Re: [cayugabirds-l] Question

2017-07-13 Thread Mike Pitzrick
It looks like it would be a good idea to purchase a Senior Pass prior to
August 28, 2017.

Changes to Senior Pass


-Mike

On Thu, Jul 13, 2017 at 12:28 PM, Judith Thurber 
wrote:

> I purchased mine at Wonderful Steamtiwn in Scranton but Ft Stanwix in Rome
> NY probably also sells them.  A bargain for sure.
>
> Judy Thurber, Liverpool
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> > On Jul 13, 2017, at 10:51 AM, Peter  wrote:
> >
> > Might anyone know where one could purchase a Senior park pass to our
> National Parks? I got mine at the Refuge but am told they are no longer
> selling them.
> >
> > Much obliged.
> >
> > Pete Sar
> >
> >
> > --
> >
> > Cayugabirds-L List Info:
> > http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
> > http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
> > http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurat
> ionLeave.htm
> >
> > ARCHIVES:
> > 1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
> > 2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
> > 3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html
> >
> > Please submit your observations to eBird:
> > http://ebird.org/content/ebird/
> >
> > --
>
>
> --
>
> Cayugabirds-L List Info:
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm
>
> ARCHIVES:
> 1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
> 2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
> 3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html
>
> Please submit your observations to eBird:
> http://ebird.org/content/ebird/
>
> --
>
>


--

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

Re: [cayugabirds-l] Why larger predatory birds flee smaller birds

2016-07-18 Thread Mike Pitzrick
A couple of years ago by the Lab of O I saw a Canada Goose repeated land on
the shoulders of a white-tailed deer and peck the back of the neck and
head, driving it away from a nearby nest.  I seem to recall that some of
the Lab staff chose an alternate entrance to the building for a couple of
weeks to avoid this aggressive gander.

-Mike

On Mon, Jul 18, 2016 at 1:49 PM, Paul Schmitt  wrote:

> This got me to recalling that last summer I saw a RW Blackbird take
> offense at some Canada Geese there were too close to a nest at MNWR.  The
> male RWB attached the gander's back, taking hold and riding him out of the
> area.  It appeared the blackbird knew just where to be clear of the
> gander's beak.
>
> Paul Schmitt
>
> On Mon, Jul 18, 2016 at 1:42 PM, Dave K  wrote:
>
>> On the Eastern end of Eaton Marsh this AM, Kingbirds were defending
>> against an Osprey. It's the first time I've seen the Kingbirds red crown
>> which, apparently, they use in this situation.
>>
>> https://flic.kr/p/K6Q3AJ
>>
>> https://flic.kr/p/K6NNDN
>>
>> 
>>
>>
>> 
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> --
>> *From:* bounce-120630872-25047...@list.cornell.edu <
>> bounce-120630872-25047...@list.cornell.edu> on behalf of Dave Nutter <
>> nutter.d...@me.com>
>> *Sent:* Sunday, July 17, 2016 10:31 PM
>> *To:* Cayuga Birds
>> *Subject:* [cayugabirds-l] Why larger predatory birds flee smaller birds
>>
>> As I drove south on NYS-89 west of Cayuga Lake this afternoon I saw a
>> Red-tailed Hawk ahead, flying vigorously alongside the road, apparently
>> having just been persuaded by an Eastern Kingbird to vacate a typical perch
>> atop a power pole. As they crossed in front of me, the Kingbird closed the
>> gap completely and appeared to land and remain between the shoulders of the
>> flying hawk. They disappeared, still attached, behind farm buildings before
>> I could tell what damage the Kingbird inflicted, but I bet it was pretty
>> uncomfortable. Meanwhile second Kingbird had also joined the chase.
>>
>> --Dave Nutter
>>
>> --
>> *Cayugabirds-L List Info:*
>> Welcome and Basics 
>> Rules and Information 
>> Subscribe, Configuration and Leave
>> 
>> *Archives:*
>> The Mail Archive
>> 
>> Surfbirds 
>> BirdingOnThe.Net 
>> *Please submit your observations to eBird
>> !*
>> --
>> --
>> *Cayugabirds-L List Info:*
>> Welcome and Basics 
>> Rules and Information 
>> Subscribe, Configuration and Leave
>> 
>> *Archives:*
>> The Mail Archive
>> 
>> Surfbirds 
>> BirdingOnThe.Net 
>> *Please submit your observations to eBird
>> !*
>> --
>>
>
> --
> *Cayugabirds-L List Info:*
> Welcome and Basics 
> Rules and Information 
> Subscribe, Configuration and Leave
> 
> *Archives:*
> The Mail Archive
> 
> Surfbirds 
> BirdingOnThe.Net 
> *Please submit your observations to eBird
> !*
> --
>



