[cayugabirds-l] Genung Nature Preserve, Tues/Wed May 12-13

2020-05-13 Thread Mark Chao
Someone just informed me about my reply-all gaffe just now. I apologize to
Sandra, Tilden, and everyone for my error (still not sure how that
happened).

Anyway, back on topic, I'll note that on Tuesday and Wednesday mornings at
the Genung Nature Preserve in Freeville, I had experiences similar to what
Dave and Suan posted -- a better-than-expected variety of songbirds finding
food and thermal gains on the sunny banks of Fall Creek, despite the
unseasonable cold. I found 12 species of warblers, almost all male and
often quite cooperative -- Wilson's, Chestnut-sided, Black-throated Blue,
Palm, Pine, Yellow, Yellow-rumped, Blue-winged, American Redstart,
Ovenbird, Northern Waterthrush, and Common Yellowthroat -- plus Blue-headed
Vireos, Veeries, a Spotted Sandpiper, and others.

Mark Chao

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

RE: [cayugabirds-l] Magical evening at Monkey Run

2020-05-13 Thread Mark Chao
Hi Sandra,



I’m so glad to read about your evening!  You had so many high-quality
moments with exciting birds!  (I was also glad to read about that
unexpected Green Heron moment you had last week!)



I hope all is well with you.  My family and I are staying productive and
happy together and well so far, with some time for birding too, as you may
have read here on the listserv.  I will miss seeing you on the Spring Bird
Quest, but I will look forward to your further reports!

I still think of that birding walk that you and my son Tilden and I had at
Hammond Hill, especially your extremely helpful and memorable advice about
various paths one can take with a law degree.  Tilden remains very
interested in policy, especially on energy and the environment.  He seems
to be settling on economics as his major.  He also has a climate-change
policy internship this summer with an NGO in California.  Beyond that, he
hasn’t yet decided on his academic and professional directions – but he
still has lots of time to decide and even to change his mind completely
(just finished first year as an undergrad).



Stay well and stay in touch,

Mark













*From:* bounce-124630240-3493...@list.cornell.edu [mailto:
bounce-124630240-3493...@list.cornell.edu] *On Behalf Of *Sandra Lynn
Babcock
*Sent:* Wednesday, May 13, 2020 10:34 PM
*To:* CAYUGABIRDS-L 
*Subject:* [cayugabirds-l] Magical evening at Monkey Run



I birdied Monkey Run tonight, May 13, from about 6-7:15 p.m.  It was a
lovely evening, and the trails were full of birds.  The highlights were a
veery pair and a flock of warblers, including yellow, yellow-rumped, and a
very cooperative black-throated blue (male). Great crested flycatcher,
sapsuckers galore, a pair of orioles, a chattering belted kingfisher, and
the usual repertoire of woodpeckers, catbirds, and red-winged blackbirds
rounded out the evening.  And a chorus of spring peepers to escort me back
to my car.



Sandra Babcock

slb...@cornell.edu



Sent from my Ipad

--

*Cayugabirds-L List Info:*

Welcome and Basics 

Rules and Information 

Subscribe, Configuration and Leave


*Archives:*

The Mail Archive


Surfbirds 

BirdingOnThe.Net 

*Please submit your observations to eBird
!*

--

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

[cayugabirds-l] Magical evening at Monkey Run

2020-05-13 Thread Sandra Lynn Babcock
I birdied Monkey Run tonight, May 13, from about 6-7:15 p.m.  It was a lovely 
evening, and the trails were full of birds.  The highlights were a veery pair 
and a flock of warblers, including yellow, yellow-rumped, and a very 
cooperative black-throated blue (male). Great crested flycatcher, sapsuckers 
galore, a pair of orioles, a chattering belted kingfisher, and the usual 
repertoire of woodpeckers, catbirds, and red-winged blackbirds rounded out the 
evening.  And a chorus of spring peepers to escort me back to my car.

