Re: [backstage] Ping...

2011-06-02 Thread Dave Crossland
On 2 June 2011 13:50, Giacomo Shimmings giacomo.shimmi...@bbc.co.uk wrote:
 It would be rather nice if people could say who they are and
 what they're up to when they reply.

After much hot air passing over this mailing list from me about the
libre software imperative, I did an MA in Typeface Design at the
University of Reading to learn how to make high quality libre fonts,
and I'm now consulting for Google on www.google.com/webfonts - a
rapidly growing directory of libre fonts - and a similar independent
project, www.openfontlibrary.org - while touring around Latin America
giving a lot of speeches and workshops to designers about why they
ought to make libre fonts :)
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Re: [backstage] Ping...

2011-06-02 Thread Dave Crossland
On 2 June 2011 15:32, Ant Miller ant.mil...@gmail.com wrote:
 a web forum it ain't.

A mailing list with a decent web-front-end in ADDITION to real email
is useful, I think - permalinks to messages, search engine indexing of
knowledge, all very useful.

Web is just not good for actually participating, because we all
actually check our email but web forums are never checked.
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Re: [backstage] iPad and iPlayer

2010-04-15 Thread Dave Crossland
On 15 April 2010 14:10, Mo McRoberts m...@nevali.net wrote:
 this is no means of going about getting that changed…

What do you suggest?

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Re: [backstage] Any more DEB reading footage from today on iPlayer?

2010-04-11 Thread Dave Crossland
Hi,

Could you provide URLs about that?

Regards, Dave

On 9 Apr 2010, 10:46 PM, Gordon Joly gordon.j...@pobox.com wrote:



Word is that the D E Bill will hit schools quite hard.

Gordo

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[backstage] Fwd: [IP] C-Span Puts Full Archives on the Web

2010-03-16 Thread Dave Crossland
Hi,

Good stuff.

Regards, Dave

-- Forwarded message --
From: Dave Farber d...@farber.net
Date: 16 Mar 2010, 11:56 AM
Subject: [IP] C-Span Puts Full Archives on the Web
To: ip i...@v2.listbox.com





Begin forwarded message:

*From:* Richard Forno rfo...@infowarrior.org
*Date:* March 16, 2010 7:31:59 AM EDT
*To:* Undisclosed-recipients: ;
*Cc:* Dave Farber d...@farber.net
*Subject:* *C-Span Puts Full Archives on the Web*

March 16, 2010
C-Span Puts Full Archives on the Web
By BRIAN STELTER
http://www.nytimes.com/2010/03/16/arts/television/16cspan.html?pagewanted=print
WASHINGTON — Researchers, political satirists and partisan mudslingers, take
note: C-Span has uploaded virtually every minute of its video archives to
the Internet.

The archives, at C-SpanVideo.org, cover 23 years of history and five
presidential administrations and are sure to provide new fodder for pundits
and politicians alike. The network will formally announce the completion of
the C-Span Video Library on Wednesday.

Having free online access to the more than 160,000 hours of C-Span footage
is “like being able to Google political history using the ‘I Feel Lucky’
button every time,” said Rachel Maddow, the liberal MSNBC host.

Ed Morrissey, a senior correspondent for the conservative blog Hot Air (
hotair.com), said, “The geek in me wants to find an excuse to start
digging.”

No other cable network is likely to give away its precious archives on the
Internet. (Even “Book TV” is available.) But C-Span is one of a kind, a
creation of the cable industry that records every Congressional session,
every White House press briefing and other acts of official Washington.

The online archives reinforce what some would call the Web’s single best
quality: its ability to recall seemingly every statement and smear. And it
is even more powerful when the viewer can rewind the video.

The C-Span founder, Brian Lamb, said in an interview here last week that the
archives were an extension of the network’s public service commitment.

“That’s where the history will be,” Mr. Lamb said.

C-Span has been uploading its history for several years, working its way to
1987, when its archives were established at Purdue University, Mr. Lamb’s
alma mater.

The archive staff now operates from an office park in West Lafayette, Ind.,
where two machines that can turn 16 hours of tapes into digital files each
hour have been working around the clock to move C-Span’s programs online.
They are now finishing the 1987 catalog.

“This is the archive’s coming of age, in a way, because it’s now so
accessible,” said Robert Browning, director of the archives.

Historically, the $1 million-a-year operation has paid for itself partly by
selling videotapes and DVDs to journalists, campaign strategists and others.

Mr. Browning acknowledges that video sales have waned as more people have
viewed clips online. “On the other hand, there are a lot of things people
now watch that they never would have bought,” he said.

The archives’ fans include Ms. Maddow, who called it gold. “It’s raw footage
of political actors in their native habitat, without media personalities
mediating viewers’ access,” she wrote in an e-mail message.

Similarly, Mr. Morrissey said the archives made “for a really intriguing
reference set.” He pointed out, however, that the volume of videos “is so
vast that finding valuable references may be a bit like looking for a needle
in a haystack.”

C-Span executives said they hoped that its search filters would be up to the
task. Mr. Lamb said, “You can see if politicians are saying one thing today,
and 15 years ago were saying another thing.”

He added, “Journalists can feast on it.”

One of the Web site’s features, the Congressional Chronicle, shows which
members of Congress have spoken on the House and Senate floors the most, and
the least. Each senator and representative has a profile page. Using the
data already available, some newspapers have written about particularly
loquacious local lawmakers.

C-Span was established in 1979, but there are few recordings of its earliest
years. Those “sort of went down the drain,” Mr. Browning said. But he does
have about 10,000 hours of tapes from before 1987, and he will begin
reformatting them for the Web soon. Those tapes include Ronald Reagan’s
presidential campaign speeches and the Iran-Contra hearings.

In a tour of the site last week, Mr. Browning said the various uses of the
archives were hard to predict. He found that a newly uploaded 1990 United
Nations address by the Romanian president Ion Iliescu was quickly discovered
and published by several Romanian bloggers.

While C-Span does not receive Nielsen ratings, a recent poll by Fairleigh
Dickinson University found that 52 percent of voters said they watched it at
least once in a while. The poll did not distinguish among C-Span’s three
channels. The original one, C-Span, shows every House of Representatives
session; C-Span2 does the same for the Senate; and 

Re: [backstage] iPad

2010-01-28 Thread Dave Crossland
2010/1/28 Daniel Morris daniel.mor...@bbc.co.uk:

  Sorry, I didn't realise we were back in the 1970s where the software that
  runs on the iPhone can be called an operating system.

 Am I missing something - how is it not an OS? :)

Apple actively oppose you installing whatever you want to, and running
applications in the background, on the iPhone and now on the iPad.

These are features of any respectable operating system since the 70s.

If you own your computer, it ought to be under your control. Apple
computers are not. The ultimate answer is 100% free software.
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Re: [backstage] iPad

2010-01-28 Thread Dave Crossland
2010/1/28 Tom Morris bbtommor...@gmail.com:

 A quote from Apple COO Tim Cook: We believe that we need to own and
 control the primary technologies behind the products we make

 Err, no thanks.

 No more Macs. I'm done feeding this beast - for the same reason I was
 done feeding the Microsoft beast a few years ago.

Awesome!

Thanks for posting this, reminds me of
http://diveintomark.org/archives/2006/06/02/when-the-bough-breaks :-)
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Re: [backstage] iPad

2010-01-28 Thread Dave Crossland
2010/1/28 Mo McRoberts m...@nevali.net:
 On Thu, Jan 28, 2010 at 11:49, Dave Crossland d...@lab6.com wrote:
 2010/1/28 Daniel Morris daniel.mor...@bbc.co.uk:

  Sorry, I didn't realise we were back in the 1970s where the software that
  runs on the iPhone can be called an operating system.

 Am I missing something - how is it not an OS? :)

 Apple actively oppose you installing whatever you want to, and running
 applications in the background, on the iPhone and now on the iPad.

 These are features of any respectable operating system since the 70s.

 No, these are features of any operating system designed for use by
 computer users.

iPad is a computer, owners of iPads are computer users, but Apple
blocks access to those features. So, from the user's perspective,
those features do not exist, and so, it is not a respectable operating
system.

I find it very similar to the way that governments, in serving
corporate interests, attempt to deny people are citizens with rights
and refer to them as much as possible as consumers.

 If you own your computer, it ought to be under your control. Apple
 computers are not. The ultimate answer is 100% free software.

 The same applies to your car, central heating system, ADSL router,
 Freeview box, TV and most mobile phones...

There is an crucial social question raised by the difference between a
microprocessor in a car, CHS, router, STB, TV or mobile phone that no
one can update the software on, and one which the manufacturer can
update but not the user.

You can't even choose NOT to take Apple's updates, for example when
they disable a feature that you enjoy using. There are countless
examples of computers with 'tivoisation' that have done this.

 Point of note, though, it's a computer in the technical sense, in
 the same way that all mobile phones are computers. Really, though,
 it's [consumer electronics].

That the iPad or any other ebook reader is not a computer is a
dangerous lie. Almost all mobile phones sold today are proper
computers and the iPad certainly is.
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Re: [backstage] Users just want video to work. You Mozilla people are such idealists?

2010-01-27 Thread Dave Crossland
Well exactly, there are THREE main desktops, and one doesn't and wont have
h264 preinstalled.

This wouldn't be a problem if The Guardian and other news broadcasters
stopped bystanding and made the videos they publish available in Xiph
formats earlier; they continue to squander their significant influence in
the contingent present.

On 26 Jan 2010, 9:58 PM, Tom Morris bbtommor...@gmail.com wrote:

On Mon, Jan 25, 2010 at 16:57, Ian Forrester ian.forres...@bbc.co.uk
wrote:  Somewhat related to ...
What I don't understand is that of the three main desktop platforms
Firefox gets installed on - Windows and Mac - both have H.264 decoders
*on the machine already* in the form of Windows Media and QuickTime
APIs. Microsoft and Apple have presumably solved whatever licensing
problems exist for H.264 decoding.

Urgh. This kind of stuff shouldn't be a problem. Really. So, to watch
one type of video online, I use Firefox and to use another type of
video online I use Safari or Chrome. And because standards bodies,
browser manufacturers and patent holders cannot resolve their
differences sensibly, it's back to the good old days.

Paul Downey (@psd) nails it when he says that standards are peace but
the standards process is war.

