungs. All efforts  
to diagnose this in Ireland, and now in Sweden, have failed.
The doctors are considering the possibility that the fungal  
infection may be something that was carried on the apples, as the  
grower in question continued with his normal apple harvesting,  
packing, sorting of rotten apples etc. despite his condition.
I would appreciate that if any one out there on the list could shed  
any light on this, or would have any suggestions, or might have  
heard of something like this before, to let me know as soon as  
possible.
Or perhaps, if you know someone off-list, who might know, and would  
not mind to ask them the question, that would also be much  
appreciated.
The condition of this person is perilous, and without an answer,  
the prognosis is not good. So any help at all would be better than  
nothing.

Best wishes,
Con Traas
The Apple Farm
Ireland
++353-52-41459






Re: Apple-Crop: Need parts

2006-12-24 Thread Maurice Tougas

Scotino
try contacting Worcester County Hort Society at Tower Hill Bot  
Gardens in Boylston, MA. They sell scion wood for heirlom

cultivars.
Mo Tougas
Tougas Farm
Northboro,MA
On Dec 24, 2006, at 9:55 AM, [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:

dear mr milburn, i dont have propellor parts but i saw your blurb  
in apple-crop. I am looking for scion wood for sibs of Cox orange  
pippin ie holstein, freyburg suncrisp etc. i am a small orchard  
grower for home use only. do you know of any sources of scion wood?  
I just cropped a few holstein last nov and they were amazing, and  
didnt seem to scab as easily as some of the japanese vars. I grow  
within 200yds of the atlantic here on cape cod. i attended Nafex  
2000 in Va. wish you luck with prop porject.




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Re: Apple-Crop: MFGA Summer Mtg. DVD

2007-02-16 Thread Maurice Tougas

Joe
It's the lenses Jon is using. It makes us all look like we're gaining  
weight.

mo Tougas
On Feb 16, 2007, at 6:21 PM, [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:



Jon, Wes is still gaining weight and so is his bread. I guess I  
need a DVD player to lean about your test updates and results. It's  
72 here  sunny- just returned from a couple of games of softball.  
Howard Lincoln is on the way for a visit - probably looking for  
bucks fror the new PSS building. Enjoy Jose


Quoting Jon Clements [EMAIL PROTECTED]:


For those of you already sick of the cold and snow, check this out:

http://www.customflix.com/Store/ShowEStore.jsp?id=224131

You can also order the title on amazon.com (particularly if you have
free shipping) -- just search for MFGA under DVD's.

Thanks.

Jon

Jon Clements
Extension Tree Fruit Specialist
UMass Cold Spring Orchard
393 Sabin Street
Belchertown, MA  01007
VOICE 413.478.7219
FAX 413.323.0382
IM mrhoneycrisp
Skype Name mrhoneycrisp




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Re: Apple-Crop: Time article

2007-03-10 Thread Maurice Tougas

Feel the glo!

http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,1595245,00.html

Getting warmer!

http://www.time.com/time/covers/0,16641,20070312,00.html

Better call the fire department!

http://artwork.barewalls.com/artwork/product.html?ArtworkID=284590

Mo Tougas
Tougas Family Farm
Northborough,MA
On Mar 10, 2007, at 7:04 PM, Jon Clements wrote:

Although I am hesitant to fan any embers -- I know there are quite  
a few out there -- into flames, it might be worth your while to  
pick up the March 12th issue of Time magazine. There is a cover  
article on organic vs. 'buy local.' A couple quotes:


In the end I bought both apples (organic vs. 'conventional New  
York state local'). They were both good, although the California  
one had a mealy bit, possibly from it's journey. (Is the author  
English -- a mealy bit?)


Eating locally also seems safer. Ted's (an upstate NY diversified  
producer) neighbors and customers can see how he farms. That  
transparency doesn't exist with, say, spinach bagged by a distant  
agribusiness. I help keep Ted in business, and he helps keep me fed  
-- and the elegance and sustainability of that exchange make more  
sense to me than gambling on faceless producers who stamp ORGANIC  
on a package thousands of miles from home.


Now, I have been trying to fully explain the phenomenal direct- 
market sales many Massachusetts apple growers -- and I understand  
it was beyond MA too -- had last season. I know the weather was  
good, and that makes a huge difference, but I am starting to think  
the buy local campaigns are really kicking in? I found the article  
interesting, and reasonably balanced, and something we should all  
be paying attention too.


If you did not catch his drift, the author clearly thought buying  
'conventional local' was preferable to buying agribusiness  
'organic' -- particularly if the petroleum environmental cost was  
figured in.


Any embers glowing brighter yet?

:-)

Jon

Jon Clements
Extension Tree Fruit Specialist
UMass Cold Spring Orchard
393 Sabin Street
Belchertown, MA  01007
VOICE 413.478.7219
FAX 413.323.0382
IM mrhoneycrisp
Skype Name mrhoneycrisp




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Re: Apple-Crop: Time article

2007-03-11 Thread Maurice Tougas

I would agree with Kurt. It is all about Trust.

The public has been told many, many times that Certified Organic  
equates to Not Been Sprayed


When was the last time anyone from the organic movement stood up and  
said, NO, that is not what Certified Organic means. Where is the  
credibility?



It is time that the real issues be addressed. Not the fear mongering  
of the anti pesticide crowd, but the real issues of obesity and the  
loss of habit of eating fresh fruits. As the fear of pesticides have  
risen, so has juvenile diabetes (double in the past decade),  
consumption of junk food, obesity, and more. What is the correlation?  
When mom fears the sprayed apple, does she reach for the high fat,  
high calorie granola bar? 7up rather than apple juice?



Mo Tougas
Tougas Family Farm
Northborough, MA








On Mar 11, 2007, at 8:50 PM, Arthur Harvey wrote:

I could agree with most of what you say about organic foods, but  
I'm not sure that what
you regard as silliness is the same as the silliness I observe.
In conventional food
standards it  is far more silly ---and dangerous to health---than  
what goes on in
organics.   I speak as an organic inspector and author of Harvey v  
Veneman.  Most of my
life was spent working in conventional apple orchards where the  
prevailing view is that
Guthion---or whatever---is perfectly safe because the manufacturers  
say so, and the feds
have not contradicted them until very recently.  Interestingly, the  
Fruit Growers News
which I have been reading for more than 40 years, has within the  
past couple of years
turned away from their contemptuous attitude toward organic  
orcharding, and now has

positive and helpful coverage.


--- Steve Demuth [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:


Kurt,

I actually agree with you that you, and other farmers, are probably
better served by the personal relationship than they would be by
certification alone (nothing, I might add, prevents one from
benefiting from both).  My point was that the consumer's trust is
based mostly on the good feelings from the personal relationship,
even though there is no demonstrable correlation between this and the
things that people claim to value about food production methods.

And the physician example is in fact perfectly apropos.  Firstly,
because physicians are certified, and required to periodically
re-certify in their chose area of practice.  I suspect it matters a
great deal to most people that their doctor actually graduated from
medical school, finished a residency, and is regularly re-certified
in their speciality.

Secondly, it is true that people do choose physicians on
recommendations, and personal trust.  And, it's a lousy way to choose
them.  Having been involved research on clinical outcomes, I can say
quite certainly that the fact that a physician appears competent,
caring and trustworthy is very poorly correlated with whether or not
they produce above or below average results for their patients.  Many
well-loved physicians are, statistically at least, a very bad bet for
your health.

This of course hardly bolsters my case for certification.  Despite
our best efforts to certify physician competence, there is still a
huge variance in quality.  However, there is an important difference
between organic certification and doctor certification: organic
certification certifies methods, not knowledge alone.  There is a
movement afoot in the medical field to start doing this with
hospitals (if you can't verify that every post heart-attack patient
is getting the most proven effective drug regimen, you may lose your
blessing as a cardiac care center); organic already does this with
horticultural practice.

All of this is not to say that I think organic is an altogether great
thing.  I don't actually like the direction that organic has taken in
the last 20 years; many of the regulations in the current
certification are to my mind just plain wrong headed.  And I
certainly think that a local, ecologically-minded agriculture is
preferable in many ways to a distant, organically certified one.

But, how am I know to that my local grower is following best
horticultural, pesticide, and ecological practice.  Trust?  Not
alone.  On this one I'm with Ronald Reagan, trust but verify.  That
is the value of certification.

Which bring me back to my starting point: this isn't an either
or.  Can't there be a certification program for ecologically sound
agriculture that steers clear of the silliness in the organic
standards, and which tells me something useful about what is going  
on the farm?