Sandra Babcock
slb...@cornell.edu

Sent from my Ipad

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

[cayugabirds-l] RED-HEADED WOODPECKER in cavity

2020-05-13 Thread Jared Dawson
This afternoon the 13th I was able to track a RED-HEADED WOODPECKER to a 
possible nest site, a cavity in a snag of a tree, the species of which I have 
not yet figured out but will. This bird has been seen or heard since 4 May, and 
a pair successfully nested in the same vicinity last year. The bird entered the 
cavity and repeatedly ejected wood chips, as documented in some photos at
 https://ebird.org/checklist/S68995280 
doing a lot of calling before entering the cavity. I enjoyed Jay McGowan’s 
description of this call as ‘desperate,’ there is something to that. It is 
distinctly higher-pitched than the more commonly heard Red-bellied. (Kweeah 
versus Kwirr, respectively, per Pieplow, if that helps).
The site is on a restricted access on neighboring private property, but with 
patience and luck you will be able to hear it, and maybe see it, somewhere 
around the intersection of Bradley and Strowbridge. It does occasionally come 
to our suet feeder, where I live at 30 Bradley. I’m of course hoping to see or 
hear two birds which has not occurred as of yet.
Cheers,
Jared Dawson
Trumansburg
--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

Re: [cayugabirds-l] molting birds question

2020-05-13 Thread Peter Saracino
Very interesting!
Thank you Anne.
Yeah - these redwings around my house are losing head feathers NOW - and
not post-breeding.
Pete Sar

On Wed, May 13, 2020, 3:01 PM  wrote:

> I will just offer the observation made several times while studying
> nesting redwinged blabkbirds at the Cornell ponds that no males arrived
> with bald heads but quite a few
> Showed missing patches during EARLy breeding season while disputes were
> common. At least once a fully feathered banded male had a down and out
> fight, flew off but was back trying to retake his territory the next
> day...with a bald spot.
>
> Whatever other explanations may pertain, male-male fights contribute I
> feel sure.
> Balding blue jays show up after breeding during post-juvenile and post
> breeding molts, I agree. Have seen. Not just their heads look ratty.
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> On May 13, 2020, at 12:20 PM, Peter Saracino 
> wrote:
>
> Thanks!
> Pete Saracino
>
> On Wed, May 13, 2020, 9:27 AM Tim Gallagher  wrote:
>
>> Here's a link to a piece they ran a few years ago on the Lab of
>> Ornithology website:
>> https://www.allaboutbirds.org/news/i-have-a-bald-bird-at-my-feeder-is-it-sick/
>>
>> 
>> I have a bald bird at my feeder. Is it sick? - All About Birds
>> 
>> We receive many inquiries about bald birds, especially Blue Jays and
>> Northern Cardinals. In late summer and fall, when a bird molts, it usually
>> grows and replaces its feathers gradually, but occasionally a bird loses
>> all the feathers on its head at once. This is particularly true of Blue
>> Jays, m ...
>> www.allaboutbirds.org
>>
>>
>> --
>> *From:* bounce-124627147-10557...@list.cornell.edu <
>> bounce-124627147-10557...@list.cornell.edu> on behalf of Peter Saracino <
>> petersarac...@gmail.com>
>> *Sent:* Tuesday, May 12, 2020 4:58 PM
>> *To:* Linda Clark Benedict 
>> *Cc:* CAYUGABIRDS-L 
>> *Subject:* Re: [cayugabirds-l] molting birds question
>>
>> Thanks for the info. Must be so m.j e as re molting non-essential
>> feathers?
>>
>> On Tue, May 12, 2020, 2:37 PM Linda Clark Benedict 
>> wrote:
>>
>> We had a bald rose-breasted grosbeak at our feeder.
>>
>> On Mon, May 11, 2020, 3:35 PM Peter Saracino 
>> wrote:
>>
>> Hi folks.
>> Recently I have seen one "bald" redwing on a tray feeder and another that
>> was nearly bald. Now I see what appears to be an adult Oriole "losing" some
>> of the black on its head. Is it normal for these birds to molt some of
>> their non-flight feathers at this time of year?
>> Thanks for the help.
>> Pete Sar
>> --
>> *Cayugabirds-L List Info:*
>> Welcome and Basics 
>> Rules and Information 
>> Subscribe, Configuration and Leave
>> 
>> *Archives:*
>> The Mail Archive
>> 
>> Surfbirds 
>> BirdingOnThe.Net 
>> *Please submit your observations to eBird
>> !*
>> --
>>
>> --
>> *Cayugabirds-L List Info:*
>> Welcome and Basics 
>> Rules and Information 
>> Subscribe, Configuration and Leave
>> 
>> *Archives:*
>> The Mail Archive
>> 
>> Surfbirds 
>> BirdingOnThe.Net 
>> *Please submit your observations to eBird
>> !*
>> --
>>
> --
> *Cayugabirds-L List Info:*
> Welcome and Basics 
> Rules and Information 
> Subscribe, Configuration and Leave
> 
> *Archives:*
> The Mail Archive
> 
> Surfbirds 
> BirdingOnThe.Net 
> *Please submit your observations to eBird
> !*
> --
>
>