--
Tom Morris
http://tommorris.org/

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Re: [backstage] Would like info about Bournemouth area connectivity

2010-01-11 Thread Dave Crossland
Hi,

I used to live there, try the BUNIX or dotDorset mailing lists :-)

Regards, Dave

On 12 Jan 2010, 7:01 AM, Ant Miller ant.mil...@gmail.com wrote:

Hi all,

Would anybody be able to have a quick chat, off list, about dommestic
connectivity in the Bournemouth area?  In particular, has anyone had any
dealings with fibrecity?

Cheers

Ant

p.s.  This isn't official BBC business, but would be useful at work, if you
know what I mean.

-- 
Ant Miller

tel: 07709 265961
email: ant.mil...@gmail.com


Re: [backstage] BBC iPlayer and the Nokia N900

2009-12-31 Thread Dave Crossland
2010/1/1 Tim Dobson li...@tdobson.net:
 it was suggested initially that GNU/Linux was pretty much irrelevant

Only by ignorant assholes. :-)
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Re: [backstage] What is TV?

2009-12-14 Thread Dave Crossland
2009/12/15 Ian Stirling backstage...@mauve.plus.com:
 Mo McRoberts wrote:

 Discuss.

 TV is live simultaneous transmission of pictures,

I'm not sure live transmission is definitional; most TV isn't live,
although it started off that way AIUI.

 where you can have a large
 number of people over a significant distance watching one event.

I'm not sure broadcasting events is definitional.

For me, TV is broadcast video, which is to say, TV is video that a
mass audience watches simultaneously.

To paraphrase McLuhan, as the medium of our time - computer networks -
is reshaping and restructuring patterns of social interdependence and
every aspect of our personal life, the way video is disseminated is
changing.

TV is still possible with the internet, but it is a very minor way for
video to be published.

Just as theatre is still going, but in a very minor way compared to
the prominance it had because electric technology.
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Re: [backstage] Google Wave - Too early for consumers

2009-12-02 Thread Dave Crossland
2009/12/2 Ian Forrester ian.forres...@bbc.co.uk:


 seeing isn't wave at all. Its simply a rough cut
 implementation of what's possible with the wave protocol.

Right; the protocol seems sound enough, and I expect that (like
Novell) it will get picked up by projects that would have had to have
done the engineering on such a protocol themselves.

But there are relatively few of those projects, and so I don't expect
it will be soon that we see anything 'wow'-worth out of Wave. I think
it will get subsumed by projects that use it and we will know those by
their own names and indeed may come to know Wave itself by those
names; like people who use the web and that the web _is_ the
internet...

 wondered if Google had put out wave too early for consumers?

As Scot said, its hardly had a consumer release. Anyone who is
involved in projects that might make use of such technology have heard
about it, understand it, and probably by now have a beta account.
What's the fuss? :-)
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[backstage] MSIE Marketshare at 4%...

2009-11-29 Thread Dave Crossland
...on the PyGoWave website ;-)

http://pygowave.net/

More seriously, I thought all you Wave fans might like to hear about
this if you didn't already.

-- 
Regards,
Dave
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[backstage] A global iPlayer to RAISE prices

2009-10-27 Thread Dave Crossland
Hi,

Haw haw.

Regards, Dave

-- Forwarded message --
From: David Farber d...@farber.net
Date: 25 Oct 2009, 4:33 PM
Subject: [IP] BBC are planning to launch a global iPlayer
To: ip i...@v2.listbox.com



Begin forwarded message:

From: Brian Randell brian.rand...@ncl.ac.uk
Date: October 25, 2009 6:44:28 AM EDT
To: d...@farber.net
Subject: BBC are planning to launch a global iPlayer

Hi Dave:

For IP, if you wish, from the (UK) Telegraph website.

Cheers

Brian

 The BBC is planning to launch a paid for international version of the
 iPlayer which would allow global audiences to watch programmes like Doctor
 Who, Torchwood and Top Gear.

 The BBC is planning to launch a paid for international version of the
 iPlayer which would allow global audiences to watch programmes like
 Torchwood and Top Gear.
 The BBC iPlayer has received over 500 million requests to view BBC
 television programmes, like Doctor Who and EastEnders, since its launch in
 2007

 BBC Worldwide, the profit making arm of the corporation, said that a global
 iPlayer would enable the business to raise its prices for its premium
 content.

 Executive say that global audiences would be prepared to pay $10 for an
 episode of hit programmes like Torchwood, the Doctor Who spin-off starring
 John Barrowman.

 The global iPlayer would also host premium catalogue material including
 historical material from the BBC's archives and catch-up material from
 overseas channels.

 It would not show the BBC's domestic iPlayer content because of
 international rights clearance required.

 However, it could host programmes shown by other UK broadcasters such as
 Channel 4.

 The focus is expected to be on America, where 20 million of BBC.com's 50
 million users are registered.

 Luke Bradley Jones, who heads BBC Worldwide's digital operations in the US
 and managing director of BBC.com, told PaidContent that the global iPlayer
 would enable the business to raise its prices.

 He said: Millions of people love Torchwood and would probably pay 10 bucks
 an episode rather than two bucks, he said, referring to the price-ceiling
 imposed by iTunes.

 The BBC iPlayer allows viewers to watch popular BBC programmes for up to
 seven days after they were first broadcast. It has received over 500 million
 requests to view BBC television programmes, like EastEnders, since its
 launch in 2007.

 The international iPlayer plans, reportedly six months in development, will
 first require approval from the BBC Trust, the Corporation's governing arm.

 In the meantime, BBC Worldwide intends to sell applications on several
 mobile platforms, where it sees a much higher willingness to pay for
 content. Mr Bradley-Jones added that commercial BBC mobile apps will likely
 cost around $2 and arrive in the next few months.


http://www.telegraph.co.uk/technology/social-media/6406428/BBC-plans-paid-for-global-iPlayer.html

-- 
School of Computing Science, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne,
NE1 7RU, UK
EMAIL = brian.rand...@ncl.ac.uk   PHONE = +44 191 222 7923
FAX = +44 191 222 8232  URL = http://www.cs.ncl.ac.uk/people/brian.randell




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Re: [backstage] Changes to the list

2009-10-19 Thread Dave Crossland
Hi,

Yeah Mailman with Gmane/etc is good IMO; mailman is undergoing a slow heavy
rewrite atm, and I think they are taking donations, and live at list.orgiirc!

Regards, Dave

On 19 Oct 2009, 9:11 PM, Tom Morris bbtommor...@gmail.com wrote:

On Mon, Oct 19, 2009 at 18:54, Ian Forrester ian.forres...@bbc.co.uk
wrote:  Hi all,   We're ma...
Something that is compatible with Gmane. slrn and NNTP beat out almost
all mail clients and all web forums I've ever seen, and allow me to
enforce a pretty good separation between mailing lists and real life
e-mail.

--
Tom Morris
http://tommorris.org/

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Re: [backstage] Free as in 'Freedom'

2009-10-09 Thread Dave Crossland
David,

Your mention of His Dark Lordship and the Magna Carter made me wonder,
perhaps you should declare yourself a 'Freeman On The Land' -
www.fmotl.com- and become exempt from copyright, council tax -
www.nocounciltax.com - and all other statutory laws.

Regards, Dave

On 9 Oct 2009, 11:21 AM, David Tomlinson d.tomlin...@tiscali.co.uk
wrote:

Richard Lockwood wrote:   It is my genuine position. Abolishing
copyright would  achieve exactly...
It's why not do a thought experiment, after all there are several million
people on the Internet, who intend to practice it.

The attempts to prevent them are the real danger to society.

Lord Mandeleson, and the French want to throw out the Magna Carta, and the
whole legal system to maintain it.

Content Vendors want to lock down every piece of consumer electronics.
and impose huge costs on society.

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Re: [backstage] Encryption of HD by the BBC - cont ...

2009-10-06 Thread Dave Crossland
Hi,

Id like to suggest that referring not to 'copy protection' but to 'copy
restriction' is an effective way of adding clarity to this kind of
discussion.

I prepared a more emotive (angry) post about this issue but didn't allocate
time to finish it as I figured an unemotive and level headed exposition of
the issues would be more effective; thanks for doing one :)

Regards, Dave

On 6 Oct 2009, 10:39 AM, David Tomlinson d.tomlin...@tiscali.co.uk
wrote:

This has discussion continued in a modest way on the blog comments.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/bbcinternet/2009/10/freeview_hd_copy_protection_a.html

I am sorry to say Nick is making misleading reassurances.

(He is not sufficiently technical or familiar with the material, to
understand the logical inconsistencies - this is an observation of fact, not
a personal attack).



See Nick comment No. 34.

Yes you will be able to put a HD tuner into my Open Source MythTV box and
watch BBC HD, again if suitable tuners become available.

The only reason tuners would not become available (they are currently
available for Standard Definition), is that they will be excluded by the
licence required to decrypt the signals.

Free and Open Source Software Drivers will be excluded (excluding Myth TV)
if there is any meaningful copy protection (unless the licence is breached).

If the copy protection is to be meaningful, the BBC must break the law,
regarding an unencrypted signal (semantics aside) and exclude FOSS from
accessing the copy protected signals (which may only apply to Hollywood
films, US imports, or may apply to the majority of content).

See Nevali's comments, No. 35, 36, 42.

Clearly Nevali, is part of the official consultation process.





Issues:

1.1 Free and Open Source software is incompatible with DRM.

1.2 Reassurances to the contrary, contradict this knowledge. And undermine
statements from the BBC.

2.1 What the BBC is proposing is in breach of the law by any reasonable
semantics, the law is clear and does not allow for exceptions.

2.2 You may wish to proceed as if this was not true, but it is a fatal flaw
that will destroy the agreements the BBC is entering into, and damage the
BBC.

2.3 The BBC TRUST cannot ignore the fact that the BBC is intending to
breaking the law. Semantics will not be sufficient to obfuscate this issue.

2.4 Several other options exist to exploit the flaw in the BBC's intentions.
I am aware how it is possible to subvert the law, but ultimately the letter
of the law, will be used to force the BBC to broadcast unencrypted.

3.1 We are in a transition phase, away from copyright and DRM.

3.2. The BBC appear to be insufficiently aware of the arguments against DRM
and, dangers of the course of action they have embarked upon, to act in the
public intrest

3.3 The BBC are not familiar with the argument against DRM which has failed
repeatedly.

3.4. The BBC are not sufficiently aware of the arguments against
intellectual property which has already lost the intellectual debate.

4.0 Free and Open Source software proponents have experience of a copyright,
patent, and DRM free environment, and are therefore more ready to embrace
the concepts, and freedoms involved.

In view of the above, how can the BBC management claim to represent the
public interest ?

