Re: [backstage] Free as in 'Freedom'

2009-10-09 Thread Martin Belam
I'll just run this by everyone again

If you wish to talk about personal images use the example of adults,
a spouse for example. Or personal information. Involving children is
like using the word Nazi, it is designed to close down debate, because
of the moral panic surrounding the issue.

Yep, absolutely David. Using a real world example of something I have
actually done in the last two weeks that used the existing copyright
law framework and Internet distribution is clearly an attempt to
stifle your debate and restrict your freedom rather than actually test
your argument. Let me be clear, I wouldn't want to impose upon you in
any way, please feel free to continue to dismiss any example that
doesn't fit into your world view.

m
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Re: [backstage] Free as in 'Freedom'

2009-10-08 Thread Martin Belam
 I suspect you can trust your family, friends etc to respect your wishes, and 
 you can limit the distribution through trust.

 Images of children can be sourced for advertising without having to resort 
 to using private images.



So your basic answer is that in a world without copyright, instead of
me being allowed to say Hey, I know you *could* just download this
straight off the internet and reuse it however you want, but I'd
really rather you didn't, the onus is instead on me to personally
vouch for the distribution of my photos on a person-by-person basis
and just hope for the best from anyone I don't know who wants a
picture of a child?

If you want to write software code, and are happy for people to take
it away and modify it and do what they want with it, then fine, I'm
not stopping you. The output of my work is writing and wireframes and
designs. I'd rather someone didn't just reproduce all of my blog or my
presentations or my wireframe ideas and pass them off as their own or
make money from them without my permission. So why do you want to stop
me expressing that wish?

You can quote as many bits of historical text from the 1800s as you
like, but it doesn't stop you sounding like an arrogant prick who
thinks he has more right to determine what should happen to the things
I produce than I do.

m
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Re: [backstage] [Fwd: [ORG-discuss] The Guardian drops Office has gone OpenOffice]

2009-04-27 Thread Martin Belam
For me one of the interesting things is the upside that at a stroke
you circumvent all of the IT security headache for remote workers -
they can access their documents from anywhere there is a web
connection and you let Google handle the security. On the downside,
you let Google handle the security and place all your business
sensitive documents about how you plan to compete with them on their
servers ;-)




2009/4/26 John O'Donovan john.odono...@bbc.co.uk:
 It's an interesting trend...probably old news now but the Telegraph went
 Google Apps last year as well...

 http://www.itpro.co.uk/604644/telegraph-swaps-microsoft-office-for-google-apps

 Cheers,

 jod
 
 From: owner-backst...@lists.bbc.co.uk on behalf of Martin Belam
 Sent: Sun 26/04/2009 00:28
 To: backstage@lists.bbc.co.uk
 Subject: Re: [backstage] [Fwd: [ORG-discuss] The Guardian drops Office has
 gone OpenOffice]

 If you are an information architect; who are the information civil
 engineers? ;-)

 They sit next to the information chimney-sweeps - mostly small
 children we pluck from librarian school and beat regularly with
 thesauri


 So how many people have *actually* moved off an MS app to an open source
 app. And more to the point, who on earth thought using Notes was a good
 idea!!

 On the first point I think Charles has the right figure. I think we
 are meant to have something like the largest networked hub of Macs in
 Europe. Pretty much all journalists and newspapers production staff
 are on Macs. You can see our rows and rows of Macs in this picture
 http://twitpic.com/3e9l2 @jackschofield posted via Twitter

 On the second point, we are supposed to be migrating off it soon. I hope.


 all the best,
 martin





 2009/4/25 Rupert Watson rup...@root6.com:
 Martin
 If you are an information architect; who are the information civil
 engineers? ;-)

 So how many people have *actually* moved off an MS app to an open source
 app. And more to the point, who on earth thought using Notes was a good
 idea!!

 Rupert Watson
 www.root6.com
 +44 7787 554801


 -Original Message-
 From: owner-backst...@lists.bbc.co.uk
 [mailto:owner-backst...@lists.bbc.co.uk] On Behalf Of Martin Belam
 Sent: 25 April 2009 23:18
 To: backstage@lists.bbc.co.uk
 Subject: Re: [backstage] [Fwd: [ORG-discuss] The Guardian drops Office has
 gone OpenOffice]

 Those of us at The Guardian who are using Windows machines still have
 MS Office as part of our build, rather than OpenOffice. We also all
 have access though to a Google-Apps-For-Your-Enterprise that goes
 across Guardian News  Media, so regardless of whether you are using
 Mac or Windows it is easy to share documents inside and outside of the
 corporate firewall.

 Mail serverwise on WIndows - Notes/Domino. Don't know what the set-up
 is on a Mac, but if you search for Jemima's tweets on the subject,
 you'll know it isn't popular ;-)

 all the best,
 Martin Belam
 Information Architect, guardian.co.uk





 2009/4/25 Rupert Watson rup...@root6.com:
 I wonder what they are using as their mail server. Kerio, Apple or
 something else?

 Rupert Watson
 www.root6.com
 +44 7787 554801


 -Original Message-
 From: owner-backst...@lists.bbc.co.uk
 [mailto:owner-backst...@lists.bbc.co.uk] On Behalf Of Tim Dobson
 Sent: 25 April 2009 22:45
 To: backstage@lists.bbc.co.uk
 Subject: [backstage] [Fwd: [ORG-discuss] The Guardian drops Office has
 gone OpenOffice]

 impressive stuff. :)

  Original Message 
 Subject: [ORG-discuss] The Guardian drops Office has gone OpenOffice
 Date: Fri, 24 Apr 2009 07:20:15 -0700 (PDT)
 From: Glyn Wintle glynwin...@yahoo.com
 Reply-To: Open Rights Group open discussion list
 org-disc...@lists.openrightsgroup.org
 To: Open Rights Group open discussion list
 org-disc...@lists.openrightsgroup.org


 http://twitter.com/charlesarthur/status/1603720276

 whole of The Guardian has dropped MS Office Mac and gone OpenOffice.
 That's 1,000+ corporate seats right there.





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Re: [backstage] [Fwd: [ORG-discuss] The Guardian drops Office has gone OpenOffice]

2009-04-25 Thread Martin Belam
Those of us at The Guardian who are using Windows machines still have
MS Office as part of our build, rather than OpenOffice. We also all
have access though to a Google-Apps-For-Your-Enterprise that goes
across Guardian News  Media, so regardless of whether you are using
Mac or Windows it is easy to share documents inside and outside of the
corporate firewall.

Mail serverwise on WIndows - Notes/Domino. Don't know what the set-up
is on a Mac, but if you search for Jemima's tweets on the subject,
you'll know it isn't popular ;-)

all the best,
Martin Belam
Information Architect, guardian.co.uk





2009/4/25 Rupert Watson rup...@root6.com:
 I wonder what they are using as their mail server. Kerio, Apple or
 something else?

 Rupert Watson
 www.root6.com
 +44 7787 554801


 -Original Message-
 From: owner-backst...@lists.bbc.co.uk
 [mailto:owner-backst...@lists.bbc.co.uk] On Behalf Of Tim Dobson
 Sent: 25 April 2009 22:45
 To: backstage@lists.bbc.co.uk
 Subject: [backstage] [Fwd: [ORG-discuss] The Guardian drops Office has
 gone OpenOffice]

 impressive stuff. :)

  Original Message 
 Subject: [ORG-discuss] The Guardian drops Office has gone OpenOffice
 Date: Fri, 24 Apr 2009 07:20:15 -0700 (PDT)
 From: Glyn Wintle glynwin...@yahoo.com
 Reply-To: Open Rights Group open discussion list
 org-disc...@lists.openrightsgroup.org
 To: Open Rights Group open discussion list
 org-disc...@lists.openrightsgroup.org


 http://twitter.com/charlesarthur/status/1603720276

 whole of The Guardian has dropped MS Office Mac and gone OpenOffice.
 That's 1,000+ corporate seats right there.





 ___
 ORG-discuss mailing list
 org-disc...@lists.openrightsgroup.org
 http://lists.openrightsgroup.org/mailman/listinfo/org-discuss

 --
 www.tdobson.net
 
 If each of us have one object, and we exchange them, then each of us
 still has one object.
 If each of us have one idea, and we exchange them, then each of us now
 has two ideas.   -  George Bernard Shaw
 -
 Sent via the backstage.bbc.co.uk discussion group.  To unsubscribe,
 please visit
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Re: [backstage] [Fwd: [ORG-discuss] The Guardian drops Office has gone OpenOffice]

2009-04-25 Thread Martin Belam
 If you are an information architect; who are the information civil engineers? 
 ;-)

They sit next to the information chimney-sweeps - mostly small
children we pluck from librarian school and beat regularly with
thesauri


 So how many people have *actually* moved off an MS app to an open source app. 
 And more to the point, who on earth thought using Notes was a good idea!!

On the first point I think Charles has the right figure. I think we
are meant to have something like the largest networked hub of Macs in
Europe. Pretty much all journalists and newspapers production staff
are on Macs. You can see our rows and rows of Macs in this picture
http://twitpic.com/3e9l2 @jackschofield posted via Twitter

On the second point, we are supposed to be migrating off it soon. I hope.


all the best,
martin





2009/4/25 Rupert Watson rup...@root6.com:
 Martin
 If you are an information architect; who are the information civil engineers? 
 ;-)

 So how many people have *actually* moved off an MS app to an open source app. 
 And more to the point, who on earth thought using Notes was a good idea!!

 Rupert Watson
 www.root6.com
 +44 7787 554801


 -Original Message-
 From: owner-backst...@lists.bbc.co.uk 
 [mailto:owner-backst...@lists.bbc.co.uk] On Behalf Of Martin Belam
 Sent: 25 April 2009 23:18
 To: backstage@lists.bbc.co.uk
 Subject: Re: [backstage] [Fwd: [ORG-discuss] The Guardian drops Office has 
 gone OpenOffice]

 Those of us at The Guardian who are using Windows machines still have
 MS Office as part of our build, rather than OpenOffice. We also all
 have access though to a Google-Apps-For-Your-Enterprise that goes
 across Guardian News  Media, so regardless of whether you are using
 Mac or Windows it is easy to share documents inside and outside of the
 corporate firewall.

 Mail serverwise on WIndows - Notes/Domino. Don't know what the set-up
 is on a Mac, but if you search for Jemima's tweets on the subject,
 you'll know it isn't popular ;-)

 all the best,
 Martin Belam
 Information Architect, guardian.co.uk





 2009/4/25 Rupert Watson rup...@root6.com:
 I wonder what they are using as their mail server. Kerio, Apple or
 something else?

 Rupert Watson
 www.root6.com
 +44 7787 554801


 -Original Message-
 From: owner-backst...@lists.bbc.co.uk
 [mailto:owner-backst...@lists.bbc.co.uk] On Behalf Of Tim Dobson
 Sent: 25 April 2009 22:45
 To: backstage@lists.bbc.co.uk
 Subject: [backstage] [Fwd: [ORG-discuss] The Guardian drops Office has
 gone OpenOffice]

 impressive stuff. :)

  Original Message 
 Subject: [ORG-discuss] The Guardian drops Office has gone OpenOffice
 Date: Fri, 24 Apr 2009 07:20:15 -0700 (PDT)
 From: Glyn Wintle glynwin...@yahoo.com
 Reply-To: Open Rights Group open discussion list
 org-disc...@lists.openrightsgroup.org
 To: Open Rights Group open discussion list
 org-disc...@lists.openrightsgroup.org


 http://twitter.com/charlesarthur/status/1603720276

 whole of The Guardian has dropped MS Office Mac and gone OpenOffice.
 That's 1,000+ corporate seats right there.





 ___
 ORG-discuss mailing list
 org-disc...@lists.openrightsgroup.org
 http://lists.openrightsgroup.org/mailman/listinfo/org-discuss

 --
 www.tdobson.net
 
 If each of us have one object, and we exchange them, then each of us
 still has one object.
 If each of us have one idea, and we exchange them, then each of us now
 has two ideas.   -  George Bernard Shaw
 -
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Re: [backstage] Google Streetview ... UK at last

2009-03-19 Thread Martin Belam
I have a fear there will be a picture of me running down the road
after the car in E17 trying to get a picture for the blog!




2009/3/19 Andrew Bowden andrew.bow...@bbc.co.uk:
 Is it rather tragic to be scanning Wood Lane in the hope that you're in a
 photo just because you passed the car when it was stuck in traffic?

 I guess so.

 
 From: owner-backst...@lists.bbc.co.uk
 [mailto:owner-backst...@lists.bbc.co.uk] On Behalf Of Brian Butterworth
 Sent: 19 March 2009 08:42
 To: backstage@lists.bbc.co.uk
 Subject: [backstage] Google Streetview ... UK at last

 http://tinyurl.com/bbcgooglesm
 About time, really.  Great with the built in compass on my G1.    And now
 for some live data overlays?
 --
 Brian Butterworth

 follow me on twitter: http://twitter.com/briantist
 web: http://www.ukfree.tv - independent digital television and switchover
 advice, since 2002




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Re: [backstage] Clay Shirky: Newspapers and Thinking the Unthinkable

2009-03-16 Thread Martin Belam
If you look at what The Sun does on mobile, it seems very geared up
to getting 'white van man' to spend the odd £1 or £2 when he is
sitting in his van bored. It certainly isn't what you'd call
traditional public service broadcasting news, but it seems very
cleverly targeted at their market.

all the best,
martin




2009/3/16 Brian Butterworth briant...@freeview.tv:
 All,
 I've been reading this thread with great interest and it seems to sum the
 whole current situation up rather well and I would add stuff but I've
 buggered my rotator cuff (apparently).
 The BBC being a public service newspaper - it is certainly a long way from
 the days of Ceefax and three-TV-bulletins-a-day.  If you were an alien and
 looked at the internet news sites you would need to dig very deep to
 understand that the BBC was somehow different, especially from outside the
 UK.
 One thing I am wondering, will News International realise that The Times
 brand needs a TV channel more than BSkyB does?  There could be such a
 cost-saving my merging Sky News with The Times, giving historic paper
 brand an instant global news TV presence.

