Re: [BlindHandyMan] advice putting up a fence

2010-09-09 Thread Bob Kennedy
You know?  I've put these fences up quite a few times.  I  see I'm completely 
ignorant when it comes to names of parts.

From the link to Lowes, it looks like there are different posts available 
depending on the topography of the property.  Had to sneak in that 50 cent 
word so I didn't feel stupid as well.

They talk about a change in elevation of 15 inches over 100 feet.  Not all that 
much of a drop over the entire run.  That is less slope than a sewer line 
requires at a quarter inch per foot.  

I'm going to have to play dumb here.  I've always just put in a longer post in 
order to keep the height above ground the same.  They want the bottom of the 
fencing, fabric 2 inches off the ground.  If I get to Lowes before you get an 
answer I'll ask some questions.  But from what I read, I'll be giving different 
info which may confuse things even further.


- Original Message - 
From: Kevin Doucet 
To: blindhandyman@yahoogroups.com 
Sent: Wednesday, September 08, 2010 10:41 PM
Subject: Re: [BlindHandyMan] advice putting up a fence


  
Hi Bob,

I either did not give enough information 
describing what I am confused about or I am so 
confused that I don't understand your answer.

Let me paste the information that confused me 
along with a link to the page with the 
information on installing the fence and see if 
this helps me and you to figure this out.

(snip)
Adding Fittings to Terminal Posts
STEP 1
After concrete footings have been allowed to 
sufficiently harden, slip the rail end
bands and tension bands onto the terminal posts. 
(Refer to parts list for the description
and quantity of fittings that are required for 
various post types and heights.) The
long flat surface of the tension band should face 
toward the outside of the fence
NOTE: Take care not to spread or distort the fittings.
STEP 2
Apply all terminal post caps.
Terraced Ground Corner post assembly is used at 
point A to allow fabric to follow
terraced contour of ground
Very Uneven Ground Corner post assembly is used 
at points A and B when ground rises
or drops more than 15 per 100 linear feet

To me it sounds like I might need to use one or 
another type of Corner post assembly, depending 
on the raise or fall of the ground.

This is what I am confused about.

This info is found on page;

http://www.lowes.com/cd_Install+a+Chain+Link+Fence_588388906_?cm_cr=Fencing+1.2-_-Web+Activity-_-Fencing+1.2+A6+Activity-_-SC_Fencing_Area6-_-20115_5

At 04:04 AM 9/8/2010, you wrote:


You still need the posts to be installed to the 
same depth as the other posts. So if you have 
fur feet showing on level ground, that's what 
you want on the incline. The posts on the 
incline have to remain plumb, or level up and 
down. That can be a challenge if you refer to 
the ground. Using a level, check on two sides of 
the post, 90 degrees from each other to make 
sure it is vertical in both directions. The 90 
degrees will take the sway or lean out of the post .
- Original Message -
From: Kevin Doucet
To: mailto:blindhandyman%40yahoogroups.comblindhandyman@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Wednesday, September 08, 2010 12:49 AM
Subject: [BlindHandyMan] advice putting up a fence

Hi all,

Ok, sorry to change horses mid stream, but, I decided to go with a
chain link fence. Lots more expensive, but, I feel it will help the
property value stay up. Got it all sussed out, except for one thing.

Part of the fence will be going up an incline. I read something on
the lowes url about needing to do something different for an end post
which is on an incline or decline, but, I did not understand what it
said. Can any one shed some light on this situation?

Thanks for all the help.

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Re: [BlindHandyMan] advice putting up a fence

2010-09-08 Thread Bob Kennedy
You still need the posts to be installed to the same depth as the other posts.  
So if you have fur feet showing on level ground, that's what you want on the 
incline.  The posts on the incline have to remain plumb, or level up and down.  
That can be a challenge if you refer to the ground.  Using a level, check on 
two sides of the post, 90 degrees from each other to make sure it is vertical 
in both directions.  The 90 degrees will take the sway or lean out of the post .
  - Original Message - 
  From: Kevin Doucet 
  To: blindhandyman@yahoogroups.com 
  Sent: Wednesday, September 08, 2010 12:49 AM
  Subject: [BlindHandyMan] advice putting up a fence



  Hi all,

  Ok, sorry to change horses mid stream, but, I decided to go with a 
  chain link fence. Lots more expensive, but, I feel it will help the 
  property value stay up. Got it all sussed out, except for one thing.

  Part of the fence will be going up an incline. I read something on 
  the lowes url about needing to do something different for an end post 
  which is on an incline or decline, but, I did not understand what it 
  said. Can any one shed some light on this situation?

  Thanks for all the help.



  

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



Re: [BlindHandyMan] advice putting up a fence

2010-09-08 Thread Kevin Doucet
Hi Bob,

I either did not give enough information 
describing what I am confused about or I am so 
confused that I don't understand your answer.

Let me paste the information that confused me 
along with a link to the page with the 
information on installing the fence and see if 
this helps me and you to figure this out.

(snip)
Adding Fittings to Terminal Posts
STEP 1
After concrete footings have been allowed to 
sufficiently harden, slip the rail end
bands and tension bands onto the terminal posts. 
(Refer to parts list for the description
and quantity of fittings that are required for 
various post types and heights.) The
long flat surface of the tension band should face 
toward the outside of the fence
NOTE: Take care not to spread or distort the fittings.
STEP 2
Apply all terminal post caps.
Terraced Ground Corner post assembly is used at 
point A to allow fabric to follow
terraced contour of ground
Very Uneven Ground Corner post assembly is used 
at points A and B when ground rises
or drops more than 15 per 100 linear feet

To me it sounds like I might need to use one or 
another type of Corner post assembly, depending 
on the raise or fall of the ground.

This is what I am confused about.