The BBC can choose to ignore the above, but the issues will not go away.
And the BBC will be seen to be, not side of the public, but on the side of
special interests on these issues.

This is intention of this email to raise issues with the BBC Management of
which Nick is one of the current spokesmen.


Further Reading:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/pressoffice/speeches/stories/thompson_bpi.shtml

But that's changing. The first episode of the new Dr Who series was
available on the unauthorised site Bit Torrent three weeks before its
premiere on BBC ONE.

And, although of course our main model in the UK is free-to-air unencrypted
broadcast, the BBC has a duty to exploit the residual commercial value of
the rights we invest in on behalf of the public: we do that both here and
around the world.

So we have an intense interest in effective digital rights management
systems; in technical, legal and regulatory means to protect the property of
rights-holders; and in increasing public awareness of the moral and economic
consequences of the theft of intellectual property.

On this last point, I believe the BBC could do considerably more than it
does at present.

Mark Thompson, BBC Director-General  Thursday 14 July 2005




Some background on semantics in law.

http://ssrn.com/abstract=831604
http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=831604

We consider in the paper whether a pragmatics of semantic content can be a
useful approach to legal interpretation. More extensively, since a pragmatic
conception of meaning is a component of an inferential semantics, we
consider whether an inferentialist approach to legal interpretation can be
of help in treating and resolving some problems of legal 

Re: RE: [backstage] The BBC is encrypting its HD signal by the back door

2009-10-06 Thread Dave Crossland
I get a strange sense of the BBC pushing DRM down the throats of the public,
AGAIN, so, yes.

On 3 Oct 2009, 10:27 AM, Nick Reynolds-FMT nick.reyno...@bbc.co.uk
wrote:

 i do get this strange sense of deja vu

 --
*From:* owner-backst...@lists.bbc.co.uk [mailto:
owner-backst...@lists.bbc.co.uk] *On Behalf Of *Jeremy Stone
*Sent:* 02 October 2009 20:19

To: backstage@lists.bbc.co.uk

Subject: Re: [backstage] The BBC is encrypting its HD signal by the back
door

Oh its just like the old days :) Jem Stone Communities Executive | BBC Audio
and Music O7966 551242 ...


Re: [backstage] Encryption of HD by the BBC - cont ...

2009-10-06 Thread Dave Crossland
Hi,

I was referring to the wording of David's original post.

Your last paragraph is a bit unclear to me, could you restate?

Regards, Dave

On 6 Oct 2009, 2:47 PM, Brian Butterworth briant...@freeview.tv wrote:

Dave,
I've gone back and looked at the original letter again.

There are two proposals.  The BBC is saying that it will use Huffman
encoding to broadcast the SI tables.  This is not a bad idea really, given
that it could extend the EPG, for example.

The BBC is saying that the table used for this Huffman encoding be
licensed.   The problem they have is that it is supposed to be generated
from data that is already broadcast, so it should be reasonable easy to
recreate this data.  You can't claim rights on something that's just a
published mathematical function on some specified public data.

This is hardly 'copy restriction', it is simply a small data table that a
bit of computing power can reproduce.  It's not like the data being decoded
from the SI isn't going to be in a known format!

It's a bit like using a broken condom.

And then the second proposal is for an unspecified scrambling system termed
in such terms that it so clear that the answer should be no.

2009/10/6 Dave Crossland d...@lab6.com

  Hi,   Id like to suggest that referring not to 'copy protection' but
to 'copy restriction' is...


-- Brian Butterworth follow me on twitter: http://twitter.com/briantist web:
http://www.ukfree.t...


Re: [backstage] Encryption of HD by the BBC - cont ...

2009-10-06 Thread Dave Crossland
Scot,

You can't see how it is in the public interest BECAUSE IT ISN'T. The BBC are
very clear that they are willing to cut their own charter up to pander to
the special interests of their suppliers; there is no need for conspiracy
theories about this, they are very up front about admitting what is going on
right now.

It is the future implications that are up for speculation... if I was in
management, Id be wondering, Cameron is going to rip Auntie a new one after
the Olympics, so what can we do now to prepare?

Regards, Dave

On 6 Oct 2009, 3:41 PM, Scot McSweeney-Roberts 
bbc_backst...@mcsweeney-roberts.co.uk wrote:



On Tue, Oct 6, 2009 at 15:00, Sean DALY sdaly...@gmail.com wrote:  
David, I'm curious, what's y...

I can't speak for David, but my own feeling on the subject is that because
the source is in the open, circumventing any restrictions would become
fairly trivial. While security through obscurity is no security still
holds (and is why even closed DRM has proven ineffective), it's hard to see
how FLOSS DRM would be in any way effective. At least with closed DRM, it
might take a little time to break.

While I can't see much argument for FLOSS DRM, I can see a lot of argument
that if you're touting a DRM system, supporting FLOSS platforms is a really
good idea. Look at what happend with DVD - some kid wanted to watch DVDs on
his Linux box, the powers that be couldn't be bothered creating a licensed
DVD player for Linux so the kid breaks DVD's CSS, rendering CSS useless. All
it takes is one individual to break a DRM system and the exact same
superdistribution that DRM is trying to stop will quickly spread the
circumvention technique.

Thinking about it, whatever DRM the BBC uses will be broken. Otherwise law
abiding people will then turn what could well be criminal activity just to
use the HD signal the way they currently use the SD signal. I don't see how
this is in the public interest.


Re: [backstage] BBC NEWS | Technology | Flash moves on to smart phones

2009-10-05 Thread Dave Crossland
Hi Cisnky,

Could you kindly elaborate? Adobe's recent aquisition makes me wonder if
they are really behind Flash for the long term; that and the lack of
engineering quality they put into it recently. I suspect HTML5 is going to
pancake it, because there is a lot more money behind it than Adobe can
muster, being a single vendor, and the engineering quality from browser
developers is better. Silverlight is likely to last longer since its sole
backer is, ahem, more tenacious, but even then, well, we shall see :-)

Regards, Dave

On 5 Oct 2009, 5:47 PM, cisnky cis...@gmail.com wrote:

Mate, Dream on about HTML 5 killing off Flash. HTML5 is a standards time
bomb waiting to go off.


2009/10/5 Zen zen16...@zen.co.uk

  Hopefully. HTML5 will kill off flash once and for all. Some hope!   
 On 5 Oct 2009, at 14:...



-- 
---
Anthony Onumonu
-

Blog
www.cisnky.com

Twitter
www.twitter.com/cisnky

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Mobile: +44 (0) 7920 10 25 35
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[backstage] Thoughtful post on AH

2009-08-19 Thread Dave Crossland
Hi,

Thought this list might find this thoughtful post on the FSFE-UK list
to be of interest :-)

-- Forwarded message --
From: MJ Ray m...@phonecoop.coop
Date: 2009/8/19
Subject: [Fsfe-uk] Educating Ashley: was it wasted time?
To: fsfe...@gnu.org


After BBC's DRM Iplayer windows only
http://comments.gmane.org/gmane.org.fsf.uk/4822
some of you may have spent time trying to educate the BBC digital
divison and its leader Ashley Highfield.  Jono Bacon spent some time
with him, as described at
http://www.jonobacon.org/2008/06/20/ashley-highfield-reviews-ubuntu/

Now, in case you hadn't heard, Ashley Highfield is back at Microsoft,
while his division's embarrassing sets of expenses and budget overruns
still swirl around the BBC.  Unfortunately, he's still being listened
to by people in the media, but is again unconvinced by the need for
freedom and sharing.

 There is a growing consensus something can be done. We have to
 protect IP for the health of our economy. We need implementable
 anti-piracy measures. We can do a lot more [than the Digital Britain
 report proposes] if there is a will to do it.
 -- 
http://www.guardian.co.uk/media/2009/aug/17/microsoft-ashley-highfield-interview

Was it a waste of time convincing him at the BBC about free software
and Ubuntu?  Or does the message live on inside the BBC?  What's the
current status of get_iplayer support from the BBC?  Tolerated, hated
or something else?  What should we learn from this?

More generally, the push for free and open source software is fast
becoming about more than FOSS for the sake of freedom of computing.
It's becoming a struggle between public and private benefit in access
to everything from Department for the Environment presentations to BBC
and ITV shows.  Where is this debate happening next?

Regards,
--
MJ Ray (slef)  LMS developer and webmaster at     | software
www.software.coop http://mjr.towers.org.uk        |   co
IMO only: see http://mjr.towers.org.uk/email.html |   op

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Re: [backstage] Thoughtful post on AH

2009-08-19 Thread Dave Crossland
2009/8/19 Richard P Edwards re...@mac.com:
 For sure, peaked my interest.

To balance out AH's bullshit, I enjoyed Dirk Riehle's The Commercial
Open Source Business Model which explains how a company can
profitably develop free software:

http://dirkriehle.com/publications/2009/the-commercial-open-source-business-model/
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[backstage] Canvas to be free software? Hardware owners to have root access?

2009-08-06 Thread Dave Crossland
Hi,

BBC Canvas. Very nice. But will it be 100% free software? And will I have
root access to my private property?

Pickets at the ready, folks.

Regards, Dave


Re: [backstage] Canvas to be free software? Hardware owners to have root access?

2009-08-06 Thread Dave Crossland
Hi,

XBMC port ahoy!

Regards, Dave

On 6 Aug 2009, 2:35 PM, Brian Butterworth briant...@freeview.tv wrote:



2009/8/6 Dave Crossland d...@lab6.com

  Hi,   BBC Canvas. Very nice. But will it be 100% free software? And
will I have root access t...
I've looked at the code and there's a special routine to keep you, and just
you from the root. ;-)

Pickets at the ready, folks.   Regards, Dave



-- 

Brian Butterworth

follow me on twitter: http://twitter.com/briantist
web: http://www.ukfree.tv - independent digital television and switchover
advice, since 2002


Re: [backstage] Fwd: [Autonomo.us] Skype, out?

2009-08-04 Thread Dave Crossland
Have you heard of Red Hat?

On 4 Aug 2009, 7:02 AM, Alun Rowe alun.r...@pentangle.co.uk wrote:


 The problem with a 'free digital society'  is that people need salaries.

Ask the music/film industry what they think.

I love the idea of utopia but we all know that unicorns don't exist, right?

On 3 Aug 2009, at 20:14, Dave Crossland d...@lab6.com wrote:  Hi,  
What about the case fo...


Alun Rowe Pentangle Internet Limited 2 Buttermarket Thame Oxfordshire OX9
3EW Tel: +44 8700 33...