At 02:18 PM 3/11/2007, you wrote:

Fellow Growers,

I think that Steve's conclusion about the gullibility of  
consumers is a
little misdirected.  I have found that what consumers (people)  
really value
and desire in America is personal relationships.  Certification  
may well
serve and be necessary for the 900 mile local model as well as  
the box
stores but I believe that it has been born out of the realization  

Re: Apple-Crop: Early season hail damage

2007-06-23 Thread Maurice Tougas

Glen
In early July 2001 we experienced a pretty good hail storm on our 25  
acres of apples. All fruit had at least dents, many multiple skin  
pierces. Crop insurance adjuster called it 100% loss. We sell all of  
our crop retail, mostly pyo.
It was heartbreaking for the entire season to look at all those  
damaged fruit every day. We spent the next month thinning out as many  
torn fruit as we could. That was a good move. At harvest we explained  
to all customer that the fruit had been Kissed by Mother Nature. We  
found that most (99% )customers were content, though they did not  
purchase as much fruit as they would have. I felt we had already  
sustained a loss of volume, and an increase in expenses, and so could  
not afford a loss on price, and so we raised our price 15% over the  
last years price. That turned out to be the best decision we made, as  
our dollar sales that year were the best in 20 years. I know it is  
counter intuitive, but the numbers do not lie.Be upfront with your  
customers. They have a stake in your continuing in business. Remind  
them of that!


Last night we saw hail for the second time this season. Last year,  
twice, and twice in 2001.  In the previous 20 years, we saw hail 1  
time. Is this pattern typical for a short period, or are we entering  
a prolonged pattern?


Maurice Tougas
Tougas Family Farm
Northborough,MA

On Jun 22, 2007, at 10:08 PM, Karl Townsend wrote:



 The grower and I would appreciate hearing from folks who have  
experienced similar situation and what were the eventual effects of  
the early season not-cutting hail dents.


Thanks, Glen


Those dents will leave a dead and pithy spot in the apple just  
under the surface. Not number 1 grade.




I'm sure no two hail storms are exactly the same. In the last 25  
years we've had early hail three times. I think it pays for farm  
market orchards to go through the trees and hand thin most of the  
hail marks out. The remaining fruit will be larger and higher  
quality. And its easier to sort bad apples out now so you don't  
have an awful time at harvest. Of course if you've got 70% plus  
damage, save your time - go fishing.




I feel for you, its a real heartbreak.



Karl








Re: Apple-Crop: U-Pick whining

2007-10-25 Thread Maurice Tougas
The overwhelming majority of consumers who are looking to pick their  
own apples are NOT looking for a price bargain in our neck of the  
woods, but they recognize the treemendous value  spending a couple of  
hours of high quality time with their family.
My proof of that is simple. We charge $18.00/ half bushel for pre  
picked apples, $23.00/half bushel for PYO. We will sell 200+ bags PYO  
for every pre picked bag.

Enough said.

Maurice Tougas
Tougas Family Farm
Northboro,MA
www.tougasfarm.com
On Oct 25, 2007, at 11:28 AM, Ken Hall wrote:

A couple of the commenters at the linked article made a key point-- 
apples fresh from the tree ought to be worth something more than  
apples that may have traveled extensively and done time in CA  
storage. That doesn't make the latter bad apples by any stretch,  
but I doubt many would argue that fresh-picked (and hand-picked by  
the end user) are better. Add the value of the experience to the  
presumably superior quality of the fruit, and the price premium can  
be justified easily. It's up to the market whether to bear it, and  
the community should make sure it is making that case.


Best regards,
Ken


From: Matt McCallum [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED]
Sent: Thursday, October 25, 2007 10:38 AM
To: Apple-Crop
Subject: Apple-Crop: U-Pick whining

Apple crop gang,
I thought you would find this interesting reading. As the former  
owner of a pick-your-own operation I was not very happy to read her  
opinion.

Matt

http://www.wisebread.com/who-saves-money-when-you-pick-apples-the- 
grower




Re: Apple-Crop: ladders in pick your own

2008-07-06 Thread Maurice Tougas

Tom,

We have operated our PYO Apple and Peaches since 1981. We provide a  
limited number of aluminum tripod ladders. We use 4' to 7'. We try to  
pick the majority of the fruit above 8' or so ourselves so as to  
limit the attraction of climbing by our customers. As it is   
inefficient to be picking only tops with ladders, we purchased a self  
propelled platform last year for harvesting tops.
Our insurance carrier is Farm Family, and they offer a package which  
includes liability coverage for PYO with ladders as a percentage of  
our sales. In addition, Massachusetts passed the Pick your own  
liability law several years ago.
This exempts PYO operators from liability for injuries unless gross  
and wanton negligence can be shown. It has been upheld in court, and  
has been a great benefit.
We did have an accident back in 1991. The gentleman was on the top of  
the ladder when he fell and broke his ankle. The action never went to  
court, but persisted for three years and was settled for under $100,000.


The majority of our trees are now planted on 9's, though we still  
have a couple of acres of standards that have been lowered.
I believe the biggest danger is people reaching and people standing  
on the top two or three rungs. We mark our ladders with a warning not  
to stand on top three rungs, and we number each ladder so we can  
monitor their condition. We also post signage telling people they use  
them at their own risk, and that they are for use by adults only.


Best of luck with your PYO. I know the grass is always greener on the  
other side of the fence, but I long for the day when the market would  
allow me to harvest and wholesale my crop, and shut the gates to PYO.


Maurice Tougas
Tougas Family Farm
Northboro, MA
www.Tougasfarm.com

On Jul 6, 2008, at 1:59 AM, Tommy and Sandy wrote:

We are allowing people to pick their own apples for the last couple  
of years.  We didn't start out as a pick your own orchard and we  
have larger trees, 111, 7, and some larger 26's.
In the past we have not allowed ladders or climbing trees.  I was  
wondering if any other pick your own orchards allowed ladders  
either supplying them to people or allowing them to bring their  
own.  Also if ladders are allowed how much more insurance do you  
have to carry.  Has anyone had any bad claims because of ladders.

Thanks for responding.

Tommy Bruguiere
Dickie Bros. Orchard
Roseland, Va




Re: Apple-Crop: fumigating machine wanted

2008-10-05 Thread Maurice Tougas

Nathan
I have one.
Mo Tougas
On Oct 5, 2008, at 11:47 AM, [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:


Hello all...
Looking for a used fumigant application machine, in good or  
reasonable shape. Preferably in the mid eastern states. Looking at  
the Reddick website, it seems there may be a difference in  
equipment between using Telone alone or with Chloropicrin. That  
part I'm not so sure about...I've only used a borrowed machine from  
the chemical company.


Anyway... check your shed or ask a neighbor.

Thanks so much!!!

--
Nathan Milburn
Milburn Orchards, Inc.
[EMAIL PROTECTED]
1-443-309-2077 (my cell)






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Apple-Crop is not moderated. Therefore, the statements do not represent 
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Re: Apple-Crop: Pruning established open-center apple trees

2009-02-22 Thread Maurice Tougas

Dr Kanner

I'd encourage you to consider joining the Massachusetts Fruit Growers  
Association.


http://www.massfruitgrowers.org/membershiprenewal

Dues are only $200/year and you will receive a wealth of information  
by attending educational sessions they sponsor along with the  
Extension service. The just completed winter meeting saw over 100  
attend and included and afternoon of orchard pruning demonstration at  
the Belchertown UMass research orchard which the association donated  
to the University years ago. You will be contributing to support   
local research and enable a voice to promote the interests of fruit  
growers in Massachusetts.


Give it a look. It's a good investment.

Maurice Tougas
Tougas Family Farm
Northborough, MA 01532

www.TougasFarm.com

On Feb 22, 2009, at 11:03 AM, dmnor...@royaloakfarmorchard.com  
dmnor...@royaloakfarmorchard.com wrote:



Steven,

I don't know if you were looking to purchase a video, but I do have  
a video by Gary Moulton that is one of the best I have seen on all  
aspects of pruning, including the pruning of open center trees.   
It's available on my blog at  http:// 
www.theorchardkeeper.blogspot.com.  I hope this helps!


Dennis Norton
Royal Oak Farm Orchard
Office (815) 648-4467
Mobile (815) 228-2174
Fax (609) 228-2174
http://www.royaloakfarmorchard.com
http://www.theorchardkeeper.blogspot.com
http://www.revivalhymn.com
- Original Message -
From: Steven R. Kanner, MD
To: apple-crop@virtualorchard.net
Sent: Sunday, February 22, 2009 9:15 AM
Subject: Apple-Crop: Pruning established open-center apple trees

I have a small 3-acre orchard, half of which are long-established  
red spy and McIntosh, which I have rehabbed reasonably well over  
the past 6 years.


I could use advice on pruning the larger open-center trees,  
especially what to do on the top scaffold limbs. How many of the  
suckers to eliminate, how to stop telephone-pole development and so  
forth.


There is an excellent peach-pruning video on the UMass Fruit  
Advisor which greatly clarifies the strategy for pruning peach  
trees. There is also a good one on central leader apples on short  
root-stock.