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) 

Re: [cayugabirds-l] Hummer/others

2020-05-13 Thread Donna Lee Scott
1 or more of my many orioles yanked off 2 of the 4 bee guards from my H-bird 
feeder so they could drink more easily! Even broke one bee guard!
Still no H-bird here.

I saw 2 different Indigo Buntings today & just saw my FOY American Redstart. 
Also 2 female Rose breasted Grosbeaks with one male & 1 of “my” Brown Thrashers.

Donna Scott
Lansing
Sent from my iPhone

On May 13, 2020, at 3:30 PM, Laura Stenzler 
mailto:l...@cornell.edu>> wrote:

Finally, our FOY hummingbird showed up at the feeder today. Yay!

Laura

Laura Stenzler
l...@cornell.edu

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


[cayugabirds-l] Hummer

2020-05-13 Thread Laura Stenzler
Finally, our FOY hummingbird showed up at the feeder today. Yay!

Laura

Laura Stenzler
l...@cornell.edu

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--



Re: [cayugabirds-l] molting birds question

2020-05-13 Thread anneb . clark
I will just offer the observation made several times while studying nesting 
redwinged blabkbirds at the Cornell ponds that no males arrived with bald heads 
but quite a few
Showed missing patches during EARLy breeding season while disputes were common. 
At least once a fully feathered banded male had a down and out fight, flew off 
but was back trying to retake his territory the next day...with a bald spot. 

Whatever other explanations may pertain, male-male fights contribute I feel 
sure.  
Balding blue jays show up after breeding during post-juvenile and post breeding 
molts, I agree. Have seen. Not just their heads look ratty. 