This info is found on page;

http://www.lowes.com/cd_Install+a+Chain+Link+Fence_588388906_?cm_cr=Fencing+1.2-_-Web+Activity-_-Fencing+1.2+A6+Activity-_-SC_Fencing_Area6-_-20115_5



At 04:04 AM 9/8/2010, you wrote:


You still need the posts to be installed to the 
same depth as the other posts. So if you have 
fur feet showing on level ground, that's what 
you want on the incline. The posts on the 
incline have to remain plumb, or level up and 
down. That can be a challenge if you refer to 
the ground. Using a level, check on two sides of 
the post, 90 degrees from each other to make 
sure it is vertical in both directions. The 90 
degrees will take the sway or lean out of the post .
- Original Message -
From: Kevin Doucet
To: mailto:blindhandyman%40yahoogroups.comblindhandyman@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Wednesday, September 08, 2010 12:49 AM
Subject: [BlindHandyMan] advice putting up a fence

Hi all,

Ok, sorry to change horses mid stream, but, I decided to go with a
chain link fence. Lots more expensive, but, I feel it will help the
property value stay up. Got it all sussed out, except for one thing.

Part of the fence will be going up an incline. I read something on
the lowes url about needing to do something different for an end post
which is on an incline or decline, but, I did not understand what it
said. Can any one shed some light on this situation?

Thanks for all the help.

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




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version of virus signature database 3975 (20090330) __

The message was checked by ESET Smart Security.

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Re: [BlindHandyMan] advice putting up a fence

2010-09-03 Thread Bill Gallik


From: Kevin Doucet 
Sent: Thursday, September 02, 2010 11:05 PM
To: blindhandyman@yahoogroups.com 
Subject: Re: [BlindHandyMan] advice putting up a fence


  
Thanks for this advice.

The posts have a flared spade part, which I guess 
is to give the post more traction, or, grip and I 
think this sort of post would need a rather large 
PVC pipe to accommodate it. I do understand your 
rationale with this idea, I just don't know if it 
will work with the particular posts I saw. I am 
still shopping around and might find some posts 
which will work with this, so, I will keep it in mind.

Thanks for this help.
At 09:21 PM 9/1/2010, you wrote:




You've gotten some very sound advice on this, 
but I'd like to throw out two additional 
considerations just because they're things that 
aren't usually thought of when installing fencing:

1) You may want to consider using PVC pipe for 
setting your fence posts. The idea here is that 
you buy some PVC pipe that will allow the posts 
to fit inside snugly to moderately loosely and 
set these PVC pipes into concrete base at no 
more than a couple of inches above ground level. 
Then you can use these PVC pipes as inserts to 
hold the fence posts. By doing this, you can 
readily take down the fence for those 
unanticipated situations where you say to 
yourself, Self, wish I had a convenient way to 
take that darn fence down. I suggest PVC 
because it is naturally slippery and will allow 
you to easily slip the constructed fence out and 
then back in after whatever it was that inspired 
you to be able to take that fence down in the 
first place. I know this because I did it when I 
lived in Wheaton, Illinois. The PVC pieces 
should be long enough to allow the fence posts 
to drop down as far as necessary with an inch or two of PVC above ground level.

2) Keep in mind that when you have to do lawn 
work that grass will happily grow into that 
fencing. It is incredibly difficult to trim that 
grass because the weave of the fence likes to 
eat lawn trimmer strings like Peg Bundy used to 
love eating Bon-bons. Get yourself some sort of 
screen to run under the fence weave (from post 
to post) to prevent that darn grass from ever 
growing up into the fencing in the first place. 
I suggest several pieces of vinyl siding; a 
color that will pleasingly match the fence and 
home colors. You can then lay a strip of the 
vinyl siding so that the it will be positioned 
under the fencing and not one blade of grass 
will weave itself into your fence. I can 
remember asking my brother-in-law about what he 
thought about doing this, he thought I was nuts. 
That is, until he had seen what I had done. I 
laid the strip of vinyl siding flat on the 
ground (having used a hole saw to cut a 
perfectly round hole to slip over the fence 
posts). He thought it was a great idea once he saw it.

Holland's Person, Bill
E-Mail: mailto:BillGallik%40CenturyTel.netbillgal...@centurytel.net
- The early bird may get the worm, but the second mouse gets the cheese!

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Flared posts will not work with the PVC idea.  The posts I used had a 
consistent OD (1 7/8 I believe) so the PVC with a 2 ID worked quite well for 
that application.

Holland's Person, Bill
E-Mail: billgal...@centurytel.net
- The early bird may get the worm, but the second mouse gets the cheese!

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



RE: [BlindHandyMan] advice putting up a fence

2010-09-02 Thread Cy Selfridge
Hi,

In many areas the various utility companies have a service which will come
to your home and mark all underground utilities such as electric, gas, cable
and phone. It does not cost and, in some areas, if you do *NOT* ask for this
service and hit a utility you will pay and pay and pay.

I have used welded wire many times and it works just fine. Just be sure that
the grid is small enough to keep your smaller pets inside.

To insure that you have a nice square line from your home don't forget and
the formula A square + B square = C square. (I have no idea where the square
sign is)

That is leg A might be 3 feet, leg B might be 4 feet and the distance
between A and B will be 5 feet. You can double these distances and the
formula will still be absolutely correct. (6 feet, 8 feet and 10 feet -
36+64=100)

It sure is handier than trying to get a line of sight (particularly when you
have no sight - LOL)

Cy, The Anasazi  

 

From: blindhandyman@yahoogroups.com [mailto:blindhandy...@yahoogroups.com]
On Behalf Of Dale Leavens
Sent: Wednesday, September 01, 2010 6:06 PM
To: blindhandyman@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [BlindHandyMan] advice putting up a fence

 

  

I don't think I know what welded wire is, I do have some experience with
chain link though.