Can someone point me to a comparable video, or clear written  
advice, to deal with the pruning strategy for the heirloom open- 
center trees, especially the top level of the canopy? Thanks.


Regards,
SRK

Steven R. Kanner, MD
12 Bypass Road
Lincoln, MA 01773
srkanne...@post.harvard.edu




Re: Apple-Crop: Early bearing

2009-03-10 Thread Maurice Tougas
I've found all the techniques mentioned work to some degree. I  
suspect that the more of them employed, the more likely you will  
succeed. One mentioned only briefly was the bending of branches below  
horizontal. It can be is very time consuming, and very  
effective.  People of course have been using spreaders, weights, kite  
string, pea string, rubber bands,.. but what we've been using for  
a few years now are 18-24 inch pieces of soft 14 or 16 ga wire.   
Either bend a small loop at each end in the shop, or carry them  
straight in bundles and make quick loops in orchard. Quick and easy,  
and can be repositioned later.  If 18 is too short, loop two together.


Mo Tougas
Tougas Family Farm
Northborough, MA

On Mar 10, 2009, at 6:58 PM, jscr...@aol.com wrote:

My experience is that in Virginia Spys are late producers.  Scoring  
really works. There are more and less severe scoring, you might  
want to try several types on some limbs.  The least severe is one  
cut around the trunk under the scaffold limps.  The most severe  
would be to remove about 1/8 inch section. Some remove a larger  
section and replace it upside down.  It is most important to cover  
any such wound to keep it from drying and from fire blight. I have  
used several layers of masking tape.  It will come off by itself  
later.  One or two weeks after bloom is when I have made the scoring.

Good luck, you can really get their attention with scoring.
John Crumlpacker
Timberville, Virginia
540 896 6000
In a message dated 3/10/2009 4:00:47 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time,  
schoo...@kwic.com writes:
Would someone care to divulge a recipe for getting slow-to-bear  
varieties into production sooner.  I have Northern Spy in mind  
using Ethrel or NAA or combinations.  Apogee perhaps.  Other  
techniques?




Harold Schooley

Orchards Limited

Simcoe, Ontario

Canada




Need a job? Find employment help in your area.




Re: Apple-Crop: Early bearing

2009-03-10 Thread Maurice Tougas

Sorry, I forgot to attach this

http://www.umass.edu/fruitadvisor/factsheets/limbposit.pdf

Mo Tougas

On Mar 10, 2009, at 6:58 PM, jscr...@aol.com wrote:

My experience is that in Virginia Spys are late producers.  Scoring  
really works. There are more and less severe scoring, you might  
want to try several types on some limbs.  The least severe is one  
cut around the trunk under the scaffold limps.  The most severe  
would be to remove about 1/8 inch section. Some remove a larger  
section and replace it upside down.  It is most important to cover  
any such wound to keep it from drying and from fire blight. I have  
used several layers of masking tape.  It will come off by itself  
later.  One or two weeks after bloom is when I have made the scoring.

Good luck, you can really get their attention with scoring.
John Crumlpacker
Timberville, Virginia
540 896 6000
In a message dated 3/10/2009 4:00:47 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time,  
schoo...@kwic.com writes:
Would someone care to divulge a recipe for getting slow-to-bear  
varieties into production sooner.  I have Northern Spy in mind  
using Ethrel or NAA or combinations.  Apogee perhaps.  Other  
techniques?




Harold Schooley

Orchards Limited

Simcoe, Ontario

Canada




Need a job? Find employment help in your area.




Re: Apple-Crop: Early bearing

2009-03-11 Thread Maurice Tougas
You can purchase lengths of wire from Finger Lakes Trellis Supply.  
They will supply galv or black, in any weight. If you use black 16 or  
18 ga, they should rust away and not need to be retrieved.

They are not in their catalog, so you'll need to email them for a price.

Mo Tougas

On Mar 11, 2009, at 2:12 PM, Harold Schooley wrote:


What is the length of these rubber bands and where available?

Harold
From: apple-crop@virtualorchard.net [mailto:apple- 
c...@virtualorchard.net] On Behalf Of dmnor...@royaloakfarmorchard.com

Sent: Wednesday, March 11, 2009 1:20 PM
To: Apple-Crop
Subject: Re: Apple-Crop: Early bearing

We have found that branch bending has worked the best for us on B9  
and M9 as well as M26.  We use the rubber bands now and find that  
they require the least amount of time of any other technique.  We  
use the bio-degradable in May and they are gone by August or just  
after terminals have set.  With the wires, you have to go back and  
retrieve them later which does take some time.  With  either  
vertical axe or tall spindle, pruning is at a minimum, so more time  
is saved on pruning.  In my opinion, this is the most cost  
effective method of all.  We are now in the process of going back  
to our vertical axe trees planted 8 x 14 and are converting them to  
tall spindle as we interplant new trees between 4-5 year olds and  
doubling  density to 4 x 14.  If anyone is interested in more  
detail feel free to contact me.


Dennis Norton
Royal Oak Farm Orchard
Office (815) 648-4467
Mobile (815) 228-2174
Fax (609) 228-2174
http://www.royaloakfarmorchard.com
http://www.theorchardkeeper.blogspot.com
http://www.revivalhymn.com
- Original Message -
From: Maurice Tougas
To: Apple-Crop
Sent: Tuesday, March 10, 2009 7:00 PM
Subject: Re: Apple-Crop: Early bearing

I've found all the techniques mentioned work to some degree. I  
suspect that the more of them employed, the more likely you will  
succeed. One mentioned only briefly was the bending of branches  
below horizontal. It can be is very time consuming, and very  
effective.  People of course have been using spreaders, weights,  
kite string, pea string, rubber bands,.. but what we've been  
using for a few years now are 18-24 inch pieces of soft 14 or 16 ga  
wire.  Either bend a small loop at each end in the shop, or carry  
them straight in bundles and make quick loops in orchard. Quick and  
easy, and can be repositioned later.  If 18 is too short, loop two  
together.


Mo Tougas
Tougas Family Farm
Northborough, MA

On Mar 10, 2009, at 6:58 PM, jscr...@aol.com wrote:


My experience is that in Virginia Spys are late producers.  Scoring  
really works. There are more and less severe scoring, you might  
want to try several types on some limbs.  The least severe is one  
cut around the trunk under the scaffold limps.  The most severe  
would be to remove about 1/8 inch section. Some remove a larger  
section and replace it upside down.  It is most important to cover  
any such wound to keep it from drying and from fire blight. I have  
used several layers of masking tape.  It will come off by itself  
later.  One or two weeks after bloom is when I have made the scoring.

Good luck, you can really get their attention with scoring.
John Crumlpacker
Timberville, Virginia
540 896 6000
In a message dated 3/10/2009 4:00:47 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time,  
schoo...@kwic.com writes:
Would someone care to divulge a recipe for getting slow-to-bear  
varieties into production sooner.  I have Northern Spy in mind  
using Ethrel or NAA or combinations.  Apogee perhaps.  Other  
techniques?

Harold Schooley
Orchards Limited
Simcoe, Ontario
Canada

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Apple-Crop: IFTA Short Tour

2010-07-16 Thread Maurice Tougas
Due to the number of registrations IFTA has added another bus for the NY
Short Tour July 28 and 29.. There are still a handful of open seats so the
deadline for registration has been extended to 7/21 or until all seats are
full, whichever happens first.

The easiest way to register is this link:
http://ifruittree.site-ym.com/default.asp?page=ShortOrchardTours

I understand the hotels that are listed on the site are full, so you will
need to check with other hotels in Geneva.

Hope to see you there.

Mo Tougas
Tougas Family Farm
Northborough, MA 01532
www.TougasFarm.com
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Tougas Family Farm
246 Ball St
Northborough, MA 01532
508-450-0844


[Apple-crop] IFTA seeking research proposals

2011-01-01 Thread Maurice Tougas
Apple croppers,

You are invited to submit research proposals to the International Fruit Tree 
Association (IFTA). Preference will be given to proposal for research in the 
following areas: fruit variety, rootstock, intensive orchard management 
systems, new technologies and additional horticultural issues.

 Proposals must be submitted no later than February 1, 2011 to Rick Dungey, 
Executive Director IFTA, at du...@ifruittree.org.

Please contact Rick at that address or at 636 449 5083 for further information 
and an application package.

Maurice (Mo) Tougas
Tougas Family Farm
Ball St
Northborough,MA 01532
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Re: [apple-crop] Tree height v. row spacing

2011-03-26 Thread maurice tougas
I would agree with Jon, but add a couple of other considerations that I'd
use to fine tune your rule.

The first would be row orientation. North / South oriented rows will receive
more uniform light exposure than trees  East / West, and so perhaps an extra
percentage of height could be added.