-- 
*Almost a Conversation *
*Mary Oliver*
I have not really, not yet, talked with otter
about his life.

He has so many teeth, he has trouble
with vowels.

Wherefore our understanding
is all body expression —

he swims like the sleekest fish,
he dives and exhales and lifts a trail of bubbles.
Little by little he trusts my eyes
and my curious body sitting on the shore.

Sometimes he comes close.
I admire his whiskers
and his dark fur which I would rather die than wear.

He has no words, still what he tells about his life
is clear.
He does not own a computer.
He imagines the river will last forever.

He does not envy the dry house I live in.
He does not wonder who or what it is that I worship.
He wonders, morning after morning, that the river
is so cold and fresh and alive, and still
I don’t jump in.

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:

Re: [cayugabirds-l] Waterfowl hunting at Salt Pt?

2015-11-03 Thread Mike Pitzrick
I see from the minutes of the 10/16/2013 Lansing Town Board Meeting

that
deer hunting is also allowed at Salt Point, and that "Recently the Town
Board did ask the DEC for clarity about whether shotgun hunting of deer is
an allowable use on that property."  Does anybody know if that question has
been resolved?

-Mike


On Tue, Nov 3, 2015 at 9:18 AM, Dave Nutter  wrote:

> I believe hunting is allowed on Salt Point, which is DEC land administered
> by the Town of Lansing. Kinda sucks for those of us who prefer to see live
> undisturbed birds.
> —Dave Nutter
>
>
> > On Nov 3, 2015, at 9:06 AM, Marie P. Read  wrote:
> >
> > I headed over to MyersPark/ Salt Pt. intending to photograph Canada
> Geese taking off against the fall colors (as they did there yesterday). To
> my disappointment, I found instead someone setting out an array of mallard
> decoys and a hunting blind on the point just below the Osprey nest platform
> at Salt Pt. No real waterfowl anywhere. Assuming hunting was illegal in the
> "Salt Pt. Conservation Area", I went over to Salt Pt. intending to talk to
> the person, but again to my dismay, that none of the signage, including the
> DEC "rules" sign as you enter Salt Pt. says anything about whether
> waterfowl hunting there is prohibited or permitted. Does anyone know
> whether hunting is legal there?
> >
> > Marie
> >
> >
> > Marie Read Wildlife Photography
> > 452 Ringwood Road
> > Freeville NY  13068 USA
> >
> > Phone  607-539-6608
> > e-mail   m...@cornell.edu
> >
> > http://www.marieread.com
> >
> > Author of Sierra Wings: Birds of the Mono Lake BasinAvailable here:
> >
> >
> http://marieread.photoshelter.com/gallery/Sierra-Wings-Birds-of-the-Mono-Lake-Basin/GNlCxX37uTzE/CBPFGij6nLfE
> > --
> >
> > Cayugabirds-L List Info:
> > http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
> > http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
> >
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm
> >
> > ARCHIVES:
> > 1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
> > 2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
> > 3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html
> >
> > Please submit your observations to eBird:
> > http://ebird.org/content/ebird/
> >
> > --
> >
>
>
> --
>
> Cayugabirds-L List Info:
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm
>
> ARCHIVES:
> 1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
> 2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
> 3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html
>
> Please submit your observations to eBird:
> http://ebird.org/content/ebird/
>
> --
>
>

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

Re: [cayugabirds-l] Deer ticks

2015-10-22 Thread Mike Pitzrick
What purpose does it serve for us to judge nature and its parts as being
good, bad or indifferent ... of service to us or otherwise?