 And then there's that gizmo, the one that can deliver the Sun to white van
 man cheaply and reliably.
 2009/3/16 Dave Crossland d...@lab6.com

 Bingo :)

 Regards, Dave

 On 16 Mar 2009, 11:45 AM, Robert (Jamie) Munro rjmu...@arjam.net
 wrote:

 Kevin Anderson wrote:   funding - the licence fee. Commercial newspapers
 are finding their  reade...

 I think that news.bbc.co.uk is already a public service newspaper -
 albeit one without a print edition.

 Robert (Jamie) Munro




 --

 Brian Butterworth

 follow me on twitter: http://twitter.com/briantist
 web: http://www.ukfree.tv - independent digital television and switchover
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Re: [backstage] BBC becomes the British Botnet Corporation

2009-03-12 Thread Martin Belam
I could be wrong, but my guess is that this episode had some pretty
heavy compliance forms to fill in. Plenty of documentary films about
nefarious stuff have filmed people doing nefarious stuff when they
could have waded in to stop it.. It is a grey area for legal I'm sure.
But my initial reaction to this is to ask whether as a tech community
we are going to jump on the BBC for making a programme about the
dangers of botnets and using one in a controlled fashion, or maybe ask
some hard questions about how botnets get financed and are able to
bank the money they earn?

all the best,
martin








2009/3/12 Sam Mbale smb...@mpelembe.net:
 The idea that botnets — networks of innocent PCs surreptitiously hijacked by
 evildoers and turned to nefarious purposes — pose a security threat both to
 computer owners and attack targets should be pretty common knowledge by now.
 The BBC tech show “Click,” however, felt its viewers could use a graphic
 reminder, and in putting one together, managed to stumble into some
 decidedly gray legal territory.

 Full story
 http://blogs.siliconvalley.com/gmsv/2009/03/bbc-becomes-the-british-botnet-corporation.html
 I saw the demo on the 6 o'clock news today, and I did wonder about the legal
 implications.
 rgds
 Sam Mbale
 Mpelembe Network
 http://www.mpelembe.net

 Follow me on http://twitter.com/mpelembe






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Re: [backstage] News Radar

2009-02-20 Thread Martin Belam
Looks great but shame launching yesterday seemed to break the main site ;-)

More seriously, I think it is a really interesting application of the
'river of news' UI.

My tuppence would be:

* Make the category name in the right-hand site a link through to the
index page for that category.

* I'm sure you'd appreciate that it would be a way to scrape the
entire content from the site in seconds, but I can haz RSS?

* Some sort of selection mechanism that allowed you to only view
certain categories e.g. you could make a Sci-Tech-Environment type
page or a Business only page


all the best,
martin
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Re: [backstage] BBC - a typical Google search on a desktop computer produces about 7g (0.25oz) of carbon dioxide

2009-01-12 Thread Martin Belam
 Is this the worst bit of maths on BBC News so far this year?

Figures actually come from Google no?
http://googleblog.blogspot.com/2009/01/powering-google-search.html
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Re: [backstage] Linguistic discrimination?

2008-12-08 Thread Martin Belam
Since the BBC is more generally accused of being pro-Chavez because it
enjoys his anti-US position, maybe this is just a bit of balance?

More seriously, it does raise wider issues about how Internet access
and language skew online representation. The BBC is always very clear
that polls online are de facto self-selecting, and therefore cannot
be held to be an accurate measure of public opinion. CNN labels their
votes as not scientific. Not all operators are as scrupulous.

all the best,
martin
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Re: [backstage] Public Transport APIs

2008-11-19 Thread Martin Belam
Matthew Somerville is your man



2008/11/19 Peter Bowyer [EMAIL PROTECTED]:
 Doing some research into what feeds/APIs are available from public
 transport operators and related organisations in the UK - any
 pointers, anyone?

 Ta
 Peter

 --
 Peter Bowyer
 Email: [EMAIL PROTECTED]
 Follow me on Twitter: twitter.com/peeebeee
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Re: [backstage] Greedy BBC Blocks External Links

2008-11-04 Thread Martin Belam
I don't think it is evil, and as I've pointed out on their blog and
on Sphinn, since Patrick at Blogstorm himself applies nofollow to
all outbound links it is a little rich to be complaining that the BBC
doesn't provide 'trusted' links. Interesting point about how Google
can be expected to run a trusted link based algorithm in the future,
but lets not forget it was the search engines that concocted
nofollow themselves, and Google is these days notorious for
penalising sites in the rankings that it 'believes' are displaying
paid links that are not clearly marked as advertising. I've blogged a
little about the Blogstorm post as well -
http://www.currybet.net/cbet_blog/2008/11/bbc_news_clumsy_linking.php

cheers,
martin
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Re: [backstage] Google Chrome

2008-09-02 Thread Martin Belam
I see this is for Windows users only. I for one want to register my
outrage etc etc.

;-)






2008/9/2 Sam Mbale [EMAIL PROTECTED]:
 thanxs for the update

 On Mon, Sep 1, 2008 at 11:22 PM, Tyson Key [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:

 Hmm, I haven't seen the links yet, but don't they want to make
 something like Unity or the ATT browser? (But with an InPrivate-esque
 feature).

 Tyson

 On 9/1/08, [EMAIL PROTECTED] [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
  This seems to have just been posted:
  http://googleblog.blogspot.com/2008/09/fresh-take-on-browser.html
 
  Best wishes,
  Dominic.
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Re: [backstage] Film Reviews

2008-06-03 Thread Martin Belam
 Just a quick idea.  How about a page on bbc.co.uk noting sections that have
 closed?

I think that is called the 'Press Release' after the
govmt/DCMS/Ofcom/BBC Trust/Uncle Tom Cobbly review of the BBC website
that seems to have to be carried out out every 18 months...
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Re: [backstage] The future of the internet

2008-05-01 Thread Martin Belam
There is a piece on this in The Guardian today - he makes some
interesting points but at one stage he suggests that Facebook is a
closed system, and that nobody can move onto a new social platform
because all of their friends are there, so Facebook will rule forever.
I would have thought that explains the massive continued success of
MySpace and Friends Reunitedoh, hang on a second
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Re: [backstage] BBC iPlayer, loved by millions, disliked by a single US citizen

2008-05-01 Thread Martin Belam
Yes, but it was no surprise that the first Service Licence review was
yet another in-depth look at online, and not BBC One, was it?




2008/4/30 Brendan Quinn [EMAIL PROTECTED]:
 Hi Tom,


  You wrote:
   the public value test is a one way expansion valve, only allowing for
  new BBC
   services, never testing existing BBC services to see if they still
  make sense.

  That's right, existing services aren't put through a PVT -- that's what
  the service licence is for, isn't it?

  http://www.bbc.co.uk/bbctrust/framework/bbc_service_licences/bbc_co_uk_s
  ervice_licence.html

  The Trust are actually reviewing the online service licence right now...
  http://www.bbc.co.uk/bbctrust/framework/bbc_service_licences/bbc_co_uk.h
  tml

  Ready to be published in Spring 2008, ie any day now, I suppose.

  Brendan.


  -Original Message-
  From: [EMAIL PROTECTED]
  [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On Behalf Of Tom Loosemore
  Sent: 30 April 2008 12:15
  To: backstage@lists.bbc.co.uk
  Subject: Re: [backstage] BBC iPlayer, loved by millions, disliked by a
  single US citizen



  New BBC services now have to go through a market impact assessment
   to  ensure they are not anti competitive:
  
http://www.bbc.co.uk/bbctrust/framework/public_value_test/#part-5

  but existing BBC services (ie everything other than iPlayer and BBC
  HD) have not been and will not be subject to such rigour...

  the public value test is a one way expansion valve, only allowing for
  new BBC services, never testing existing BBC services to see if they
  still make sense.
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Re: [backstage] iPlayer email updates, RSS

2008-01-31 Thread Martin Belam
I've got a hunch the answer is going to involve the word Majordomo...

martin
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Re: [backstage] Identity/trust/reputation project savingtheinternetwithhate.com

2008-01-09 Thread Martin Belam
 (From http://www.zedshaw.com/rants/rails_is_a_ghetto.html which I
 found hilarious and may be of interest to Ruby on Rail developers :-)

I *loved* that, but I wasn't convinced I'd ever hire him and expect
him to respect an NDA after the event - which maybe doesn't show he is
a good a business analyst as he thinks he is ;-)

all the best,
martin
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Re: [backstage] Fwd: [Gnash] Adobe EULA

2008-01-08 Thread Martin Belam
I think 10% or 20% time is a great thing to allow not just developers,
but many areas of the BBC, and I wished it had happened whilst I was
there. Just a shame that if people get to know more widely about it
you can be sure that the press will be asking that everyone gets a 10%
or 20% rebate on their licence fee!

all the best,
martin
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Re: [backstage] BBC News : site feedback.... [Fwd: RE: Feedback [NewsWatch]]

2008-01-08 Thread Martin Belam
I used to face this kind of question when doing the analysis of search
logs at the BBC to produce the popular searches right now list.

Obviously I used to filter out obscenities, but, for example,
something like 'big brother' or the 'x-factor' would generate a lot of
searches on bbc.co.uk, but were not BBC programme - so should the BBC
'censor' what they were showing back to the user as user activity?

Personally I would rather the most read/most emailed reflected exactly
what the user was doing, and wasn't most emailed stories from the
last 7 days excluding the also in the news section because we are the
BBC and we want our readers to look very serious all the time

m
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Re: [backstage] Broadcasters to launch joint VoD service

2007-12-29 Thread Martin Belam
 An excellent quote which I will endeavour to use in 2008 every time
 the zealots start drowning out the conversation.

though I suspect you will be met with similar content to almost the
first reaction to that article:

It's sad to see that Linus Torvalds, one of the leading figures in
the Free Software movement, doesn't really care for freedom.

Damn him, and his freedom to express an opinion...


m
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Re: [backstage] Please release Perl on Rails as Free Software

2007-12-06 Thread Martin Belam
 The difference is that the BBC could drop the probability to zero by
 not requiring the use of proprietary software...

Or by closing the list if it was deemed to be an unhelpful echo
chamber that wasn't beneficial to the BBC for the amount of money
spent on the backstage.bbc.co.uk project

m
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Re: [backstage] Muddy Boots on Backstage

2007-11-28 Thread Martin Belam
 I would start by constructing Acts of Parliament by Wiki for a start.

If that isn't a job creation scheme for lawyers I don't what is...

May it please the court to get back to the matter in hand, is a
blaspheme against the Flying Spaghetti Monster still a crime if it is
was spoken in LOLCAT by a professed Jedi who had invoked Convention 15
of the Shadow Proclamation as defined by the 2009 Act of Parliament
Known as Thursday?
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Re: [backstage] Muddy Boots on Backstage

2007-11-26 Thread Martin Belam
  With internet speeds increasing these online systems are very useful for
 the average user who sends emails, writes letters, etc, as they take away
 the burden of looking after software and keeping it up to date.

Or another way of looking it, if you keep building systems with the
expectation that people will have an always-on, persistent fast
connection - you look out people like me still on 31.2 Kbps dial-up...

But in this case, API would easily trump source code and
dictionary/thesarus with patches IMHO - API could react within minutes
to a sudden change in the significance of a term. Who would want to
wait 15 days lag for a patch to keep switching McClaren from being
primarily about Formula One, Steve or Malcolm
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Re: [backstage] BBC Podcasts Including Music

2007-11-24 Thread Martin Belam
 So what you are really saying is that as long as it is not generally
known that saving streams is easy to do, then this is fig leaf to
placate the rights holders.



To be less glib than I have been on here recently, erm, pretty much
that is it. *I* know you can rip streams to files to keep for ever
pretty easily. *You* all know you can rip streams to files to keep for
ever pretty easily, probably easier and quicker than I could manage.
The key people at the BBC know that too. But so long as it is
*sufficiently* too much effort or too much of a secret for joe schmoe
in the street, the rights-holders are kept happy.

There was a great comment on The Register article about how the
iPlayer was a waste of money - It is still frustrating that instead
of using their negotiating power and influence to try to make the
producers see some sense, the BBC resorted to the easy option of
spending millions on a useless product

Because obviously, the producers were so desperate to give their
products away for free it was only the BBC negotiating stance of *not*
giving stuff away for free that was a factor ;-)

As I've said before, look at the radio podcasts. Where the BBC *can*
give stuff away for free in a format that is economical to deliver to
the *majority* of users it will. Nobody thinks DRM is safe - it just
has to be safe enough. Nobody has sold streaming as safe for
content holders, but it is safe enough...

And there are still rights holders for whom the DRM'd download
solution isn't good enough - that is why not every programme broadcast
by the BBC is in iPlayer
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Re: [backstage] BBC Podcasts Including Music

2007-11-23 Thread Martin Belam
 This is a particular feature of Internet Explorer 7, I find.

Google Reader does the same as well


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Re: [backstage] BBC Podcasts Including Music

2007-11-20 Thread Martin Belam
I'm more interested in Usability and Value For Money for Licence
Fee payers. Does anyone have any kind of gauge of what percentage of
portable music players will actually play files encoded in Vorbis out
of the box without either a firmware upgrade or installing software on
them?




On 20/11/2007, Dave Crossland [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
 On 19/11/2007, Martin Belam [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
  You see, I just somehow knew that giving away content including music
  for free, forever, at the point of delivery, to anyone, regardless of
  whether they had paid their Licence Fee or lived in the UK, *still*
  wasn't going to be good enough for some.

 Martin, I am not interested in for free. I'm happy to pay money for
 things I value, and often do.