Re: [backstage] Fwd: [Autonomo.us] Skype, out?

2009-08-04 Thread Dave Crossland
Maybe you should be more specific so we know what to picket?

On 4 Aug 2009, 6:40 PM, Stephen Jolly st...@jollys.org wrote:

On 4 Aug 2009, at 12:23, Deirdre Harvey wrote:   My 90+ year old
Grandmother (also non-geeky) al...
I've acted as Windows and MacOS tech support for enough relatives over the
years to think that in many cases, getting them to use a decent Linux
distribution would be preferable!  Something like Ubuntu gives users a
standard way of installing applications and keeping them up-to-date, doesn't
require regular sweeping for viruses and spyware (yet!) and is easy to
manage remotely - what more could you ask for?

Having said that, the BBC taught my grandmother (85+) to use Windows*, and
she seems to be coping just fine.

S

*if I don't get responses to this email complaining that the BBC shouldn't
be teaching people to use proprietary software, I will be sincerely
disappointed.

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Re: [backstage] Fwd: [Autonomo.us] Skype, out?

2009-08-04 Thread Dave Crossland
2009/8/4 Alun Rowe alun.r...@pentangle.co.uk:

 Preaching open standards is fine AS LONG as you understand the deep economic
 issues behind them

Why should economics trump freedom?

Would you scrap free elections if it was better for the economy? China
is proving that free elections are not needed for a efficient
capitalist market system.
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Re: [backstage] Fwd: [Autonomo.us] Skype, out?

2009-08-04 Thread Dave Crossland
2009/8/4 Alun Rowe alun.r...@pentangle.co.uk:

 Yes I have but it is fairly unique.

RHAT is the only free software company in the SP500, but there are
several direct competitors and many smaller and very different free
software companies.

 How would you obtain funding for an idea which had no IP of it own?

Red Hat started. How did this happen?

There are hundreds of small companies that only supply free software.
How did they start?

I know, and, clearly, you don't, but since you have seen the evidence
that such companies exist, I find your position quite strange; rather
than saying, I don't understand the economics you say The economics
cannot possibly work.

 Like I say I love the utopian model but I can’t see it happening for a long
 long time.  Companies NEED to be able to maintain their own technology
 without simply passing it to their competitors on a plate.

Red Hat has been doing very well for a long long time.

This isn't a utopian model. It is an ethical position with a proven
business model.

 Anyway it’s no surprise people pay Red Hat for support.  Mere users don’t
 stand a chance with anything Linux based.  It’s far too geeky to use still.

Try telling that to the millions of school kids whose schools provide
them with GNU/Linux desktops.

As a percentage of the whole software industry, how much revenue is
generated by the casual home users I assume you are referring to?

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[backstage] Fwd: [Autonomo.us] Skype, out?

2009-08-03 Thread Dave Crossland
Proprietary software and centtalised network services strike again...

Regards, Dave

-- Forwarded message --
From: Nathan Willis nwil...@glyphography.com
Date: 3 Aug 2009, 4:05 PM
Subject: [Autonomo.us] Skype, out?
To: autonomo.us discussion mailing list disc...@lists.autonomo.us

Seems like this would be a good opportunity to discuss the free
alternatives:
http://www.nbr.co.nz/article/if-skype-goes-who-would-fill-gap-106880

Executive summary: eBay is in an acrimonius patent lawsuit with a company
called Joltid that owns a patent on something used by Skype; Joltid is
claiming that eBay violated their license and has terminated it, a
situation that if upheld by the court would force them to deactivate Skype.
Highly doubtful that that will come to pass, but I suppose you never know.

Nate
-- 
nathan.p.willis
nwil...@glyphography.com
aim/ym/gtalk:n8willis
flickr.com/photos/willis

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Re: [backstage] Fwd: [Autonomo.us] Skype, out?

2009-08-03 Thread Dave Crossland
Hi,

What about the case for a free digital society?

Regards, Dave

On 3 Aug 2009, 6:36 PM, Alun Rowe alun.r...@pentangle.co.uk wrote:


 No doubt some palms will be crossed with silver (or equity).

The business case for open standards has to be thought through ingreat depth
before embracing it.

Also Skypes network has been around for a longtime!

On 3 Aug 2009, at 17:10, Dave Crossland d...@lab6.com wrote:

 Proprietary software and centtalised network services strike again...  
Regards, Dave   ...


 *Alun Rowe*

*Pentangle Internet Limited*

2 Buttermarket

Thame

Oxfordshire

OX9 3EW

Tel: +44 8700 339905

Fax: +44 8700 339906
*Please direct all support requests to
**it-supp...@pentangle.co.uk*it-supp...@pentangle.co.uk

Pentangle Internet Limited is a limited company registered in England and
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[backstage] get_iplayer

2009-08-02 Thread Dave Crossland
Hi,

I hadn't seen http://linuxcentre.net/getiplayer/ mentioned here so I
thought I would.

-- 
Regards,
Dave
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Re: [backstage] Google Chrome OS

2009-07-08 Thread Dave Crossland
2009/7/8 Ian Forrester ian.forres...@bbc.co.uk:

 http://googleblog.blogspot.com/2009/07/introducing-google-chrome-os.html
 From reading the link above, it seems like it will be something like I
 saw at Minibar a while back but can't find now ...
 I was hoping it would be a X11 environment to compete with Gnome,
 KDE, Fluxbox, etc.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pyro_Desktop shows that you can make a
desktop using the web canvas as the compositing engine; perhaps it
will go that way.
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Re: [backstage] The Final Digital Britain report

2009-06-17 Thread Dave Crossland
2009/6/17 Rob Myers r...@robmyers.org:

 Can anyone recommend an alternative to Virmin in Peterborough?

I'm with ukfsn.org
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Re: [backstage] The Final Digital Britain report

2009-06-16 Thread Dave Crossland
2009/6/16 Ian Forrester ian.forres...@bbc.co.uk:
 The Final Digital Britain Report 
 http://www.culture.gov.uk/what_we_do/broadcasting/6216.aspx
 So what do people think? Time to leave the country or dig a hole and stick 
 our heads into it?

Maybe just time to get a https://www.relakks.com/?lang=engcid=gb
account, and possibly switch to a smaller ISP if your current one
messes with your quality of service too much.
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Re: [backstage] Shutting down the developer only list

2009-06-05 Thread Dave Crossland
Sounds good to me.

It is quiet on this list too, though.
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Re: RE: [backstage] video cameras + sailing dingies

2009-05-23 Thread Dave Crossland
I live in Poole :)

Regards, Dave

On 23 May 2009, 10:23 PM, Gavin Pearce gav...@tbs.uk.com wrote:

Tech + sailing does the trick. Laser (classic) plus quite a keen cat
sailor.

Tacking this off the list as way off topic.  ; - )


Gav

Trinity Belmann Scott Limited t/a TBS. Registered in England , number
2261735, at Abbey House, Gre...

Sent: 23 May 2009 21:46 To: backstage@lists.bbc.co.uk Subject: Re:
[backstage] video cameras + saili...

Gavin Pearce wrote:  Didn't know anyone here sailed! I should have guessed
at least one of  you cu...

__
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Re: [backstage] New Blog in beta

2009-04-07 Thread Dave Crossland
2009/4/7 Ian Forrester ian.forres...@bbc.co.uk:
 Any more feedback on the beta BBC Backstage site?

Stop shilling for Microsoft? :-)

Cheers,
Dave
Personal opinion only.
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Re: [backstage] New Blog in beta

2009-04-07 Thread Dave Crossland
2009/4/7 Ian Forrester ian.forres...@bbc.co.uk:

 explain how we're shilling for Microsoft,
 bearing in mind we went to a large conference and
 would post the same if it had been Etech, FOWA, etc. :)

I spy with my little eye 5 out of the 10 latest posts beginning with...

Maybe you just had a bad month ;-)
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Re: [backstage] New Blog in beta

2009-04-07 Thread Dave Crossland
2009/4/7 Ian Forrester ian.forres...@bbc.co.uk:

 Ah not seen how it looks on IE7 or IE8 (take note Dave)

I look forward to the Silverlight version.
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Re: [backstage] New Blog in beta

2009-04-07 Thread Dave Crossland
2009/4/7 Dave Crossland d...@lab6.com:
 2009/4/7 Ian Forrester ian.forres...@bbc.co.uk:

 Ah not seen how it looks on IE7 or IE8 (take note Dave)

 I look forward to the Silverlight version.

More helpfully:

Try http://browsershots.org/ :-)
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Re: [backstage] Clay Shirky: Newspapers and Thinking the Unthinkable

2009-03-29 Thread Dave Crossland
2009/3/18 John O'Donovan john.odono...@bbc.co.uk:
 A blog reader does not replace all the things people buy a newspaper for in
 my criteria. If it did, Newspapers would be dead already,

This strikes me as fallicious. Just because it hasn't collapsed yet
doesn't mean that it won't peter out.

McLuhan said early on that a new medium doesn't replace all the things
the old medium has, but it has new things which the old medium
doesn't, that make it preferable. Reading through a blog-reader and
through a printed newspaper are as good an example of this as any.

 but there is more
 to it than this. If anything, reach and growth of newspapers on the internet
 is growing

That's because newspaper websites are becoming blogs, such as the
replacement of subscription paywalls with public full-texts and ads,
and no longer detering deeplinks in their URLs.

 News International spent £650M on new presses last year...
 ...clearly they are idiots. If only someone had told them about the
 internet.

NI is totally subsidised by its parent. How many other news
corporations have made similar purchases? To hazard a guess, NI's
nearest competitor, DMGT, makes £15 million a year. I expect they'll
be able to save their pennies sooner than get a loan.

 It is obviously a time of great change for Journalism. By newsroom
 colleagues I didn't mean to imply just the BBC, I meant friends and contacts
 in newsrooms across the globe who all have interesting stories to tell and
 face various challenges. The BBC is funded differently to many of these, but
 I can assure you UK, US and other newspapers all have plans. They are not
 packing up all the desks and switching off the lights; they are looking at
 how they adapt and stay relevant.

But they have not found what they are looking for.

 You did actually predict gleefully the demise of the middleman, the
 aggregator, the editor, whatever you like to think of the Newspaper
 infrastructure as, and I think this is something that is not certain. If you
 don't want this then no one will force you to have it, but others do want
 it.

 I would say the recession is having a more acute effect than the internet.
 Without ad revenues, there are funding issues.