Second, training system  results in differing depth or density of canopy,
and so a system with wider row spacing may result in longer branches which
may result in greater shading in the interior of the tree. Systems such as
tall spindle, super spindle and maybe fruiting wall systems result in
narrower canopies and so there is less depth to the canopy resulting in less
distance sunlight must travel to trunk. That said, these systems may well
have a more dense canopy than more open, widely spaced trees when pruned
properly.
The narrower canopies I believe have the advantage, and so the ratio of
height to row spacing may again allow for a slightly taller tree.

Thirdly, consider hours of sunlight per growing season. I've never seen a
zone chart for this. Might be an interesting project for some statistician
(Wes!), but developing some sort of sunlight zone similar to traditional
hardiness zones should influence height/width ratio.
Certainly the number of hours of sunlight, and, it's intensity on average,
received in Pasco,WA or Hastings, NZ  is appreciably higher than
Northborough,MA or Acton,ME and has an influence on ideal height/row width
ratio.

Mo Tougas
Tougas Family Farm
Northborough, MA

On Fri, Mar 25, 2011 at 11:50 PM, Jon Clements cleme...@umext.umass.eduwrote:

 If you are growing hi-density apples, then tree height should be no
 greater than between-row width. Slightly less (0.9) is even better.

 Jon

 2011/3/25 Arthur Kelly kellyorcha...@gmail.com:
  What do you all think about required row spacing for various tree
 heights?
   Should row width be 1.1, 1.3 or 1.5 X tree height?
  Art Kelly
  Kelly Orchards
  Acton, ME
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 Jon Clements
 cleme...@umext.umass.edu
 aka 'Mr Liberty'
 aka 'Mr Honeycrisp'
 IM mrhoneycrisp
 413.478.7219
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[apple-crop] Pommier, Le Mur Fruiter

2011-04-01 Thread maurice tougas
-- Forwarded message --
From: maurice tougas appleman.maur...@gmail.com
Date: Fri, Apr 1, 2011 at 7:24 AM
Subject: Pommier, Le Mur Fruiter
To: Andre Tougas tougasf...@gmail.com


Croppers,

Does anyone know of a translated version of Pommier, le Mur fruitier?

I am intrigued by the concept of this system after having traveled to
Belgium last week scouting visits for the IFTA study tour this summer. We
saw example of orchards trated with this system, and will be visiting them
in July. The above publication appears to be the best coverage of the system
I've seen.

Alas, mon papa is no longer with me to help me with this.

Maurice Tougas


-- 
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Tougas Family Farm
Northborough,MA 01532
508-450-0844



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Northborough,MA 01532
508-450-0844
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Re: [apple-crop] Pommier, Le Mur Fruiter

2011-04-01 Thread maurice tougas
Hello Jean,

This must be my lucky day.
Je dois traiter ma femme à dîner ce soir!
I will soon develop a list of questions for you.
Thank you so much for your offer.

Maurice


2011/4/1 Jourdain Jean-Marc jourd...@ctifl.fr

 Hi Maurice

 To my knowledge there is no translation of the book. Since the concept was 
 created in our orchards here in Lanxade Centre (near Bergerac South West of 
 France), I shall be able to answer all questions.

 The first rows of this training system were planted in 1995 for better access 
 to fruit, since we were hosting a robotic harvester program at that time. 
 Then the robotic program fell down, too much cost, too poor yield, then we 
 decided to go on with the orchard.

 Jean Marc Jourdain
 Ctifl
 Centre manager
 Jourdain(at)Ctifl.fr

 -- Forwarded message --
 From: maurice tougas appleman.maur...@gmail.com
 Date: Fri, Apr 1, 2011 at 7:24 AM
 Subject: Pommier, Le Mur Fruiter
 To: Andre Tougas tougasf...@gmail.com


 Croppers,



 Does anyone know of a translated version of Pommier, le Mur fruitier?



 I am intrigued by the concept of this system after having traveled to Belgium 
 last week scouting visits for the IFTA study tour this summer. We saw example 
 of orchards trated with this system, and will be visiting them in July. The 
 above publication appears to be the best coverage of the system I've seen.



 Alas, mon papa is no longer with me to help me with this.



 Maurice Tougas

 --
 Maurice Tougas
 Tougas Family Farm
 Northborough,MA 01532
 508-450-0844


 --
 Maurice Tougas
 Tougas Family Farm
 Northborough,MA 01532
 508-450-0844

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Re: [apple-crop] Pommier, Le Mur Fruiter

2011-04-02 Thread maurice tougas
Jean,

Please comment/correct my impressions of what principles are involved
with the le Mur fruitier system.

1) The tree form result is a wall which is 1 meter thick at the base,
1/2 meter wide at the top.

2) Mechanical pruning consists of a single annual shearing at 6 to
8/10 leaves upon the fruiting shoot. Exception being first year
conversion when a single shearing would additionally take place as
buds break in the spring.

3) That initial spring shearing stimulates numerous points of growth,
which will later be sheared at the 6-10 leaf shearing.

4) The shearing at 6-10 leaves is timed to coincide with a relatively
short period of time before summer solstice.

5) This shearing shortly before solstice allows for short extension of
growth. As solstice is passed, days begin to become shorter. As days
become shorter, tree is keyed to shift from vegetative growth to
reproductive, and so extension growth is limited and conversion of
growth to fruiting bud initiation begins.

6) With total width of no more than 1 meter, sunlight needs to travel
no more than 1/2 meter to reach trunk (assuming north/south
orientation), and so an adequate amount of sunlight exposure is
maintained though out  the canopy.

7) Depth or severity of pruning is determined by crop load. If crop is
heavy, then more severe, or deeper shearing is employed.

8) Tree planting distance is 80cm by 3 meters.

9) Conversion from axis, tall spindle and super spindle tree forms are possible.

10) Hedging must occur when dry weather is predicted and conditions
for fireblight infection are not high.

11) The year of conversion will result in significant yield reduction.

12) Initial spring shearing year of conversion should be at 40 cm from
the trunk at the base, tapering to 20 cm at the top.

13) Mechanical thinning of blossoms is encouraged by this system.

14) Mechanical thinning should take place at the pink bud stage.

15) Yield increase of 10% as compared to traditional hand pruned trees
is expected.

16) Increase in red color is expected.

17) Decrease in fruit sunburn is expected.

18) Total reduction in labor requirements is expected in the range of 10%.

You are most kind to comment on these impressions. If there are
additional points you believe I should consider, please feel free to
bring them into the discussion.

Thank you again,

Maurice Tougas
Fruit grower
Northborough, MA



On Fri, Apr 1, 2011 at 12:29 PM, maurice tougas
appleman.maur...@gmail.com wrote:
 Hello Jean,

 This must be my lucky day.
 Je dois traiter ma femme à dîner ce soir!
 I will soon develop a list of questions for you.
 Thank you so much for your offer.

 Maurice


 2011/4/1 Jourdain Jean-Marc jourd...@ctifl.fr

 Hi Maurice

 To my knowledge there is no translation of the book. Since the concept was 
 created in our orchards here in Lanxade Centre (near Bergerac South West of 
 France), I shall be able to answer all questions.

 The first rows of this training system were planted in 1995 for better 
 access to fruit, since we were hosting a robotic harvester program at that 
 time. Then the robotic program fell down, too much cost, too poor yield, 
 then we decided to go on with the orchard.

 Jean Marc Jourdain
 Ctifl
 Centre manager
 Jourdain(at)Ctifl.fr

 -- Forwarded message --
 From: maurice tougas appleman.maur...@gmail.com
 Date: Fri, Apr 1, 2011 at 7:24 AM
 Subject: Pommier, Le Mur Fruiter
 To: Andre Tougas tougasf...@gmail.com


 Croppers,



 Does anyone know of a translated version of Pommier, le Mur fruitier?



 I am intrigued by the concept of this system after having traveled to 
 Belgium last week scouting visits for the IFTA study tour this summer. We 
 saw example of orchards trated with this system, and will be visiting them 
 in July. The above publication appears to be the best coverage of the system 
 I've seen.



 Alas, mon papa is no longer with me to help me with this.



 Maurice Tougas

 --
 Maurice Tougas
 Tougas Family Farm
 Northborough,MA 01532
 508-450-0844


 --
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 Tougas Family Farm
 Northborough,MA 01532
 508-450-0844

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 Tougas Family Farm
 Northborough,MA 01532
 508-450-0844




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Re: [apple-crop] Pommier, Le Mur Fruiter

2011-04-05 Thread maurice tougas
Thank you Jean and Con,

You have made what on the surface appeared to be an easy transition,
into a most interesting, albeit time consuming, research project.

I assume now that when Jean states that he is not confident with
conversions in comment related to question two, having to do with the
timing of summer hedging, that you meant that you are not confident
with stating that we here in Massachusetts would find that the correct
timing for hedging would be 10 leaves, as opposed to not being
confident of the wisdom of conversion of training systems.