 I'm interested in freedom, and I'm sorry that the difference between
 libre and gratis, as the two unrelated concepts are known in
 French, hasn't been clear to you.

 --
 Regards,
 Dave
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Re: [backstage] BBC Podcasts Including Music

2007-11-20 Thread Martin Belam
That is kind of the figures I was expecting. Just to be clear here,
the way I see it is that if the BBC stands up and says we believe in
libre not gratis, so we don't want anything to do with  software
or codecs that involve patents, pretty much at least 80%+ of the
people who own portable music players in the UK are going to turn
around and say Chuffing hell, lads, why doesn't that work on my
machine? I mean, I *paid* for all this stuff to be made by the BBC.
Who are you to tell me which machines I should have to buy.

I mean, isn't that the argument for the BBC making the iPlayer work in
Linux - because a market is there and so the BBC should support it in
the interest of universal access?

Or, they could just make 120+ radio programmes available free to
download, for nothing, for people to keep for as long as they like,
and re-encode into any format they want
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Re: [backstage] BBC Podcasts Including Music

2007-11-19 Thread Martin Belam
You see, I just somehow knew that giving away content including music
for free, forever, at the point of delivery, to anyone, regardless of
whether they had paid their Licence Fee or lived in the UK, *still*
wasn't going to be good enough for some.

[throws up hands in despair and backs way from the internet]




On 19/11/2007, Dave Crossland [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
 On 19/11/2007, Matthew Cashmore [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
  Somebody has kindly corrected me off-list with regards to the 'trial' of 
  podcasts
 
  the iplayer PVT gave us regulatory permission to do non drm audio 
  downloads in April

 Awesome - now we just need the BBC to do non-patent encumbered audio
 (ie, Ogg Vorbis) :-)

 --
 Regards,
 Dave
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Re: [backstage] Use of Tinyurl in Emails

2007-11-05 Thread Martin Belam
 though i suspect the problem (and usage of tinyurl) is that to get
one of those nice urls hooked up, you gotta email someone a request,
who needs to get approval from a manager

Heh, heh, that's not even the half of it ;-)

m





On 05/11/2007, James Cox [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:


 On 5 Nov 2007, at 12:58, David Greaves wrote:

 Adam wrote:
 What does everyone else think.

 bbc.com/2e5u8e


 David

 PS it's smaller than tinyurl and it's a use for bbc.com too... (unless it's
 used
 internationally)

 'course, bbc.co.uk has had some kind of redirect magic for a while:
 http://bbc.co.uk/zanelowe/

 though i suspect the problem (and usage of tinyurl) is that to get one of
 those nice urls hooked up, you gotta email someone a request, who needs to
 get approval from a manager

 probably not all that efficient when all you want to do is send an email out
 and go home (or to the pub!)

 - james



 --


 James Cox,
 Internet Consultant
 t: 07968 349990  e: [EMAIL PROTECTED] w: http://imaj.es/




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Re: [backstage] iPlayer usage

2007-10-18 Thread Martin Belam
hmm, IANAL but me reckons iplayer usage numbers would probably fall
under that catch-all its about broadcasting and the way we do our
business, innit? FOI get out clause that keeps the Balen Report out
of the public eye





On 18/10/2007, Brian Butterworth [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
 On 18/10/2007, Steve Jolly [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
  Adam Lindsay wrote:
   I went back and noticed that the original poster's question wasn't
   answered: are there any plans to reveal statistics on iPlayer usage?
 
  http://www.bbc.co.uk/foi/
 
  You could always ask directly... :-)


 You could ask ... I would be after Jana Bennet's BlackBerry records first...


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 --
 Please email me back if you need any more help.

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 www.ukfree.tv


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Re: [backstage] iPhone SDK news

2007-10-18 Thread Martin Belam
Simon, that sounds like a terribly restricting product that uses
proprietary technology and potentially distorts the market for mobile
phone technology - have you cleared this with the BBC Trust? I expect
there will be questions in the House and a demo outside TVC if you
don't ;-)






On 18/10/2007, Simon Cross [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:


 Finally we might be able to do things propery!

 We've been working on a podcast browser for iPhone which is in alpha at the
 moment

 http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio/podcasts/directory/iphone/  --
 note: requires Safari to view, or an iphone/touch obviously!

 S

  
  From: [EMAIL PROTECTED]
 [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On Behalf Of Martin Deutsch
 Sent: 17 October 2007 17:36
 To: backstage@lists.bbc.co.uk
 Subject: Re: [backstage] iPhone SDK news



 I'd say that Apple have a good track record of releasing things, generally
 when they say they will. The only major product I can recall not seeing the
 light of day was Copland, over 10 years ago.

  - martin


 On 10/17/07, Brian Butterworth [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
 
  On 17/10/2007, Adam Lindsay  [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
   http://www.apple.com/hotnews/
  
   Native third party applications on the iPhone (and iPod touch) will be
   enabled via an SDK as of February 2008.
 
 
  There's a name for that .. vapourware
 
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RE: [backstage] Voting data ideas

2007-09-27 Thread Martin Belam
 I was in a class of four people in the sixth form that did a
Statistics A-Level
 
There's a statistics joke in there somewhere but it is too early for me.
 
Just to be clear here, the BBC has strong editorial guidelines that
online votes are to be effectively taken with a pinch of salt, and not
used with editorial prominence in other media i.e. you can't on the News
say And 79% of people prefered crisps to chocolate in the results of
our online poll. They are always meant to be called 'votes' rather than
'polls' as well, as polls implies some sort of scientific methodology,
rather than a self-selecting bunch of web users. This doesn't, of
course, stop producers getting it wrong from time to time
 
http://www.bbc.co.uk/guidelines/editorialguidelines/onguide/interacting/
onlinevoting.shtml
 
 
 
And I don't think Vijay is being too paranoid about BBC releases
personal data! scare stories cropping up either - look at the fuss made
over the release of the AOL search log data that wasn't properly made
anonymous
 
m



From: [EMAIL PROTECTED]
[mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On Behalf Of Brian Butterworth
Sent: 26 September 2007 22:58
To: backstage@lists.bbc.co.uk
Subject: Re: [backstage] Voting data ideas


My apologies...  I was in a class of four people in the sixth form that
did a Statistics A-Level


On 26/09/2007, vijay chopra [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote: 



On 26/09/2007, Christopher Woods  [EMAIL PROTECTED]
mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED]  wrote: 

Leaving the last digit from the last octet out would be
fine, though? Then you could group by IP addresses for purposes like
fraud checking and suchlike. I'm sure the BBC sites always say that
standard information such as browser and IP address will be collected
whenever you submit information to the server, so that's a fairly
standard get-out clause. 


That's actually a really good idea, and to add to my previous
email, it would certainly be intresting to see what topics inspire the
most vote fraud. Having Geographic and ISP info aswell would be good.
Are Northerners or Southerners more honest online? NTL customers or BT
customers etc. 

 
What utter tosh.  I'm sorry, but aside from the fact that you cannot
determine anything at all from an IP address, because of NAT and
corporate gateways and proxy servers, firewalls and so forth, it misses
out the principles of: 
 
- Psephology - IP addresses might not be pebbles, but you need to
understand the actual system you are considering and not make
generalisations about questions not yet even asked.
 
- Statistical weighting.  Unless you do a universal poll, you should
weight the incoming votes you get so that they represent the population
as a whole.  So, if you ask people to vote, and 25% of the voters are
men, you need to weight the male votes up so they match the 50% in the
population as a whole and unweight the female votes from 75% to 50%. 
 
- Secret ballots.  The whole point of a secret ballot is that you do
not know the votes of other people and cannot be influenced by votes
already cast.  This is not the case with most web, radio and telly
voting where you are being encouraged to part with money, not provide a
statistically correct outcome. 
 
Remember that ALL the voting where you are asked to pay for the call or
text are simply revenue collection systems, not statistically valid
ones.  The adjudicators (on Big Brother for example) simple verify
that the number of calls have been made, not the meaning of the votes.
As far as I know the only systems that the BBC uses on a regular basis
that are statistically valid is the popular music chart and the BARB
figures. 
 
 




There's bugger all you can really do with an IP address,
even a complete one, unless you're a malicious fellow with a botnet
behind you. 


I know that, you know that and everyone on this list knows that,
but it doesn't make as good a headline in the daily mail as BBC giving
out information about your computers or BBC helps spammers then going
on to detail all the evil things that can be done with a botnet... 
Or am I being too cynical?

 
There is no reason why the BBC could not use a table where random values
are assigned to each IP address as they are encountered - as long as a
reverse look up was not published
 
 


Vijay.





-- 


Brian Butterworth 
www.ukfree.tv 


[backstage] Voting data ideas

2007-09-26 Thread Martin Belam
Hi all, I have my BBC hat back on at the moment, and one of the things I
am working on is a project to do with online voting and ratings.

Part of my brief is to explore how the BBC might utilise and re-use
information and data gathered via voting, and hopefully make a business
case for releasing it.

So, whilst trying to avoid a response along the lines of Can we have
all the data, in as many different formats as possible, I wondered what
kind of data would you like to play with, what formats would be handy,
what time intervals, and what can you imagine doing with it.

When talking about voting data I'm thinking of examples like...

The Daily Mini-Quiz on the Magazine -
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/magazine/default.stm
Votes on local BBC sites -
http://www.bbc.co.uk/norfolk/raw/favourite_childrens_book_east_feature.s
html
Votes on CBBC Newsround -
http://news.bbc.co.uk/cbbcnews/hi/newsid_604/newsid_6048100/6048158.
stm

And also things like the Player Rater
http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport1/hi/football/internationals/6447317.stm
(which I can't find an open example of, I think you'll have to have a
look for them around 3pm on Saturday)


What I'm interested in is hearing any ideas you might have about
including that kind of data in prototypes, how you might track it over
time or by topic and so on.

Just to be clear, this isn't a trawl for your IP so I can go and get
stuff built. It is so I can put into a document something along the
lines of - And one of the reasons that releasing the data direct to the
web is a GOOD THING and the RIGHT THING to do is that it only took n
hours for the lovely BBC Backstage community to come up with x fantastic
applications for the data

Ideas welcome on or off-list to [EMAIL PROTECTED]

And please don't mention the Blue Peter cat



All the best,
martin

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RE: [backstage] Voting data ideas

2007-09-26 Thread Martin Belam
. 

The eight out of 10 cat-owners who expressed a preference are now just
too clumsy to be bothered with. When Ant and Dec, or that breathy girl
from The X Factor, announce that 'the nation has chosen', they skip the
bit about 'the bunch of sad gits who stay home on Saturdays and waste
money on premium-rate telephone calls has chosen' (self included, by the
way). 

We devour survey results, careless of method: last week, a poll
'revealed' that two out of three people are unhappy. Now, leaving aside
that I'd give teeth to see how the questions were phrased, what this
actually meant was that two out of three people who have nobody more
interesting to talk to than a pollster are unhappy, a truth, I'd have
thought, by definition. Moreover, in their loneliness, these people
selected themselves as surely as throngs select themselves for focus
groups. 

Those who make money from progressively fashionable focus groups boast
of their cross-sections of age, sex, race and so forth. But, again, they
overlook what really matters: that their guinea pigs are aliens from a
distant planet where a few tenners and a sticky bun are considered a
sane reward for the mind-numbing tedium that is an evening's focus
group. 

Even a jury's verdict is likely, now, to be the opinion of a
self-selected sample. Where once, in sterner times, a cross-section was
reasonably achievable as everyone did his duty, these days, limousine
liberals are adept at deferring jury service, leaving the defendant's
fate largely in the hands of the unemployed and the unemployable who
select themselves or, rather, fail to deselect themselves and are about
as socially representative as Diddly Squat. 

Self-selected samples, by and large, appear to relish their day in the
sun. But while markets and manipulators invest in research, surveys,
psychology, profiles and debriefings from the rising cacophony, it is a
curiosity that, quite possibly, the more we listen to what some people
say, the less we know about what - or even if - most people think. 



 
On 26/09/2007, Martin Belam [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote: 

Hi all, I have my BBC hat back on at the moment, and one of the
things I
am working on is a project to do with online voting and ratings.


Part of my brief is to explore how the BBC might utilise and
re-use
information and data gathered via voting, and hopefully make a
business
case for releasing it.

So, whilst trying to avoid a response along the lines of Can we
have 
all the data, in as many different formats as possible, I
wondered what
kind of data would you like to play with, what formats would be
handy,
what time intervals, and what can you imagine doing with it.

When talking about voting data I'm thinking of examples like...

The Daily Mini-Quiz on the Magazine -
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/magazine/default.stm 
Votes on local BBC sites -

http://www.bbc.co.uk/norfolk/raw/favourite_childrens_book_east_feature.s
html
Votes on CBBC Newsround - 

http://news.bbc.co.uk/cbbcnews/hi/newsid_604/newsid_6048100/6048158.
stm

And also things like the Player Rater

http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport1/hi/football/internationals/6447317.stm
(which I can't find an open example of, I think you'll have to
have a
look for them around 3pm on Saturday)


What I'm interested in is hearing any ideas you might have about

including that kind of data in prototypes, how you might track
it over
time or by topic and so on.

Just to be clear, this isn't a trawl for your IP so I can go and
get
stuff built. It is so I can put into a document something along
the 
lines of - And one of the reasons that releasing the data
direct to the
web is a GOOD THING and the RIGHT THING to do is that it only
took n
hours for the lovely BBC Backstage community to come up with x
fantastic 
applications for the data

Ideas welcome on or off-list to [EMAIL PROTECTED]

And please don't mention the Blue Peter cat



All the best, 
martin

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Re: [backstage] Kreta -- was: Re: Introducing Chipwrapper search for UK newspapers

2007-09-02 Thread Martin Belam
Perhaps that is where all my bandwidth went...

m




On 02/09/07, Richard Smedley [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
 On Sun, 2007-09-02 at 00:50 +0300, Martin Belam wrote:
  Yeah, mostly Pipes to process the RSS feeds, and the Google Custom
  Search Engine. There's also some very crude Perl of my own to add
  Newspaper: Some newspaper headline into the RSS before it gets
  passed to Feedburner, and to make the 'headline buzz' feed.
 
