Re: [backstage] Stephen Fry: There is this marvellous idea the iPlayer is secure. It's anything but secure

2008-05-18 Thread Dave Crossland
2008/5/18 Richard Edwards [EMAIL PROTECTED]:

 The problem isn't money, it is the legal contracts associated with trying to 
 protect
 created works for use worldwide through the internet, and the derivatives.

The ones that exist will time out; the ones that haven't been signed
yet can be changed.

Some authors have realised that protecting - I would say the more
accurate phrase is restricting - their works from anyone else's
non-commercial distribution and modification, worldwide, is doomed -
and actually harms them by pushing their audience away.

The number of these authors appears to be increasing, not levelling off.

Creative Commons has already done decent generic legal work an author
needs for this, and the BBC has repeatedly done its own legal work to
this effect.

The BBC ought to ignore the authors who won't accept this is the 21st
century, and concentrate on the authors who will enter these
audience-friendly legal contracts.

 Personally I would like to see a brand new approach, one that truly protects 
 the rights
 of the creator against the interests of big business, as well as this new 
 market.

I believe non commercial CC terms restrict big business enough.

But proposing that authors need protection from this new market,
which is also known as, er, their _audience,_ is absurd; the buyer
ultimately decides the terms of sale, the seller can only influence
them.

 The BBC should be perfectly placed to promote a new ideal, a new
 contract between creators and the world of the internet not simply
 for the UK, or for no financial reward. They themselves fund creations,
 and therefore have exactly the same potential problems.

I think there are two models here, and the BBC makes use of both.

The 'investment-capital' model raises money from investors, spends it
on it authoring something, and then tries to sell copies of the thing
to end up with more money than was invested.

The 'original BBC' model is to collect tax money, spend it on
authoring something, and then make copies of the thing available to
those who paid the taxes.

The current BBC is mostly just a buyer to investment-capital modelled
companies, but still does some original BBC authoring.

The investment model is broken when it depends on monetising
non-commercial uses, and the original BBC model is broken when it
expects to only make things available to those who paid the taxes.
Neither of these things is a disaster.

The Internet also allows new forms of business, which I've been
discussing elsewhere recently, and perhaps BBC could do something like
http://lists.gnu.org/archive/html/gnuherds-app-dev/2008-03/msg00019.html

 I have yet to find anyone in the UK who is able to see the internet of
 2012 as more open than 1993.

I think it will be; the semantic web and handheld computers running
free software will make the net more open. States that are more
dictatoral will clamp the net down more, and free states will not.

 Business in the artistic world seems to want to close it all down in
 to country states.

This is as likely to succeed as DRM :-)

 But briefly, if I pay UK tax, a UK license fee, have a UK home, a
 UK passport with Europe on it.. why do I still lose the use of iPlayer
 just because I am overseas? Others have solved this problem

It is indeed bogus that the BBC hasn't announced this as an upcoming
feature of iPlayer :-)

 I'll happily contribute more if anyone wishes.

:-)

-- 
Regards,
Dave
Personal opinion only.
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Re: [backstage] Stephen Fry: There is this marvellous idea the iPlayer is secure. It's anything but secure

2008-05-18 Thread frankie roberto
On Thu, May 8, 2008 at 1:40 PM, Jeremy Stone [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:

 the transcript and audio have just been uploaded.
 http://www.bbc.co.uk/thefuture/transcript_fry.shtml

 video goes out on bbc parliament and then iplayer after that on sat 9pm.

Annoyingly (an perhaps ironically), even though the video seems to be
permanently available online here:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/programmes/bbc_parliament/7396964.stm and
here: http://www.bbc.co.uk/thefuture/video_fry.shtml, the video isn't
available (or even a link to it) at
http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b00bwfzh or on iPlayer
(http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/page/item/b00bwfzh.shtml) at all...