If you are sinking your posts more than about a foot you would be well
advised to have the utilities checked. Usually the gas, water and
electricity, phone and cable will make a pretty straight line from the
street or lane to the meters or house locations but you cannot be certain.
When I lived in Chatham the telephone people came with one of those earth
cutting chainsaw like devices and cut a line along the side of my house and
across the back yard diagonally to supply a neighbour who's house backed
onto one corner of my property. I never would have guessed there would have
been a line there, I don't know how deep it went.

Up here they don't charge to mark out the utilities, they spray paint to
show where the utilities lay.

My fence is a 6 foot one but the posts aren't a lot taller. I bored 4 foot
holes and filled them with cement and embedded the posts into them. It is
about 18 years and the fence stands straight still. At the same time my
neighbour had one installed, they dug the holes with a power auger, set in
wood 4 by 4 posts. It has been leaning for several years now and was pulled
down this spring. We have to worry about frost getting down and shifting
things up here though.

A lot of people now are driving those stakes into the ground with the steel
frames to grab wood posts and they work well enough but they do move. One
neighbour behind me had a couple of sections of his pushed down by a drunk
one night a couple of years ago the stakes broke off or bent but they were
fairly easily replaced and the fence again erected.

I don't know of any really good way of sinking steel posts reliably into the
ground and keeping them even height without mounting them into something
like cement. you would need to get them pretty deep I would think if they
are to remain secure.

What I did was to drive stakes into the ground at the corners then loop a
good strong string, masonry string is excellent for the purpose around the
posts so that there are two parallel strings between which I could mark and
dig my holes. This also allowed me to determine the height since the ground
isn't nice and level but you probably want the top of the fence to be level
for appearance. You can then decide on height and I marked each steel post
with tape at the desired height so I would know exactly how deep to sink
them.

Hope this gives you some useful ideas.

Dale Leavens.

- Original Message - 
From: Kevin Doucet 
To: blindhandyman@yahoogroups.com mailto:blindhandyman%40yahoogroups.com  
Sent: Wednesday, September 01, 2010 4:25 PM
Subject: [BlindHandyMan] advice putting up a fence

Hi group,

I am looking in to getting a dog. This dog will be for in doors but I 
want a fenced area for the pet to run and for us to play out in the 
air. I have an area walled up on two sides, one side the house brick 
wall and the other side a wood wall of a room addition. I am thinking 
about having the gate on the wooden wall running along the same plane 
as the wall, then running the fence at a ninety degree angle to the 
gate, perpendicular to the brick wall and joining an end fence 
running perpendicular to the wood wall of the room addition and 
boxing off the end joining the brick wall to the other ninety degree fence.
This will give about a 25 by 50 foot area. As this will not be a 
big dog, not more than about 30 LBS. this should be enough area, 
don't you agree?

I looked at some mettle fencing, I think it was called welded wire, 
which looks like it would do the job nicely. Also looked at some 
mettle fence posts and some wire clamps to attach the fence to the 
posts. I also have an idea of what to get for the gate and it's fasteners.

Now, my concerns are what is involved

Re: [BlindHandyMan] advice putting up a fence

2010-09-02 Thread Dan Rossi
Kevin,

I don't know where in the country you are, but many states have a service 
called one call.  You need to call them and they will take care of 
sending someone out to mark any buried utilities.

-- 
Blue skies.
Dan Rossi
Carnegie Mellon University.
E-Mail: d...@andrew.cmu.edu
Tel:(412) 268-9081


RE: [BlindHandyMan] advice putting up a fence

2010-09-02 Thread Michael baldwin
here is the site
http://www.diggershotline.com/
 
Michael
 

  _  

From: blindhandyman@yahoogroups.com [mailto:blindhandy...@yahoogroups.com]
On Behalf Of Dan Rossi
Sent: Thursday, September 02, 2010 8:16 AM
To: blindhandyman@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [BlindHandyMan] advice putting up a fence


  

Kevin,

I don't know where in the country you are, but many states have a service 
called one call. You need to call them and they will take care of 
sending someone out to mark any buried utilities.

-- 
Blue skies.
Dan Rossi
Carnegie Mellon University.
E-Mail: d...@andrew.cmu.edu mailto:dr25%40andrew.cmu.edu 
Tel: (412) 268-9081





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



Re: [BlindHandyMan] advice putting up a fence

2010-09-02 Thread Kevin Doucet
Hi Mike,

First welcome to the list.

Thanks to you and others who have pointed me to 
checking for under ground utility concerns. I 
called and have it scheduled to be marked.
At 05:29 PM 9/1/2010, you wrote:


Hi,

I am somewhat of a newbie to this list, but hello to all.

Yes, it would be advisable to check out the risk 
of punturing an electrical or water cable/pipe.

If the metal posts are not too big, a crowbar is 
a good item to make it easier to get the posts 
into the ground. Crowbar is the term used in the 
UK, it is a long metal bar, about 4 foot long 
with a pointed end at one end and a flat end at the other.

After making a hole with the bar, pour some 
water into the hole. It makes it a lot easier to 
hammer in a post; this is also true of wooden posts.

Some dogs are bad at digging and I have seen 
some of them dig beneath the fence; so depending 
on the type of ground, whether it is concrete 
paved, tar or asphalt, or soil will deternine if 
you may need to sink the wire into the ground several inches.

Hope this helps to start with.

Take care,

Mike

- Original Message -
From: Kevin Doucet
To: mailto:blindhandyman%40yahoogroups.comblindhandyman@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Wednesday, September 01, 2010 9:25 PM
Subject: [BlindHandyMan] advice putting up a fence

Hi group,

I am looking in to getting a dog. This dog will be for in doors but I
want a fenced area for the pet to run and for us to play out in the
air. I have an area walled up on two sides, one side the house brick
wall and the other side a wood wall of a room addition. I am thinking
about having the gate on the wooden wall running along the same plane
as the wall, then running the fence at a ninety degree angle to the
gate, perpendicular to the brick wall and joining an end fence
running perpendicular to the wood wall of the room addition and
boxing off the end joining the brick wall to the other ninety degree fence.
This will give about a 25 by 50 foot area. As this will not be a
big dog, not more than about 30 LBS. this should be enough area,
don't you agree?