-Mike


On Thu, Oct 22, 2015 at 3:29 PM, AB Clark  wrote:

> Oxpeckers and such birds on other continents could give us some purposes.
> Although apparently the story is muddy:   see
> http://beheco.oxfordjournals.org/content/11/2/154.full
>
> Anne
>
>
>
> On Oct 22, 2015, at 3:12 PM, Asher Hockett  wrote:
>
> Once I tried to persuade to my wife that all creatures have a purpose in
> the scheme of nature, and she responded with, "Ticks, even?" I must admit I
> was at a loss to reply.
>
> On Thu, Oct 22, 2015 at 2:59 PM, Melanie Uhlir  wrote:
>
>> Eeeew. Ticks are one species I would love to see become extinct.
>>
>> On 10/22/2015 2:46 PM, Paul Anderson wrote:
>>
>>> A couple of years ago when we had that mild winter, I got a tick on the
>>> Christmas Bird Count. Not the FOY species I was hoping for!
>>>
>>> -Paul
>>>
>>> On 10/22/2015 2:22 PM, Donna Lee Scott wrote:
>>>
 Some of my animals and I have all had multiple ticks on us in the last
 2 weeks, after a summer of relative freedom from them.
 I am a tick magnet and had 3 on my levis yesterday, then one trying to
 embed in my thigh, later!  Ick!
 Donna

 Lansing Station Road
 Lansing, NY

 -Original Message-
 From: bounce-119809930-15001...@list.cornell.edu [mailto:
 bounce-119809930-15001...@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Melanie Uhlir
 Sent: Thursday, October 22, 2015 2:17 PM
 To: Carolyn McMaster ; 'Ann Mitchell' <
 annmitchel...@gmail.com>; CAYUGABIRDS-L 
 Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Deer ticks

 Good grief! Thank you for the heads-up!!

 Melanie

 On 10/22/2015 1:39 PM, Carolyn McMaster wrote:

> Dr. Carolyn McMaster here,
> Just a note of caution for all you fellow birders.  This is the season
> when ticks are most active.  Even after it freezes, if it goes above
> freezing during the day, the ticks will be foraging for a blood meal.
> Only after continual hard frosts will they go dormant.  Lyme disease
> is becoming more and more common around here.
> Carolyn
>
> -Original Message-
> From: bounce-119808363-47503...@list.cornell.edu
> [mailto:bounce-119808363-47503...@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Ann
> Mitchell
> Sent: Thursday, October 22, 2015 9:33 AM
> To: cayugabird...@list.cornell.edu
> Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Deer ticks
>
> Just a heads up. I know I am attracted to ticks, or the other way
> around, but they are still with us. I discovered one on me after a
> walk at Roy Park Preserve last evening.
> Good birding,
> Ann
>
> Sent from my iPhone
> --
>
> Cayugabirds-L List Info:
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
> 
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
> 
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave
> 
> .htm
>
> ARCHIVES:
> 1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
> 2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
> 3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html
>
> Please submit your observations to eBird:
> http://ebird.org/content/ebird/
>
> --
>
>
> --
>
> Cayugabirds-L List Info:
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
> 
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
> 
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave
> 
> .htm
>
> ARCHIVES:
> 1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
> 2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
> 3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html
>
> Please submit your observations to eBird:
> http://ebird.org/content/ebird/
>
> --
>
>
 --

 Cayugabirds-L List Info:
 http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
 
 http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
 

 http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm
 

 ARCHIVES:
 1) 

Re: [cayugabirds-l] Accipiter eating bats

2014-08-11 Thread Mike Pitzrick
Howdy,

Birds of North America says that Red-tailed Hawk has been reported as far
south as Venezuela and Colombia.