Frankie
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Re: [backstage] Stephen Fry: There is this marvellous idea the iPlayer is secure. It's anything but secure

2008-05-17 Thread Dave Crossland
2008/5/8 Richard P Edwards [EMAIL PROTECTED]:

 I am still not certain about Dave Crossland's model either

As kind as it is to be attributed with the http://freedomdefined.org
model of culture that I advocate, may I suggest you call it the
culture freedom model or similar :-)

 as a result it is very frustrating to try to professionally consider why I 
 should
 work so hard when the rules of distribution are clearly so uncertain at
 present

May I suggest you work hard because you love what you do, and if its
just about the money, slack off a bit :-)

-- 
Regards,
Dave
Personal opinion only :-)
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Re: [backstage] Stephen Fry: There is this marvellous idea the iPlayer is secure. It's anything but secure

2008-05-17 Thread Richard Edwards
Thanks Dave,

If I slacked anymore, I'd be totally horizontal. :-)
The problem isn't money, it is the legal contracts associated with trying to 
protect created works for use worldwide through the internet, and the 
derivatives.
Personally I would like to see a brand new approach, one that truly protects 
the rights of the creator against the interests of big business, as well as 
this new market. It should be so simple, especially when the words culture, 
BBC, and Rights are used within the Backstage list, repeatedly. 
I'm saddened that the technical and innovational advantage that the BBC had in 
decades gone by, is now perhaps being lost, under the guise of political and 
social correctness. when equally we are all becoming more and more aware 
that the BBC is no longer a single entity, but more a collection of private 
interest's contracted to work together. :-) This is slowly being extended.
Yes, there are parts of the content of the BBC that do belong to the culture 
and fabric of British society.. but if the archive represents the real 
model of what is happening now, then we are all going to lose out. I hope that 
some there are actually debating the future, and whether the return to 
important culture is something that is worth not only protecting, but 
protecting for society  to represent this time as a stamp for the world. 
Legally. :-) 
The BBC should be perfectly placed to promote a new ideal, a new contract 
between creators and the world of the internet not simply for the UK, or 
for no financial reward. They themselves fund creations, and therefore have 
exactly the same potential problems. as well as an incredible opportunity 
ahead. 
The connected parts of this debate are amazingly complex, but I have yet to 
find anyone in the UK who is able to see the internet of 2012 as more open than 
1993. Business in the artistic world seems to want to close it all down in to 
country states. Those borders should not be so problematic by now. Art doesn't 
respect them.
The Bealtles, and British music in general, would have been pretty sad if the 
guys hadn't borrowed from the US Blues and African rhythms.the 
BBC/UKCentric model of the world wide web does not allow for this innovation to 
happen freely. I remember time shifting the news on the BBC site back in 
1997.. over 10 years ago, and how far have we come? In 12 years I know that 
there is much that is different in the coding, but very little that has been 
truly innovative enough to change the BBC's contribution to society as a whole.
That is not to bash anyone... radio hasn't changed in essence, nor has TV, 
but for tinkering to some features and obvious technical advances.
I love the net, and I have surfed it since 1989.. it has changed, and is 
changing as I write. Everyone now has a library of information.. their own 
as well as the worlds. The structure of business within the net doesn't have to 
be the same as the real world. can you imagine the Rolling Stones saying 
that they were only going to play in the UK? Absurd. Same with Hollywood and 
Cinema.
This is only a brief introduction.. I'll happily contribute more if anyone 
wishes. But briefly, if I pay UK tax, a UK license fee, have a UK home, a UK 
passport with Europe on it.. why do I still lose the use of iPlayer just 
because I am overseas? Others have solved this problem without cutting off 
their customers or audience, but I understand it cannot be done if one 
follows the rules of the real world but meanwhile those who do it illegally 
tend to get most of what they wish for. Should we all have another slice of 
cultural anarchy? Google in bondage. :-)
Regards
Rich


On Saturday, May 17, 2008, at 07:22PM, Dave Crossland [EMAIL PROTECTED] 
wrote:
2008/5/8 Richard P Edwards [EMAIL PROTECTED]:

 I am still not certain about Dave Crossland's model either

As kind as it is to be attributed with the http://freedomdefined.org
model of culture that I advocate, may I suggest you call it the
culture freedom model or similar :-)

 as a result it is very frustrating to try to professionally consider why I 
 should
 work so hard when the rules of distribution are clearly so uncertain at
 present