  Apologies on and off list for delay in replying to people. At the
  moment in Crete I'm getting 7.2 Kbps online in 30 second bursts. Ho ho
  ho

 Not at LBW [1] then? I'm sure they'll have the fattest
 pipe on the island.

  - Richard

 [1] http://lbw2007.hellug.gr/index.php/Main_Page


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Re: [backstage] Introducing Chipwrapper search for UK newspapers

2007-08-31 Thread Martin Belam
One of the problems I had with the datestamps is that certain
newspapers CMS systems date all of their entries to being published on
January 1st 1971 or some such arbitrary figure - but possibly I can do
some more work on the Pipes.

m




On 31/08/2007, Mario Menti [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
 Hi Martin,

 this is cool, and I was immediately thinking of feeding the headlines to
 twitter using twitterfeed. However, some of the feeds, e.g.
 http://feeds.feedburner.com/chipwrapper (the chipwrapper uk
 newspaper headlines) don't seem to contain any date stamps, so won't work
 with twitterfeed which needs the time stamps to know if an item is new
 and/or has been posted previously.

 Any chance you could add this?

 Cheers,
 Mario.


 On 8/30/07, Martin Belam [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
 
  Hi all, I wanted to introduce to the list a site I've been working on,
  and invite you to have a play with the feeds being produced, and maybe
  help make some new tools for it.
 
  Called Chipwrapper, it is intended to be a hub for searching purely UK
  newspapers and UK news sources.
 
  http://www.chipwrapper.co.uk
 
  OK, I know, I know, the Chipwrapper metaphor doesn't work once you add
  TV news. Originally it was strictly newspapers only, but it just
  seemed weird to be searching UK news and not see links from the BBC,
  ITN and Sky.
 
  The homepage is a headline aggregator and a Google Custom Search
  Engine which only brings back results from the major UK newspapers,
  plus the TV news giants.
 
  astonishingly long link which will break in your mail client
 
 
 http://www.google.com/custom?cx=003036505619348485408%3Aminejdg5pkecof=AH%3Aleft
 %3BALC%3A%2366%3BBGC%3A%23FF%3BCX%3AChipwrapper%3BDIV%3A%23BB%3BFORID%3A0%3BGALT%3A%23003300%3BGFNT%3A%2366%3BGIMP%3A%2366%3BL%3Ahttp%3A%2F%2Fwww.chipwrapper.co.uk%2Fimages%2Fchipwrapper-logo-small.jpg
 %3BLC%3A%2366%3BLH%3A35%3BLP%3A1%3BS%3Ahttp%3A%2F%2Fwww.chipwrapper.co.uk%3BT%3A%2333%3BVLC%3A%23002200%3Bq=BBC+backstage
 
  /astonishingly long link which will break in your mail client
 
  I plan to add regional and local newspapers to the results later in the
 year.
 
 
  There are Opensearch plugins and a custom Google Toolbar button for the
 service.
 
 
 http://www.chipwrapper.co.uk/tools/browser_search_plugins.shtml
 
 http://www.chipwrapper.co.uk/tools/google_toolbar_buttons.shtml
 
 
  There are also some RSS feeds for news headlines, sport headlines and
  football headlines - with some rugby-flavoured stuff to come to tie-in
  with the upcoming world cup.
 
  http://www.chipwrapper.co.uk/tools/rss_feeds.shtml
 
 
 
  There's also a Headline Buzz feature. It uses a longer Yahoo! Pipe
  which takes ten headlines for each source -
 
 http://pipes.yahoo.com/pipes/pipe.run?_id=QKDz_ihT3BGSheQho_NLYQ_render=rss
  - and then analyses the most popular words.
 
 
  The top 7 words (at the moment) appear on the Chipwrapper homepage as
  the Headline Buzz links, but there is also a headline buzz RSS feed.
  This has all of the words (minus stop words like 'the', 'of' etc)
  that appear more than 3 times in the set of headlines in popularity
  order. It refreshes every hour.
 
  http://feeds.feedburner.com/chipwrapper-buzz
 
 
  There's a page on the site about making DIY stuff, with links to all
  the feeds and the original Yahoo! Pipes I've used to mash-up the
  newspaper content in one place.
 
  http://www.chipwrapper.co.uk/tools/make_stuff.shtml
 
 
 
 
  So far, apart from the cost of registering the domain and my own time,
  I've done everything using free (as in didn't cost me money) tools and
  free (as in I've republished it but am not quite sure how The Sun's
  lawyers are going to take it) content.
 
  There's lots of things that I've thought of, but don't have the
  ability and/or time to do or learn about - like mash-ups with maps,
  tracking headline changes over time, email alerts on topics - which
  maybe some of you guys and gals might want to play with?
 
  Of course, any feedback on what is there already is very welcome on or
  off-list - [EMAIL PROTECTED] - plus does anyone know of a
  really good ready-to-download text file of 'stop' words, because at
  the moment I'm having to build it up by hand?
 
  I'm going to be in London for most of September and October with my
  BBC hat back on for a bit, so hopefully I might see/meet some of you
  at something suitably geeky during the course of that.
 
  all the best,
  martin
 
 
 
 
  --
  Martin Belam - http://www.currybet.net
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Re: [backstage] A bit late

2007-08-22 Thread Martin Belam
But I presume they'll make a knock-off copy on Blue Peter out of
sticky-backed plastic and household waste?





On 22/08/07, Christopher Woods [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:


 New for Christmas 2007: Early Learning Centre presents Tomy's 'My First
 Interactive Media Player'

 £130's about average for those sought-after faddy kids' toys these days
 anyway, isn't it? You know, like Pogs or Tracey Islands or what have you


 I'm showing my age now


  
  From: [EMAIL PROTECTED]
 [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On Behalf Of Andrew Bowden
 Sent: 22 August 2007 09:13
 To: backstage@lists.bbc.co.uk
 Subject: RE: [backstage] A bit late



 IIRC a kids version of iPlayer is on the roadmap - with various content
 controls to prevent the watershed being breached.


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Re: [backstage] BBC iPlayer Protest tommorow, Tuesday 14th, 10:30AM, White City

2007-08-16 Thread Martin Belam
 I guess the idea is Microsoft use the BBC content (that created
from licence fees) and use it to leverage their PlayReady system on
multiple platforms, so the BBC can claim that the system is
cross-platform, whereas people are actually asking for something that
isn't owned by Bill Gates' company...


s/created/commissioned/;
s/people/some people/;


m


On 16/08/07, Brian Butterworth [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
 On 16/08/07, Dave Crossland [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
  On 16/08/07, Jason Cartwright [EMAIL PROTECTED]  wrote:
  
   Does iPlayer contain Silverlight? I've not seen anything to suggest it
 does.
 
  It might not today, but its very clear what Microsoft's web-video strategy
 is.
 
  There was an article in The Register today about this:
 
 
 http://www.theregister.co.uk/2007/08/16/silverlight_iplayer_playready/
 
   What the hell does all this matter anyhow, there is no lock in. The tech
 is
   just being used to deliver the content as per spec, which it seems to be
   doing. Nothing is stopping the BBC ditching MS products for iPlayer at
 any
   time with a simple (automatically installed?) patch, right?
 
  No lock in? Nothing stopping the BBC ditching MS products?  Let's see
  an iPlayer that is free software then please.


 I guess the idea is Microsoft use the BBC content (that created from licence
 fees) and use it to leverage their PlayReady system on multiple platforms,
 so the BBC can claim that the system is cross-platform, whereas people are
 actually asking for something that isn't owned by Bill Gates' company...


  --
  Regards,
  Dave
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Re: [backstage] BBC iPlayer Protest tommorow, Tuesday 14th, 10:30AM, White City

2007-08-15 Thread Martin Belam
Presumably on the news we'll get the traditional 10+% rule of
Organisers put the turnout at 20 people, whilst The Metropolitan
Police said 2-and-a-half-people turned up?


cheers,
martin



On 14/08/07, Dave Crossland [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
 On 14/08/07, David Greaves [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
  Ian Forrester wrote:
   Yep we were there along with about another 20 people.
 
  So were they making a point or trying to make a difference?

 I believe the additional media coverage of the unconscionable
 restrictions in the iPlayer will make a difference.

 --
 Regards,
 Dave
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Re: [backstage] BBC iPlayer Protest tommorow, Tuesday 14th, 10:30AM, White City

2007-08-15 Thread Martin Belam
 Dan Lyons is a well known Microsoft shill.

Who said outing him would spoil the Fake Steve Jobs fun?

Although I do still like the fact that people put serious comments in
reply to the posts, kind of like writing to one of the characters in
Monkey Dust to set them straight about something :-)










On 15/08/07, Dave Crossland [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
 On 15/08/07, Paul Daniel [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
  A view from America.
  http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/TheSecretDiaryOfSteveJobs/~3/144065882/freeta
  rds-attack-bbc-but-get-beaten-off.html

 Dan Lyons is a well known Microsoft shill.

 --
 Regards,
 Dave
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Re: [backstage] BBC iPlayer Protest tommorow, Tuesday 14th, 10:30AM, White City

2007-08-15 Thread Martin Belam
From /.

An anonymous reader writes The future of iPlayer, the BBC's new
online on-demand system for delivering content, is continuing to look
bleaker. With ISPs threatening to throttle the content delivered
through the iPlayer, consumers petitioning the UK government and the
BBC to drop the DRM and Microsoft-only technology, and threatened
legal action from the OSC, the last thing the BBC wanted to see today
was street protests at their office and at the BBC Media Complex
accompanied by a report issued by DefectiveByDesign about their
association with Microsoft.


Elsewhere in the news, more than 100,000 iPlayer sign-ups in a week ;-)

/. is surely the Fox News of the tech world, no?

m







On 15/08/07, vijay chopra [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
 It seems you made it to the slashdot frontpage!
 http://yro.slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=07/08/15/1721229

 Vijay


  On 15/08/07, Matthew Cashmore [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
  Well. When I was interviewing at about 10:45 there were 12 people
 there
  (that's when I took the photos) Ian then came down when I left and he came
  back and said there were about 20 people there after others joined.
 
  m
 
 
  On 15/8/07 16:54, Richard Lockwood [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
 
   Whereas, looking at the photos indicates that 20 is an exaggeration of
   about 100%.
  
   Cheers,
  
   R.
  
   On 8/15/07, Richard Lockwood [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
   More likely, Organisers put the turnout at 800...
  
   R.
  
   On 8/15/07, Martin Belam [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
   Presumably on the news we'll get the traditional 10+% rule of
   Organisers put the turnout at 20 people, whilst The Metropolitan
   Police said 2-and-a-half-people turned up?
  
  
   cheers,
   martin
  
  
  
   On 14/08/07, Dave Crossland [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
   On 14/08/07, David Greaves  [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
   Ian Forrester wrote:
   Yep we were there along with about another 20 people.
  
   So were they making a point or trying to make a difference?
  
   I believe the additional media coverage of the unconscionable
   restrictions in the iPlayer will make a difference.
  
   --
   Regards,
   Dave
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   Registered address:
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  ___
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  BBC Future Media  Technology, Research and Innovation
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Re: [backstage] iPlayer Today?

2007-08-06 Thread Martin Belam
How I enjoyed weekly update meetings with the BBC's message board
team. The cycle generally went like this.

Week 1: The message boards are knacked and overloaded, we are going to
put some extra servers in, that will double the number of messages we
can handle in a day

Week 2: BBC Technology / Siemens haven't put the servers in yet

Week 3: The servers are in, and we have doubled our capacity to handle messages.

Week 4: Now that the boards are working better and are stable, we are
getting three times as many messages as we ever did before

Go back to Week 1

:-)

m



On 06/08/07, Andrew Bowden [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
  From: [EMAIL PROTECTED]
  [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On Behalf Of Nico Morrison
  On 30/07/07, James Cridland [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
   On 7/30/07, Nico Morrison [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
But for heavens sake BBC - put a proper forum up, not this manky
'messageboard'.
   The manky messageboard is the BBC's DNA system, which talks
   correctly to the single sign-on service, and does other
  useful fancy
   things. There's a lot of work going on behind the scenes;
  much of what
   I see of the BBC's current web infrastructure (now I'm
  inside) is very
   Web0.5, but that's being sorted. Don't panic. (That
  previous sentence
   was, I note, an unintended pun, given that 'DNA' is
  actually based on
   the H2G2 engine.)
  There are several scalable, user-friendly forum software
  packages, with the facility to login externally from another
  sign-on service.
  They can also connect to web pages news/articles - often
  called 'talkback', much superior to blog comments, as they
  connect news articles to an automatic forum topic and the
  article can also be founs from the forum.

 For many years in a previous life, I worked on the predecessor to the
 DNA engine, Howerd 2 (named after Frankie Howerd because a funny thing
 happened on the way to the forum - you might guess that Howerd 2 was the
 successor to Howerd)

 One of the problems the BBC has had with its forum software in the past
 is the /sheer/ scalability that such software has needed in the past -
 it's far more than most people imagine.

 Millions of users, at one point nearly 100 different themes, a
 requirement to moderate across different forums easily. And ultimately
 software that doesn't crash every lunch time under the enormous weight
 of board office workers :)

 Last time it was looked at, external software was looked at and
 discounted because nothing was scalable enough - hence a bespoke
 solution was built.  Indeed most large sites of the scale of the BBC
 have had bespoke solutions over the years.

 In the meantime the forum industry has continued to improve their
 offering.  Next time there's a requirement for a software refresh of the
 forum software, then it might just be that an off the shelf offering is
 suitable.