As you have both clearly stated that the single most critical aspect
of this system is determining the proper timing for summer hedging,
then proceeding with caution is advised.

Last summer the IFTA visited several NY orchards who were employing
modified summer hedging. Though they were not attempting to keep as
thin a wall as described, I believe they were performing the hedging
in August as suggested by Con.

Jean, would it be possible to receive the protocol you developed to
test for timing of summer pruning, or is it as simple as shearing at a
series of timings, and then watching for results?

Thanks again for your input.

Maurice

On Tue, Apr 5, 2011 at 6:38 AM, Con.Traas con.tr...@ul.ie wrote:


 Hello all,
 Point 5 is in my mind probably the most vital to get right. If this does
 not work the system will not work.

 Quote:

 5) This shearing shortly before solstice allows for short extension of
 growth. As solstice is passed, days begin to become shorter. As days
 become shorter, tree is keyed to shift from vegetative growth to
 reproductive, and so extension growth is limited and conversion of
 growth to fruiting bud initiation begins.

 5/ yes that's the explanation from Louis Lorette who did a theorization
 of summer pruning in early 20th. In our case I am afraid that we did a
 more empirical work, designing trials to find the best pruning date in
 our conditions. The 10 leaves date, seems to work for France.

 I have been looking at summer pruning for many years, and in our part of
 the World, a 10 leaves point of pruning, or just around June 21st, does
 not work. In fact, for most varieties, early August, perhaps even the
 second week of August, is the appropriate time. The date at which a
 shoot can be headed with reasonable expectation of forming a fruit bud
 on resultant brindle seems to depend on crop load, soil nutrition and
 soil type (which can vary across a field or orchard), water
 availability, apple variety, use of gibberellin inhibitor (like
 prohexadione calcium) and then something like an Indian Summer (an
 unusually warm spell in mid August) can cause re-growth of buds which
 you would expect to set fruit buds, resulting in turn in no shoot tip
 fruit buds.

 What I am attempting to put across is that using mechanical pruning with
 this system is not without difficulty, and what may work well in France
 may not work so well elsewhere.

 A most interesting conversation; many thanks.

 Con Traas
 The Apple Farm
 Cahir
 Ireland



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[apple-crop] IFTA Study Tour

2011-05-15 Thread maurice tougas
Apple croppers,

Registration for the IFTA Study Tour to England, Netherlands and Belgium is
now open. You may see information at
http://ifruittree.site-ym.com/?page=StudyTour11
The tour has a nice balance of cultural and technical visits, and so will be
enjoyed by you and your spouses. Due to logistical limitations, the trip is
currently limited to a total of 48 participants.  I hope you will take a
look at the itinerary, and give this informative tour a consideration.

Thanks,
Mo Tougas

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[apple-crop] IFTA 2012 Conference Registration

2011-10-20 Thread maurice tougas
Apple Croppers,

The 2012 IFTA Annual Conference to be held early January in Chile
information and registration are now live online at the IFTA website.

http://www.ifruittree.org/?page=Conference2012

The conference will be hosted in Santiago, Chile January 8th to the 11th,
 followed by post conference tour options to Central/Southern Chile,
Argentina and Brazil.

Mo Tougas


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[apple-crop] IFTA Chile Conference

2011-11-22 Thread maurice tougas
Apple Croppers,

Just a reminder that the IFTA Annual Conference will be taking place a good
month earlier than normal this coming year. The conference to be held in
Santiago, Chile January 8-11 with post tours to southern Chile, Argentina
and Brazil is an opportunity for those of us involved with apple production
to see first hand progressive fruit production in South America.

We're wrapping up harvest here this week, and if you've done so or are
about to, time time to take a look at the program at ifruittree.org

http://www.ifruittree.org/?page=Conference2012

Thanks,

Mo Tougas
Tougas Family Farm
Northborough,MA
508 450 0844

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[apple-crop] IFTA 2012 Conference presentations

2012-02-15 Thread maurice tougas
The majority of the power point presentations given in Santiago, Chile at
the 2012 IFTA Conference a couple weeks ago are now online on the IFTA
website (ifruittree.org).

They can be found in the Research  Links section, Presentations
subsection.

Hope to see you all at the Boston 2013 IFTA Conference next February!

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Re: [apple-crop] Hedging tall spindle trees

2012-02-22 Thread maurice tougas
Nick,

Yes, we've done some hedging as a trial. People are hedging at differing
times, in NY hedging is done by a couple of growers in August when branches
turn or drop under the weight of growing fruit.

We're trying several approaches as described a year ago or so here on Apple
crop and in French publication Le Mur Fruitier.

You can do a site search of apple crop from the Virtual Orchard website to
find the discussion a year ago.

Best of luck,

Mo Tougas



2012/2/22 Nick Lucking n...@cannonvalleyorchard.com

 Here's the link to the video that Mo Tougas took.  Thanks Mo!
 *
 *
 *http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8SNxztQr-80feature=related*
 *
 *
 *Nick Lucking *
 *Cannon Valley Orchard*

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Re: [apple-crop] Painting Trees

2012-03-06 Thread Maurice Tougas
Interesting observation, would be great to see some University trials.  Perhaps 
the silica acts as irritant? Do you still see borers laying eggs and larva not 
surviving? Also, which borers are targets?
I understand that there is work with pheromone confusion a la peach tee borer 
research going on. 

Do you need to repaint  every season?

Thanks

Mo tougas
Tougas Farm
Northborough, ma
Sent from my iPhone

On 6 Mar 2012, at 10:09 AM, kuffelcr...@kuffelcreek.com wrote:

 I've been using 1/3 paint, 1/3 water, 1/3 all-purpose drywall joint
 compound; this is still thin enough to brush on, but makes a pretty good
 crust.  I had Gripper white primer left over (Home Depot) and have been
 using it, despite dire warnings about not using exterior paint.  If it
 works again this year, I'm ready to declare victory as we've gotten
 hammered from borers over the last several years.
 
 Kevin Hauser
 Kuffel Creek Apple Nursery
 Riverside, California
 
 On Tue, 06 Mar 2012 06:08:08 -0600, Randy Steffens Jr
 randyjrsteff...@me.com wrote:
 That's interesting - what's his ratio of plaster to paint?
 
 Randy Steffens
 Shepherd's Valley Orchards 
 Tennessee
 On Mar 6, 2012, at 3:54 AM, kuffelcr...@kuffelcreek.com wrote:
 
 Add a slug of drywall mud to the mixture and you'll have borers covered
 too!  This is John Bunker's recipe at Fedco Trees in Maine and was
 effective last year in reducing borer damage here.
 
 Kevn Hauser
 Kuffel Creek Apple Nursery
 Riverside, California
 
 On Tue, 6 Mar 2012 03:48:36 -0600, Nick Lucking
 n...@cannonvalleyorchard.com wrote:
 Randy,
 
 I've noticed on mature trees where I had yellow belly sapsucker  
 (woodpecker) damage and I've painted them, the birds do not return to 
 
 peck.  I had quite a bit of vole damage last year where I had painted 
 
 trunks but no guards.  I have started to add hot pepper sauce to the  
 latex paint should the critters make it though the guard.
 
 Nick Lucking
 Cannon Valley Orchard
 
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Re: [apple-crop] How to deal with field mice

2012-03-25 Thread maurice tougas
We have similar mouse concerns with much forest nearby and stonewalls. I've
found not much beats good orchard sanitation. Keeping row middles mowed and
tree rows clean. We rake all debris out from under trees in fall and remove
any root suckers. Mice need a place to hide, they love weeds and leaf
litter. Of course any dropped fruit or trash of any kind needs to be kept
out of orchard. Owls, hawks, coyotes, and wild cats seem to also enjoy
hunting where there are few places for mice to find cover.

Mo Tougas
Tougas Family Farm
Northborough, MA

2012/3/24 Alberto Da Silva Alvares Dos Santos asan...@utad.pt

  Hi All !
 Fruit growers in this region often have problems with field mice (Microtus
 lusitanicus), which seriously damage the roots of the trees. In an attempt
 to control this pest using biological means:
 1 • The presence of wild ferrets may be a good method, but we need know
 how to create safe havens for them. Which size (diameter) should be a
 plastic tube to be used as protection against its predators?
 2 • Are there any other effective biological means of struggle against
 field mice?
 Sincerely,

 Alberto Santos
 Agronomy Departament
 University of Trás-os-Montes e Alto Douro (UTAD)
 Tel.: + 351 259 350 447

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Re: [apple-crop] ledge in tall spindle planting

2012-05-23 Thread Maurice Tougas
Quarter stick dynamite.