Sent from my iPhone

> On May 13, 2020, at 12:20 PM, Peter Saracino  wrote:
> 
> Thanks! 
> Pete Saracino
> 
>> On Wed, May 13, 2020, 9:27 AM Tim Gallagher  wrote:
>> Here's a link to a piece they ran a few years ago on the Lab of Ornithology 
>> website: 
>> https://www.allaboutbirds.org/news/i-have-a-bald-bird-at-my-feeder-is-it-sick/
>> 
>> I have a bald bird at my feeder. Is it sick? - All About Birds
>> We receive many inquiries about bald birds, especially Blue Jays and 
>> Northern Cardinals. In late summer and fall, when a bird molts, it usually 
>> grows and replaces its feathers gradually, but occasionally a bird loses all 
>> the feathers on its head at once. This is particularly true of Blue Jays, m 
>> ...
>> www.allaboutbirds.org
>> 
>> 
>> From: bounce-124627147-10557...@list.cornell.edu 
>>  on behalf of Peter Saracino 
>> 
>> Sent: Tuesday, May 12, 2020 4:58 PM
>> To: Linda Clark Benedict 
>> Cc: CAYUGABIRDS-L 
>> Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] molting birds question
>>  
>> Thanks for the info. Must be so m.j e as re molting non-essential feathers?
>> 
>> On Tue, May 12, 2020, 2:37 PM Linda Clark Benedict  
>> wrote:
>> We had a bald rose-breasted grosbeak at our feeder.
>> 
>> On Mon, May 11, 2020, 3:35 PM Peter Saracino  wrote:
>> Hi folks.
>> Recently I have seen one "bald" redwing on a tray feeder and another that 
>> was nearly bald. Now I see what appears to be an adult Oriole "losing" some 
>> of the black on its head. Is it normal for these birds to molt some of their 
>> non-flight feathers at this time of year?
>> Thanks for the help.
>> Pete Sar
>> --
>> Cayugabirds-L List Info:
>> Welcome and Basics
>> Rules and Information
>> Subscribe, Configuration and Leave
>> Archives:
>> The Mail Archive
>> Surfbirds
>> BirdingOnThe.Net
>> Please submit your observations to eBird!
>> --
>> --
>> Cayugabirds-L List Info:
>> Welcome and Basics
>> Rules and Information
>> Subscribe, Configuration and Leave
>> Archives:
>> The Mail Archive
>> Surfbirds
>> BirdingOnThe.Net
>> Please submit your observations to eBird!
>> --
> 
> --
> Cayugabirds-L List Info:
> Welcome and Basics
> Rules and Information
> Subscribe, Configuration and Leave
> Archives:
> The Mail Archive
> Surfbirds
> BirdingOnThe.Net
> Please submit your observations to eBird!
> --

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

Re: [cayugabirds-l] molting birds question

2020-05-13 Thread Peter Saracino
Thanks!
Pete Saracino

On Wed, May 13, 2020, 9:27 AM Tim Gallagher  wrote:

> Here's a link to a piece they ran a few years ago on the Lab of
> Ornithology website:
> https://www.allaboutbirds.org/news/i-have-a-bald-bird-at-my-feeder-is-it-sick/
>
> 
> I have a bald bird at my feeder. Is it sick? - All About Birds
> 
> We receive many inquiries about bald birds, especially Blue Jays and
> Northern Cardinals. In late summer and fall, when a bird molts, it usually
> grows and replaces its feathers gradually, but occasionally a bird loses
> all the feathers on its head at once. This is particularly true of Blue
> Jays, m ...
> www.allaboutbirds.org
>
>
> --
> *From:* bounce-124627147-10557...@list.cornell.edu <
> bounce-124627147-10557...@list.cornell.edu> on behalf of Peter Saracino <
> petersarac...@gmail.com>
> *Sent:* Tuesday, May 12, 2020 4:58 PM
> *To:* Linda Clark Benedict 
> *Cc:* CAYUGABIRDS-L 
> *Subject:* Re: [cayugabirds-l] molting birds question
>
> Thanks for the info. Must be so m.j e as re molting non-essential feathers?
>
> On Tue, May 12, 2020, 2:37 PM Linda Clark Benedict 
> wrote:
>
> We had a bald rose-breasted grosbeak at our feeder.
>
> On Mon, May 11, 2020, 3:35 PM Peter Saracino 
> wrote:
>
> Hi folks.
> Recently I have seen one "bald" redwing on a tray feeder and another that
> was nearly bald. Now I see what appears to be an adult Oriole "losing" some
> of the black on its head. Is it normal for these birds to molt some of
> their non-flight feathers at this time of year?
> Thanks for the help.
> Pete Sar
> --
> *Cayugabirds-L List Info:*
> Welcome and Basics 
> Rules and Information 
> Subscribe, Configuration and Leave
> 
> *Archives:*
> The Mail Archive
> 
> Surfbirds 
> BirdingOnThe.Net 
> *Please submit your observations to eBird
> !*
> --
>
> --
> *Cayugabirds-L List Info:*
> Welcome and Basics 
> Rules and Information 
> Subscribe, Configuration and Leave
> 
> *Archives:*
> The Mail Archive
> 
> Surfbirds 
> BirdingOnThe.Net 
> *Please submit your observations to eBird
> !*
> --
>

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

[cayugabirds-l] Slowest Spring

2020-05-13 Thread Dave Nutter
The prolonged cold weather and northwest winds have put a damper on migration 
and leaf-out. 

