Re: Competition vs. Profits in the NBA

2003-07-10 Thread Robin Hanson
At 01:31 PM 7/10/2003 -0500, Fabio wrote: ... But a lot people inside sports seem to resent big market teams (Yankees, LA Lakers) consistently dominating the play-offs, although audiences seem to want dynasties from big cities. Is there an inherent problem here? Is it inevitable that there is a

Re: Competition vs. Profits in the NBA

2003-07-10 Thread fabio guillermo rojas
Robin said: The conflict you describe is that some people want more of a fair fight, and others put more weight on wanting my team to win. Of course the second group doesn't want to win via too easy or obvious an advantage. They may want the rough appearance of fairness, but in fact want

RE: Competition vs. Profits in the NBA

2003-07-10 Thread Mike Cardwell
In truth, the major pro sports (at least in the US and Canada)have very different buisness models that to different degrees skew the system to big and small market teams. First and formost, every league has different revenue sharing agreements between its membership. To my recollection, the

RE: Competition vs. Profits in the NBA

2003-07-10 Thread fabio guillermo rojas
Why do relatively similar endeavors have such different business models? Perhaps it is social learning. Baseball was founded in the 19th century with few rules, while the modern NFL was a product of the 1960's. So people may have had more experience with the sports business, which was used in

Family Businesses and Licensing

2003-07-10 Thread John Perich
In my informal experience, fathers and sons tend to work together full-time only in professions with strict licensing or training requirements. Electricians, lawyers, realtors and even CPAs - I've found more father/son teams here than in any other type of job. All of those jobs have fairlyrigid