I looked at some mettle fencing, I think it was called welded wire,
which looks like it would do the job nicely. Also looked at some
mettle fence posts and some wire clamps to attach the fence to the
posts. I also have an idea of what to get for the gate and it's fasteners.

Now, my concerns are what is involved in putting up the fence? Do I
need to have the ground checked by some one to see about water or
electrical lines I may puncture with the posts? What tools will I
need and what methods do I need to familiarize my self with before
starting this project?

Thanks for any help you can give.

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




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version of virus signature database 3975 (20090330) __

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Re: [BlindHandyMan] advice putting up a fence

2010-09-02 Thread Kevin Doucet
Thanks for the help with method and tools.

I have all the tools I need other than a 
come-a-long and the pole driver. I have a friend 
which will lend me his pole driver.

Do I need to set the corner posts in concrete?

At 06:49 PM 9/1/2010, you wrote:


That is a fairly easy job to do. You need to 
call the utility companies in your area and ask 
about checking for wires of all sorts, water and 
gas lines. It's a free service unless you wreck one of the lines.

Years ago I was putting up some chain link 
fencing and was trying to drive in the posts. 
They are nothing more than light gauge metal pipe.

Lowes had a tool that dropped down over the pipe 
and the top end was closed. There are two 
handles that come out from the sides of this 
first piece and you hold them. The posts are 
driven in the ground by lifting this tool up and 
slamming it down on the post. It's a right heavy 
tool but it does a great job at driving posts in 
the ground. And it doesn't destroy the end of the post.

In the event you go with chain link, you might 
consider a come along as well. Doesn't have to 
be super powerful because you'd wreck something 
if you went crazy drawing it up. But a couple 
tons would lend a hand in stretching the chain 
link sections. Then you'll have your hands free to connect the nuts and bolts.

A thirty pound dog won't require the posts be 
set in concrete other than possibly the posts at the gate.

Any sales rep can show you what you need to know 
about assembly right in the store.

Probably going to need a couple half inch or 
9/16 wrenches for the nuts and bolts, I 
recommend the come along, a level that's really 
about it. Everything else is probably not going 
to be necessary. However, I'm pretty sure it's 
against some rule to buy the minimum in tools. I 
know I'd be ashamed if I did such a terrible deed.

So having said that... You probably need a 
socket set and a set of combination wrenches to 
put the different parts of the fence together.

I'd go for a power auger to set the posts and a 
small cement mixer to mix the concrete you will use to set the posts.

You might want a laser level and an audible 
level as well because you can't always be sure 
one is 100% accurate. Good to have an extra to compare with.

It's possible you'll need some vise grips in 
case the sockets and wrenches don't do all you need.

This should definitely get your fence up and add 
to the ever growing collection of tools you need 
to combat life's situations. And the list will 
be shorter next time you take on another project that calls for tools.
- Original Message -
From: Kevin Doucet
To: mailto:blindhandyman%40yahoogroups.comblindhandyman@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Wednesday, September 01, 2010 4:25 PM
Subject: [BlindHandyMan] advice putting up a fence

Hi group,

I am looking in to getting a dog. This dog will be for in doors but I
want a fenced area for the pet to run and for us to play out in the
air. I have an area walled up on two sides, one side the house brick
wall and the other side a wood wall of a room addition. I am thinking
about having the gate on the wooden wall running along the same plane
as the wall, then running the fence at a ninety degree angle to the
gate, perpendicular to the brick wall and joining an end fence
running perpendicular to the wood wall of the room addition and
boxing off the end joining the brick wall to the other ninety degree fence.
This will give about a 25 by 50 foot area. As this will not be a
big dog, not more than about 30 LBS. this should be enough area,
don't you agree?

I looked at some mettle fencing, I think it was called welded wire,
which looks like it would do the job nicely. Also looked at some
mettle fence posts and some wire clamps to attach the fence to the
posts. I also have an idea of what to get for the gate and it's fasteners.

Now, my concerns are what is involved in putting up the fence? Do I
need to have the ground checked by some one to see about water or
electrical lines I may puncture with the posts? What tools will I
need and what methods do I need to familiarize my self with before
starting this project?

Thanks for any help you can give.

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




__ Information from ESET Smart Security, 
version of virus signature database 3975 (20090330) __

The message was checked by ESET Smart Security.

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[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



Re: [BlindHandyMan] advice putting up a fence

2010-09-02 Thread Bob Kennedy
Depends on how soft the ground is there.  if you go deep enough with the post 
you shouldn't have to use concrete.  But saying that, concrete would be a good 
way to make sure nothing can go wrong.  
  - Original Message - 
  From: Kevin Doucet 
  To: blindhandyman@yahoogroups.com 
  Sent: Thursday, September 02, 2010 5:14 PM
  Subject: Re: [BlindHandyMan] advice putting up a fence



  Thanks for the help with method and tools.

  I have all the tools I need other than a 
  come-a-long and the pole driver. I have a friend 
  which will lend me his pole driver.

  Do I need to set the corner posts in concrete?

  At 06:49 PM 9/1/2010, you wrote:
  
  
  That is a fairly easy job to do. You need to 
  call the utility companies in your area and ask 
  about checking for wires of all sorts, water and 
  gas lines. It's a free service unless you wreck one of the lines.
  
  Years ago I was putting up some chain link 
  fencing and was trying to drive in the posts. 
  They are nothing more than light gauge metal pipe.
  