If the money isn't there to support it, it will stop, even if people
want it to continue. The recession is an acute effect, the internet
is a chronic effect; the net causes the money to not be there because
ad revenues are being redirected from professional media to
unprofessional media, following the redirection of mass attention from
professional content to amateur content.

In short: Google wins, because they don't have to pay people to make
the stuff they sell ads off.

Perhaps a couple of newspapers will continue as 'vanity press' but
those are not exactly known for quality unbiased journalism.

 Striving for independence is not new to this field either. There is a long
 tradition of independent journalists, freelance reporters and photographers
 and it's nothing new that people have been trying independent models:

Working as a big corporate news contractor isn't really different to
being an employee, because as the corporations go bust, they'll be
doing just the same amount of journalism: None.

 In a more direct move to deliver to the audience, an independent group such
 as the workers cooperative behind City Limits might be another interesting
 model of relevance, and it was not the internet that brought about it's
 existence or demise (
 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/City_Limits_(London_magazine).

a more direct move to deliver to the audience sounds awful like
learn up about internet marketing to me.

And isn't MediaLens a contemporary for City Limits?

 Of course with these models there is still organisation and infrastructure.
 Someone pays the bills. Someone is exerting editorial control. If you want a
 (quality) picture of an event, someone has to be there and some poor
 pictures from a phone camera are not a replacement. This type of content is
 used where relevant.

Phone camera quality is getting better faster and more widely
distributed year on year. How many years until it is a replacement,
and the script is flipped so professional photos are used where
relevant?

 If you feel that the Journalistic community is full of people trying to
 subvert the truth, espousing mis-information, I dread the day that a billion
 unaccountable blogs replace them. I'd pay for something in between and that
 might likely be the Newspapers in a different form. I don't think I will be
 alone.

Why do you think that the journalist profession is NOT full of people
trying to subvert the truth and espouse mis-information?

I think that blogs can be as accountable as newspapers, if not more so.

 For a while now, readers have had the best of both worlds: all the benefits
 of the old, high-profit regime--intensive reporting, experienced editors,
 and so on--and the low costs of the new one. But that situation can't last.
 Soon enough, we're going 

Re: [backstage] Clay Shirky: Newspapers and Thinking the Unthinkable

2009-03-29 Thread Dave Crossland
2009/3/29 James Ockenden james.ocken...@gmail.com:
 I think this is a false dilemma. Guys in my office have phones with
 8MP cameras. My 18-month old phone has a 5MP camera. I suspect a good
 lens and skill with photoshop is vastly more important than the
 photographer being professional.

 Sure, some kid with a 10MP phone can take a 300dpi front-page-sized
 picture of a UFO crashing down into the village green – but when the
 alien crawls out and asks to speak to Gordon Brown for the first time,
 do you, as a news editor, send the kid with the phone, or perhaps
 someone who has a bagfull of experience, a ladder, good elbows, and a
 record of never ever fg up?

This also seems like a false dilemma, since there won't be any
professional news editors, nor any money to send anyone anywhere, and
the kid is there already, and his photos and videos got published
instantly on the net for everyone to link to.

There will be plenty of bloggers commenting on the UFO technology, the
alien's politics and Gordon Brown's tie, and some of them might be
paid for their efforts, and grasp at the pretense of calling
themselves journalists, but it will look more like blogging than
journalism, and be better than churning press releases that currently
passes for much of journalism's editorial comment.

Photography did in portrait painters. Same story, different century.

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Re: [backstage] Clay Shirky: Newspapers and Thinking the Unthinkable

2009-03-29 Thread Dave Crossland
2009/3/29 Richard Lockwood richard.lockw...@gmail.com:
 Dave C will have you believe that a 'blogger is more trustworthy because
 he's free - but he's unaccountable to anyone.

That's not what I am saying.

I don't say that any random blogger is more trustworthy than a random
journalist. I say they are both untrustworthy - for different reasons
- and deciding who is trusthworthy will no longer be delegated to
editoral staff at companies who sell ads. Instead it will be done by
the people, of the people, for the people.

I earlier quoted this guy:

political reporters no longer get to decide what's news
- 
http://blogs.telegraph.co.uk/Daniel_Hannan/blog/2009/03/25/my_speech_to_gordon_brown_goes_viral

Someone with another job to pay the bills (and more, hah), blogging
and (probably) being paid a little bit for it, under the pretense of a
old newspaper brand. For each unemployed professional journalist
there'll be a dozen like him. That's the future of journalism IMO.

 The whole concept of unbiased reporting doesn't apply to 'bloggers.

The whole concept of unbiased reporting is a joke at best.
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Re: [backstage] Clay Shirky: Newspapers and Thinking the Unthinkable

2009-03-17 Thread Dave Crossland
2009/3/17 John O'Donovan john.odono...@bbc.co.uk:

 [those] in the newsroom should go get another job
 to pay the bills so that they can support their journalism in their spare
 time, sort themselves out and learn up about internet marketing and the
 brave new world.

 Seriously?

Yes. Professional bloggers have been moving out of other institutions
and in to that model for a few years now. So why not?

 I'll pass those thoughts on to my journalistic colleagues, but I
 don't think that is the future.

As I said, I think those who resist will have another job and will not
continue to do journalism, unless they either already work in a
resilient model - which would be your journalistic colleagues at the
BBC, who can tell me I'm mistaken all they like because they won't be
out of work this/next year.

 For example, thinking about printed Newspapers, people like to read the news
 on the way to work. When a digital model effectively replaces the simplicity
 of accessing Journalism in a printed form, in a varied and moving
 environment like travelling to work then these people will stop buying
 newspapers. It's a wasteful and expensive way to get the news anyway.

This effective replacement will happen when all the new phones
available are iPhone, Windows Mobile, Blackberry, or Android - that
is, they have screens and webbrowsers to read with.

 Will this mean that the Guardian or other newspapers stop printing their
 content on paper? Maybe. It doesn't mean they cease to exist though.

I'm not saying that the Guardian brand will totally cease to exist.
I'm saying that most of their journalists will be laid off in the
depression, and won't be hired again.

 Of course, though people may stop wanting to pay for Newspapers, Metro has
 proved you can distribute the physical newspaper for free. On my commute it
 is quite hard to get to work without reading Metro...

Does the Metro hires lots of journalists? :-)

 There is a new exciting model out there that will deliver content of
 interest and preference to me, my favourite journalists packaged, what my
 social network likes and reinforce my own biased viewpoints. And works on
 the train. And challenges my thinking on a Sunday afternoon with a mass of
 thought provoking features and ideas carefully brought together.
 Not found it yet.

It is a program called a blog reader.

Cheers,
Dave

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Re: [backstage] Clay Shirky: Newspapers and Thinking the Unthinkable

2009-03-17 Thread Dave Crossland
2009/3/17 Brian Butterworth briant...@freeview.tv:
 That was quick of them...

Monday 12 May? Looks like you've been stealing others' intellectual
property, Brian! :)
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Re: [backstage] Clay Shirky: Newspapers and Thinking the Unthinkable

2009-03-16 Thread Dave Crossland
Bingo :)

Regards, Dave

On 16 Mar 2009, 11:45 AM, Robert (Jamie) Munro rjmu...@arjam.net wrote:

Kevin Anderson wrote:   funding - the licence fee. Commercial newspapers
are finding their  reade...
I think that news.bbc.co.uk is already a public service newspaper -
albeit one without a print edition.

Robert (Jamie) Munro


Re: [backstage] Clay Shirky: Newspapers and Thinking the Unthinkable

2009-03-16 Thread Dave Crossland
2009/3/16 Kevin Anderson global...@gmail.com:

 Going back to some of the previous comments though, the resistance to the
 change wasn't just in the boardrooms, it was also in the newsrooms.

It strikes me as exceedingly likely that the bastards in the boardroom
will be joined in the dole queue by the bastards in the newsroom who
have been recycling press releases and heaping scorn on people who
tried to keep up, instead of keeping up.

 I haven't heard many other solutions offered up in this thread.
 ...
 saying the BBC has a model that works doesn't really answer some of the
 challenges that news organisations and individual journalists are facing
 right now.

The BBC model might well become more widespread when the other large
beehive organisations collapse in the depression, and popular support
for this communist evil ;-) emerges.

For individuals, the solution is, they get another job to keep the
bills paid, learn how internet marketing really works (which ought not
to be too hard for those already expert at writing), continue to do
journalism about what they love, and work hard at being worth it.
They'll have to accept that everyone else will call them a blogger
podcaster or video podcaster or something else that fails to see
past the media form to the actual activity, and will fail to pay the
social dividend of I work at Acme Media Corp. As you said, plenty
won't like that social adjustment, but those who resist will be stuck
with another job and not contunuing to do journalism.

There have been _plenty_ of professional bloggers during the last few
years, and some were not lone individuals but small groups. Of all the
ones I've paid for, my favourite was Gruber, who offered for money a
full-text RSS feed with a T shirt. My hope is that we'll get more
stuff like MediaLens but outwards facing (who are also not
traditionally funded, but who are indeed funded.)

My hope with the change is that we'll get an answer to the questions
MediaLens raise about the integrity of the profession.

Cheers,
Dave
(personal opinon only)
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Re: [backstage] Clay Shirky: Newspapers and Thinking the Unthinkable

2009-03-16 Thread Dave Crossland
2009/3/16 Brian Butterworth briant...@freeview.tv:

 One thing I am wondering, will News International realise that The Times
 brand needs a TV channel more than BSkyB does?

Hopefully not, because that would be an excellent idea for them to do so :)
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Re: [backstage] Clay Shirky: Newspapers and Thinking the Unthinkable

2009-03-15 Thread Dave Crossland
2009/3/15 Kevin Anderson global...@gmail.com:

 As for Clay's piece, it's one of the best of a kind. I would say that much
 of the discussion here is confusing public funding with a business model.

I think the phrase business model is colloquially used as funding
model for people for whom the Internet is dissolving the funding model
they previously relied upon rather than profiteering scheme for
shareholders :-)
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Re: [backstage] Clay Shirky: Newspapers and Thinking the Unthinkable

2009-03-15 Thread Dave Crossland
2009/3/15 Andy Halsall andyhals...@ictsc.com:
 On Sunday 15 March 2009 14:55:43 Dave Crossland wrote:
 2009/3/15 Kevin Anderson global...@gmail.com:
  As for Clay's piece, it's one of the best of a kind. I would say that
  much of the discussion here is confusing public funding with a business
  model.