May I suggest you work hard because you love what you do, and if its
just about the money, slack off a bit :-)

-- 
Regards,
Dave
Personal opinion only :-)
-
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RE: [backstage] Stephen Fry: There is this marvellous idea the iPlayer is secure. It's anything but secure

2008-05-08 Thread Andrew Wong
It's rather interesting that one of the very few TV personalities who
really *gets* the digital revolution (tm) and all that is essentially
arguing that the digital arms race needs to be beefed up, instead of
starting negotations.
 
My personal opinion, not those of my employers etc.
 
Andrew
 


From: [EMAIL PROTECTED]
[mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On Behalf Of Brian Butterworth
Sent: 08 May 2008 08:31
To: backstage@lists.bbc.co.uk
Subject: [backstage] Stephen Fry: There is this marvellous idea the
iPlayer is secure. It's anything but secure


http://www.guardian.co.uk/media/2008/may/08/bbc.television2



He also sounded a warning for BBC executives, accusing them of
incredible naivety in believing they could control the distribution of
programmes online. 

Programmes distributed via the BBC's increasingly popular online iPlayer
service are supposed to be viewable for a week only, and can be stored
on a PC for up to 30 days. But Fry said that large numbers of viewers
were bypassing the corporation's digital rights management software, and
more would follow. 

There is this marvellous idea the iPlayer is secure. It's anything but
secure, said Fry, host of the TV quiz show QI. His recent documentary
on the Gutenberg printing press was one of the most popular programmes
on the iPlayer catch-up service. The BBC is throwing out really
valuable content for free. It shows an incredible naivety about how the
internet and digital devices work.

Fry admitted to bypassing the copy protection to transfer programmes to
his Apple iPhone, and said the corporation's iPlayer was hurting its
commercial rivals. 


Brian Butterworth



Re: [backstage] Stephen Fry: There is this marvellous idea the iPlayer is secure. It's anything but secure

2008-05-08 Thread Tom Loosemore
unhelpfully, the BBC's not yet put up the transcript of the speech, so
it's hard to judge given the vagries of reporting...

http://www.bbc.co.uk/thefuture/

2008/5/8 Andrew Wong [EMAIL PROTECTED]:


 Can I just pedal backwards very quickly as I realise that in reading the
 article, Mr. Fry actually said no such thing... he just pointed out that the
 lock wasn't particularly secure. Which is not news to anyone...

 *pedals backwards rapidly*

  
  From: [EMAIL PROTECTED]
 [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On Behalf Of Andrew Wong
 Sent: 08 May 2008 10:20

 To: backstage@lists.bbc.co.uk
 Subject: RE: [backstage] Stephen Fry: There is this marvellous idea the
 iPlayer is secure. It's anything but secure




 It's rather interesting that one of the very few TV personalities who really
 *gets* the digital revolution (tm) and all that is essentially arguing that
 the digital arms race needs to be beefed up, instead of starting
 negotations.

 My personal opinion, not those of my employers etc.

 Andrew

  

 From: [EMAIL PROTECTED]
 [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On Behalf Of Brian Butterworth
 Sent: 08 May 2008 08:31
 To: backstage@lists.bbc.co.uk
 Subject: [backstage] Stephen Fry: There is this marvellous idea the iPlayer
 is secure. It's anything but secure


 http://www.guardian.co.uk/media/2008/may/08/bbc.television2



 He also sounded a warning for BBC executives, accusing them of incredible
 naivety in believing they could control the distribution of programmes
 online.

 Programmes distributed via the BBC's increasingly popular online iPlayer
 service are supposed to be viewable for a week only, and can be stored on a
 PC for up to 30 days. But Fry said that large numbers of viewers were
 bypassing the corporation's digital rights management software, and more
 would follow.

