[cayugabirds-l] Merlins galore - thanks

2015-07-28 Thread John Confer
*Thanks to assistance from participants in the cayugabirds-l,* Mark 
Witmer, Maddie Ulinski, and I were able to monitor 7 Merlin nests this 
spring-summer. The Briarwood Lane nest fledged the third of three 
nestlings this morning (28 July). Five nests were in Ithaca, one in 
Dryden and one of Wells College campus. Three of the nests were 
predated. Although this is a statistically tiny sample, it provides a 
very high rate of nest failure in comparison to other, large surveys. 
The dominant prey species at all nests was the House Sparrow. 
Interestingly, House Sparrows have been declining very rapidly, a 
decline that started long before Merlin started to nest and increase in 
abundance in New York.

It is nice to have our little urban falcon zipping around the town/city, 
picking off a lot of species but mostly House Sparrows.

Thanks again for directing us to nest locations.

John, Mark, and Maddie

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--attachment: confer.vcf

Re: [cayugabirds-l] Merlins galore - thanks

2015-07-28 Thread Dave Nutter
Nestlings may have fledged, but Merlins still have to eat and hunt. Yesterday (Monday 27 July) at 9:32am I was on Meadow Street waiting to turn left onto Buffalo Street by the FastRack gas station when I heard a short succession of unidentified agitated call notes to my left. Immediately afterward I saw a MERLIN carrying small prey and flying from near the source of the sound, proceeding northeast low over Joe's Restaurant, across Meadow Street, then lost to view among treetops. Was the nest by the Finger Lakes Land Trust office successful? That's the direction it went. I don't know whether the sound was from the Merlin, its prey, its prey's parent, or another witness.By the way, I haven't noticed an actual shortage of House Sparrows yet, and to me Merlins seem like a good trade for them so far.--Dave NutterOn Jul 28, 2015, at 09:22 AM, John Confer con...@ithaca.edu wrote:Thanks to assistance from participants in the cayugabirds-l, Mark Witmer, Maddie Ulinski, and I were able to monitor 7 Merlin nests this spring-summer. The Briarwood Lane nest fledged the third of three nestlings this morning (28 July). Five nests were in Ithaca, one in Dryden and one of Wells College campus. Three of the nests were predated. Although this is a statistically tiny sample, it provides a very high rate of nest failure in comparison to other, large surveys. The dominant prey species at all nests was the House Sparrow. Interestingly, House Sparrows have been declining very rapidly, a decline that started long before Merlin started to nest and increase in abundance in New York.  It is nice to have our little urban falcon zipping around the town/city, picking off a lot of species but mostly House Sparrows.  Thanks again for directing us to nest locations.  John, Mark, and Maddie --
--
Cayugabirds-L List Info:
Welcome and Basics
Rules and Information
Subscribe, Configuration and Leave
Archives:
The Mail Archive
Surfbirds
BirdingOnThe.Net
Please submit your observations to eBird!
--
attachment: confer.vcf

Re: [cayugabirds-l] Sapsucker Woods Weekend Bird walk reports.

2015-07-28 Thread Yvonne Fogarty


Sent from my iPad

 On Jul 27, 2015, at 2:03 PM, Chris R. Pelkie chris.pel...@cornell.edu 
 wrote:
 
 Speaking of compliant Phoebes, I walked to Sherwood Platform at lunch and met 
 (first time) a visitor/birder from NYC. As he was turning to leave and I was 
 approaching, I spotted a Phoebe on the hand rail and pointed it out to him. 
 It was 5’ away. Then it hopped to a closer post and eventually to about 3’ 
 from us. We remarked that it must be a juvenile though it was in full 
 feather. Then it landed on the floor of the platform in the hot sun and 
 spread its wings and squashed its belly down, opened its mouth and started 
 sunning. We had to walk around it (!) to get back to the rail to look for 
 herons and kingbirds, etc. It finally flew into the bushes at its own good 
 time.
 
 I have often thought of tethering a flycatcher to my hat to ward off 
 mosquitoes...
 
 ChrisP
 __
  
 Chris Pelkie
 Information/Data Manager; IT Support
 Bioacoustics Research Program
 Cornell Lab of Ornithology
 159 Sapsucker Woods Road
 Ithaca, NY 14850
 
 On Jul 27, 2015, at 12:10, Linda Orkin wingmagi...@gmail.com wrote:
 
 I thought people might be interested in reading these.  The leaders write up 
 these reports each week and they are posted on the Cayugabirdclub.org 
 website under About us, and then field trips. Hope you enjoy. I plan on 
 posting them each week, as long as this is okay with the list administrator. 
   Linda Orkin
 
 Reports from this past weekend's beginner bird walks led by Cayuga Bird Club 
 Members.
 Saturday from Lisa Wood. 22 participants. Big group today, so I was grateful 
 for help from CBC member Donna Coventry Wray, who’s been on many, many of 
 these walks and is a multiple-year SFO alumna. A few “townies” were mixed in 
 with the many visitors. We had several memorable experiences in the 2.5 
 hours it took us to get all the way around the Wilson Trail. First, we had 
 good looks at a silent Yellow Warbler pair foraging in full sun near the 
 Owens Platform boardwalk. From the platform itself, we watched a long and 
 daring (and comical) “tightrope“ walk by a Green Heron across a section of 
 the wire above the pond. From the Sherwood Platform, everyone enjoyed 
 watching Eastern Kingbirds feeding busily and noisily above the lily pads. 
 Having seen a Great Crested Flycatcher earlier, we declared it a flycatcher 
 day when, by the pergola, we were repeatedly “buzzed” by a brave little 
 Eastern Phoebe. The bird first flew from the island over to the shore and 
 perched above us, quite close. That was a nice treat, but then it actually 
 flew to a couple of us, close to our faces and above our heads/hats—close 
 enough that those of us in the front couldn’t help but flinch. Evidently the 
 bird was after the mosquitoes that were after us! It successfully caught 
 prey several times while we stood there—what a thrill for all of us!
 