But those conditions which make flying insects harder to find have herded the 
swallows down to Cayuga Lake and the easier to watch marina at Allan H Treman 
State Marine Park. There are no boats in the way, and the water is so high that 
the swallows can’t fly under most of the docks. Day before yesterday at the 
marina I saw all 6 of our regular species of swallows plus Chimney Swift. 

The Hawthorn Orchard may be “dead” but I have seen a few warblers and other 
treats in some Hawthorns in the parks here, including the row near the 
Children’s Garden in Cass Park and a stand north of the boat ramp near the 
state park office. 

And yesterday I figured  how to deal with the weather, which started out near 
freezing with a growing northwest wind. I spent the morning on the Black 
Diamond Trail walking on the old railroad grade from Cass Park as far as 
Glenwood Heights Rd, the 3.5 mile section I call BDT1. The sun rising in the 
northeast warmed that slope first at the base of West Hill. My warbler list 
included:

Louisiana Waterthrush, singing in a gorge just past the hospital
Nashville Warbler, in the first sunlit flock just past Hangar 
Common Yellowthroat, singing in the swamp behind Union Field
American Redstart, also in Union Swamp plus other spots
Northern Parula, 3 heard and great looks at 2 of them
Blackburnian Warbler, male FOY also in the first sunlit flock
Yellow Warbler, singing at BDT start, plus in some flocks
Chestnut-sided Warbler, in first sunlit flock plus later locals
Black-throated Blue Warbler, FOY in 2nd flock near Williams Glen
Palm Warbler, several places along BDT
“Myrtle” Yellow-rumped Warblers, many along BDT
Black-throated Green Warbler, female FOY in 2nd flock
Canada Warbler, FOY on ground on uphill side = eye level

The second flock soon after sunrise was just north of the waterfall of Williams 
Glen Creek. My intro was an Eastern Phoebe which I met in the next gully south 
as I approached. Then I heard and saw my FOY Red-eyed Vireo, who soon joined a 
gang of birds north of the falls. On a tall treetop on the north side of that 
gorge, a Rose-breasted Grosbeak sang. He later came down to ground level to 
chase off another male. Maybe the female there was impressed. Several Myrtle 
Warblers were busy, and were joined by the Chestnut-sided from earlier, while a 
Black-throated Green quietly worked on a small Hemlock. At least one Palm 
Warbler was there, and my FOY male Black-throated Blue made a brief appearance, 
as did a Northern Parula. A Least Flycatcher was perched quietly nearly at 
ground level, and a Warbling Vireo wandered through. A male Baltimore Oriole 
sang persistently for attention. Meanwhile a Downy Woodpecker joined the flock 
and a male Red-bellied Woodpecker clung to the nearest power pole and preened. 
A pair of Tufted Titmice and a Black-capped Chickadee were present, as well as 
Northern Cardinals. When a deep red male Scarlet Tanager flew to a treetop I 
just had to laugh. All the commotion attracted a female Brown-headed Cowbird to 
survey the scene. Then a shadow made me turn around. It was a Great Blue Heron 
flying over the flooded Hog Hole.  

The Canada Warbler was a short distance farther along the trail. It was with a 
Palm Warbler under a spray of leafing-out Beech shoots where NYSEG has cleared 
large trees away from their power lines. Nearby, a House Wren walked on some 
dead brush. It was silent, which seemed odd.

The whole trip couldn’t be that fantastic, but I had a good time. Having seen 
enough other warblers, I could enjoy the beauty of the many Myrtle Warblers. 
There was a pair of Eastern Towhees hiding in a thicket, the vacated Bison 
pasture had a pair of Eastern Kingbirds and at least 1 Killdeer (the other 
parent and any offspring were hidden), and there were singing Wood Thrushes 
along the way. I stopped so often it hardly seemed worth bringing the bike 
except it let me mostly coast back home. 