-Mike




On Mon, Aug 11, 2014 at 11:16 AM, Lindsay Goodloe l...@cornell.edu wrote:

 From what I’ve read, the red-tailed hawk occurs in Central America
 but not in South America. When I was growing up in the 1950s, I was a big
 fan of Disney’s True Life Adventure films, one of which was The Living
 Desert. Though it’s been about 60 years since I’ve seen the film, I have a
 clear memory of a sequence in which a red-tailed hawk dove through a flying
 mass of bats that were either just departing from or returning to the cave
 in which they roosted by day.  As I recall, the red-tail eventually caught
 a bat after repeated failures. I’m sure an accipiter could have done better!

 Lindsay Goodloe

 I think one of the BBC specials shows red-tailed hawks catching bats.  Big
 bats, in South America...I think.

 David Diaz
 Tburg, NY

  On Aug 10, 2014, at 8:51 PM, Kevin Loope *kj...@cornell.edu
 http://kj...@cornell.edu* wrote:
 
  Sitting on my porch at around 8:15 this evening, I noticed a silhouetted
 accipiter (female sharp-shinned or male cooper’s?) atop the utility pole in
 the TCAT parking lot in Varna.  It was pulling apart what I thought was a
 small bird, but when it tossed it off and flew away I found the fresh
 remains of a bat (mostly wings) at the base of the pole, plus the remains
 of at least two more bats that were slightly less fresh.  Do they “hawk”
 the bats in flight??  What a remarkable feat that would be!  Anyone ever
 witnessed it?
 
  Cheers,
  Kevin Loope
 --
 *Cayugabirds-L List Info:*
 Welcome and Basics http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
 Rules and Information http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
 Subscribe, Configuration and Leave
 http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm
 *Archives:*
 The Mail Archive
 http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
 Surfbirds http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
 BirdingOnThe.Net http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html
 *Please submit your observations to eBird
 http://ebird.org/content/ebird/!*
 --




-- 
The birds they sang
at the break of day.
Start again
I heard them say.
Don't dwell on what
has passed away
or what is yet to be.

Ring the bells that still can ring.
Forget your perfect offering.
There is a crack, a crack in everything,
That's how the light gets in.

-Leonard Cohen

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

Re: [cayugabirds-l] Not birds-but FIREFLIES tonight

2014-06-29 Thread Mike Pitzrick
Hi Dave,

People do perceive colors differently due to both biological capacity and
training.  This is an area of active research.

Regarding biological capacity, most people have three types of color
receptors in their eyes, each of which is most sensitive to a single color:
red, green, or blue.  Some people, mostly male, are completely or partially
color blind, meaning that one or more types of color receptor are partially
or completely disabled color receptors, resulting in diminished capacity to
discriminate differences in color.

Recently it was discovered that some females have four types of color
receptors in their eyes, giving them the potential to distinguish more
colors than is usual in humans.  This article in Discover magazine, Humans
with Super Human Vision
http://discovermagazine.com/2012/jul-aug/06-humans-with-super-human-vision,
explains.

If you are interested in testing your ability to discriminate colors, try
out this Color Test http://www.xrite.com/online-color-test-challenge.  If
you'd like to see if you are color blind, check out Free Colorblindness Test
http://www.colour-blindness.com/colour-blindness-tests/.  Note that these
online tests are not 100% reliable, due to variation in computer monitors.

By the way, this discussion is pretty far afield from the usual content of
CAYUGABIRDS-L, and I'm surprised no one has complained yet.  People who
would enjoy participating in a similar email list with broader scope may be
interested in NATURAL-HISTORY-L.  Instructions for joining a Cornell email
list can be found in Join an E-list
http://www.it.cornell.edu/services/elist/howto/user/join.cfm.