  Lowes had a tool that dropped down over the pipe 
  and the top end was closed. There are two 
  handles that come out from the sides of this 
  first piece and you hold them. The posts are 
  driven in the ground by lifting this tool up and 
  slamming it down on the post. It's a right heavy 
  tool but it does a great job at driving posts in 
  the ground. And it doesn't destroy the end of the post.
  
  In the event you go with chain link, you might 
  consider a come along as well. Doesn't have to 
  be super powerful because you'd wreck something 
  if you went crazy drawing it up. But a couple 
  tons would lend a hand in stretching the chain 
  link sections. Then you'll have your hands free to connect the nuts and 
bolts.
  
  A thirty pound dog won't require the posts be 
  set in concrete other than possibly the posts at the gate.
  
  Any sales rep can show you what you need to know 
  about assembly right in the store.
  
  Probably going to need a couple half inch or 
  9/16 wrenches for the nuts and bolts, I 
  recommend the come along, a level that's really 
  about it. Everything else is probably not going 
  to be necessary. However, I'm pretty sure it's 
  against some rule to buy the minimum in tools. I 
  know I'd be ashamed if I did such a terrible deed.
  
  So having said that... You probably need a 
  socket set and a set of combination wrenches to 
  put the different parts of the fence together.
  
  I'd go for a power auger to set the posts and a 
  small cement mixer to mix the concrete you will use to set the posts.
  
  You might want a laser level and an audible 
  level as well because you can't always be sure 
  one is 100% accurate. Good to have an extra to compare with.
  
  It's possible you'll need some vise grips in 
  case the sockets and wrenches don't do all you need.
  
  This should definitely get your fence up and add 
  to the ever growing collection of tools you need 
  to combat life's situations. And the list will 
  be shorter next time you take on another project that calls for tools.
  - Original Message -
  From: Kevin Doucet
  To: mailto:blindhandyman%40yahoogroups.comblindhandyman@yahoogroups.com
  Sent: Wednesday, September 01, 2010 4:25 PM
  Subject: [BlindHandyMan] advice putting up a fence
  
  Hi group,
  
  I am looking in to getting a dog. This dog will be for in doors but I
  want a fenced area for the pet to run and for us to play out in the
  air. I have an area walled up on two sides, one side the house brick
  wall and the other side a wood wall of a room addition. I am thinking
  about having the gate on the wooden wall running along the same plane
  as the wall, then running the fence at a ninety degree angle to the
  gate, perpendicular to the brick wall and joining an end fence
  running perpendicular to the wood wall of the room addition and
  boxing off the end joining the brick wall to the other ninety degree fence.
  This will give about a 25 by 50 foot area. As this will not be a
  big dog, not more than about 30 LBS. this should be enough area,
  don't you agree?
  
  I looked at some mettle fencing, I think it was called welded wire,
  which looks like it would do the job nicely. Also looked at some
  mettle fence posts and some wire clamps to attach the fence to the
  posts. I also have an idea of what to get for the gate and it's fasteners.
  
  Now, my concerns are what is involved in putting up the fence? Do I
  need to have the ground checked by some one to see about water or
  electrical lines I may puncture with the posts? What tools will I
  need and what methods do I need to familiarize my self with before
  starting this project?
  
  Thanks for any help you can give.
  
  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
  
  
  
  
  __ Information from ESET Smart Security, 
  version of virus signature database 3975 (20090330) __
  
  The message was checked

Re: [BlindHandyMan] advice putting up a fence

2010-09-02 Thread Dale Leavens
I measured 6 feet down from the top then wrapped masking tape around the post 
marking that distance. Once I had the string at the right height, and you may 
want to use a hoe or shovel to knock down any high points on the ground) it is 
then just a matter of setting the posts with the tape height to the string. 
They will be in a straight line provided you don't deflect the string with your 
post. You may even wish to use a stake a little thicker than the posts allowing 
half an inch or so each side just to keep yourself from deflecting the string 
as you go.

Be careful, a come-along will easily put a lot of stress on the fencing and may 
deflect the posts.


  - Original Message - 
  From: Kevin Doucet 
  To: blindhandyman@yahoogroups.com 
  Sent: Thursday, September 02, 2010 5:18 PM
  Subject: Re: [BlindHandyMan] advice putting up a fence



  masonry string and marking the posts with tape to know the depth to 
  sink it is a good idea.

  At 07:06 PM 9/1/2010, you wrote:

  What I did was to drive stakes into the ground at the corners then 
  loop a good strong string, masonry string is excellent for the 
  purpose around the posts so that there are two parallel strings 
  between which I could mark and dig my holes. This also allowed me to 
  determine the height since the ground isn't nice and level but you 
  probably want the top of the fence to be level for appearance. You 
  can then decide on height and I marked each steel post with tape at 
  the desired height so I would know exactly how deep to sink them.



  

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



Re: [BlindHandyMan] advice putting up a fence

2010-09-02 Thread Mike Moore
Kevin,

Thanks! You could tink of hanging the gate from the wall, and you could use the 
fence, either wooden posts or metal to act as a closer.

It is worth thinking of the possibility of needing a strainer post at either 
end; if the run is quite long, as pulling the chain link up to tension could 
pull over the corner posts.

Take care and hope all goes well.

Mike
  - Original Message - 
  From: Kevin Doucet 
  To: blindhandyman@yahoogroups.com 
  Sent: Thursday, September 02, 2010 10:11 PM
  Subject: Re: [BlindHandyMan] advice putting up a fence



  Hi Mike,

  First welcome to the list.

  Thanks to you and others who have pointed me to 
  checking for under ground utility concerns. I 
  called and have it scheduled to be marked.
  At 05:29 PM 9/1/2010, you wrote:
  
  
  Hi,
  
  I am somewhat of a newbie to this list, but hello to all.
  
