[cayugabirds-l] A last hurrah for my little feeder - five Rose-Breasted Grosbeaks!

2020-05-10 Thread Wee Hao Ng
At least FIVE different Rose-Breasted Grosbeaks had visited my window sill
feeder over the past three days. Two females were feeding together on
Friday, occasionally interrupted by a pugnacious male, and the same pattern
played out yesterday. Only this afternoon (Sunday), watching the feeder
from the outside, did I realise there were three different males! Unlike
the females, the males didn't seem willing to share the feeder, and each
waited for his turn as though there was a pecking order.

What a last hurrah for my humble little feeder, right before I finally move
out of my apartment! I doubt I'll be allowed one at my new place. While
only three years old, this window sill feeder has brought me so much
memories and stirred so much emotions:
- The excitement of having my very first visitor, a blue jay.
- The sense of "achievement" at having more and more visiting species.
- Being amused by juncos scolding anyone remotely nearby, and by nuthatches
clinging upside down on the window mesh.
- Annoyance at seeing poop; I like my feeder fastidiously clean so that
meant immediate chores.
- The sinking feeling when witnessing the all-too-often mourning dove
fights; I thought doves were peaceful.
- The horror of seeing dried blood on the feeder one winter morning,
probably from a particularly vicious fight.
- Sense of poetic justice when a mourning dove finally fended off the
perpetual feeder bully, a female red-bellied woodpecker.
- Guilt at shooing off the squirming mass of mourning doves (you'll be
surprised how many of them can pack on a window sill) on harsh winter
mornings, so that the small ones can grab a few much-needed seeds before
the doves return.
- The surprise at seeing a stray redpoll, just days after I saw my
first-ever redpolls at Mount Pleasant.
- The joy of watching courtship feeding, and later parents feeding
juveniles, right on my window sill!

I'll miss you, my neighbourhood feathered ones.

Wee Hao,
Cornell North Campus, Ithaca

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[cayugabirds-l] Hairy Woodpeckers

2020-05-10 Thread Suan Hsi Yong
So last week I found a Hairy Woodpecker nest hole here in Commonland.
It wasn't hard two find, as a pair was constantly and noisily squabbling
around it.
I got some video which I put together and posted on Facebook, link below.
Although some of the behavior is quite clear, others are ambiguous, though
I have some guesses.

To set the stage: A female (F1) is inside the cavity, presumably
incubating, head popping out every now and then. A second female (F2) is
noisily trying to get into the nest, I think, and is chased off by both a
male (M) hanging around, and F1 inside the cavity. Towards the end of the
video, F2 leaves the cavity, and shortly after M enters to take over
incubation duties. After this, F1 and F2 continue the squabbling, though
offstage (away from the nest cavity) and not shown in the video.

Note that a few times F1 and F2 are pecking at each other, seemingly in
aggression. But a couple times F1 and M look to do the same, though it's
unclear whether those are aggressive pecks or perhaps "kisses", and if the
latter, what's the difference between the two? If you've seen woodpeckers
feeding their young, it looks like an aggressive pecking -- it seems to be
what they do.

I also note that M's responses to F2 appear sometimes noncommittal.
Sometimes M will seem to tolerate F2's pestering without obvious response.

Here's the video link:

  https://www.facebook.com/suan.yong/videos/10223245304658894

(If you don't have a facebook account, you can clink "Not Now" and still
view the video. Be sure to unmute.)

My hypothesis: could F2 be a youngster from last year still seeking out
Mom's attention?

In any case, happy mother's day!

Suan

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[cayugabirds-l] RBGB

2020-05-10 Thread Marilyn Ray
We've had a female RBGB around the feeders for about two weeks, but no 
males until yesterday.  What a relief to have him return and know things 
are okay.   Marilyn Ray


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[cayugabirds-l] FOY hummingbird

2020-05-10 Thread Anne Hobbs
I was doing my bit for Global Big Day by watching my feeders and, near the end 
of the 40 minutes, with a whole six species to report, what should whiz by than 
the FOY Ruby-throated Hummingbird. There is now nectar up for it...

Anne Hobbs


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