-Mike


On Sun, Jun 29, 2014 at 10:45 AM, Dave Nutter nutter.d...@me.com wrote:

 That's a great website for a neat project, Mike! On the discussion board,
 a participant (whose name  email I have omitted here) asked Linda's
 question, and the project leader replied:

 In my June 1, 2014 report I reported an individual flying with three
 flashes and reported it as orange because red was not an option. It looked
 RED to me. Is that possible?
 .:Don Salvatore - 6/16/2014 1:20 pm Firefly colors are listed as yellow,
 yellow green, green, orange, amber and blue. I have never heard of a red
 firefly. But that doesn't mean that there isn't one. Or that because of the
 way people may see colors differently or environmental conditions, you
 won't see a red firefly.

 * * *
 I still have only seen what I'd describe as yellow-green fireflies, but a
 lot of them. Maybe that's all there are at my house, or maybe I haven't
 learned to discern the colors. I certainly haven't put in the disciplined
 time of a Firefly Watch participant, but I'm considering it. Then maybe
 I'll have more legitimate replies when people ask about red flashes in the
 night.

 --Dave Nutter


 On Jun 29, 2014, at 12:24 AM, Mike Pitzrick mpitzr...@gmail.com wrote:

 The Museum of Science in Boston has published some web pages with
 information about how to identify fireflies using their flash color and
 pattern.

 Types Of Fireflies
 https://legacy.mos.org/fireflywatch/types_of_fireflies

 Flash Chart https://legacy.mos.org/fireflywatch/flash_chart

 Virtual Habitat https://legacy.mos.org/fireflywatch/virtual_habitat
 (interactive tool to help you learn to identify firefly flashes)


 These web pages are part of a citizen science project called Firefly Watch
 https://legacy.mos.org/fireflywatch/, which is designed to find out
 more about the distribution of the various firefly species.

 -Mike


 On Sat, Jun 28, 2014 at 10:49 PM, Linda Orkin wingmagi...@gmail.com
 wrote:

 Does anyone else notice that some of the flashes look like different
 colors. Reds and greens. Is this just like a Doppler shift type thing or
 are they really like that?

 Linda


 --
 *Cayugabirds-L List Info:*
 Welcome and Basics http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
 Rules and Information http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
 Subscribe, Configuration and Leave
 http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm
 *Archives:*
 The Mail Archive
 http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
 Surfbirds http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
 BirdingOnThe.Net http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html
 *Please submit your observations to eBird
 http://ebird.org/content/ebird/!*
 --




-- 
Human freedom involves our capacity to pause between the stimulus and
response and, in that pause, to choose the one response toward which we
wish to throw our weight. The capacity to create ourselves, based upon this
freedom, is inseparable from consciousness or self-awareness.

-Rollo May

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http

Re: [cayugabirds-l] Bluebird bot? flies

2014-06-13 Thread Mike Pitzrick
Hi Richard,

There's a chance that what you are seeing are bird blow flies.

Bird blow flies are common in the nests of many birds, including bluebirds,
 swallows, chickadees, wrens, warblers, flycatchers and raptors.  Research
 shows that heavy infestations can make nestlings anemic (cause reduced red
 blood cell counts) and severe infestations may be lethal (Whitworth 
 Bennett, 1992).  Infestation rates vary from almost 100% in magpies to 50%
 in many bluebirds, to zero in over 100 oriole nests (Whitworth  Bennett,
 1992).  In most areas, around 5-10% of infested nests are likely to have
 sufficient larval populations to make nestlings sick.  Little is known
 about this parasite since it is rarely encountered in nature, except in
 bird nests.

 http://www.birdblowfly.com/generalinfo.html


Terry Whitworth, the investigator who put up the website linked above,
invites readers to send data from their observations of bird nests.