 And Sunday from Paul Anderson 10 participants.I had ten people show up: a 
 group of six students from Colombia, a couple from New Jersey and a two 
 ladies from Binghamton. There was a lot to see, even if little of it was 
 unusual. Many juveniles of many species were out begging. We saw more 
 flycatchers - mostly Phoebes - than I've ever seen on one of these walks. 
 The mosquitoes were voracious. An early highlight was a Green Heron on the 
 main pond, but everybody's favorite was a group of three baby Wood Ducks.
 -- 
 Veganism is simply the acknowledgment that a replaceable and fleeting 
 pleasure isn't more valuable than someone's life and liberty.
 ~ Unknown
 
 If you permit 
 this evil, what is the good
 of the good of your life?
 
 -Stanley Kunitz...
 
 --
 Cayugabirds-L List Info:
 Welcome and Basics
 Rules and Information
 Subscribe, Configuration and Leave
 Archives:
 The Mail Archive
 Surfbirds
 BirdingOnThe.Net
 Please submit your observations to eBird!
 --
 
 --
 Cayugabirds-L List Info:
 Welcome and Basics
 Rules and Information
 Subscribe, Configuration and Leave
 Archives:
 The Mail Archive
 Surfbirds
 BirdingOnThe.Net
 Please submit your observations to eBird!
 --

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

[cayugabirds-l] Help

2015-07-28 Thread Yvonne Fogarty
We found this bird dead in our side yard. Can you help identify it? Thanks, 
Yvonne 


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


Sent from my iPad

Re: [cayugabirds-l] Help

2015-07-28 Thread JCampbell-Smith
It's a woodcock. If you would like something done with it, please take it
to the Lab of Ornithology front desk to be given to the museum.

Jenn
On Jul 28, 2015 5:44 PM, Yvonne Fogarty yvonnefoga...@icloud.com wrote:

 We found this bird dead in our side yard. Can you help identify it?
 Thanks, Yvonne


 --

 Cayugabirds-L List Info:
 http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
 http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
 http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

 ARCHIVES:
 1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
 2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
 3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

 Please submit your observations to eBird:
 http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

 --



 Sent from my iPad


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

[cayugabirds-l] Knox-Marsellus: 13 shorebird sp incl RED-NECKED PHALAROPE

2015-07-28 Thread Dave Nutter
Today during the late morning and early afternoon I did some scouting at 
Montezuma NWR's Knox-Marsellus marsh in preparation for the field trip I'll be 
leading onto the dikes there next Sunday morning (2 August, 8am leaving from 
Visitor Center, 8:20am walking down from overlook on East Road). Shorebirds 
included:

SEMIPALMATED PLOVER - several among distant flock of peep on mudflat.
KILLDEER - at least 5 together
GREATER YELLOWLEGS - several scattered feeding
LESSER YELLOWLEGS - quite a few scattered about, the most numerous non-peep, 
but not big numbers
SOLITARY SANDPIPER - 1 on Puddler seen from Towpath Rd
SPOTTED SANDPIPER - a few sightings of individual bird(s) feeding and flying
STILT SANDPIPER - at least 5, all in breeding plumage, 4 in K-M in open water 
fairly close to the dike, 1 or more in Puddler in more marshy area visible 
sometimes/places from mosquitor-infested Towpath Rd
PECTORAL SANDPIPER - 4 together on mud flat
SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPER - 1 seen well on end of mudflat
LEAST SANDPIPER - 3 seen well on end of mudflat; more, I think, in distance
PEEP - distant flocks that will be easier to check on the field trip in early 
morning light with less shimmer.
DOWITCHER, SHORT-BILLED (I think) - 2 feeding and resting in deep water. We'll 
spend more time on dowitcher ID on the field trip.
RED-NECKED PHALAROPE - 1 adult in non-breeding plumage feeding while swimming 
in open water far from either East Road or Towpath Road but scoped well from 
the dike. I believe this is a first for the basin for the year.
WILSON'S PHALAROPE - 1 adult in non-breeding plumage: from Towpath Road I saw a 
very distant and white pot-bellied phalarope wading and feeding in shallow 
water in K-M, as I have seen this species do, but when I went on the dike later 
I did not re-find it, and I only saw the Red-necked swimming.

Other birds included:
CANADA GEESE
MALLARDS
GREAT BLUE HERONS
GREAT EGRETS
GREEN HERONS - 2 together in flight
OSPREY - at least 2 in flight
BALD EAGLE - immature in flight
SANDHILL CRANE - family of 3, very rusty
RING-BILLED GULL - dozens resting; no other species of gulls noted
CASPIAN TERN - dozens resting, including some juveniles; no other species of 
terns noted
WILLOW FLYCATCHER
TREE SWALLOW
BARN SWALLOW
CEDAR WAXWING
YELLOW WARBLER
SWAMP SPARROW
SONG SPARROW
INDIGO BUNTING - male and female together in bush on dike

from Towpath Road I also saw ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAK and heard BLUE-GRAY 
GNATCATCHER among several other songbirds.

Other critters:
MONARCH? - pair flying along dike while mating, one upside-down with closed 
wings, thus not looking as familar
MOSQUITOS  BITING FLIES - nasty on Towpath Rd, but not a problem today on the 
dike. We can avoid Towpath.

Your experience may differ, but the variety of shorebirds looks promising even 
though the numbers are not large.

--Dave Nutter
--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--