 I think the phrase business model is colloquially used as funding
 model for people for whom the Internet is dissolving the funding model
 they previously relied upon rather than profiteering scheme for
 shareholders

 I think business model is the right term when talking about how something is
 going to make money,

But make money for whom? Those doing the activity at the core of the
profession - in the case of newspapers, the reporters; in the case of
music, the artists - or for those involved in the profession in roles
peripheral to it's core, and shareholders?

We should be talking about new models for employing reporters rather
than resuscitating old models for employing publishers; the more time
we waste fantasizing about magic solutions for the latter problem, the
less time we have to figure out real solutions to the former one.
- http://www.shirky.com/weblog/2009/02/why-small-payments-wont-save-publishers/


 to me it seems to include distribution, revenue
 generation, and operations in general.  What people seem to miss is that when
 they want to take advantage of a new method of distribution, they need to make
 allowances for it in other areas.

The internet takes care of distribution and operations in general
because, the people formerly known as the audience do the bulk of
distribution for you and software takes the labour out of general
operations.

 I fear it will be
 along time until businesses realise just how different the world is when a
 perfect digital copy can be provided to thousands if not millions of people,
 with little or no investment.

The great moral question of the twenty-first century is this: if all
knowing, all culture, all art, all useful information can be
costlessly given to everyone at the same price that it is given to
anyone; if everyone can have everything, anywhere, all the time, why
is it ever moral to exclude anyone? - Eben Moglen, 2001
http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-2263095526020953463

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Re: [backstage] Clay Shirky: Newspapers and Thinking the Unthinkable

2009-03-14 Thread Dave Crossland
2009/3/15 Andy Halsall andyhals...@ictsc.com:

 I concur with his viewpoint that business models are being broken
 faster than new ones can be invented.

 Business models and distribution methods, the demand for high quality content
 however remains constant, as long as that doesn't change there will always be
 a need for journalists, writers, photographers and all the people who support
 them.  However problem with generating revenue from this work, beyond
 recognition at least, will only get harder.

There will always be a need for people doing journalism, writing
well-informed opinions, taking the right photos at the right time in
the right place. But we don't need other people to support us do these
things any more.

So as it gets harder to generate revenue from these activities, the
people who support the activities and turn them into 'work' - which
directly means, the organisations who support and employ the
activity-participants - are collapsing in the vacuum.

And this also means the demand for high quality content is changing;
because what defined 'high quality' is changing. Sharable and
modifiable are now crucial parts of what make up high quality, and
HD quality broadcast footage is facing stiff competition from HD
quality off-my-pocket-camera.

Cheers,
Dave

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Re: [backstage] Slightly bias view maybe?

2009-02-23 Thread Dave Crossland
2009/2/23 Ian Forrester ian.forres...@bbc.co.uk:
 http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/entertainment/7899602.stm

 Via Glyn, just wondered what everyone else thought?

Isn't this an old story? I thought the Ars Technica article from
December was much better ;-)

http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/news/2008/12/uk-ignores-logic-backs-20-year-music-copyright-extension.ars

 I specially like this part

 Said the source: The 'creativity' argument is based on ignorance.
 There is nothing to stop a creative person using an old recording as part of 
 their work - as long as they do not release it.

 Like to see that stand up in court...

Right - typical comment from someone whose understanding of
copyright-law is for how it was pre-DRM-law.

I liked this quote best:

Some of them have no pensions and need this money, he said.

Shouldn't have squandered it on booze and fags then eh? :-)

Cheers,
Dave
(Personal opinion only.)
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Re: [backstage] Slightly bias view maybe?

2009-02-23 Thread Dave Crossland
2009/2/23 Robert (Jamie) Munro rjmu...@arjam.net:

 Some of them have no pensions and need this money, he said.

 Perhaps builders who built buildings in the 1950s should be paid rights
 on the labour they used to build the building as long as the buildings
 still stand. Or Doctors whose patients continue to be alive.

Surely the comparison is with doctors who did the best they could but
now their patients are dead, but they ought to be continually paid for
the excellent job they did at the time?

:-)

-- 
Regards,
Dave
(Personal opinion only.)
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[backstage] Mozilla Bespin

2009-02-16 Thread Dave Crossland
Hi,

I thought the collaboration stuff is especially interesting:

http://labs.mozilla.com/2009/02/introducing-bespin/

I think its funny how Emacs ends up as a design pattern in all kinds
of places :-)

Cheers,
Dave
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Re: [backstage] Make the primary operating system used in state schools free and open source

2009-02-09 Thread Dave Crossland
2009/2/9 Richard Lockwood richard.lockw...@gmail.com:

 If something as simple as a petition will make
 Windows free and open source, why has no-one thought of it before?

That is not what the petition is about! :-)
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Re: [backstage] Make the primary operating system used in state schools free and open source

2009-02-09 Thread Dave Crossland
2009/2/9 Phil Whitehouse phil.whiteho...@gmail.com:

Maybe I'm a poor deluded misguided fool who needs showing the error of my
 ways?

 We're training our kids to give money to vendors for their entire lives.

And, more importantly IMO, to not consider the value of freedom in
relation to the parts of there lives that are computer-mediated, which
is an accelerating part of all our lives.

Sadly, since schools routinely spy on the use of computers and
discipline students for using them for hobbies instead of only using
them for school-approved learning, students learn lessons about
freedom and privacy in relation to computers the hard way.

Cheers,
Dave
(personal opinion only.)
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Re: [backstage] Twittering on

2009-02-09 Thread Dave Crossland
2009/2/9 Ian Forrester ian.forres...@bbc.co.uk:
 The really cool kids are on both right?

Given that identi.ca can now supply Twitter and Facebook with messages
automatically itself - just pop in your login details - this isn't as
cool as it sounds. ;p
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Re: [backstage] Make the primary OS used in state schools FOSS

2009-02-09 Thread Dave Crossland
2009/2/9 Richard Smedley r...@m6-it.org:

 curriculum areas - this can easily be delivered through
 500 - 600 web apps. The whole curriculum.  A small investment from
 government (less than 1% of the UK's annual school IT spend) would get all
 of these apps written. Released under the GNU GPL,

Affero GPL ought to be used for new web-apps :-)

http://www.gnu.org/licenses/agpl.html

Cheers,
Dave
(Personal views only)
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Re: [backstage] Make the primary OS used in state schools FOSS

2009-02-09 Thread Dave Crossland
2009/2/9 Richard Smedley r...@m6-it.org:

 Good point. Although I had in mind putting the apps on the school's
 intranet server, in which case GPL would be adequate. However there would
 doubtless be a market for remote delivery.

Affero is still important for intranets; The plain GPL does not
protect the rights of users of a program, only those of the systems
administrators who install it on the server.
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[backstage] Nice CC-ND-ish DVD

2009-02-02 Thread Dave Crossland
Hi,

A nice example of someone running a business, with streaming and
torrent downloads and verbatim commercial redistribution permitted:

http://www.chrismartenson.com/make-your-own-crash-course-dvds

-- 
Regards,
Dave
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Re: [backstage] Nice CC-ND-ish DVD

2009-02-02 Thread Dave Crossland
2009/2/2 Frank Wales fr...@limov.com:
 Dave Crossland wrote:
 A nice example of someone running a business, with streaming and
 torrent downloads and verbatim commercial redistribution permitted:

 http://www.chrismartenson.com/make-your-own-crash-course-dvds

 Er, you sure?

Quite sure.

http://www.google.co.uk/search?q=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.chrismartenson.com%2Fmake-your-own-crash-course-dvds
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[backstage] free software from ground up home-grown alternative to AIR/Silverlight

2009-01-31 Thread Dave Crossland
Hi,

This is neat:

http://www.advogato.org/article/981.html

Cheers,
Dave
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Re: [backstage] Mozilla to support open video natively

2009-01-26 Thread Dave Crossland
2009/1/26 Dogsbody d...@dogsbody.org:
 Mozilla Firefox 3.1 will include native support for video in the browser and
 they have chosen Theora as the format of choice.

Great news! :-)
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[backstage] Al Jazeera posts footage under CC-BY

2009-01-24 Thread Dave Crossland
Hi,

Thought this was an interesting annoucement,

http://cc.aljazeera.net/content/launch-press-release

especially when contrasted with

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2009/jan/22/gaza-charity-appeal

Cheers,
Dave
Personal opinion only.
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Re: [backstage] If you had a ton of content to freely distribute

2009-01-21 Thread Dave Crossland
2009/1/21 Michael Walsh michael.wa...@digitalrightsmanifesto.com:
 If you have digital material you can release for remixing purpose - then I
 would contend that along with distributing it via some channel or another,
 you should also consider hosting the content on a BBC server and make tools
 available which would (1) allow people to remix online

Like http://corp.kaltura.com/ ?
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Re: [backstage] If you had a ton of content to freely distribute

2009-01-21 Thread Dave Crossland
2009/1/21 Rob Myers r...@robmyers.org:

 And ensuring that the results can be used by commercial organizations
 (by not making it NC) would help defuse any competition concerns.

And boost Wikipedia et al :-)

http://meta.wikimedia.org/wiki/Licensing_update
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Re: [backstage] If you had a ton of content to freely distribute

2009-01-21 Thread Dave Crossland
2009/1/21 Rob Myers r...@robmyers.org:

 http://meta.wikimedia.org/wiki/Licensing_update

 Ugh. Dual licencing. ;-)

Not for long, I expect.
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Re: [backstage] If you had a ton of content to freely distribute

2009-01-20 Thread Dave Crossland
2009/1/20 Ian Forrester ian.forres...@bbc.co.uk:

 The reason why we would like to Tar the files together is because of things 
 like subtitles, artwork, cuts of music,
 other metadata pieces, etc. We're not just talking a collection of video 
 files.

What does Tar add to the ability to organise files in a set into a
hierarchy, that a directory tree in the Torrent doesn't? Except
stopping people from downloading only the files that they want from
that set?

 I guess we're also thinking about the 5% of the audience who would actually
 do a remix with the raw project files.

Good :-)

 This would be on going rather that a one off, so we
 need the ability to handle everything from low rez 3gp files to
 ultra high rez animations at stupid frame rates

So you'd have a torrent for each of the broad use-cases (download
files to keep on mobile, medium quality compression for desktop
watching, high quality compression for casual remixing, and original
files for hardcore remixing - say) with all the files needed for each
one, and a note saying where the others are if the user feels they
might want a file but its not in what they have.

 how we pass footage around internally and the answer was via hard drives.
 There was some thought in the past about having drop off points in
 major cities where you can get all the footage in one go
 by bringing your 1TB drive for example. Sneakernet, or what ever
 they now call it.