Sent from my iPhone

On 23 May 2012, at 01:35 PM, Frank Carlson fcarl...@carlsonorchards.com 
wrote:

 Michael:
 Thanks for the reply.  What we have hit is granite ledge, which is non 
 poundable.  I think the boring machine will be needed.
 Frank Carlson
 From: apple-crop-boun...@virtualorchard.net 
 [mailto:apple-crop-boun...@virtualorchard.net] On Behalf Of Michael Vaughn
 Sent: Wednesday, May 23, 2012 1:27 PM
 To: Apple-crop discussion list
 Subject: Re: [apple-crop] ledge in tall spindle planting
  
 FrANKLYN,
  
 I have a 4 acre planting that has a layer locally called a Hardpackthat 
 occurs about 12 to 18 inches down.
 I used a skid steer with a hydraulic Ram for pounding/driving posts.  I drove 
 5-6 treated southern pine posts 4 feet down
 with little trouble. Beside the End posts/anchors there is another post every 
 30 ft or so.
 In between the posts I planted 10 to 11 Tall spindle trees all secured to 4 
 layers of High tensile wire spaced every 2 ft.
 This anchoring has been in the ground for 4 years now and is quite stable. 
 
 On Wed, May 23, 2012 at 10:20 AM, Frank Carlson 
 fcarl...@carlsonorchards.com wrote:
 We are inquiring if anyone else has hit unexpected ledge in anchoring a tall 
 spindle planting?  We are hitting it 18inches down, surely not enough to 
 anchor a post in the soil.
 One idea we have is to drill a 13/4 inch hole in the ledge and put a 12 foot 
 galv steel fence post in, but it is only good for every other one because of 
 its strength to bend when you use more than one.
 Experience or ideas ?
 Thanks,
 Frank   Bruce Carlson
  
 Franklyn W. Carlson, Pres.
 Carlson Orchards, Inc.
 115 Oak Hill Road
 P.O.Box 359
 Harvard, MA. 01451
 617-968-4180 cell
 978-456-3916 office
  
 
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 Pie-In-the-Sky Orchards
 
 
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Re: [apple-crop] Tree Row Volume and newer pesticide chemistries?

2012-10-27 Thread maurice tougas
That said, we've always been told the label is the law, and when you
apply materials below labeled rate, you are on your own in terms of
efficacy. Assume that manufacturer will assume no responsibility for damage
if rate applied is below minimum stated on label.


I'm confident that we are close to having the technology available to
deliver an accurate dose to our trees that will take account of the many
factors that influence the effectiveness of our production enhancing
materials. Tree row volume being one component. Past, current and predicted
weather, stage of growth, pest density, intended market, etc, etc, all
influence optimal target rate of material per acre to be applied.

Maurice Tougas
Tougas Family Farm
Northborough, MA 01532

On Fri, Oct 26, 2012 at 8:36 PM, Arthur Kelly kellyorcha...@gmail.comwrote:

 My understanding is it is both.  X ounces of pesticide per 100 gal of
 water and then TRV calculation and # of gals per acre.

 Art Kelly
 Kelly Orchards
 Acton, ME

 On Fri, Oct 26, 2012 at 12:21 PM, Peter Werts pwe...@ipminstitute.orgwrote:

  Hi All, 

 ** **

 Has anyone come across Extension articles or peer reviewed work which
 discuss the use of Tree Row Volume (TRV) applications and this age old
 question: is it the amount of pesticide or water that changes when using
 TRV, especially where TRV application rates are below manufacture labeled
 rates for neonicotinoids, diamides, spinosyns and etc? 

 ** **

 ** **

 ** **

 Thanks,

 ** **

 Peter

 ** **

 ** **

 =

 Peter Werts

 Project Coordinator

 Specialty Crop IPM

 IPM Institute of North America, Inc.

 4510 Regent St. 

 Madison WI 53705

 Office: 608 232-1410

 Cell: 612 518-0319

 Fax: 608 232-1440

 pwe...@ipminstitute.org

 www.ipminstitute.org

 ** **

 ** **

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Re: [apple-crop] EverCrisp

2012-11-08 Thread maurice tougas
In the 31 years I've been growing and marketing apples PYO, I've never seen
the excitement that Honeycrisp has generated with my customers. I'll take a
dozen more if they will build on that excitement (= increase in demand).
We'll plant EverCrisp in the hope that it may be one of the dozen.

Mo Tougas
Tougas Family Farm
Northborough, MA 01532


On Thu, Nov 8, 2012 at 6:41 PM, Tommy and Sandy orcha...@ceva.net wrote:

 **
 Exactly what we need a new apple variety.  We already have enough.  We
 don't know what to plant for our area, will it sell, can you grow it
 everywhere.
 We have a lot of good apples now, why not concentrate on raising good
 quality apples from the ones we have now.

 Tommy Bruguiere
 Dickie Bros. Orchards

 - Original Message -
 *From:* david_d...@me.com
 *To:* Apple-Crop apple-crop@virtualorchard.net
 *Sent:* Thursday, November 08, 2012 10:49 AM
 *Subject:* [apple-crop] EverCrisp

 A new apple available to everyone - the first story about it is in this
 month's Fruit Growers News -

 http://fruitgrowersnews.com/index.php/news/release/19002

 It's excellent -

 David Doud
 grower - Indiana

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Re: [apple-crop] Removing Flowers by hand

2013-02-02 Thread maurice tougas
You're doing fine Rye. You will encourage growth and do no harm. You'll
also reduce the potential for fireblight infections. We simply pinch the
buds at or as they break tight cluster. Prefer not removing entire spur
as we may want fruit there next year. It's time consuming, but for
fireblight reduction and increased growth response, worth it.

Mo Tougas
Grower, Tougas Family Farm


On Fri, Feb 1, 2013 at 6:38 PM, Rye Hefley ducn...@yahoo.com wrote:


 I am removing flowers by hand this year to promote scaffolding growth.
 When I see a flower that is protruding from the bud (before it is open), I
 grab the whole bud and pull it off. I started to wonder if this is in any
 way harmful to my goal of scaffold growth. Is there a right time and
 right way to manually remove flowers?  I'm not looking to grow any fruit
 this year just scaffolding.

 Thanks,
 Rye Hefley
 So Cal
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Re: [apple-crop] Removing Flowers by hand

2013-02-02 Thread maurice tougas
Rye,

I'm going to assume you won't be able to do 100% flower removal, and I'm
told there is nearly 0zero chance of resistance developing if you spray
strep ONLY during bloom, I would. With you already having FB in the
orchard, don't risk it! My opinion. Good luck,

Mo


On Sat, Feb 2, 2013 at 11:35 AM, Rye Hefley ducn...@yahoo.com wrote:


 Hi Mo,

 Thank you for your response and confirmation to continue that way.

 Yes there was fireblight last year and now will be forevermore. Was
 thinking that also would be a fringe benefit of removing flowers.

 After pruning and flower removal, is it still necessary to spray this year?

 Thanks again Mo!

 Rye Hefley
 So Cal
 --
 On Sat, Feb 2, 2013 3:09 AM PST maurice tougas wrote:

 You're doing fine Rye. You will encourage growth and do no harm. You'll
 also reduce the potential for fireblight infections. We simply pinch the
 buds at or as they break tight cluster. Prefer not removing entire spur
 as we may want fruit there next year. It's time consuming, but for
 fireblight reduction and increased growth response, worth it.
 
 Mo Tougas
 Grower, Tougas Family Farm
 
 
 On Fri, Feb 1, 2013 at 6:38 PM, Rye Hefley ducn...@yahoo.com wrote:
 
 
  I am removing flowers by hand this year to promote scaffolding growth.
  When I see a flower that is protruding from the bud (before it is
 open), I
  grab the whole bud and pull it off. I started to wonder if this is in
 any
  way harmful to my goal of scaffold growth. Is there a right time and
  right way to manually remove flowers?  I'm not looking to grow any
 fruit
  this year just scaffolding.
 
  Thanks,
  Rye Hefley
  So Cal
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 Tougas Family Farm
 Northborough,MA 01532
 508-450-0844

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Re: [apple-crop] Removing Flowers by hand

2013-02-04 Thread maurice tougas
Rye,

We remove the actual flower buds only, leaving the spur leaves behind. My
understanding is that Fireblight is not a problem until flower is open, but
I could be wrong about that. I leave the leaves only because I suspect that
doing so there is a better chance of that spur flowering again next year
that way and I also suspect that those spur leaves will add somewhat to the
vigor of the tree that first year. So I am waiting a bit longer than you
suggest you have been. Often a number of the flowers are open, many at pink
as well. This means you may need to pass through a couple of times as often
it's those last few open flowers that end up being your FB headache.