  Yes, it would be advisable to check out the risk 
  of punturing an electrical or water cable/pipe.
  
  If the metal posts are not too big, a crowbar is 
  a good item to make it easier to get the posts 
  into the ground. Crowbar is the term used in the 
  UK, it is a long metal bar, about 4 foot long 
  with a pointed end at one end and a flat end at the other.
  
  After making a hole with the bar, pour some 
  water into the hole. It makes it a lot easier to 
  hammer in a post; this is also true of wooden posts.
  
  Some dogs are bad at digging and I have seen 
  some of them dig beneath the fence; so depending 
  on the type of ground, whether it is concrete 
  paved, tar or asphalt, or soil will deternine if 
  you may need to sink the wire into the ground several inches.
  
  Hope this helps to start with.
  
  Take care,
  
  Mike
  
  - Original Message -
  From: Kevin Doucet
  To: mailto:blindhandyman%40yahoogroups.comblindhandyman@yahoogroups.com
  Sent: Wednesday, September 01, 2010 9:25 PM
  Subject: [BlindHandyMan] advice putting up a fence
  
  Hi group,
  
  I am looking in to getting a dog. This dog will be for in doors but I
  want a fenced area for the pet to run and for us to play out in the
  air. I have an area walled up on two sides, one side the house brick
  wall and the other side a wood wall of a room addition. I am thinking
  about having the gate on the wooden wall running along the same plane
  as the wall, then running the fence at a ninety degree angle to the
  gate, perpendicular to the brick wall and joining an end fence
  running perpendicular to the wood wall of the room addition and
  boxing off the end joining the brick wall to the other ninety degree fence.
  This will give about a 25 by 50 foot area. As this will not be a
  big dog, not more than about 30 LBS. this should be enough area,
  don't you agree?
  
  I looked at some mettle fencing, I think it was called welded wire,
  which looks like it would do the job nicely. Also looked at some
  mettle fence posts and some wire clamps to attach the fence to the
  posts. I also have an idea of what to get for the gate and it's fasteners.
  
  Now, my concerns are what is involved in putting up the fence? Do I
  need to have the ground checked by some one to see about water or
  electrical lines I may puncture with the posts? What tools will I
  need and what methods do I need to familiarize my self with before
  starting this project?
  
  Thanks for any help you can give.
  
  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
  
  
  
  
  __ Information from ESET Smart Security, 
  version of virus signature database 3975 (20090330) __
  
  The message was checked by ESET Smart Security.
  
  http://www.eset.comhttp://www.eset.com

  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



  

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



Re: [BlindHandyMan] advice putting up a fence

2010-09-02 Thread Kevin Doucet
Thanks for this advice.

The posts have a flared spade part, which I guess 
is to give the post more traction, or, grip and I 
think this sort of post would need a rather large 
PVC pipe to accommodate it. I do understand your 
rationale with this idea, I just don't know if it 
will work with the particular posts I saw. I am 
still shopping around and might find some posts 
which will work with this, so, I will keep it in mind.

Thanks for this help.
At 09:21 PM 9/1/2010, you wrote:




You've gotten some very sound advice on this, 
but I'd like to throw out two additional 
considerations just because they're things that 
aren't usually thought of when installing fencing:

1) You may want to consider using PVC pipe for 
setting your fence posts. The idea here is that 
you buy some PVC pipe that will allow the posts 
to fit inside snugly to moderately loosely and 
set these PVC pipes into concrete base at no 
more than a couple of inches above ground level. 
Then you can use these PVC pipes as inserts to 
hold the fence posts. By doing this, you can 
readily take down the fence for those 
unanticipated situations where you say to 
yourself, Self, wish I had a convenient way to 
take that darn fence down. I suggest PVC 
because it is naturally slippery and will allow 
you to easily slip the constructed fence out and 
then back in after whatever it was that inspired 
you to be able to take that fence down in the 
first place. I know this because I did it when I 
lived in Wheaton, Illinois. The PVC pieces 
should be long enough to allow the fence posts 
to drop down as far as necessary with an inch or two of PVC above ground level.

2) Keep in mind that when you have to do lawn 
work that grass will happily grow into that 
fencing. It is incredibly difficult to trim that 
grass because the weave of the fence likes to 
eat lawn trimmer strings like Peg Bundy used to 
love eating Bon-bons. Get yourself some sort of 
screen to run under the fence weave (from post 
to post) to prevent that darn grass from ever 
growing up into the fencing in the first place. 
I suggest several pieces of vinyl siding; a 
color that will pleasingly match the fence and 
home colors. You can then lay a strip of the 
vinyl siding so that the it will be positioned 
under the fencing and not one blade of grass 
will weave itself into your fence. I can 
remember asking my brother-in-law about what he 
thought about doing this, he thought I was nuts. 
That is, until he had seen what I had done. I 
laid the strip of vinyl siding flat on the 
ground (having used a hole saw to cut a 
perfectly round hole to slip over the fence 
posts). He thought it was a great idea once he saw it.

Holland's Person, Bill
E-Mail: mailto:BillGallik%40CenturyTel.netbillgal...@centurytel.net
- The early bird may get the worm, but the second mouse gets the cheese!

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




__ Information from ESET Smart Security, 
version of virus signature database 3975 (20090330) __

The message was checked by ESET Smart Security.

http://www.eset.comhttp://www.eset.com


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



Re: [BlindHandyMan] advice putting up a fence

2010-09-01 Thread Mike Moore
Hi,

I am somewhat of a newbie to this list, but hello to all.

Yes, it would be advisable to check out the risk of punturing an electrical or 
water cable/pipe.

If the metal posts are not too big, a crowbar is a good item to make it easier 
to get the posts into the ground. Crowbar is the term used in the UK, it is a 
long metal bar, about 4 foot long with a pointed end at one end and a flat end 
at the other.