 There is this marvellous idea the iPlayer is secure. It's anything but
 secure, said Fry, host of the TV quiz show QI. His recent documentary on
 the Gutenberg printing press was one of the most popular programmes on the
 iPlayer catch-up service. The BBC is throwing out really valuable content
 for free. It shows an incredible naivety about how the internet and digital
 devices work.

 Fry admitted to bypassing the copy protection to transfer programmes to his
 Apple iPhone, and said the corporation's iPlayer was hurting its commercial
 rivals. 
 Brian Butterworth

-
Sent via the backstage.bbc.co.uk discussion group.  To unsubscribe, please 
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RE: [backstage] Stephen Fry: There is this marvellous idea the iPlayer is secure. It's anything but secure

2008-05-08 Thread Andrew Wong
Can I just pedal backwards very quickly as I realise that in reading the
article, Mr. Fry actually said no such thing... he just pointed out that
the lock wasn't particularly secure. Which is not news to anyone...
 
*pedals backwards rapidly*



From: [EMAIL PROTECTED]
[mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On Behalf Of Andrew Wong
Sent: 08 May 2008 10:20
To: backstage@lists.bbc.co.uk
Subject: RE: [backstage] Stephen Fry: There is this marvellous idea the
iPlayer is secure. It's anything but secure


It's rather interesting that one of the very few TV personalities who
really *gets* the digital revolution (tm) and all that is essentially
arguing that the digital arms race needs to be beefed up, instead of
starting negotations.
 
My personal opinion, not those of my employers etc.
 
Andrew
 


From: [EMAIL PROTECTED]
[mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On Behalf Of Brian Butterworth
Sent: 08 May 2008 08:31
To: backstage@lists.bbc.co.uk
Subject: [backstage] Stephen Fry: There is this marvellous idea the
iPlayer is secure. It's anything but secure


http://www.guardian.co.uk/media/2008/may/08/bbc.television2



He also sounded a warning for BBC executives, accusing them of
incredible naivety in believing they could control the distribution of
programmes online. 

Programmes distributed via the BBC's increasingly popular online iPlayer
service are supposed to be viewable for a week only, and can be stored
on a PC for up to 30 days. But Fry said that large numbers of viewers
were bypassing the corporation's digital rights management software, and
more would follow. 

There is this marvellous idea the iPlayer is secure. It's anything but
secure, said Fry, host of the TV quiz show QI. His recent documentary
on the Gutenberg printing press was one of the most popular programmes
on the iPlayer catch-up service. The BBC is throwing out really
valuable content for free. It shows an incredible naivety about how the
internet and digital devices work.

Fry admitted to bypassing the copy protection to transfer programmes to
his Apple iPhone, and said the corporation's iPlayer was hurting its
commercial rivals. 


Brian Butterworth



Re: [backstage] Stephen Fry: There is this marvellous idea the iPlayer is secure. It's anything but secure

2008-05-08 Thread Tom Loosemore
Good example of how the world looks *very* different if you're a
rights holder currently making money from your secondary rights...
even a rights holder as clued up as Fry

2008/5/8 Andrew Wong [EMAIL PROTECTED]:


 It's rather interesting that one of the very few TV personalities who really
 *gets* the digital revolution (tm) and all that is essentially arguing that
 the digital arms race needs to be beefed up, instead of starting
 negotations.

 My personal opinion, not those of my employers etc.

 Andrew

  

 From: [EMAIL PROTECTED]
 [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On Behalf Of Brian Butterworth
 Sent: 08 May 2008 08:31
 To: backstage@lists.bbc.co.uk
 Subject: [backstage] Stephen Fry: There is this marvellous idea the iPlayer
 is secure. It's anything but secure



 http://www.guardian.co.uk/media/2008/may/08/bbc.television2



 He also sounded a warning for BBC executives, accusing them of incredible
 naivety in believing they could control the distribution of programmes
 online.

 Programmes distributed via the BBC's increasingly popular online iPlayer
 service are supposed to be viewable for a week only, and can be stored on a
 PC for up to 30 days. But Fry said that large numbers of viewers were
 bypassing the corporation's digital rights management software, and more
 would follow.