Of course the added benefit in doing so will prevent danger of internal
leps being a problem, as well as fruit scab and a host of other maladies.
For those customers who don't want us to spray anymore, flower removal is
their ultimate dream :-)

Mo Tougas


On Sun, Feb 3, 2013 at 5:54 PM, Rye Hefley ducn...@yahoo.com wrote:

 Hi Mo,

 Another question about flower thinning:  I guess in my first writing I
 should have said I have been removing the whole blossom.  Should I keep or
 remove the small leaves that were around the buds?

 I have been removing the whole cluster, leaves and all and still not
 confident if I'm doing it right.  Should I let the cluster open up more and
 just grab the flower buds?  Too many variances in the images of what is
 labeled tight cluster on the web.  Some images show the leaves completely
 unfurled where you could just grab the flower buds,and others show the
 leaves still mostly wrapped around the buds such that you'd have to remove
 the leaves with the buds.  Or if it doesn't matter either way.

 Thanks,
 Rye Hefley
 So Cal

   --
 *From:* maurice tougas appleman.maur...@gmail.com
 *To:* Apple-crop discussion list apple-crop@virtualorchard.net
 *Sent:* Saturday, February 2, 2013 3:09 AM
 *Subject:* Re: [apple-crop] Removing Flowers by hand

 You're doing fine Rye. You will encourage growth and do no harm. You'll
 also reduce the potential for fireblight infections. We simply pinch the
 buds at or as they break tight cluster. Prefer not removing entire spur
 as we may want fruit there next year. It's time consuming, but for
 fireblight reduction and increased growth response, worth it.

 Mo Tougas
 Grower, Tougas Family Farm


 On Fri, Feb 1, 2013 at 6:38 PM, Rye Hefley ducn...@yahoo.com wrote:


 I am removing flowers by hand this year to promote scaffolding growth.
 When I see a flower that is protruding from the bud (before it is open), I
 grab the whole bud and pull it off. I started to wonder if this is in any
 way harmful to my goal of scaffold growth. Is there a right time and
 right way to manually remove flowers?  I'm not looking to grow any fruit
 this year just scaffolding.

 Thanks,
 Rye Hefley
 So Cal
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 Northborough,MA 01532
 508-450-0844

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508-450-0844
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[apple-crop] IFTA Boston Conference

2013-02-07 Thread maurice tougas
There's still time to register for the International Fruit Tree Association
annual conference! The meeting, intensive workshop and tour will be based
in Boston Feb 23 thru the 27th at the Marriott Copley. Last day to book
rooms at conference rate is Feb 8.  For more information visit
https://ifruittree.site-ym.com/?page=AnnualConference2013

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Re: [apple-crop] native pollinators

2013-05-02 Thread maurice tougas
Yup, same thing here. I suspect that natural population dynamics are taking
it's usual course. As a kid living on Greenwich Bay in Rhode Island I
remember years when the eels were so thick you dared not swim. Same for
jellyfish. Next ten years, none. One year clams in such abundance that you
hardly needed to move to fill a bucket, the next year you'd dig for hours.
Now as an apple grower some years tarnished plant bugs seem to be
everywhere, the next, no where. Spotted Wing Dros. here today, ummm
probably here tomorrow too!. If I were to blame spraying pesticides for any
decline in bee population, I'd suggest that our switch to much less toxic
materials has led to bees carrying the materials home to the hive rather
than dying in the field. Perhaps the surge in organic pesticides means
fewer bees dying in the field, instead carrying safer materials home.
Just a thought!

Mo Tougas
Tougas Family Farm
Northborough, MA


On Thu, May 2, 2013 at 5:03 PM, Ginda Fisher l...@ginda.us wrote:

 I'm surprised. In my suburban-boston backyard, I have seen more bumblebees
 and other pollinators than in recent years. Maybe that's just because one
 of my neighbors sprayed less this year, or some similar very local effect.
 But just this weekend I was pleased by the number and variety of
 pollinators in my garden.
 --
 Ginda

 Typed with Swype. Who knows what I intended to say?

 Peter J. Jentsch p...@cornell.edu wrote:

 In the Hudson Valley of NY we are also finding very few native
 pollinators
 on dandelions as of late morning into the mid-afternoon.
 Carpenter bees are plentiful but few honeybees or orchard bees.
 By the end of the day we will be at 50% bloom on Ginger Gold with 1st
 bloom observed only yesterday.
 Blossoms opening on Golden Delicious and McIntosh today.

 Peter J. Jentsch
 Senior Extension Associate - Entomology
 Department of Entomology
 Cornell University¹s Hudson Valley  Lab
 P.O. Box 727, 3357 Rt. 9W
 Highland, NY 12528

 Office: 845-691-7151
 Cell: 845-417-7465
 FAX: 845-691-2719




 On 5/2/13 2:03 PM, David Doud david_d...@me.com wrote:

 indeed - the dandelions are empty - few bumblebees -
 
 I have a half dozen hives of honeybees on the property, managed by
 mediocre bee keeper, but they are flying - I have about 20 acres of
 tree
 fruit and have always considered the native pollinators to be adequate
 to
 the job, this year may be different -
 
 on the other hand, I don't know that I want a complete pollination job
 this year - I have been vacillating for the last 36 hours whether to
 call
 in some more honeybees - my current thinking is that I'll just ride
 what
 I have and count on it being enough -
 
 I'm in north central Indiana -
 D
 
 
 On May 2, 2013, at 1:06 PM, Frank Carlson wrote:
 
  David:
  I forgot where you are located.  Here in Harvard, MA, we have just
 been
  commenting on the lack of wild bees as we are about to open on
 McIntosh.
  There also are less bumble bees visible .
  Frank Carlson
 
  Franklyn W. Carlson, Pres.
  Carlson Orchards, Inc.
  115 Oak Hill Road
  P.O.Box 359
  Harvard, MA. 01451
  617-968-4180 cell
  978-456-3916 office
 
 
 
  -Original Message-
  From: apple-crop-boun...@virtualorchard.net
  [mailto:apple-crop-boun...@virtualorchard.net] On Behalf Of David
 Doud
  Sent: Thursday, May 02, 2013 11:02 AM
  To: Apple-Crop
  Subject: [apple-crop] native pollinators
 
  Another casualty of last year's freak weather is the population of
 native
  pollinators - my asian pears entered full bloom over the last 48
 hours -
  other years they are surrounded by a cloud of several species of
 solitary
  pollinators, this year that activity is roughly 10% of what I am
 accustomed
  to observing -
 
  The first apple bloom opened yesterday - 72 hours ago at tight
 cluster I
  considered the amount of bloom as 'full' but not particularly
 remarkable,
  now bloom has seemingly spontaneously generated to an amount that I
 cannot
  remember observing in the past - it's going to be spectacular, but
 has
 upped
  my anxiety about the potential 'big crop of little green apples' -
 hope
  thinners are effective
 
 
 
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Re: [apple-crop] Late summer drop and fruit size

2014-01-17 Thread maurice tougas
Jon, google translate est votre meilleur femme de chances de Québec!


On Fri, Jan 17, 2014 at 5:02 PM, Vincent Philion vincent.phil...@irda.qc.ca
 wrote:

 For once, I actually agree with you Jon. ;-)

 I don’t have your skills and talent, so I know I should stick to the easy
 topics like pathology that my simple mind can understand.

 So from your friendly comment I conclude that all this was all quite
 predictable? Good.

 My only goal here was to confirm that this data made sense. If it does,
 I’m happy.

 I don’t intend to publish in Nature.  I rely on you for that. ;-)

 have a nice weekend!


 PS = You should come up here and teach us. Your French level is not bad!
 Enough to flirt with the women and order beer. The essential stuff.

 Vincent


 On 17janv., 2014, at 15:21, Jon Clements jon.cleme...@umass.edu wrote:

 Bonjour Vincent! Désolé, mais peut-être que vous devriez vous en tenir à
 l'entomologie et de la pathologie et de laisser la recherche horticole très
 dur très important pour les vrais experts! :-)


 On Thu, Jan 16, 2014 at 9:34 PM, Vincent Philion 
 vincent.phil...@irda.qc.ca wrote:

 Hello, sorry for the delay.

 Yes, correct. Crop load influenced fruit weight notwithstanding ReTain.
 Fruits left on tree at harvest were more numerous and larger when treated
 with Retain. Fruits were up to 56g larger (148g vs 92g) depending on the
 specifics of the ReTain application.

 What I also found interesting was that the average fruit pressure of
 retain treated fruit significantly dropped for fruit left on the trees. As
 if the fruit stuck to the tree with Retain, and continued to grow but got
 softer.

  The Brix index was also influenced by the number of fruits on the tree:
 lower Brix on trees with more fruit. Retain also increased sugar content.

 Not much else to report.

 I’m not usually into physiology. This was a “accidental” project for us!