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Re: [backstage] More iPlayer protesting

2007-08-02 Thread Martin Belam
 Again, who (that is assuming sanity)  buys the ridiculously overpriced
 monstrosity that is Sky+ ?

As is often the case on this list we seem to be leaps and bounds ahead
of the general learning curve of the general public. Sky+ might not
make sense to the sane people here, but they have shifted a not
inconsiderable 2.37m units of it - around 25% of their subscriber base
have opted for it. That's the thing - most people just like technology
that works, and don't care about _how_ it works, or what it _will_ or
_won't_ let them do, or the philosophy behind that, because they just
use the product 'as is'

all the best,
martin
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Re: [backstage] More iPlayer protesting

2007-07-31 Thread Martin Belam
From today, you will need to own a Microsoft operating system to view
BBC programming on the web. This is akin to saying you must own a Sony
TV set to watch BBC TV.

He's quite right, because when they launched the trial of the iPlayer,
the BBC shut off the cross-platform system they *used* to run that
allowed you to watch hundreds of hours of BBC TV on the web on-demand
for nothing ;-)

cheers,
martin






On 31/07/07, Gordon Joly [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
 At 19:41 +0100 31/7/07, Dave Crossland wrote:
 On 30/07/07, Jeremy Stone [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
 
   From time to time there has been (mostly around iPlayer) some strong
   criticism of how the BBC develops products. That's good.
 
 http://www.defectivebydesign.org/blog/BBCcorrupted
 
 August 14th seems like a date for the diary :-)
 


 Channels, IE 4?

 Gordo

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Re: [backstage] iPlayer Today?

2007-07-28 Thread Martin Belam
 list archive: 
 http://www.mail-archive.com/backstage@lists.bbc.co.uk/



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Re: [backstage] iplayer reviewed on mashable.com

2007-07-27 Thread Martin Belam
 or 'book' to download for watching later?

Rather oddly the BBC Executive didn't explicitally include the
functionality to bookmark future broadcasts in their submission to the
BBC Trust during the Public Value Test. Consequently, the Trust
decided to specifically rule out the iPlayer having that functionality
available to the user - which seemed to fundamentally miss the point
of the main interaction models for watching TV IMHO, as the BBC Trust
doesn't outlaw anyone setting their video, PVR, or highlighting
something in a listings magazine.

http://www.currybet.net/cbet_blog/2007/02/the_bbc_iplayers_odd_bookmarki_2.php

all the best,
martin




On 27/07/07, [EMAIL PROTECTED] [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:




 Will it be wholly P2P? Or will it operate on a similar principle to 4OD,
 where you can stream now and watch on demand, or 'book' to download for
 watching later?



 - c



  


 From: [EMAIL PROTECTED]
 [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On Behalf Of Simon Cobb
  Sent: 27 July 2007 09:06
  To: backstage@lists.bbc.co.uk
  Subject: [backstage] iplayer reviewed on mashable.com











 http://mashable.com/2007/07/26/bbc-iplayer-2/





 p2p though? I thought it was straight downloads. Can anyone set me straight?
 Thanks.

   ___
  Simon Cobb
  Technical Project Manager, BBC Vision (FL)
  BBC Future Media  Technology
  2507, White City, London W12 7TS
  T:  020 875 27968





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Re: [backstage] iPlayer Today?

2007-07-27 Thread Martin Belam
As I understand it, it is that the Kontiki client underpinning the
iPlayer-library-component-thing doesn't support Vista yet

all the best,
martin




On 27/07/07, Gary Kirk [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
 Why is Windows Vista unsupported? Windows XP is no longer the
 'current' version of the operating system and hasn't been for nearly
 six months. Surely iPlayer should have been developed for both, or
 what's the point of betas and testing and bla?

 On 7/27/07, Jonathan Tweed [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
 
  On 27 Jul 2007, at 09:08, Steve Jolly wrote:
 
   Phil Winstanley wrote:
   Any idea what time it'll be available?
   This press release [1] says it'll be available from here on the
   27^th : -
   http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer
  
   When I go to that link I see a Find out more and register... link
   that takes me through to the signup page.  I'm connecting from
   within the BBC though - perhaps a different page is presented to
   external visitors?
 
  No, that's what appeared last night.
 
  What's been launched today is an 'open, closed beta', i.e. it's still
  only available to users of the beta but anyone can register their
  interest and at some point receive an account.
 
  Cheers
  Jonathan
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Re: [backstage] Over 10,000 sign BBC iplayer petition

2007-07-25 Thread Martin Belam

The whole point of the BBC is that it's not a commercial entity (at

least domestically)

Although it would find it mighty hard to put anything on the screen if
it didn't have confidential commercial negotiations with the companies
who rent buildings, make cameras, do transmission, provide subtitles,
sell teabags etc etc

all the best,
Martin



On 25/07/07, vijay chopra [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:



On 25/07/07, Brian Butterworth [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
 You won't get anything, the FOI Act makes provision for the witholding of
documentation relating to commercial negotiations.

The whole point of the BBC is that it's not a commercial entity (at least
domestically). Besides, if I don't ask, I won't get; if I do ask, the worst
they can do is refuse me.

Vijay.






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Re: [backstage] Worried about your music being pirated?

2007-07-05 Thread Martin Belam

I love the fact that it takes quite a few comments before someone says
the equivalent of or stick a lead in the headphone socket rather
than running some complicated set of emulators and software and
hardware to get the music into a different format. Stick the lead in
the headphone socket every time..

:-)
martin.

On 05/07/07, Frank Wales [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:

You could always try this:
  http://musicthing.blogspot.com/2007/07/dude-releases-his-new-album-on-nes.html

Probably a bit extreme for the BBC to consider, though.

(P.S., don't mention using emulators to distribute copies; it'll only upset 
people.)
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Re: [backstage] BBC Ofcom complaint raised

2007-06-26 Thread Martin Belam
allowed to do so.

The Windows Media Player and MS DRM libraries manage to fail all 3 of
those tests. Which moron decided that it would be a good thing to use
considering the requirement for it being platform neutral?

Add to that the fact an EU court has found that WMP has already been
used to restrict competition and this is adding up to either the
single most incompetent software engineer in the history of the world
or deliberate actions to restrict other operating systems. Which is
it?

Another good trick when working cross platform is to make sure you use
a programming style that is portable. Do NOT call OS functions that
are not defined to exist on multiple platforms. For instance calling
Windows API functions would be non-portable. Calling POSIX functions
would be portable as any system conforming to standards will have the
same functions though the underlying implementation would vary.

I do have further evidence regarding mismanagement but I can't provide
it as it would influence future or current legal proceedings.

Andy

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Re: [backstage] OS choice, assume= ass u me

2007-04-11 Thread Martin Belam
 in this incoming message.
   Checked by AVG Free Edition.
   Version: 7.5.446 / Virus Database: 269.0.0/754 - Release
   Date: 09/04/2007 22:59
  
  
 
  --
  No virus found in this outgoing message.
  Checked by AVG Free Edition.
  Version: 7.5.446 / Virus Database: 269.0.0/754 - Release
  Date: 09/04/2007
  22:59
 
 
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  Date: 09/04/2007 22:59
 
 

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 Date: 09/04/2007
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Re: [backstage] Browser Stats

2007-03-28 Thread Martin Belam

Gruß Gott - if I wasn't being worked like a dog on the last three days
of my contract here in Austria I would have responded at some length
already, but most of the points I would have made appear to have been
covered already... ;-)

I can give you off hand the user agent figures for all the Sony
services I work on though (well, the web ones anyway) - Internet
Explorer 100%, Microsoft Windows 100% - everything else gets chucked
off.

Not through lack of trying on my part, I should add, I have trained a
parrot to sit on my shoulder chipping in with And the reason we don't
support Firefox is? every five minutes during meetings here.

cheers,
martin



On 28/03/07, Kim Plowright [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:

If you read Martin Belam (hello Martin!) on the methods he used to derive these 
figures, you'll note that he's extremely thorough in his data analysis. 
http://www.currybet.net/articles/user_agents/index.php I think you should read 
a little levity in to Jem's use of a grin after the Linux comment!

Below are the stats, taken from our Sage Analyst system 
(http://www.sagemetrics.com/content/sageanalyst/overview.html - about the 
system, currently very slow!), from the 24th of march - the most recent 24h 
period available. We tend to run a bit late, as, IIRC, the daily server logs 
run to around 5gigabytes of data, which needs to be warehoused and processed.

These figures are for all visits, to all pages of the whole of bbc.co.uk, not 
just the homepage.

Automated requests (from bots, spiders etc) are stripped from our data; as far 
as I know we comply with JICWEBS and IFABC  standards that require this. This 
is done using browser string filtering, against an industry standard set of 
strings supplied by IFABC.

I provide these OS breakdowns both as % of Total Page Views, and % of users. 
Unique users are deduplicated, based on Cookie data - so you should caveat that 
with the usual cookie churn stuff*. However, as we're looking at percentage 
shares in a very large (6.5million+) user sample, I think it should be 
considered a good indicative slice.


By Page Impression
Operating Systems for Mar 24, 2007 for Entire Site from Entire World
OS Type % of Total Page Views
Windows 88.37
Macintosh   4.51
Liberate3.32
Nokia   1.09
SonyEricsson0.67
BlackBerry  0.43
Motorola0.36
Samsung 0.23
LG  0.17
NEC 0.08
Orange  0.04
Sagem   0.03
O2  0.02
TMobile 0.01
Sharp   0.01
Linux   0.01
DOS 0
Panasonic   0
BenQ0
Sprint  0
ZTE 0
Philips 0
Unix0
VK  0
Siemens 0
Toshiba 0
Sun 0
Sanyo   0
IRIX0
OSF10
Unidentified0.65

By User
Operating Systems for Mar 24, 2007 for Entire Site from Entire World
OS Type % of Total Users
Windows 85.39
Macintosh   6.51
Nokia   2.26
Liberate1.66
SonyEricsson1.5
Motorola0.84
BlackBerry  0.76
Samsung 0.55
LG  0.18
Sagem   0.08
Orange  0.06
Sharp   0.04
O2  0.03
TMobile 0.03
Linux   0.02
Panasonic   0.02
NEC 0.02
BenQ0.01
DOS 0.01
Philips 0.01
ZTE 0
Sprint  0
Toshiba 0
VK  0
Unix0
Siemens 0
Sanyo   0
Sun 0
IRIX0
OSF10

- - -

Breakdown of WINDOWS operating systems
Operating Systems for Mar 24, 2007 for Entire Site from Entire World
OS Type   % of Total Page Views
Windows XP  53.71
Windows XP SP2  31.96
Windows 20006.94
Windows NT  2.65
Windows Vista   2.25
Windows 98  1.23
Windows ME  0.72
Windows CE  0.35
Windows 32  0.13
Windows 95  0.06
Windows 64  0.01
Windows 31  0

Breakdown of MAC os'es
Operating Systems  for  Mar 24, 2007 for Entire Site from Entire World
OS Type % of Total Page Views
Macintosh X 97.21
Macintosh PowerPC   2.53
Macintosh   0.26
Macintosh OS8   0

Breakdown of LINUX oses
Operating Systems for Mar 24, 2007 for Entire Site from Entire World
OS Type % of Total Page Views
Linux 2443.17
Linux 2236.4
Linux 2020.43

*From our guidance notes, internally:
Figures for unique users are based on the BBCUID.
This is a unique identifier - known as a cookie - which is sent to a user's 
computer the first time they request a page from a BBC web site. Provided the 
cookie is accepted by the requesting computer then it will be saved to that 
computer's memory and will be returned to the web server with all subsequent 
requests.
The returned cookies are included in the log records for each request and 
because each cookie is unique it is then possible to track the activity of each 
user across time.
The total number of unique users is really a count of the number of unique 
BBCUID values seen in the logs.
Note that although each cookie may appear many times in the log it must only be counted 
once. It is this de-duplication that makes unique user figures difficult to 
calculate.

Some important points to note about unique users:

* Users are not people. Cookies attach to browsers, to user logins or 
possibly

Re: [backstage] UK trumps Europe on Linux streaming

2007-03-05 Thread Martin Belam

devils advocate
Wow, what an excellent use of council tax payers money.

I mean, firstly nobody else has developed any kind of streaming video
system, so I'm glad they spent 18 months building it themselves.

And the potential user base is, what, the 1% of people in the UK with
computers that run Linux, provided they also live in Waverley, and
want to stream video of their local council meetings.

I wonder what the cost per user is?

Perhaps we can get together and do a FOI request on the council to find out?
/devils advocate



m









On 02/03/07, Glyn Wintle [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:

http://news.zdnet.co.uk/software/0,100121,39286141,00.htm

When the European Commission launched a streaming
video service last year which excluded Linux users,
large swathes of the open source community became
deeply angry. Now, a Surrey local council has shown
that open source operating systems can be included in
such programmes.

...a local council in Surrey has developed a streaming
project over the last 18 months. And unlike the
Commission's project, developers behind the UK version
have made their service available to Linux users.




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Browse Top Cars by Green Rating at Yahoo! Autos' Green Center.
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Re: [backstage] http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/technology/default.stm

2007-03-02 Thread Martin Belam

The whole blogosphere?


I think they get it sent on a CD-ROM each week, like the way AOL used
to send people the internet ;-)

m

On 01/03/07, Andrew Bowden [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:

 And whilst asking, how does the Beeb choose the FROM THE
  BLOGOSPHERE comments?
 A journalist reads the blogosphere, and chooses something.

The whole blogosphere?

Good job :)

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Re: [backstage] Percentage of License fee going towards DRM?

2007-02-28 Thread Martin Belam

On a related DRM tip, I just thought I'd chip in with some comments my
wife made last night. We download podcasts from the BBC, and from
Virgin Radio (thanks Mr Cridland!), but obviously it is all talk
related, not full track music content.