 There is this marvellous idea the iPlayer is secure. It's anything but
 secure, said Fry, host of the TV quiz show QI. His recent documentary on
 the Gutenberg printing press was one of the most popular programmes on the
 iPlayer catch-up service. The BBC is throwing out really valuable content
 for free. It shows an incredible naivety about how the internet and digital
 devices work.

 Fry admitted to bypassing the copy protection to transfer programmes to his
 Apple iPhone, and said the corporation's iPlayer was hurting its commercial
 rivals. 
 Brian Butterworth

-
Sent via the backstage.bbc.co.uk discussion group.  To unsubscribe, please 
visit http://backstage.bbc.co.uk/archives/2005/01/mailing_list.html.  
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Re: [backstage] Stephen Fry: There is this marvellous idea the iPlayer is secure. It's anything but secure

2008-05-08 Thread Matt Barber
Didn't think of it like that, good points

On Thu, May 8, 2008 at 10:34 AM, Tom Loosemore [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
 Good example of how the world looks *very* different if you're a
  rights holder currently making money from your secondary rights...
  even a rights holder as clued up as Fry

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Re: [backstage] Stephen Fry: There is this marvellous idea the iPlayer is secure. It's anything but secure

2008-05-08 Thread Richard P Edwards
I agree with Mr Fry's position and furthermore, I think that it  
is important, as is my own case, to understand that there are many  
rights-holders who fear all of this. and the result is that they  
cannot see a high quality/secure way to release their work for  
financial reward. Therefore the speed of cultural development has  
suffered since the mid 90's, across both TV and Radio. and a lot  
of supporting industries.
If the BBC were to connect the two it would be wonderful, even a new  
secure codec would help.
I am still not certain about Dave Crossland's model either.. and  
as a result it is very frustrating to try to professionally consider  
why I should work so hard when the rules of distribution are clearly  
so uncertain at present.

RichE

On 8 May 2008, at 10:42, Tom Loosemore wrote:


unhelpfully, the BBC's not yet put up the transcript of the speech, so
it's hard to judge given the vagries of reporting...

http://www.bbc.co.uk/thefuture/

2008/5/8 Andrew Wong [EMAIL PROTECTED]:



Can I just pedal backwards very quickly as I realise that in  
reading the
article, Mr. Fry actually said no such thing... he just pointed  
out that the

lock wasn't particularly secure. Which is not news to anyone...

*pedals backwards rapidly*

 
 From: [EMAIL PROTECTED]
[mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On Behalf Of Andrew Wong
Sent: 08 May 2008 10:20

To: backstage@lists.bbc.co.uk
Subject: RE: [backstage] Stephen Fry: There is this marvellous  
idea the

iPlayer is secure. It's anything but secure




It's rather interesting that one of the very few TV personalities  
who really
*gets* the digital revolution (tm) and all that is essentially  
arguing that

the digital arms race needs to be beefed up, instead of starting
negotations.

My personal opinion, not those of my employers etc.

Andrew

 

From: [EMAIL PROTECTED]
[mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On Behalf Of Brian  
Butterworth

Sent: 08 May 2008 08:31
To: backstage@lists.bbc.co.uk
Subject: [backstage] Stephen Fry: There is this marvellous idea  
the iPlayer

is secure. It's anything but secure


http://www.guardian.co.uk/media/2008/may/08/bbc.television2



He also sounded a warning for BBC executives, accusing them of  
incredible
naivety in believing they could control the distribution of  
programmes

online.

Programmes distributed via the BBC's increasingly popular online  
iPlayer
service are supposed to be viewable for a week only, and can be  
stored on a

PC for up to 30 days. But Fry said that large numbers of viewers were
bypassing the corporation's digital rights management software,  
and more

would follow.

There is this marvellous idea the iPlayer is secure. It's  
anything but
secure, said Fry, host of the TV quiz show QI. His recent  
documentary on
the Gutenberg printing press was one of the most popular  
programmes on the
iPlayer catch-up service. The BBC is throwing out really valuable  
content
for free. It shows an incredible naivety about how the internet  
and digital

devices work.