After making a hole with the bar, pour some water into the hole. It makes it a 
lot easier to hammer in a post; this is also true of wooden posts.

Some dogs are bad at digging and I have seen some of them dig beneath the 
fence; so depending on the type of ground, whether it is concrete paved, tar or 
asphalt, or soil will deternine if you may need to sink the wire into the 
ground several inches.

Hope this helps to start with.

Take care,

Mike

  - Original Message - 
  From: Kevin Doucet 
  To: blindhandyman@yahoogroups.com 
  Sent: Wednesday, September 01, 2010 9:25 PM
  Subject: [BlindHandyMan] advice putting up a fence



  Hi group,

  I am looking in to getting a dog. This dog will be for in doors but I 
  want a fenced area for the pet to run and for us to play out in the 
  air. I have an area walled up on two sides, one side the house brick 
  wall and the other side a wood wall of a room addition. I am thinking 
  about having the gate on the wooden wall running along the same plane 
  as the wall, then running the fence at a ninety degree angle to the 
  gate, perpendicular to the brick wall and joining an end fence 
  running perpendicular to the wood wall of the room addition and 
  boxing off the end joining the brick wall to the other ninety degree fence.
  This will give about a 25 by 50 foot area. As this will not be a 
  big dog, not more than about 30 LBS. this should be enough area, 
  don't you agree?

  I looked at some mettle fencing, I think it was called welded wire, 
  which looks like it would do the job nicely. Also looked at some 
  mettle fence posts and some wire clamps to attach the fence to the 
  posts. I also have an idea of what to get for the gate and it's fasteners.

  Now, my concerns are what is involved in putting up the fence? Do I 
  need to have the ground checked by some one to see about water or 
  electrical lines I may puncture with the posts? What tools will I 
  need and what methods do I need to familiarize my self with before 
  starting this project?

  Thanks for any help you can give.



  

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



Re: [BlindHandyMan] advice putting up a fence

2010-09-01 Thread Bob Kennedy
That is a fairly easy job to do.  You need to call the utility companies in 
your area and ask about checking for wires of all sorts, water and gas lines.  
It's a free service unless you wreck one of the lines.  

Years ago I was putting up some chain link fencing and was trying to drive in 
the posts.  They are nothing more than light gauge metal pipe.  

Lowes had a tool that dropped down over the pipe and the top end was closed.  
There are two handles that come out from the sides of this first piece and you 
hold them.  The posts are driven in the ground by lifting this tool up and 
slamming it down on the post.  It's a right heavy tool but it does a great job 
at driving posts in the ground.  And it doesn't destroy the end of the post.

In the event you go with chain link, you might consider a come along as well.  
Doesn't have to be super powerful because you'd wreck something if you went 
crazy drawing it up.  But a couple tons would lend a hand in stretching the 
chain link sections.  Then you'll have your hands free to connect the nuts and 
bolts.  

A thirty pound dog won't require the posts be set in concrete other than 
possibly the posts at the gate.  

Any sales rep can show you what you need to know about assembly right in the 
store.  

Probably going to need a couple half inch or 9/16 wrenches for the nuts and 
bolts,  I recommend the come along, a level that's really about it.  Everything 
else is probably not going to be necessary.  However, I'm pretty sure it's 
against some rule to buy the minimum in tools.  I know I'd be ashamed if I did 
such a terrible deed.  

So having said that...  You probably need a socket set and a set of combination 
wrenches to put the different parts of the fence together.  

I'd go for a power auger to set the posts and a small cement mixer to mix the 
concrete you will use to set the posts.  

You might want a laser level and an audible level as well because you can't 
always be sure one is 100% accurate.  Good to have an extra to compare with.  

It's possible you'll need some vise grips in case the sockets and wrenches 
don't do all you need.  

This should definitely get your fence up and add to the ever growing collection 
of tools you need to combat life's situations.  And the list will be shorter 
next time you take on another project that calls for tools. 
  - Original Message - 
  From: Kevin Doucet 
  To: blindhandyman@yahoogroups.com 
  Sent: Wednesday, September 01, 2010 4:25 PM
  Subject: [BlindHandyMan] advice putting up a fence



  Hi group,

  I am looking in to getting a dog. This dog will be for in doors but I 
  want a fenced area for the pet to run and for us to play out in the 
  air. I have an area walled up on two sides, one side the house brick 
  wall and the other side a wood wall of a room addition. I am thinking 
  about having the gate on the wooden wall running along the same plane 
  as the wall, then running the fence at a ninety degree angle to the 
  gate, perpendicular to the brick wall and joining an end fence 
  running perpendicular to the wood wall of the room addition and 
  boxing off the end joining the brick wall to the other ninety degree fence.
  This will give about a 25 by 50 foot area. As this will not be a 
  big dog, not more than about 30 LBS. this should be enough area, 
  don't you agree?

  I looked at some mettle fencing, I think it was called welded wire, 
  which looks like it would do the job nicely. Also looked at some 
  mettle fence posts and some wire clamps to attach the fence to the 
  posts. I also have an idea of what to get for the gate and it's fasteners.

  Now, my concerns are what is involved in putting up the fence? Do I 
  need to have the ground checked by some one to see about water or 
  electrical lines I may puncture with the posts? What tools will I 
  need and what methods do I need to familiarize my self with before 
  starting this project?

  Thanks for any help you can give.



  

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



Re: [BlindHandyMan] advice putting up a fence

2010-09-01 Thread Dale Leavens
I don't think I know what welded wire is, I do have some experience with chain 
link though.

If you are sinking your posts more than about a foot you would be well advised 
to have the utilities checked. Usually the gas, water and electricity, phone 
and cable will make a pretty straight line from the street or lane to the 
meters or house locations but you cannot be certain. When I lived in Chatham 
the telephone people came with one of those earth cutting chainsaw like devices 
and cut a line along the side of my house and across the back yard diagonally 
to supply a neighbour who's house backed onto one corner of my property. I 
never would have guessed there would have been a line there, I don't know how 
deep it went.