My wife asked me Are there any podcasts from XFM or something like
that, where they just play you the new cool tunes?

and then she said the immortal words that no anti-DRM zealot ever
wants to hear...

I wouldn't care if I could only listen to it once and it just blew up

So there you go, you have to keep in mind that the people on this list
are not representative of the public in general, whether it is about
clicking web adverts, or avoiding DRM like the plague.

As a consumer my wife is savvy enough to understand the concept of DRM
- and she just doesn't *care* that it restricts her use and re-use of
downloaded material. She's just interested in downloading time-shifed
radio programmes with full music tracks in it, and being able to
listen to it once.
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Re: [backstage] A couple of things including Arrington

2007-02-23 Thread Martin Belam

And it does stop the BBC getting into Oh God Series 19 of Friends syndrome

Actually I think there have been some very good sitcoms in recent
years - Early Doors, Royale Family and off BBC Spaced and Black
Books - but I think this is one of those areas where things are not
held as a 'classic' until years after - for example


Surprisingly, or maybe not, as sometimes a new series can take some
time to work its way into the hearts of the British public, none of
the first series [of Fawlty Towers] in 1975 made an impact in its
respective week's viewing figures. One newspaper sniped: Long John,
Short On Jokes — The Daily Mirror

http://www.fawltysite.net/awards.htm




On 23/02/07, Kirk Northrop [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:

Richard Hyett wrote:
 He raises perhaps inadvertantly  the old point about why we haven't
 done many good 'Situation Comedies recently and when we do why they
 only run for a fairly limited series.  You can't imagine Friends or
 Cheers or MASH closing after two series.

But Two series and out is a very UK way of working. Life on Mars being
a recent example.

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Re: [backstage] BBC Clocks in SVG

2007-02-21 Thread Martin Belam

I had to rescue the original FLA file from a Zip100 disk that I've

been keeping safe in my desk drawer for about six years...

Ah, BBC archiving at its finest :-)








On 20/02/07, Kim Plowright [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:





Heh
 (aside)
 I know it's 'rubbish flash', but this was the first area of the BBC site I
produced all on my own:
 http://www.bbc.co.uk/cult/classic/testcards/
 They're made by a chap called Dave Jeffrey - more of his stuff here
http://625.uk.com/tv_logos/flash.htm
 Oddly, I got a phonecall about them just the other day - they wanted to
reuse one for the recent Life On Mars trailers. I had to rescue the original
FLA file from a Zip100 disk that I've been keeping safe in my desk drawer
for about six years...



 -Original Message-
 From: [EMAIL PROTECTED] on behalf of [EMAIL PROTECTED]
 Sent: Tue 20/02/2007 09:56
 To: backstage@lists.bbc.co.uk
 Subject: [backstage] BBC Clocks in SVG

 Ooops.. sorry for sending again - the URLs got stripped!

 Hello Backstage,

 Yet another lurker!  I noticed on the ideas blog yesterday that Ian
Forrester had suggested using SVG or similar to recreate the old BBC School
clocks.  His original post is here
http://backstage.bbc.co.uk/ideas/archives/2007/01/bbc_clocks_as_a.html

 I haven't managed the school clocks yet, but I have managed to recreate
three of the old BBC 1 clocks, as used at junctions going into the news.
It's my first experiment with mixing SVG+Javascript, so be gentle!

 http://www.domsmith.co.uk/bbc_clocks/
 (Obviously only works in browsers with SVG support, such as Firefox - sorry
IE users)

 Best wishes,

 Dominic.
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Re: [backstage] First BBC Backstage Podcast: DRM and the BBC

2007-02-19 Thread Martin Belam

The automation means that you don't lose any focus.


Erm right, I mean, apart from the time you spend building the
automation into your production process.

And then fixing it when it goes wrong.

And patching and sysadmining the servers running the automation.

And having someone who understands how to support the system.

And briefing your customer service team about it in case they get queries

etc etc









On 18/02/07, Dave Crossland [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:

On 18/02/07, James Cridland [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:

 It's possible for all our podcasts to be produced in Ogg Vorbis
 automatically, too.
...
 Ultimately, no organisation can spend time servicing 0.01% of people without
 losing focus for the 99.99% of people.

The automation means that you don't lose any focus.

--
Regards,
Dave
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Re: [backstage] First BBC Backstage Podcast: DRM and the BBC

2007-02-15 Thread Martin Belam

not *exactly*... the 'it was too popular for its own good' refers to
various local radio stations having their bandwidth soaked up due to
people downloading stuff... not good for business, that...


It didn't do much for productivity either as I recall - I think at the
point my team blagged two or three accounts on the internal beta thing
we must have wasted about five hours (=several people's licence fee)
going effing hell, you can download x, effing hell, you can
download y, effing hell, all of the sports programming etc etc

I've got a similar experience here at Sony at the moment, where my
test account on various live Vodafone services around europe in
'theory' means I have free access to a back catalogue of 500,000+
tracks that I can download for nowt onto my work laptop. Now, if I can
just work out how to get the DRM off them ;-)

cheers,
martin
www.currybet.net
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Re: [backstage] platform-agnostic approach to the iPlayer

2007-02-15 Thread Martin Belam

Nation shall encrypt peace unto nation


Although, of course, if the other nation is using the same OS and has
the right DRM key, that would be better than Nation shall offer
nothing to nation wouldn't it?

ducks

m










On 15/02/07, Brian Butterworth [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:

  What's the point, then? Well, the point of the BBC is that, by
  informing, educating and entertaining everyone in the UK, the
  population of the UK gains both individually and collectively to an
  extent greater than the BBC's negative market impact

 This is a nice argument against BBC DRM, I think :-D

A bit like the one that points out that the BBC's motto is not

Nation shall encrypt peace unto nation




Brian Butterworth
www.ukfree.tv

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Re: [backstage] First BBC Backstage Podcast: DRM and the BBC

2007-02-13 Thread Martin Belam

Haven't had a chance to listen to it yet, but will do. Does that mean
we don't have to carry on the debate here anymore ;-)

cheers,
martin




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On 13/02/07, Dave Crossland [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:

Hi All,

I'd just like to say thanks to everyone who was involved, it was a
pleasure being part of the debate :-)

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Re: [backstage] democracyplayer

2006-12-20 Thread Martin Belam

You're saying the global market is more important than everyone being able

to download BBC content for free.

Hmm, I don't think I was saying that.

What I'm saying is that when the BBC paid for Paul Jackson Productions
to make series I, II, and III of Red Dwarf, the people who made it
(not the BBC), the people who wrote the theme tune (not the BBC), the
people who wrote the incidental music (not the BBC), and the people
who wrote the script (not the BBC) will all have done so in the
expectation of being able to exploit it commercially and earn
additional money for their work through VHS and subsequent overseas
sales.

That is all set up contractually, and you can't just wave your hand
and say that 18 years later, because we have IP delivery of video
content now, it is OK for everybody in the world with an internet
connection to download their work for free on the basis that you have
paid your Licence Fee.

The industry is moving slowly, and not probably in the direction we'd
all hope. PACT have moved towards allowing on demand and catch-up
downloads of independently produced programmes braodcast by the BBC,
but in return they get greater control over the new media commercial
exploitation of programming at a later date

http://www.bbc.co.uk/pressoffice/pressreleases/stories/2006/06_june/02/newmedia.shtml


It occurs to me I may have turned to the dark side since starting to
work at Sony ;-)



martin
http://www.currybet.net


On 19/12/06, Josh at GoUK.com [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:

 if the BBC started chucking out DRM free open format versions
of shows on the web, then it would have a massive impact on the global
market - BBC Worldwide has just signed a deal with Zudeo [1] to sell
copies of shows via P2P in the U.S. market [2] which wouldn't be
feasible if everyone could just download all BBC content for free at
source from the UK


You're saying the global market is more important than everyone being able
to download BBC content for free.

But why shouldn't it be the other way round: that people's right to download
content for free (or at a fee direct from the BBC) be more important that
the global market?

What is all this for: the global market of for people? In the end, the
global market just resells the stuff to the people - why should BBC
content be used to make other BBC content suppliers rich and make people pay
twice for their BBC content?

I even wonder what the BBC is for in this digital era... ... ...




-Original Message-
From: [EMAIL PROTECTED]
[mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] Behalf Of Martin Belam
Sent: Tuesday, December 19, 2006 11:41 AM
To: backstage@lists.bbc.co.uk
Subject: Re: [backstage] democracyplayer

 What you're talking about is a global, industry issue with thousands of
 diverse stakeholders - from actors to cameramen.


And you also have to realise that the rights are not just for the UK,
there are different rights frameworks across the globe. So, for
example, if the BBC started chucking out DRM free open format versions
of shows on the web, then it would have a massive impact on the global
market - BBC Worldwide has just signed a deal with Zudeo [1] to sell
copies of shows via P2P in the U.S. market [2] which wouldn't be
feasible if everyone could just download all BBC content for free at
source from the UK


martin

http://currybet.net

[1] http://www.zudeo.com/
[2] http://www.zudeo.com/az-web/docs/PR20061219_BBC_Content_Partnership.pdf


On 19/12/06, Andrew Bowden [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
  Dave Crossland [EMAIL PROTECTED] writes:
   So that's one reason for the BBC to dump their own-brand
   NIH-syndrome
   iPlayer and start publishing video feeds you can consume in
   Democracy
   or whatever player you like the most, just like they
   publish RSS feeds of the news stories.
  Absolutely. I like that idea a lot.
  I think there would still be space for the BBC to do
  something in this area just because they're the BBC. My mum
  is probably not going to use Democracy but she probably would
  use something from Auntie.


 Ultimately this is exactly the reason why the BBC (and other parties) do
 these things.  Why does AOL have its own browser after all?  If people
 didn't use it, they wouldn't create it.

 There is a world of between the kind of person that is on backstage and
 the average BBC user.

 I can still remember the first time I ever saw some user testing being
 performed (for those that don't know, it's where various people come in,
 sit at a computer and are asked to do various tasks, like try and find
 something on a website - for those who the testing is being done for,
 there is usually a two way mirror or video link so that you can watch
 what's going on).

 In one respect I found my first session incredibly frustrating (almost
 wanting to shout through the mirror LOOK!  IT'S THERE!) but in another
 way, it was extremely enlightening.  It showed me a different side to
 the coin.  The side where people don't distinguish between adverts and
 general website

Re: [backstage] democracyplayer

2006-12-20 Thread Martin Belam

This is maybe going a bit off-topic for this list?


In an era where we now have IP video delivery (and such delivery will
increase in the future) then what is the point of the BBC?


It is very good question, and one that there was a lot of debate on in
the run-up to the charter renewal fandango.

I think three of the salient points with regard to direct IP broadcast
without the BBC as a distributor are

- you can get 8m people around the TV for a shared experience watching
Strictly Come Dancing and Doctor Who, but there are few (if any)
videos on YouTube with an aggregation of 8 million eyeballs on them

- Inital funding for those programmes that independent production
companies make on TV and radio (and within New media on web sites and
software) comes from the Licence Fee. I don't know that you'd see the
same level of commissioning if smaller independent producers had to
find start-up cash for each programme they wanted to make

- there are still more TV sets in the UK than broadband connections





I'm also concerned that the licence fee is used to support the BBC's net
activities - it gives the BBC a huge advantage over other net companies who
don't get public money to support their online ventures.


The DCMS online review found that to be the case in a couple of areas,
which the BBC shut down. I guess it really comes down to the argument
of whether people still think having bbc.co.uk as a digital on-ramp to
the internet for people in the Uk is on the whole a good thing. If
using the iPlayer for free makes people more confident about
downloading TV shows and watching them on their PC, and so go on to
buy download content from Sky or Channel 4, then has that benefitted
or distorted the market?

Interestingly in my line of work at the moment, all my user testing
says people love the idea of streaming music to their mobile phones,
but don't try it because they are worried about the price. Now, if
they had a free service to get them used to the concept, does that
make them more or less likely to sign up to a subscription in the long
term for a different service?

all the best,
martin

http://www.currybet.net


On 20/12/06, Josh at GoUK.com [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:

Thanks, Martin, for the explanation - appreciated and understood.

In an era where we now have IP video delivery (and such delivery will
increase in the future) then what is the point of the BBC? If Paul Jackson
Productions can produce Red Dwarf IV, why not just sell it direct on the net
(every production company can be its own IP driven TV station) - what is
the point of a BBC funded by the licence fee? At one time, the BBC was
needed as a distributor of content, but do we still need the BBC to do that
now if everyone has the ability to publish and distribute on their own?

And of BBC programming - do we need it? Commercially there are plenty of
ways to get similar (and sometimes identical/repeat) content to what the BBC
provides. I am not trying to be objectionable or malicious: I am genuinely
struggling to understand why the country needs a publicly funded broadcaster
 or at least one as big and as powerful as the BBC.

I'm also concerned that the licence fee is used to support the BBC's net
activities - it gives the BBC a huge advantage over other net companies who
don't get public money to support their online ventures.

Festive wishes

Josh


-Original Message-
From: [EMAIL PROTECTED]
[mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] Behalf Of Martin Belam
Sent: Wednesday, December 20, 2006 9:13 AM
To: backstage@lists.bbc.co.uk
Subject: Re: [backstage] democracyplayer

 You're saying the global market is more important than everyone being
able
to download BBC content for free.

Hmm, I don't think I was saying that.

What I'm saying is that when the BBC paid for Paul Jackson Productions
to make series I, II, and III of Red Dwarf, the people who made it
(not the BBC), the people who wrote the theme tune (not the BBC), the
people who wrote the incidental music (not the BBC), and the people
who wrote the script (not the BBC) will all have done so in the
expectation of being able to exploit it commercially and earn
additional money for their work through VHS and subsequent overseas
sales.