That would be cool, although, costly? Sounds like a haxor playground to me ;p

 I think we'll use something like CC-BY-NC (although I
 totally understand the arguments against NC, Dave)
 CC-BY-NC-SA is tempting

CC-BY-SA  CC-BY  CC-BY-NC-SA  CC-BY-NC

For an entertaining TV show, I think non-commercial restrictions are
merely annoying rather than wrong, and copyleft (even weak copyleft
like CC-*-SA) is preferable because it defends the commons.

 I do wonder how we keep the licence in tack even  when the
 assets are broken up and reused?

Since licensing is legal, not technical, the ultimate answer is to
make sure the license is very clear to people downloading the stuff
first.

AFAIK licensing metadata tech - like ccRel and XMP, both been
submitted to W3C so supporting them would be good - is not yet widely
supported in a way that makes it useful to people. While discussing
the W3C EOT (Web Font DRM) stuff, Tom Lord came up with MAME - a way
to provide such notices on the web -
http://basiscraft.com/web-font-issue/mame.xml - which I hope might get
some further development...

:-)
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Re: [backstage] If you had a ton of content to freely distribute

2009-01-20 Thread Dave Crossland
2009/1/20 Steffan Davies st...@steff.name:
 Dave Crossland d...@lab6.com wrote at 16:50 on 2009-01-20:

 2009/1/20 Ian Forrester ian.forres...@bbc.co.uk:
 
  The reason why we would like to Tar the files together is because of 
  things like subtitles, artwork, cuts of music,
  other metadata pieces, etc. We're not just talking a collection of video 
  files.

 What does Tar add to the ability to organise files in a set into a
 hierarchy, that a directory tree in the Torrent doesn't? Except
 stopping people from downloading only the files that they want from
 that set?

 It limits the number of file descriptors the torrent client has to deal
 with. I know this has been a problem for some torrent clients in the
 past

I think Backstage should be pushing the envelope so this isn't
persuasive for me :-)

-- 
Regards,
Dave
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Re: [backstage] If you had a ton of content to freely distribute

2009-01-19 Thread Dave Crossland
2009/1/19 Ian Forrester ian.forres...@bbc.co.uk:
 1. Package it?

File formats:

Packaging: None. Direct files on...

 2. Distribute it?

BitTorrent clients are now wide spread enough for a mass market
audience. But I would sadly still expect that even in 2009 a BBC
programme which we owned all the rights to means some minor
specialist audience, so that isn't a bonus.

And if you are dealing with a lot of files (405 Gig of Live HD
footage online the other day could be a lot of files, but since its
HD video, it is probably some very large files...) which I suppose is
the case when dealing with an ongoing series, rather than a one off
programme, as you mention, then BitTorrent on its own is a bit sparse.
You'd want keyword searching, content recommendations based on
collaborative filtering, donation of upload capacity to spike
recommendations to friends also on the tracker, that kind of thing.
So, good thing the BBC has been paying for the development of Tribler
already, then.

 3. Licence it? (this isn't such a worry)

I cuss the non-commercial restrictions.

 They packaged everything it would seem in a zip/tar

Pointless.

 and included a README files, some further notes about the footage,

+1

conveniently formatted for easy editing

Please support free formats.

 and even a Final Cut Pro sequences with the footage pre-organized for editing.

Shame on them for supporting Apple.

Doing that for Cinelerra/etc and including a copy, would be good though.

 I wonder how long it took to actually build the zip files and upload them?

Upload them means what for BitTorrent?

 We were considering MXF

It looks proprietary to me, so that was a mistake.

 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MXF but it looks difficult and time consuming to 
 build

Oh good :-)

 however the BBC did help build it

Did they ensure it was a free standard?

Cheers,
Dave
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Re: [backstage] If you had a ton of content to freely distribute

2009-01-19 Thread Dave Crossland
2009/1/19 Dave Crossland d...@lab6.com:
 2009/1/19 Ian Forrester ian.forres...@bbc.co.uk:
 1. Package it?

 File formats:

File formats: Whatever is closest to original.
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Re: [backstage] BNP mashups

2008-11-19 Thread Dave Crossland
2008/11/19 Ian Forrester [EMAIL PROTECTED]:
 If you've not heard about the BNP member leak, you've obviously not reading 
 Techcrunch UK

I have decided to take down the map

Good.
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Re: [backstage] BNP mashups

2008-11-19 Thread Dave Crossland
2008/11/19 Richard Lockwood [EMAIL PROTECTED]:
 That surprises me Dave.  After all, you're always bleating on about
 how just because information can be copied, it should be copied, and
 how there's no such thing, morally, as copyright any more, and how all
 information should be free.

Unpublished information is clearly different to published information.
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Re: [backstage] BNP mashups

2008-11-19 Thread Dave Crossland
2008/11/19 Richard Lockwood [EMAIL PROTECTED]:
 And it was published, by an ex-member of the BNP.  (Obviously despite
 a high court injunction, but when it comes to little things like, say,
 the law, you don't think it applies to you when copying stuff, do
 you?)

 So where's your problem?  It's published, it's in the public domain.

I'm glad to hear you think publishing works means they are in the
public domain. I just think they should be redistributable verbatim.

Har har.

Cheers,
Dave
(Personal opinoin only)
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[backstage] Free Software in the Cloud

2008-11-19 Thread Dave Crossland
Hi,

More on topic:

It seem free software for cloud computing is starting to appear -
think Google AppEngine without lockin!

http://reasonablysmart.com/

http://www.10gen.com

-- 
Regards,
Dave
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Re: [backstage] BNP mashups

2008-11-19 Thread Dave Crossland
2008/11/19 Michael [EMAIL PROTECTED]:
 On Wednesday 19 November 2008 16:18:17 Richard Lockwood wrote:
 So where's your problem?  It's published, it's in the public domain.

 I personally think this is rather tasteless.

 Privacy matters.

Just to clarify: I do not support the BNP, do not agree with their
foundational concepts, but think they have a right to exist and a
right to privacy - as MS says, privacy matters.

Cheers,
Dave
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Re: [backstage] [ORG-discuss] DRM Free BBC Content on GNU/Linux (Ubuntu)

2008-10-30 Thread Dave Crossland
2008/10/30 David McBride [EMAIL PROTECTED]:

 this looks like wonderful progress from the BBC

Totally!

I'm very happy to see this - and hope the iPlayer will one day be
available like this :-)

Regards,
Dave
(Personal opinion only)
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Re: [backstage] Android UK launch set for Tuesday

2008-10-28 Thread Dave Crossland
http://koolu.com/ is going to sell OpenMoko Neo handsets with Android
preinstalled, btw.
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Re: [backstage] BBC Backstage ideas store

2008-10-28 Thread Dave Crossland
2008/10/28 Mr I Forrester [EMAIL PROTECTED]:

 Odd I'll look into the submit problem, I think it might be permissions
 again.

The link is to 
http://ideas.welcomebackstage.com/ideatorrent/user?destination=submit/
and that 404s, and when logged in with the normal user account I have,
if I access http://ideas.welcomebackstage.com/ideatorrent/submit/
manually then there is a Access denied permissions problem.
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Re: [backstage] BBC DRM iplayer mobiles etc

2008-10-15 Thread Dave Crossland
2008/10/15 Phil Wilson [EMAIL PROTECTED]:

 Yes, the fact that this will run on all the Linux PCs in
 both my houseand office is a shockingly pro-Microsoft
 move and must be stopped!

The fact that this will run only with proprietary software is
continuing the BBC's discriminatory policy against software freedom,
and it must be stopped.

Dave
Personal opinion only.
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Re: [backstage] Interview with Jonathan Schwartz

2008-10-06 Thread Dave Crossland
2008/10/6 Mr I Forrester [EMAIL PROTECTED]:
 http://blip.tv/file/get/Bbc_backstage-BBCBackstageInterviewWithJonathanSchwartzCEOOfSunMicros368.ogg
  - Ogg Vorbis version

Thanks! :-)
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Re: [backstage] Questions for upcoming interviews

2008-10-01 Thread Dave Crossland
On 01/10/2008, Richard P Edwards [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
 Hi Ian,

 My question...
 When, after waiting thirty years, will I and others, be able to truly
 own our digital files on computers and over the internet?
 Where every file is stamped with digital ownership. A stamp that is
 integrated to all files and attributes universal ownership to the
 person who put it in to a computer first.
 Is that so difficult that we still have to rely on licensing to
 contract usage instead of simply getting the code to do the work?

Please ask them this! :-)
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Re: [backstage] Questions for upcoming interviews

2008-09-30 Thread Dave Crossland
2008/9/30 Ian Forrester [EMAIL PROTECTED]:
 Hi All,

 Those who are subscribed to the Backstage Calendar

 http://www.google.com/calendar/feeds/q7frqh0v016rki1769l9d7jlro%40group.calendar.google.com/public/basic
  - XML
  
 http://www.google.com/calendar/ical/q7frqh0v016rki1769l9d7jlro%40group.calendar.google.com/public/basic.ics
  - ICAL

 http://www.google.com/calendar/embed?src=q7frqh0v016rki1769l9d7jlro%40group.calendar.google.comctz=Europe/London
  - HTML

 May have noticed were at the FOWA expo this month. As part of the shift in 
 emphases for backstage we're also doing more interviews with people in the 
 industry or around the culture of mashup and remix. we're currently 
 interviewing Kevin Rose, Alex Albrecht, Jason Calacanis, Matt Biddulph, Matt 
 Jones, Mark Zukerberg and others.

 If you guy's were asking the questions, what questions would you ask them.

What does freedom mean for the users and developers of web services?
What is at risk? What should the free and open source software
community do to ensure that software, and its users, stay free in this
new technological environment?

- http://autonomo.us/about/

http://www.guardian.co.uk/technology/2008/sep/29/cloud.computing.richard.stallman
has some great quotes.
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Re: [backstage] Questions for upcoming interviews

2008-09-30 Thread Dave Crossland
2008/9/30 Ian Forrester [EMAIL PROTECTED]:

 What bugs me about the Stallman interview (and oracle's
 comments) is cloud computing is already here and many
 users are already using it. Call it gibberish and marketing
 hype isn't going to help solve the real problem of cloud-based lock-in.

I believe Stallman wasn't quoted clearly in the article, but until he
writes and publishes an essay about the topic, its hard to know
precisely what he thinks about the topic in detail.

It sounds to me like his marketing hype quote is scoped to inevitablility.

 They should be talking up user/freedom/rights friendly services 
 practices.