Fry admitted to bypassing the copy protection to transfer  
programmes to his
Apple iPhone, and said the corporation's iPlayer was hurting its  
commercial

rivals. 
Brian Butterworth


-
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please visit http://backstage.bbc.co.uk/archives/2005/01/ 
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RE: [backstage] Stephen Fry: There is this marvellous idea the iPlayer is secure. It's anything but secure

2008-05-08 Thread Jeremy Stone
the transcript and audio have just been uploaded.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/thefuture/transcript_fry.shtml

video goes out on bbc parliament and then iplayer after that on sat 9pm.

fry's point about downloading iPlayer files is actually a sideshow to (another) 
lengthy spirited defence of the licence fee and the public good.

some nice jokes, intellectual flights of fancy and laboured metaphors too of 
course.



-Original Message-
From: [EMAIL PROTECTED] on behalf of Richard P Edwards
Sent: Thu 5/8/2008 1:45 PM
To: backstage@lists.bbc.co.uk
Subject: Re: [backstage] Stephen Fry: There is this marvellous idea the 
iPlayer is secure. It's anything but secure
 
I agree with Mr Fry's position and furthermore, I think that it  
is important, as is my own case, to understand that there are many  
rights-holders who fear all of this. and the result is that they  
cannot see a high quality/secure way to release their work for  
financial reward. Therefore the speed of cultural development has  
suffered since the mid 90's, across both TV and Radio. and a lot  
of supporting industries.
If the BBC were to connect the two it would be wonderful, even a new  
secure codec would help.
I am still not certain about Dave Crossland's model either.. and  
as a result it is very frustrating to try to professionally consider  
why I should work so hard when the rules of distribution are clearly  
so uncertain at present.
RichE

On 8 May 2008, at 10:42, Tom Loosemore wrote:

 unhelpfully, the BBC's not yet put up the transcript of the speech, so
 it's hard to judge given the vagries of reporting...

 http://www.bbc.co.uk/thefuture/

 2008/5/8 Andrew Wong [EMAIL PROTECTED]:


 Can I just pedal backwards very quickly as I realise that in  
 reading the
 article, Mr. Fry actually said no such thing... he just pointed  
 out that the
 lock wasn't particularly secure. Which is not news to anyone...

 *pedals backwards rapidly*

  
  From: [EMAIL PROTECTED]
 [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On Behalf Of Andrew Wong
 Sent: 08 May 2008 10:20

 To: backstage@lists.bbc.co.uk
 Subject: RE: [backstage] Stephen Fry: There is this marvellous  
 idea the
 iPlayer is secure. It's anything but secure




 It's rather interesting that one of the very few TV personalities  
 who really
 *gets* the digital revolution (tm) and all that is essentially  
 arguing that
 the digital arms race needs to be beefed up, instead of starting
 negotations.

 My personal opinion, not those of my employers etc.

 Andrew

  

 From: [EMAIL PROTECTED]
 [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On Behalf Of Brian  
 Butterworth
 Sent: 08 May 2008 08:31
 To: backstage@lists.bbc.co.uk
 Subject: [backstage] Stephen Fry: There is this marvellous idea  
 the iPlayer
 is secure. It's anything but secure


 http://www.guardian.co.uk/media/2008/may/08/bbc.television2



 He also sounded a warning for BBC executives, accusing them of  
 incredible
 naivety in believing they could control the distribution of  
 programmes
 online.

 Programmes distributed via the BBC's increasingly popular online  
 iPlayer
 service are supposed to be viewable for a week only, and can be  
 stored on a
 PC for up to 30 days. But Fry said that large numbers of viewers were
 bypassing the corporation's digital rights management software,  
 and more
 would follow.

 There is this marvellous idea the iPlayer is secure. It's  
 anything but
 secure, said Fry, host of the TV quiz show QI. His recent  
 documentary on
 the Gutenberg printing press was one of the most popular  
 programmes on the
 iPlayer catch-up service. The BBC is throwing out really valuable  
 content
 for free. It shows an incredible naivety about how the internet  
 and digital
 devices work.