- - Dave Nutter
--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

RE: [cayugabirds-l] ebird reporting question re: motion activated photos

2020-05-13 Thread Magnus Fiskesjo

Applause! 

Well said!

I too would love to see those “camera trap” photos and would support their 
inclusion in eBird.

Magnus Fiskesjö, PhD
Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, Cornell University
McGraw Hall, Room 201. Ithaca, NY 14853, USA
E-mail: magnus.fiske...@cornell.edu, or: n...@cornell.edu
 

From: bounce-124628501-84019...@list.cornell.edu 
[bounce-124628501-84019...@list.cornell.edu] on behalf of Dave Nutter 
[nutter.d...@mac.com]
Sent: Wednesday, May 13, 2020 10:23 AM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L
Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] ebird reporting question re: motion activated 
photos

Some thoughts about eBird & non-standard reports: EBird has more than one 
purpose.

Certainly ornithologists want usable data, and that means lots of reports made 
in the same way. That’s why eBird promotes “complete” checklists of a certain 
length and time, which can be thrown in the same pile for statistical purposes. 
Reports which don’t meet those standards must be easily separated by how they 
are labeled. But that doesn’t mean they should not be in eBird at all. Perhaps 
the query about reports long after they were submitted was to find out whether 
they were usable for a particular study.

The reason eBird can collect enough data to use for statistical purposes is 
because birders find the program useful and fun. Promoting awareness of birds 
and conservation issues, which I hope includes birding, are functions the Lab 
of O and eBird program. To me as a birder, eBird is great for a couple of 
reasons.

First, I can keep track of what I’ve observed and include all my obscure and 
excruciating notes and terrible photos (See if you can make use of *that*, 
Merlin!). And my lists are not all statistically usable data for many 
ornithological purposes. I have modified my birding to try to help the 
ornithologists with standard complete lists, but when I find an interesting 
bird even though I wasn’t doing a formal timed birding session, I try to do an 
“incidental” eBird report.

Second, I can find out what other people have found, including their notes, 
photos, & audio. To me this is interesting and satisfying whether or not I want 
to chase it. Especially for species which I have seen before, I can enjoy 
someone else’s photo instead of burning gasoline and destroying the climate by 
chasing it. When Dave Kennedy makes a local trip to Montezuma and puts his 
fantastic photos in eBird, I have *less* need to drive 100miles. I would love 
to see “camera trap” photos and would support their inclusion in eBird. That’s 
how we learned that a Crested Caracara showed up to feed on carrion in Wayne 
County in 2018. I enjoy the audio from night flight calls (NFCs), even though 
my hearing isn’t good enough to detect them. I use eBird to find out what has 
been found in the Cayuga Lake Basin. I use eBird to learn about the ranges of 
“our” species when they are not here. I use eBird to learn about species I will 
never personally see because I expect never to fly again, and even trips more 
than a couple counties away (let alone south Texas!) have huge questions now. 
My birding this spring has been almost exclusively where I walk and bike, but 
eBird and CayugaBirds-L keep me connected.

- - Dave Nutter

--
Cayugabirds-L List Info:
Welcome and Basics
Rules and Information
Subscribe, Configuration and 
Leave
Archives:
The Mail 
Archive
Surfbirds
BirdingOnThe.Net
Please submit your observations to eBird!
--

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

Re: [cayugabirds-l] ebird reporting question re: motion activated photos

2020-05-13 Thread Dave Nutter
Some thoughts about eBird & non-standard reports: EBird has more than one 
purpose. 

Certainly ornithologists want usable data, and that means lots of reports made 
in the same way. That’s why eBird promotes “complete” checklists of a certain 
length and time, which can be thrown in the same pile for statistical purposes. 
Reports which don’t meet those standards must be easily separated by how they 
are labeled. But that doesn’t mean they should not be in eBird at all. Perhaps 
the query about reports long after they were submitted was to find out whether 
they were usable for a particular study. 