Up here they don't charge to mark out the utilities, they spray paint to show 
where the utilities lay.

My fence is a 6 foot one but the posts aren't a lot taller. I bored 4 foot 
holes and filled them with cement and embedded the posts into them. It is about 
18 years and the fence stands straight still. At the same time my neighbour had 
one installed, they dug the holes with a power auger, set in wood 4 by 4 posts. 
It has been leaning for several years now and was pulled down this spring. We 
have to worry about frost getting down and shifting things up here though.

A lot of people now are driving those stakes into the ground with the steel 
frames to grab wood posts and they work well enough but they do move. One 
neighbour behind me had a couple of sections of his pushed down by a drunk one 
night a couple of years ago the stakes broke off or bent but they were fairly 
easily replaced and the fence again erected.

I don't know of any really good way of sinking steel posts reliably into the 
ground and keeping them even height without mounting them into something like 
cement. you would need to get them pretty deep I would think if they are to 
remain secure.

What I did was to drive stakes into the ground at the corners then loop a good 
strong string, masonry string is excellent for the purpose around the posts so 
that there are two parallel strings between which I could mark and dig my 
holes. This also allowed me to determine the height since the ground isn't nice 
and level but you probably want the top of the fence to be level for 
appearance. You can then decide on height and I marked each steel post with 
tape at the desired height so I would know exactly how deep to sink them.

Hope this gives you some useful ideas.

Dale Leavens.


  - Original Message - 
  From: Kevin Doucet 
  To: blindhandyman@yahoogroups.com 
  Sent: Wednesday, September 01, 2010 4:25 PM
  Subject: [BlindHandyMan] advice putting up a fence



  Hi group,

  I am looking in to getting a dog. This dog will be for in doors but I 
  want a fenced area for the pet to run and for us to play out in the 
  air. I have an area walled up on two sides, one side the house brick 
  wall and the other side a wood wall of a room addition. I am thinking 
  about having the gate on the wooden wall running along the same plane 
  as the wall, then running the fence at a ninety degree angle to the 
  gate, perpendicular to the brick wall and joining an end fence 
  running perpendicular to the wood wall of the room addition and 
  boxing off the end joining the brick wall to the other ninety degree fence.
  This will give about a 25 by 50 foot area. As this will not be a 
  big dog, not more than about 30 LBS. this should be enough area, 
  don't you agree?

  I looked at some mettle fencing, I think it was called welded wire, 
  which looks like it would do the job nicely. Also looked at some 
  mettle fence posts and some wire clamps to attach the fence to the 
  posts. I also have an idea of what to get for the gate and it's fasteners.

  Now, my concerns are what is involved in putting up the fence? Do I 
  need to have the ground checked by some one to see about water or 
  electrical lines I may puncture with the posts? What tools will I 
  need and what methods do I need to familiarize my self with before 
  starting this project?

  Thanks for any help you can give.



  

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



Re: [BlindHandyMan] advice putting up a fence

2010-09-01 Thread Peter Mikochik
a blind trick i learned about laying out a line with a string is not to 
start the string at the corner of your house but to run the string 
starting from a point along the wall as far back as you can.
its easy then to make sure the string is equal distant along the wall then 
when it passes out beyond the corner you can maintain a nice straight line 
out from the house.

stake down the far end of the line then go back and feel that the line 
stays straight along the wall.
you may have to move the far stake left or right till you get it just 
right.
dont know if this is clear, it's real easy if i showed you but maybe not 
to explain.




Re: [BlindHandyMan] advice putting up a fence

2010-09-01 Thread Bill Gallik

 
You've gotten some very sound advice on this, but I'd like to throw out two 
additional considerations just because they're things that aren't usually 
thought of when installing fencing:

1)  You may want to consider using PVC pipe for setting your fence posts.  The 
idea here is that you buy some PVC pipe that will allow the posts to fit inside 
snugly to moderately loosely and set these PVC pipes into concrete base at no 
more than a couple of inches above ground level.  Then you can use these PVC 
pipes as inserts to hold the fence posts.  By doing this, you can readily take 
down the fence for those unanticipated situations where you say to yourself, 
Self, wish I had a convenient way to take that darn fence down.  I suggest 
PVC because it is naturally slippery and will allow  you to easily slip the 
constructed fence out and then back in after whatever it was that inspired you 
to be able to take that fence down in the first place.  I know this because I 
did it when I lived in Wheaton, Illinois.  The PVC pieces should be long enough 
to allow the fence posts to drop down as far as necessary with an inch or two 
of PVC above ground level.

2)  Keep in mind that when you have to do lawn work that grass will happily 
grow into that fencing.  It is incredibly difficult to trim that grass because 
the weave of the fence likes to eat lawn trimmer strings like Peg Bundy used to 
love eating Bon-bons.  Get yourself some sort of screen to run under the 
fence weave (from post to post) to prevent that darn grass from ever growing up 
into the fencing in the first place.  I suggest several pieces of vinyl siding; 
a color that will pleasingly match the fence and home colors.  You can then lay 
a strip of the vinyl siding so that the it will be positioned under the fencing 
and not one blade of grass will weave itself into your fence.  I can remember 
asking my brother-in-law about what he thought about doing this, he thought I 
was nuts.  That is, until he had seen what I had done.  I laid the strip of 
vinyl siding flat on the ground (having used a hole saw to cut a perfectly 
round hole to slip over the fence posts).  He thought it was a great idea once 
he saw it.

Holland's Person, Bill
E-Mail: billgal...@centurytel.net
- The early bird may get the worm, but the second mouse gets the cheese!

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]