That is all set up contractually, and you can't just wave your hand
and say that 18 years later, because we have IP delivery of video
content now, it is OK for everybody in the world with an internet
connection to download their work for free on the basis that you have
paid your Licence Fee.

The industry is moving slowly, and not probably in the direction we'd
all hope. PACT have moved towards allowing on demand and catch-up
downloads of independently produced programmes braodcast by the BBC,
but in return they get greater control over the new media commercial
exploitation of programming at a later date

http://www.bbc.co.uk/pressoffice/pressreleases/stories/2006/06_june/02/newme
dia.shtml


It occurs to me I may have turned to the dark side since starting to
work

Re: [backstage] democracyplayer

2006-12-19 Thread Martin Belam

What you're talking about is a global, industry issue with thousands of
diverse stakeholders - from actors to cameramen.



And you also have to realise that the rights are not just for the UK,
there are different rights frameworks across the globe. So, for
example, if the BBC started chucking out DRM free open format versions
of shows on the web, then it would have a massive impact on the global
market - BBC Worldwide has just signed a deal with Zudeo [1] to sell
copies of shows via P2P in the U.S. market [2] which wouldn't be
feasible if everyone could just download all BBC content for free at
source from the UK


martin

http://currybet.net

[1] http://www.zudeo.com/
[2] http://www.zudeo.com/az-web/docs/PR20061219_BBC_Content_Partnership.pdf


On 19/12/06, Andrew Bowden [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:

 Dave Crossland [EMAIL PROTECTED] writes:
  So that's one reason for the BBC to dump their own-brand
  NIH-syndrome
  iPlayer and start publishing video feeds you can consume in
  Democracy
  or whatever player you like the most, just like they
  publish RSS feeds of the news stories.
 Absolutely. I like that idea a lot.
 I think there would still be space for the BBC to do
 something in this area just because they're the BBC. My mum
 is probably not going to use Democracy but she probably would
 use something from Auntie.


Ultimately this is exactly the reason why the BBC (and other parties) do
these things.  Why does AOL have its own browser after all?  If people
didn't use it, they wouldn't create it.

There is a world of between the kind of person that is on backstage and
the average BBC user.

I can still remember the first time I ever saw some user testing being
performed (for those that don't know, it's where various people come in,
sit at a computer and are asked to do various tasks, like try and find
something on a website - for those who the testing is being done for,
there is usually a two way mirror or video link so that you can watch
what's going on).

In one respect I found my first session incredibly frustrating (almost
wanting to shout through the mirror LOOK!  IT'S THERE!) but in another
way, it was extremely enlightening.  It showed me a different side to
the coin.  The side where people don't distinguish between adverts and
general website navigation.  Where people can't see what you consider to
be extremely obvious.


Most importantly, it gave me a firm impression.  That I should always,
always, always remember...  not everyone is like me.


That's not to say that everything should be dumbed down to the lowest
level - just that, for the BBC anyway, it's important to try and cater
for everyone.


  Unfortunately, the Backstage community appears uninterested
 in talking
  about Free Software media formats, and why they are important. (I
  don't know why this is.)
 I am interested in talking about it. I know others here are.
 But the trouble is we can't solve the problem. We need to get
 the management thinking about the rights of the licence payer
 instead of the rights of the talent.

Actually I'd say that's only part of the problem because if it was just
a BBC issue, you'd be almost there.

What you're talking about is a global, industry issue with thousands of
diverse stakeholders - from actors to cameramen.

There is, for example, a certain, well known British actor who has
decreed that some of his early work cannot be repeated on television.
Everytime someone tries to negotiate repeat rights for those series, he
is a voice that says no.  As such the programmes can't be repeated.

That's the way the industry has worked for decades.  Trying to unpick it
will take years.  That's a guarentee.


Anyway, back to those tedious admin tasks I'm supposed to be doing right
now :)

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Re: [backstage] Mozilla interview and Backstage Schwag preview

2006-12-05 Thread Martin Belam

I don't know why it seems to be Flash in particular that brings this

out in folk.

I can tell you that it is no different on the continent either - I
spent a very entertaining meeting here in Austria the other week
facing exactly the same The horror! The horror! reaction to the
notion of using Flash :-)

all the best,
martin
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Re: (freeing) content is king (was Re: [backstage] Psiphon Next Gen content)

2006-11-29 Thread Martin Belam

Ian, why don't you apply for the job of Chairman of the BBC?


I think the Chairman is more of a strategic hands-off job, and I'm
sure Ian would miss getting his hands dirty with widget code :-)





On 29/11/06, Nic James Ferrier [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:

Ian Forrester [EMAIL PROTECTED] writes:

 I keep meaning to draw this out and post it on my blog

I am suprised at the level of heavy breathing going on about Grade's
departure. Clearly there is very little vision in the executive branch
of the television industry right now.

I think it's time that someone who understands the content issues from
the point of view of the future took over Auntie.

Ian, why don't you apply for the job of Chairman of the BBC?


--
Nic Ferrier
http://www.tapsellferrier.co.uk   for all your tapsell ferrier needs
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Re: [backstage] Psiphon

2006-11-28 Thread Martin Belam

As far as I am aware, every song on TOTP up until 1983 was

re-recorded so that the BBC owned the rights of broadcast in the
charter it clearly states that the BBC must distribute its content to
the UK public. so where is all that music that I payed for :-)


A lot of it got discarded, even the good stuff - The story also
features The Beatles in a film clip. It was originally planned for the
band to appear as themselves, but under heavy aging make-up, to
represent themselves in the future; but their schedules conflicted.
Thus, footage from the BBC pop music magazine programme Top of the
Pops was used instead. Ironically, considering the number of lost
Doctor Who episodes, this is the only surviving clip of the Beatles
from Top of the Pops.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Chase_(Doctor_Who)


cheers,
m
http://www.currybet.net



On 28/11/06, Richard Edwards [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:

Hi Lee,

I accept your points, at the same time though, the British are being sold on 
this idea of privacy with a number, an ID number. Well, as a public Corporation 
the BBC could reverse that thinking and treat us all as UK residents wherever 
we are in the world already.. it is still far easier to find people that 
you can trust, than to be weighed down by the thoughts of people that you 
cannot.
That is pandering to the lowest common denominator.
The benefits far out-weigh the negatives for a closer social community.
I think it is a shame that all that power goes to support the tiny worse case 
scenario.
As far as I am aware, every song on TOTP up until 1983 was re-recorded so that the BBC 
owned the rights of broadcast in the charter it clearly states that the BBC must 
distribute its content to the UK public. so where is all that music that I 
payed for :-)
I am sure that similar can be said for BBC TV. All they would have to do is say 
publically that such and such a show was going to be aired on the net, in not 
best quality, and that the original producer would be payed X. If he doesn't agree - fine 
- but right now is anyone asking that question?
If you can see a matrix of good honest people, the vast majority, across the 
planet, all UK residents if you want, all hosting bits of a show and streaming 
it, then the BBC doesn't have to host anything. it simply has to control 
the first issue and the delivery mechanism. Which is exactly what it is trying 
to do now along with Sky, ITV etc.
The first lines do not have political leanings, please excuse me if it comes 
across that way. I am not interested in negative or political social 
engineering, but take a look, the fact is that it is happening all around us 
right now.

Richard

On Tuesday, November 28, 2006, at 09:52AM, Lee Goddard [EMAIL PROTECTED] 
wrote:
From P Edwards (Monday, November 27, 2006 11:19 PM):

 I think it is pretty laughable :-)

 I am very happy to pay for quality and expensive programming,
 but being censored from the same, just because of a legal
 precedent, is almost the ultimate insult, especially if one
 does have a UK TV license.
 In my hallucination, it should take one person within
 Auntie's legal department about a month to change the
 contracts for content production, add some budget for servers
 and bandwidth, to make the biggest change to how the BBC
 works since radio gave way to black and white TV.

Probably less time, but I guess the problems isn't that the Beeb can't find 
the time for contract-updating. I imagine every recording has associated contracts 
and releases, and often after the initial broadcast and an agreed number of 
re-broadcastings, the artist release evaporates, and the rights revert to the 
performers.


 I can hear the voices of resistance still. There is absolutely no reason not 
to

Hosting all that media, not to mention distributing it at a reasonable rate, 
is not going to be cheap.


 So where exactly did all this locking out and streaming
 certain content to certain places come from? Big brother? :-)

It certainly annoyed me when in Cologne: I could watch Planet Earth but not 
the website. On the other hand, I would be more annoyed if, after paying my TV 
Tax/Licence, I couldn't watch the website because the bandwidth is consumed by 
people outside the UK who don't pay for it.  Maybe that's selfish of me :)


 How about leading the way with both feet in to a new world of
 a really universal BBC on the net, with none of the
 boundaries? The opposite to the TV world.

To be fair, it is the British Broadcasting Corporation, not Universal ;)
Flippant, but I do think that it is not the job of the British Broadcasting 
Corporation to be addressing the world (save the World Service, World news 
channel): rather, shouldn't Auntie be taking care of broadcasting to the British 
people?


 I'm sure that a way could be programmed to reverse Psiphon or
 the like, with something like real-time P2P to distribute the
 feeds via a massive server of trusted associates, now that
 would be 

Re: [backstage] Psiphon

2006-11-27 Thread Martin Belam

What happens when setting up a proxy service is as easy as running

an application and using one is as easy as typing in a url?

It means I finally get to listen to the Ashes here in Austria :-)





On 27/11/06, Ian Forrester [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:



So it looks like some kind of GPL tunnelling service/application?

Looks interesting though, specially if they make it super easy to use.

It does raise a whole load of privacy questions for the user (I would
suggest Tor is better in that case) and lots of questions for a broadcaster
such as the BBC who uses GeoIP.

What happens when setting up a proxy service is as easy as running an
application and using one is as easy as typing in a url?

Interesting :)

Ian Forrester || backstage.bbc.co.uk || x83965



 
 From: [EMAIL PROTECTED]
[mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On Behalf Of Richard P Edwards
Sent: 27 November 2006 11:53
To: backstage@lists.bbc.co.uk
Subject: Re: [backstage] Psiphon


Wow, I will be watching the next World Cup live on the BBC then. ;-)
If this does what I think it will, then the resulting discussion will,
again, have consequences for everyone. Personally, I like the idea of
sharing and from this side of the Channel, the UK is a state that censors.
I accept the reasons why, copyright etc. but this will push those
regulations once more.
Now, I am off to find a trusted friend. :-)
Thanks Mario.





On 27 Nov 2006, at 10:17, Mario Menti wrote:

Just stumbled upon this, and thought it may be of interest to some folks on
the list: http://psiphon.civisec.org

According to the front page, psiphon is a human rights software project
developed by the Citizen Lab at the Munk Centre for International Studies
that allows citizens in uncensored countries to provide unfettered access to
the Net through their home computers to friends and family members who live
behind firewalls of states that censor.

Mario.



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Re: [backstage] AGH! Cruddy BBC website

2006-11-14 Thread Martin Belam

One of the things I tried to do that I was suprised didn't work [and

is an issue for backstage I suspect] is the normal BBC 2 tv
schedule. It only has links for one week. I didn't try url hacking
maybe that would have worked I don't know. I was just suprised that
the standard listing showed only one week of listings.


The TV schedule is only actually fixed about 10 days in advance.
There is even legislation/code of practice about when the terrestrial
TV companies have to notify each other of what they are going to show
when. When I was at the BBC I saw a presentation about the whole
scheduling effort which was quite gob-smacking in its complexity.

all the best
martin

http://www.currybet.net
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Re: [backstage] Flickr Photo Map...

2006-11-10 Thread Martin Belam
Now a useful feature would be the ability to drag someone's incorrectly placed photo across the map to the right spot.That way I could stop greyhounds winning races a good bus ride away from Walthamstow's dog stadium - 
http://www.flickr.com/photos/emsef/227626652/ - and somebody Sapnish could sort our my errant understanding of Madrid, where I'm not sure if my Real Madrid photos are hovering over their ground or Atleticos - 
http://www.flickr.com/map/madridPerhaps you could get a message like Such-and-such Flickr person has suggested respositioning photo x to hereI wonder how many URLs like this there are - it gets down to some pretty small places
http://www.flickr.com/map/chania (pop 60,000, Crete)and it even makes a semi-passable stab at http://www.flickr.com/map/yorkshire
all the best,martinhttp://www.currybet.netOn 10/11/06, Chris Sizemore 
[EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:wow, this one blows me away:
http://www.flickr.com/map/birminghamdoes it know I'm geoIP'd in the UK?is anyone in the states right now? does this URL show you birmingham,alabama or brum?
bestcs-Original Message-From: [EMAIL PROTECTED][mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED]
] On Behalf Of Tom LoosemoreSent: 10 November 2006 15:12To: backstage@lists.bbc.co.ukSubject: [backstage] Flickr Photo Map...
http://www.flickr.com/map/london/Nice...Though I don't understand the logic behind the 'pages' approach-Sent via the backstage.bbc.co.uk discussion group.To unsubscribe,
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Re: [backstage] Newssniffer - BBC News site monitoring

2006-10-24 Thread Martin Belam
As someone who used to work closely with the BBC community site teams my first thought was what happens when the BBC pulls posts for legal reasons, and this site reproducesthem - who ends up potentially legally liable - the site re-hosting the content, the BBC, or the original poster, even though they didn't give explicitpermission for newssniffer to re-use the content.


*shuffles off to consult lawyer*

all the best,
martin
http://www.currybet.net


On 24/10/06, Jason Cartwright [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:


Thought this might be of interest to the backstage crew:

http://newssniffer.newworldodour.co.uk/articles/list_by_revision

http://newssniffer.newworldodour.co.uk/bbc/threads/mostcensored


J


Jason Cartwright
Client Side Developer -CBBC Interactive
[EMAIL PROTECTED] 

Desk: (0208 57) 67938
Mobile: 07976500729

Recreate the world in your own image and make it better for your having been here - Ray Bradbury



Re: [backstage] Official BBC Weather feeds ahoy!