Its a shame the article doesn't mention www.autonomo.us, which seems
like a central collection point for that talk.

 While slamming down the ones which don't. Putting a
 mid rule through cloud computing is like putting a mid rule through mobile.

More like putting a mid rule through proprietary software.

And that did put a rule through mobile computing, until OpenMoko.
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Re: [backstage] Android UK launch set for Tuesday

2008-09-29 Thread Dave Crossland
2008/9/25 Brian Butterworth [EMAIL PROTECTED]:
  
   Shall I carry on?
 
  Okay, I agree that for the UI it seems Microsoft has similar features
  to Apple and Google.
 
  Ah, the Windows, Icons, Mouse and Pointer invented so very long ago by
  Xerox

 Xerox didn't invent touchscreens with (pseudo) 3D accelerated
 interaction models AFAIK ;p

 Sorry, I thought we were talking about the User Interface not the input
 methods...

These aren't as discrete as you suggest; ie, the M in WIMP is an input
method, the WIP are UIs.

And the UIs of these phones don't seem very WIMPish to me:
Touchscreens collapse the separation between the Mouse and Pointer,
and the screen size of mobile computers is small which means
overlapping Windowing doesn't work well. Thus the visual dominance of
the icons in the iPhone OS UI, and the invisibility of the majority of
the modes of interaction.

 Not sure about touchscreens, Wikipedia says Virtually all of the
 significant touchscreen technology patents were filed during the 1970s and
 1980s and have expired.
 And I'm sure that the gyroscopic sensors were around back when Tomorrow's
 World was on...

Sure, none of the individual parts - fast CPU, big RAM, solid state
disk, 3D graphics chip, high res color display okay in sunlight, touch
screen input, long battery life, wireless, GPS, gyroscope, and pocket
size form factor for all - are new this decade by a long shot, and I
have a sense that the fastest rate of computer hardware innovation was
in the 70s.

But the whole is greater than the sum of the parts, and the price drop
is staggering.

 Perhaps this just proves Android=mashup OS?

AIUI the iPhone has the mashup OS, because the only way to program it
seriously is with webapps. However, Android (if it isn't fettered) and
OpenMoko (which has protection against fettering via GPL) provide
access to the hardware so developers can really program these devices.

Over on the Free Software Business mailing list recently, Tom Lord
paraphrased Eben Moglen's outline of the strategy of GPLv3:

The strategy:  engage in diplomacy with [cloud computing
vendors] and push as hard as you can on all forms of
truly personal computing in software freedom.

Rationale:  In 10 years, the number of people with access
to personal computing hardware is going to skyrocket relative
even to today's numbers.  That is where the main action [is].
In 10 years, the ad-broker model will have broken when
the price-bubble on ads bursts and also when users get fed
up with the privatized secret police starting to emerge out
of the muck -- and given all of that available *personal*
computing, the [software freedom] community will have
ample room to work around those scary services.
- http://www.crynwr.com/cgi-bin/ezmlm-cgi?msn:12045:cllbikaneglapjlfljcf

(IMO a nice thread if you have time, btw)

In contrast it seems most people are planning for the core of the
network to continue outpacing the periphery. I'm not sure, because it
seems likely that portable computing will follow the same price-power
curve that desktop computing did. Plus, I agree with Moglen/Lord that
there will be several large privacy disasters - of the kind that we in
the UK are most familiar with thanks to our data-greedy yet
incompetent state.

Together this will put people off centralised cloud computing and on
to personal cloud computing.

-- 
Regards,
Dave
(Personal opinion only)
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Re: [backstage] HD Videocamera advice please...

2008-09-29 Thread Dave Crossland
2008/9/29 Matt Barber [EMAIL PROTECTED]:

 I'd like to hear any suggestions or comments.

Out of your price range and needs, but the Red ONE is fun to know about :-)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RED_Digital_Camera_Company
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Re: [backstage] Android UK launch set for Tuesday

2008-09-29 Thread Dave Crossland
2008/9/25 Michael [EMAIL PROTECTED]:
 On Thursday 25 September 2008 16:22:26 Dave Crossland wrote:
 Xerox didn't invent touchscreens with (pseudo) 3D accelerated
 interaction models AFAIK ;p

 Circa 1991 - Xerox Europarc's Digital Desk.

Wow! Awesome - thanks Michael! :-)

 projection onto a real desk and scanning in things on the desk as a
 result)

I'd guess that under-projected desk-size multitouch screens like the
one Jeff Han became famous with at TED Talsk 2006(?) would complement
an over-head high res camera for 'scanning' better, so that shadows
don't annoy (and the pointing doesn't seem very accurate in the first
demo of the calculator... But it is 199_1_! :-)

Cheers,
Dave
(Personal opinion only.)
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Re: [backstage] Android UK launch set for Tuesday

2008-09-25 Thread Dave Crossland
2008/9/24 Brian Butterworth [EMAIL PROTECTED]:
 2008/9/24 Dave Crossland [EMAIL PROTECTED]

 2008/9/24 Ian Forrester [EMAIL PROTECTED]:
  Touchflo 3D - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DbzVuhzdCFkfeature=related
  TouchWiz UI - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=95Ky6nwR8ms
 
  Shall I carry on?

 Okay, I agree that for the UI it seems Microsoft has similar features
 to Apple and Google.

 Ah, the Windows, Icons, Mouse and Pointer invented so very long ago by Xerox

Xerox didn't invent touchscreens with (pseudo) 3D accelerated
interaction models AFAIK ;p
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Re: [backstage] Android UK launch set for Tuesday

2008-09-25 Thread Dave Crossland
2008/9/25 Matt Hammond [EMAIL PROTECTED]:

 * greater egalatarianism between apps - ie. you can replace functionality of
 built in apps - such as messaging/phone (though if an operator chooses to
 lock it down?...)

Quite. That Android is Apache and not GPL is a serious bug IMO,
because I mistrust hardware vendors and don't trust phone networks at
all to not turn parts of the phones they ship proprietary.

Thus I'm sticking with the freerunner.

Best,
Dave
(Personal opinion only.)-
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Re: [backstage] Android UK launch set for Tuesday

2008-09-23 Thread Dave Crossland
2008/9/24 Ian Forrester [EMAIL PROTECTED]:
 Dave - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ukh5jXjoQBY

Out of the box?
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Re: [backstage] Android UK launch set for Tuesday

2008-09-23 Thread Dave Crossland
2008/9/24 Ian Forrester [EMAIL PROTECTED]:
 Touchflo 3D - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DbzVuhzdCFkfeature=related
 TouchWiz UI - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=95Ky6nwR8ms

 Shall I carry on?

Okay, I agree that for the UI it seems Microsoft has similar features
to Apple and Google.

I wonder how much proprietary software is on the G1?
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Re: [backstage] Android UK launch set for Tuesday

2008-09-22 Thread Dave Crossland
2008/9/22 Ian Forrester [EMAIL PROTECTED]:
 I still don't see why a non developer or non geek would want the google
 phone over windows mobile?

 Maybe its just me?

I'm totally ignorant, but I hadn't seen a WinMo do anything like the
gPhone/iPhone's animated UI.

(Apple doesn't even allow the public to see the API for its canvas,
because iPhone apps are webapps, but Google has made Skia free
software; Skia is the high performance canvas library that doesn't
require a 3D graphics chip, that makes all the iPhone-style bouncy UI
animation fly)

Cheers,
Dave
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Re: [backstage] Manchester Free Software Talk: Dave Crossland - Free as in Profit

2008-09-11 Thread Dave Crossland
2008/9/11 Matt Barber [EMAIL PROTECTED]:

 I can't go - but will there be a pod/webcast?

I think Tim is going to bring a video camera, so hopefully, yes
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Re: [backstage] A few interesting bits...

2008-09-07 Thread Dave Crossland
2008/9/7 Tim Dobson [EMAIL PROTECTED]:
 Dave Crossland wrote:
   There is also the secondary technical issue of CPU muscle - can puny

 embedded devices like the iPhone and OpenMoko handle Java? ;p

 Good question, I'll give it a go.
 The FR can cope with debian so perhaps java isn't out of the question,
 however I can't see it being too much fun on 640x480 or the 400mhz processor
 :P

This is why I said 'handle,' not 'run' ;-)

Cheers,
Dave
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Re: [backstage] Google Chrome

2008-09-02 Thread Dave Crossland
2008/9/2 Martin Belam [EMAIL PROTECTED]:

 I see this is for Windows users only. I for one want to register my
 outrage etc etc.

If they are making GTK work properly on Mac OS X and Windows, I don't
mind the wait.

Cheers,
Dave
Personal opinion only.
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Re: [backstage] Google Chrome

2008-09-02 Thread Dave Crossland
2008/9/2 Christopher Woods [EMAIL PROTECTED]:
 On Tue Sep  2 15:51:38 2008, Christopher Woods wrote:
  Great, that makes four major browsers, each with their own
 'take' on
  web standards. Someone think of the developers!

 You never know, Chrome might be standards compliant.

 Oh god no, that means we'll have to do fully standards compliant pages and
 then code for the other three! I will be scouring Google's pages like a hawk
 for incorrect rendering as soon as I install Chrome.

Its based on WebKit, so not really. WebKit is LGPLv2, so Safari and
all the other webkit browsers will from Google's improvements.

http://webkit.org/coding/lgpl-license.html

-- 
Regards,
Dave
Personal opinion.
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Re: [backstage] Google Chrome

2008-09-01 Thread Dave Crossland
2008/9/1 Michael [EMAIL PROTECTED]:

 http://blogoscoped.com/archive/2008-09-01-n47.html

 Unknown if it's real at the moment, but getting Scott McCloud to do a 38
 page comic describing things in detail etc, does make me think the contents
 are plausible. (certainly his style of cartoons/drawing)

Chrome has a privacy mode; Google says you can create an incognito
window and nothing that occurs in that window is ever logged on your
computer.

Will the privacy mode mean nothing that occurs in that window is ever
logged by Google? *chortle*

-- 
Regards,
Dave
Personal opinion only.
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[backstage] Software freedom and web applications

2008-08-31 Thread Dave Crossland
Hi,

Aaron Swartz has written a nice summary of the history and issues of
software freedom in the age of web applications:
http://autonomo.us/2008/07/software-freedom-and-web-applications/

With small proof-of-concept projects like http://identi.ca/ and large
Web 2.0 artifices like Ma.gnolia.com showing leadership in this
direction, will people upgrade from 'data portability' to tackling the
underlying issue of network software freedom? :-)

-- 
Regards,
Dave
Personal opinion only.
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