The reason eBird can collect enough data to use for statistical purposes is 
because birders find the program useful and fun. Promoting awareness of birds 
and conservation issues, which I hope includes birding, are functions the Lab 
of O and eBird program. To me as a birder, eBird is great for a couple of 
reasons. 

First, I can keep track of what I’ve observed and include all my obscure and 
excruciating notes and terrible photos (See if you can make use of *that*, 
Merlin!). And my lists are not all statistically usable data for many 
ornithological purposes. I have modified my birding to try to help the 
ornithologists with standard complete lists, but when I find an interesting 
bird even though I wasn’t doing a formal timed birding session, I try to do an 
“incidental” eBird report. 

Second, I can find out what other people have found, including their notes, 
photos, & audio. To me this is interesting and satisfying whether or not I want 
to chase it. Especially for species which I have seen before, I can enjoy 
someone else’s photo instead of burning gasoline and destroying the climate by 
chasing it. When Dave Kennedy makes a local trip to Montezuma and puts his 
fantastic photos in eBird, I have *less* need to drive 100miles. I would love 
to see “camera trap” photos and would support their inclusion in eBird. That’s 
how we learned that a Crested Caracara showed up to feed on carrion in Wayne 
County in 2018. I enjoy the audio from night flight calls (NFCs), even though 
my hearing isn’t good enough to detect them. I use eBird to find out what has 
been found in the Cayuga Lake Basin. I use eBird to learn about the ranges of 
“our” species when they are not here. I use eBird to learn about species I will 
never personally see because I expect never to fly again, and even trips more 
than a couple counties away (let alone south Texas!) have huge questions now. 
My birding this spring has been almost exclusively where I walk and bike, but 
eBird and CayugaBirds-L keep me connected. 

- - Dave Nutter
> 

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

Re: [cayugabirds-l] molting birds question

2020-05-13 Thread Tim Gallagher
Here's a link to a piece they ran a few years ago on the Lab of Ornithology 
website: 
https://www.allaboutbirds.org/news/i-have-a-bald-bird-at-my-feeder-is-it-sick/
[https://www.allaboutbirds.org/news/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/norcarBald_RohiniMehta_2_pre12-539x500.jpg]
I have a bald bird at my feeder. Is it sick? - All About 
Birds
We receive many inquiries about bald birds, especially Blue Jays and Northern 
Cardinals. In late summer and fall, when a bird molts, it usually grows and 
replaces its feathers gradually, but occasionally a bird loses all the feathers 
on its head at once. This is particularly true of Blue Jays, m ...
www.allaboutbirds.org



From: bounce-124627147-10557...@list.cornell.edu 
 on behalf of Peter Saracino 

Sent: Tuesday, May 12, 2020 4:58 PM
To: Linda Clark Benedict 
Cc: CAYUGABIRDS-L 
Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] molting birds question

Thanks for the info. Must be so m.j e as re molting non-essential feathers?

On Tue, May 12, 2020, 2:37 PM Linda Clark Benedict 
mailto:lbenedic...@gmail.com>> wrote:
We had a bald rose-breasted grosbeak at our feeder.

On Mon, May 11, 2020, 3:35 PM Peter Saracino 
mailto:petersarac...@gmail.com>> wrote:
Hi folks.
Recently I have seen one "bald" redwing on a tray feeder and another that was 
nearly bald. Now I see what appears to be an adult Oriole "losing" some of the 
black on its head. Is it normal for these birds to molt some of their 
non-flight feathers at this time of year?
Thanks for the help.
Pete Sar
--
Cayugabirds-L List Info:
Welcome and Basics
Rules and Information
Subscribe, Configuration and 
Leave
Archives:
The Mail 
Archive
Surfbirds
BirdingOnThe.Net
Please submit your observations to eBird!
--
--
Cayugabirds-L List Info:
Welcome and Basics
Rules and Information
Subscribe, Configuration and 
Leave
Archives:
The Mail 
Archive
Surfbirds
BirdingOnThe.Net
Please submit your observations to eBird!
--

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--