2006-10-20 Thread Martin Belam
 Is there any chance this could have 5 days like the url suggests? 
Are there any plans to include the full 5-day forecasts in the feed?I'm pretty sure the key phrase in Kathryn's opening email was (Met Office willing)
:-(martinOn 18/10/06, Michael Pritchard [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
also the url is a bit deceiving, seeing '5day' in the url made me think that it would contain a 5 day forecast, but it only seems to be 1 day. Is there any chance this could have 5 days like the url suggests?

On 18/10/06, Michael Pritchard [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:

what would be useful would be some sort of listing of all areas, such as an opml file. I don't fancy manually finding out what each of the 7379 feeds correspond to
On 18/10/06, 
Kathryn Schmitt [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:












Greetings Backstagers,


I am very pleased to inform you that BBC Weather's first RSS feeds are now live. Links to them can be found on all 5 day forecast pages: 


http://www.bbc.co.uk/weather/5day.shtml 

The feeds are located at 


http://feeds.bbc.co.uk/weather/feeds/rss/{world|id}/{location_id}.xml


E.g. 


http://feeds.bbc.co.uk/weather/feeds/rss/5day/id/2315.xml and 


http://feeds.bbc.co.uk/weather/feeds/rss/5day/world/4567.xml

All of the 7379 feeds are updated at least* twice a day (at approximately 8AM/PM *GMT*). 


We are planning more feeds, and improvements to these ones as well (e.g. dynamic generation of feeds, which will allow us to offer different flavours such as Atom; additional content such as tide times and current observations (Met Office willing); additional semantic mark-up).


In the meantime we look forward to seeing your BBC Weather widgets in the Backstage Widgets Compo: 


http://backstage.bbc.co.uk/news/archives/2006/10/widgets_competi.html

I have included geo:lat/long tags in all entries to facilitate mappy mashups. Enjoy!


I look forward to hearing your comments, concerns and ideas.


Best,

Kass




Kathryn Schmitt

Senior Developer

BBC Weather Centre

2026 Television Centre

T: 020 82259448

M: 0771 7582482


www.bbc.co.uk/weather

www.bbc.co.uk/climate





-- --Michael PritchardWeb:: 

http://www.blueghost.co.uk
GMail:: [EMAIL PROTECTED]--

-- --Michael PritchardWeb:: 
http://www.blueghost.co.uk
GMail:: [EMAIL PROTECTED]--




Re: [backstage] Last played songs?

2006-05-18 Thread Martin Belam
 I suspect at many points in the show, he's has on two different 
tracks, plus his own drum machine.



Well, that at least goes some way to explaining why I find it an 
intolerable racket ;-)


More seriously on this point, I think on this list there are a 
collection of people who are likely to be more tolerant of the 80/20 
rule than the general public. You would be astonished at the number of 
phone calls, yes *phone calls*, that the BBC gets to complain about 
typographical errors on news.bbc.co.uk or spelling mistakes on News 24 
captions or about pages failing to update on Ceefax. Dan is right to be 
wary.


m




James Mastros wrote:

On Tue, May 16, 2006 at 05:04:53PM +0100, Richard P Edwards wrote:

   Hi,
   I would like to add to this.
   If you look on the Pete Tong Radio 1 web-site, for example, you will see
   that a playlist is published as much as possible.

Note, by the way, that the Pete Tong show (if it's the one I'm thinking of;
I've only caught the beginning of it once -- not my cup of tea) contains
just about every possible special case.  It contains music mixed from the
source well in advance, it contains a live show, it probably contains single
performances split into multiple 2 hour chuncks.  It's likely nearly
impossible for even the majority of the transcript to be up live, and I
suspect at many points in the show, he's has on two different tracks, plus
his own drum machine.


   Two points come to mind...
   1. If the shows are specialist then it is very important that the audience
   has this information.
   2. In which ever case, for the sake of the music business and new artists,
   there should never be a situation where this information is not documented
   for MCPS/PRS etc..

I assume what you mean is so that the artists get paid.  There's a limit
to that, though.  Artists don't need to get paid for several weeks (possibly
several months).  They don't get paid for a few seconds of the song.  In
fact, I'm surprised they get paid directly by the BBC at all -- in the US,
the recording industry gives away tracks, including the right to play them
on air -- to the radio.  They consider it great advertising.  OTOH, around
here there's a lot more TV advertising for music.  (Not on the BBC,
obviously.)


   Therefore 80% actually online now, is far better than the odd piece
   missed, for everyone concerned. Anyway - what do those show producers do
   whilst on air?

Um, produce the show?  It takes a lot of effort to make this sort of thing
look effortless.  Who do you think listens to everybody calling the Jo
Whiley show?  (Which reminds me of another fun special case -- every morning
on her show at approx 10:30, she has a segment during which the entire point 
is that the audience doesn't know what tracks are being played in real-time, 
the 7 song shuffle.)


-=- James Mastros
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RE: [backstage] Weather feeds

2005-11-16 Thread Martin Belam
Fair play, the delay is annoying, as is building up a false expectation - but 
I'll wager my tuppence that Ben and Jem are more fed up with the wrangling 
causing the delay than anyone outside the BBC :-(

m


-Original Message-
From: [EMAIL PROTECTED] on behalf of Dogsbody
Sent: Tue 15/11/2005 11:25 PM
To: backstage@lists.bbc.co.uk
Subject: Re: [backstage] Weather feeds
 

 Is there any word on when the weather feeds are being released?
 I went to OpenTech 05, and I seem to recall it was happening next 
 week!

 Oh, it's a long story - but I'm sorry it's been delayed and I'm hoping
 we can get this out in the next 14 days or so.
 
 Sorry for sending a chase but I'm very interested in this feed and it's 
 almost a month later! :-\  Any news??

And now almost another month!   Please can I submit this as feedback on 
the Backstage service.  I would rather you say that something is a year 
away than say it is 14 days or so away when it isn't :-\

Regards, Dan
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RE: [backstage] Backstage - Stagnant

2005-10-26 Thread Martin Belam
Firstly I'd echo Tom's sentiment:

 Strange behaviours surface when you see bbc.co.uk at the end of your email 
 address; fear of bringing opprobrium to the BBC due to saying the wrong 
 thing in public can cause otherwise eloquent BBC employees to clam up.

I'm normally happy to shout to the rooftops about what we've been doing, but I 
find myself a bit nervy posting to this list because I know firstly that it is 
populated by a load of very intelligent people, and secondly because anything I 
say, typos and all, is being instantly pinged into the in-boxes of some of the 
colleagues and peers that I respect the most. SO I don't want to say anything 
stupid.


 - The front page archive.
---
One of the objectives of Backstage this year is to make as many of the 
submitted prototypes live on bbc.co.uk as we can. The homepage archive is the 
first of these and going live next week. Matthew submitted the idea to 
backstage, we liked it, we contracted (and paid) him to do the work to make it 
live on bbc.co.uk. We'd like and want to do more of this and are looking hard 
at some other contenders. The hold ups aren't the strength of your ideas or how 
they've been presented and I hope that Tom's mail has given you a little bit 
more background in terms of what we think we need. Hurdles are sometimes 
rights, and tricky infrastructure stuff but mostly its persuasion and 
reassurance which as Tom has said perhaps we've been doing too much behind 
closed doors.



Maybe we should have been more forthright about saying that we *were* doing 
this. It has been an interesting challenge not just on the legal/contract side 
but on the product development side. The work to get it running for the BBC 
rather than outside the BBC is being done in my production group. Turning a 
prototype into a beta service with a BBC URL is something we are doing for the 
first time, and suddenly all sorts of considerations come into it. 

Here is just one example, if we know that we are about to do a one-off special 
version of the homepage, which will cause the archive to register every single 
thing on the page changing, and that breaks the templates the archive is 
published in, that isn't a problem for us if it is a backstage prototype hosted 
externally. Once we are doing it *as the BBC* however, suddenly someone 
emailing my team Your homepage archive didn't work properly over the weekend 
becomes an email we have to answer. So does that mean the templates of the 
homepage archive have become or should become, a design constraint on the 
homepage itself? So leaving aside the infrastructure considerations, these kind 
of product development decisions are things we frankly haven't done before. And 
they have been fun - I wrote up an initial draft of how to turn the 'prototype' 
into a 'beta product', and one of my Assistant Producers looks to have done a 
great job with Matthew in getting it up and running for us. !
 But that has all taken time, and the work has had to be prioritised against 
the other work in my production area.

We've also been working on generating some new, and hopefully useful feeds - I 
take on board the point about asking you what the BBC wants. When we have them 
properly running on live I'll remember to be vocal about what I was hoping 
might come out of them

all the best,
martin












-Original Message-
From: [EMAIL PROTECTED] [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On Behalf Of Jeremy Stone
Sent: Wednesday, October 26, 2005 1:16 PM
To: backstage@lists.bbc.co.uk
Subject: RE: [backstage] Backstage - Stagnant


Could you /please/ start sending us some sort of 
 ongoing status things on the competition.

We have a short list of three for the (3) prizes and we're now arguing the toss 
about who's gonna win. There's some legal fine detail that we've just sorted. 
So we just need to get in touch with the individuals first and then we'll 
announce it to the list and site. This took longer than I'd hoped. Partly 
because Ben was away and partly because I was crap. That said I'll say again we 
were genuinely taken aback with the quality of the prototypes submitted and 
will feedback in greater detail what we liked and what blew us away to the 
list/site again. I've dropped a note offlist to Leo from MightyTV and I'll do 
the same to the rest of you who entered.

 
  giving weekly status reports

Ok we'll give it a go. For now here's whats on the slate..
Tom has filled in as admirably as ever on the bigger picture but here's some 
more detail.
- RSS / APIs
--
Data, data, data. I know this is the key to making backstage work for a lot of 
you and the BBC still has a limited range of data that we can offer for all 
sorts of reasons. However, centrally we now have some live test feeds of the 
popular links within search, jobs, tickets, BBC press releases, complaints, the 
BBC front page and tv pages.  These are relatively small projects but the idea 
for converting them came from 

RE: [backstage] breaking news alerts

2005-09-07 Thread Martin Belam
In the wierd way that the BBC works I am responsible for both the homepage 
Breaking News and the system that delivers the breaking News email. The 
breaking news email and desktop alert gozmo are both much more fequent events 
than switching the homepage into 'breaking news' mode

The BBC sends out breaking news emails and alerts in the same way it puts a 
breaking news strap on News 24, i.e. every time a story breaks or a big one 
develops.

Putting the homepage into Breaking News mode is more akin to We interupt this 
programme to bring you an urgent news story happening on BBC One. In fact BBC 
One being interupted is one of the criteria for switching it over.

all the best,
m


-Original Message-
From: [EMAIL PROTECTED] on behalf of Matthew Somerville
Sent: Tue 06/09/2005 9:24 PM
To: backstage@lists.bbc.co.uk
Subject: Re: [backstage] breaking news alerts
 
Murray wrote:
 On Tue, Sep 06, 2005 at 07:53:49PM +0100, Matthew Somerville wrote:
 
 Do you mean you want http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/help/3533099.stm and/or
  http://newsvote.bbc.co.uk/email/breakingnews ? :)
 
 I don't think so.  Last time I checked, they both issue emails at least
 once a day.  More frequent than I want.

No, that's http://newsvote.bbc.co.uk/email/news - the breakingnews one above 
only emails for breaking news (although the page does say daily e-mail, 
that's a mistake, I believe).

 I could be wrong tho.

Certainly the Windows program (the first URI) doesn't send any emails, it 
pops up a window as soon as there's breaking news, the page has a screenshot 
of what it did when the Pope died:
http://newsimg.bbc.co.uk/media/images/40996000/gif/_40996331_popealert203.gif
Works here.

ATB,
Matthew
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winmail.dat

RE: [backstage] Test

2005-08-16 Thread Martin Belam
I know there have been some issues with the Majordomo servers, and that
some work is planned on them, but I'm not aware that they have packed in
completely

Martin Belam, Senior Development Producer, BBC New Media  Technology




-Original Message-
From: [EMAIL PROTECTED]
[mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On Behalf Of Phil Mossop
Sent: Tuesday, August 16, 2005 3:43 PM
To: backstage@lists.bbc.co.uk
Subject: Re: [backstage] Test


Last message I got was on the 12th. Same for everyone else?

Phil Mossop
[EMAIL PROTECTED]
- Original Message - 
From: Graeme Mulvaney 
To: backstage@lists.bbc.co.uk 
Sent: Tuesday, August 16, 2005 2:45 PM
Subject: Re: [backstage] Test


it's been a bit quiet of late...


On 8/16/05, Ben Metcalfe [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote: 
Yes, I hate it too when dumb people like myself send TEST messages. 
Doh, this obviously it working... 
Sorry. 


Ben :: backstage.bbc.co.uk 



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RE: [backstage] Test

2005-08-16 Thread Martin Belam
Ha! Ha! The unintentional irony - amongst other things I've been working
on/off for nearly three years now trying to get Majordomo replaced
within the BBC...

m

-Original Message-
From: [EMAIL PROTECTED]
[mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On Behalf Of Amias Channer
Sent: Tuesday, August 16, 2005 4:12 PM
To: backstage@lists.bbc.co.uk
Subject: Re: [backstage] Test


On Tue, 16 Aug 2005 15:51:03 +0100
Martin Belam [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:

 I know there have been some issues with the Majordomo servers, and 
 that some work is planned on them, but I'm not aware that they have 
 packed in completely

Could i suggest changing to mailman ?
http://www.gnu.org/software/mailman/

.It has a nice web interface for controlling subscription options and an
archive browser. 

Toodle-pip
Amias
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