 Fry admitted to bypassing the copy protection to transfer  
 programmes to his
 Apple iPhone, and said the corporation's iPlayer was hurting its  
 commercial
 rivals. 
 Brian Butterworth

 -
 Sent via the backstage.bbc.co.uk discussion group.  To unsubscribe,  
 please visit http://backstage.bbc.co.uk/archives/2005/01/ 
 mailing_list.html.  Unofficial list archive: http://www.mail- 
 archive.com/backstage@lists.bbc.co.uk/

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Re: [backstage] Stephen Fry: There is this marvellous idea the iPlayer is secure. It's anything but secure

2008-05-08 Thread Michael Walsh
2008/5/8 Richard P Edwards [EMAIL PROTECTED]:

 I agree with Mr Fry's position and furthermore, I think that it is
 important, as is my own case, to understand that there are many
 rights-holders who fear all of this. and the result is that they cannot
 see a high quality/secure way to release their work for financial reward.
 Therefore the speed of cultural development has suffered since the mid 90's,
 across both TV and Radio. and a lot of supporting industries.
 If the BBC were to connect the two it would be wonderful, even a new
 secure codec would help.
 I am still not certain about Dave Crossland's model either.. and as a
 result it is very frustrating to try to professionally consider why I should
 work so hard when the rules of distribution are clearly so uncertain at
 present.
 RichE


What if you didn't have to fear copying - but instead embraced it?
What if you could, in effect, outsource the heavy lifting of the
distribution to those who wished to do it for you?
What if you could build a direct connection to, and a business model from,
people's desire to watch/listen/read your stuff?

The trick then is to develop a relationship with those who obviously love
your work. I could ramble on - but I have already:
http://digitalrightsmanifesto.wordpress.com/2008/04/05/marginal-cost-of-zero-or-substitute-goods-redux/

I have a dog in this fight. I think you can compete with free without having
to technologically cripple the person who wants to give you their money.
I've started up a business which recognises free as your starting point and
everything after that is about building relationships with those who wish to
give you their money! I won't do an advertising pitch (not really what this
list is for) - other than to say drop me a line if you would like to know
more.

-- 
Michael Walsh

Mobile: +44-(0)771-2524200
Mobile: +353-(0)85-1278212

Email: [EMAIL PROTECTED]
Web: http://www.digitalrightsmanifesto.com
Blog: http://digitalrightsmanifesto.wordpress.com


Re: [backstage] Stephen Fry: There is this marvellous idea the iPlayer is secure. It's anything but secure

2008-05-08 Thread Sean DALY
http://www.contentinople.com/author.asp?section_id=450doc_id=152567

So Verisign is spinning off Kontiki?
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Re: [backstage] Stephen Fry: There is this marvellous idea the iPlayer is secure. It's anything but secure

2008-05-08 Thread Phil Wilson

Jeremy Stone wrote:

the transcript and audio have just been uploaded.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/thefuture/transcript_fry.shtml


wot, no mp3? ;)

Phil
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RE: [backstage] Stephen Fry: There is this marvellous idea the iPlayer is secure. It's anything but secure

2008-05-08 Thread Jeremy Stone
don't shoot the messenger!


-Original Message-
From: [EMAIL PROTECTED] on behalf of Phil Wilson
Sent: Thu 5/8/2008 3:56 PM
To: backstage@lists.bbc.co.uk
Subject: Re: [backstage] Stephen Fry: There is this marvellous idea the 
iPlayer is secure. It's anything but secure
 
Jeremy Stone wrote:
 the transcript and audio have just been uploaded.
 http://www.bbc.co.uk/thefuture/transcript_fry.shtml

wot, no mp3? ;)

Phil
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Re: [backstage] Stephen Fry: There is this marvellous idea the iPlayer is secure. It's anything but secure

2008-05-08 Thread Phil Wilson

Jeremy Stone wrote:

don't shoot the messenger!


I initially thought of signing off as Phil 'never satisfied' Wilson, but couldn't bear the 
thought of causing so much nationwide tittering.


Oh, wait...
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