 Vincent

 On 14janv., 2014, at 16:41, David Kollas kol...@sbcglobal.net wrote:


 Vincent:

 As I understand your most recent explanation, both the untreated and the
 ReTain-treated trees
 produced greater fruit size at harvest if they were borne on trees most
 heavily-set at start of
 experiment. And that the ReTain treated trees showed a greater
 size/initial number of fruit than did the
 untreated.  If the difference in fruit size for treated versus untreated
 is small, I would not be much
 bothered by it. Can you tell us how much different they were?

 David Kollas

 On Jan 14, 2014, at 12:26 PM, Vincent Philion vincent.phil...@irda.qc.ca
 wrote:

 Hello!

 Thank you all for your input!

 I did not explain why I was looking at drop and fruit size: it was an
 experiment on the use of ReTain.

 In the end I’m not sure I can pinpoint the reason this increased fruit
 size on trees with more apples (notwithstanding ReTain), but your input
 underlined that a number of variables can be involved! I liked Duane’s idea.

 If you’re curious, the report will read: ReTain Treatments significantly
 increased harvested McIntosh yield as compared to the control (p0.0001).
  Average fruit size at harvest was proportional to the total number
 of fruits on the trees present at the start of the experiment (p=0.01) and
 fruits treated with ReTain were larger than in the control (p=0.02).

 The effect of ReTain on harvest was expected (drop prevention) but the
 effect on fruit size was undetectable if the model was not adjusted to the
 initial crop load (thus my question)

 So the next question is now: why are ReTain treated fruits bigger than
 untreated fruit at harvest?

 bye for now,

 Vincent


 On 14janv., 2014, at 10:06, Duane Greene dgre...@pssci.umass.edu wrote:


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 393 Sabin St.
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 413-478-7219
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Re: [apple-crop] back up cameras for spray rig

2014-01-24 Thread maurice tougas
Russell,
I tried doing just what you suggest several years ago and found it not
terribly useful. The clarity of the picture with all of the bouncing around
proved to make the view not useful. I did not buy a top o the line unit (I
am a new englander after all!) and so perhaps with improvements in
technology and your willingness to shell out more $ than I was would prove
more success. I would agree that you would need as large a screen as you
could fit and that would be helpful. I'd be inclined to try Evan's idea
first though.

Mo Tougas


On Wed, Jan 22, 2014 at 7:37 AM, russ...@holmbergorchards.com wrote:

 I'm looking for other members input/experience with the use of remote
 back-up type cameras for monitoring a sprayer from inside a cab.  I have
 seen youtube videos from europe with orchard rigs using cameras and a quick
 google search turned up several options designed for ag use that cost
 between $400 and $900.  My concerns with regard to orchard use are:

 1. Whats the minimum screen size required to get clarity?
 2. How well do they work at night?
 3. Does the screen create too much reflected light in the cab at night?

 If anyone can answer these questions or has anything to else to add, it
 would be appreciated.

 Russell Holmberg
 Holmberg Orchards
 Gales Ferry, CT
 www.holmbergorchards.com
 cell 860 575 2888

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Re: [apple-crop] Sprayer Calibration Between Training Styles

2014-06-05 Thread maurice tougas
Nick,

We use a TeeJet sprayer controller which allows us to change flow/pressure
based on tree density. At times this requires a change in travel speed and
or tractor rpms as well. Cost was about $1500, and at times the unit is a
bit of a headache.

Mo Tougas


On Thu, Jun 5, 2014 at 1:47 AM, Nick Lucking n...@cannonvalleyorchard.com
wrote:

 Hi everyone,

 Just curious as to how you guys with larger orchards spray blocks in your
 orchards when some might be high density and others free standing.  Do you
 do a couple of calibrations with different gear/pressure settings or just
 do all of one style block at a time?

 Cheers,

 Nick Lucking
 Cannon Valley Orchard
 Cannon Falls, MN
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Re: [apple-crop] Kasugamycin for fire blight

2015-03-21 Thread maurice tougas
Would oxytetracycline be an effective economical alternative in those
borderline instances?

Mo Tougas

On Fri, Mar 20, 2015 at 10:18 PM, Smith, Timothy J smit...@wsu.edu wrote:

  HI Brian,



 Yes, that would work well.   Kasumin has worked well in Michigan.



 Tim



 *From:* apple-crop-boun...@virtualorchard.net [mailto:
 apple-crop-boun...@virtualorchard.net] *On Behalf Of *Brian Heatherington
 *Sent:* Thursday, March 19, 2015 1:29 PM
 *To:* Apple-Crop
 *Subject:* [apple-crop] Kasugamycin for fireblight



 Planning ahead for bloom:
 In an area where fireblight is still effectively controlled by
 streptomycin, would it be advisable to rotate to kasugamycin for one or
 more sprays, purely for resistance management? Perhaps when models show a
 borderline need for application? How effective has Kasumin been in
 Michigan?


  --

 Brian Heatherington

 Beech Creek Farms and Orchards

 2011 Georgia Highway 120

 Tallapoosa, GA  30176

 770-714-8381


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Re: [apple-crop] Arctic Apples again -

2015-03-30 Thread maurice tougas
 -- they must say NO to GMO apples!

 Tell fast food companies that their customers don’t want GMO apples!
 http://vitaloriginswellorgllc.cmail2.com/t/t-l-thbijk-illrihdyd-i/

 Like other GMOs, this apple won’t be labeled and didn’t undergo
 independent safety testing -- the USDA relied on the company’s own
 assessment that it is safe for human consumption. Worse yet, this GMO apple
 was genetically engineered via a new, virtually untested experimental
 technique called RNA interference -- which many scientists are concerned
 may have unintended negative impacts on human health and the environment.

 So who stands to benefit from the GMO apple? Not consumers. Definitely not
 apple growers, who have been opposing this apple all along. The only
 benefits will go to Okanagan Specialty Fruit -- the biotech company that
 produces the Arctic Apple®.

 Now that the USDA has approved the apple, it could end up in everything
 from school lunches to fast food, kids’ meals and grocery produce aisles.
 The risks to our health, our environment and apple farmers across the U.S.
 could be enormous.

 Fast food restaurants are increasingly trying to provide healthier options
 and are among the biggest potential buyers of these GMO apples -- so if we
 can stop them from buying the Arctic Apple®, we can send a strong signal
 that there is no market for it.

 It’s not too late to keep GMO apples off our plates -- tell fast food
 restaurants to say no to this rotten idea.
 http://vitaloriginswellorgllc.cmail2.com/t/t-l-thbijk-illrihdyd-d/

 Sincerely,

 Pedram Shojai, OMD
 http://vitaloriginswellorgllc.cmail2.com/t/t-l-thbijk-illrihdyd-h/
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   COPYRIGHT © 2015 VITAL ORIGINS, LLC/WELL.ORG. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. THE
 INFORMATION INWELL.ORG IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND SHOULD NOT BE
 CONSTRUED AS MEDICAL ADVICE. READERS ARE ADVISED TO CONSULT A QUALIFIED
 PROFESSIONAL ABOUT ANY ISSUE REGARDING THEIR HEALTH AND WELL-BEING.

  *Unsubscribe*
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Tougas Family Farm
Northborough,MA 01532
508-450-0844
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Re: [apple-crop] MAIA newsletter

2015-12-17 Thread maurice tougas
Fabulous inaugural issue David! I look forward to the opportunity to work
with you guys in the future.

Mo Tougas
Tougas Family Farm,LLC
Northborough,MA 01532

On Wed, Dec 16, 2015 at 11:16 PM, David Doud <david_d...@me.com> wrote:

> An autumn 2015 edition of the Midwest Apple Improvement Association
> newsletter has been published and is available online at
> http://midwestapple.com/_PDF/_Newsletters/MAIA_Autumn2015Newsletter.pdf
>
> 6000 consumer evaluations were carried out this past fall with standard
> varieties and MAIA elite selections - direct marketers should find the
> report interesting reading -
>
> David  Doud - grower, IN
> I cannot remember a year with warmer late fall/early winter weather
>
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Re: [apple-crop] Paulared

2016-05-30 Thread maurice tougas
With a chainsaw Art!

On Thursday, May 26, 2016, kellyorchards <kellyorcha...@gmail.com> wrote:

> Has anyone ever overthinned Paulared?
>
>
>
> Art Kelly
> Kelly Orchards
> Acton, Maine
>


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Northborough,MA 01532
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Re: [apple-crop] Freeze/Frost Damage

2016-04-04 Thread maurice tougas
We will know better in a few days Christina. Wish I could sleep better!
Mo

On Mon, Apr 4, 2016 at 10:13 AM, Christina M. Herrick <
cmherr...@meistermedia.com> wrote:

> Does anyone have any losses from the latest cold snap? Dave and Christina
> from *American Fruit Grower* would like to talk to you about it. Send
> Dave Eddy (de...@meistermedia.com) or Christina Herrick (
> cmherr...@meistermedia.com) a note.
>
>
>
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