If you should disagree with Terry's opinion that it is best to allow blow
flies free access to bird nests because they are perfectly natural,
http://www.sialis.org/forumlinks.htm offers some advice about controlling
blow flies in bluebird boxes.

-Mike





On Fri, Jun 13, 2014 at 7:48 AM, Richard Tkachuck rictkal...@gmail.com
wrote:

 We had a bluebird box with six eggs. Looked in yesterday and saw one dead
 nearly fledged bird and one egg. We assume that the others made it out of
 the nest, but have not seen any around, nor the adults. However, saw about
 eight larvae and two pupae  on the floor of the box.

 Can anyone tell what the species might be? Have collected them and are
 waiting for them to hatch.

 What I might do to avoid these should they use the box again?

 What harm do they cause?

 We saw a Red-bellied Woodpecker looking in the box. Would it act as a
 predator?
 Cheers,
 Richard Tkachuck
 --
 *Cayugabirds-L List Info:*
 Welcome and Basics http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
 Rules and Information http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
 Subscribe, Configuration and Leave
 http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm
 *Archives:*
 The Mail Archive
 http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
 Surfbirds http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
 BirdingOnThe.Net http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html
 *Please submit your observations to eBird
 http://ebird.org/content/ebird/!*
 --




-- 
You give but little when you give of your possessions.  It is when you give
of yourself that you truly give.

-Kahlil Gibran

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

Re: [cayugabirds-l] Mockingbirds on our house

2014-06-08 Thread Mike Pitzrick
Hi Richard,

The range map for Northern Mockingbird in *Birds of North America*
indicates that they breed as far north as southern Ontario, and are
permanent residents as far north as Watertown, NY.  Regarding migratory
habits, BNA says it is

Not well understood. Reported to be partly migratory in northern portion of
 range, but at least some individuals remain in winter at northern limits of
 breeding range. Perceptions of status could be affected by reduced
 visibility of mockingbirds during winter.


About the number of songs types one bird can make,

The vocal repertoires of individual males have been estimated to be as low
 as 45 and as high as 203 song types ... Song types appear to be added
 continuously to the vocal repertoire, suggesting that an individual bird
 may not have an upper limit to its repertoire.


The BNA account does not appear to address the issue of the fidelity of
mimicry, so I will venture into the realm of my own impressions of how
mockingbird mimicry can be distinguished from the songs of birds they
imitate.  I would welcome commentary from others who have similar or
different impressions.

BNA mention that

Mockingbirds typically repeat one song type several times before switching
 to another. Songs are presented in “bouts,” with each bout consisting of
 repetitions of only one song type. Song types of short duration are
 repeated more often within a bout than are longer song types


This suggests one of the cues that might clue me into the fact that I'm
hearing an imitation of a cardinal song rather than a real cardinal song.
The mockingbird is likely to make several identical repetitions of the same
cardinal song in a pretty short time frame.

Beyond that, it appears to me that while many aspects of the cardinal song
are faithfully reproduced to my ear, there are definitely alterations.  To
me, a real cardinal song has more dynamic range, more change in pitch, more
variety between repetitions of the same song, more variability in song
length, etc.

To anthropomorphize, when I hear a real cardinal, I sometimes form a mental
image of an opera singer.  I hear years of voice lessons.  Each note is
milked for every possible ounce of melodrama and emotion.  I can almost see
the exaggerated facial expressions.

The mockingbird reminds me more of an advanced beginner pianist.  The
repertoire is getting to be quite large and increasing every week, but each
of the pieces is of similar length because it gets boiled down to a single
page in the piano lesson book.  The performance is lacking in dynamic
range, change of tempo, and creativity.  Each repetition is rendered
mechanically and identically.  My impression is that of a rote performance.

Does this ring true for other observers?

Richard, I'm guessing you would really enjoy reading The Singing Life of
Birds
http://www.amazon.com/The-Singing-Life-Birds-Listening/dp/0618840761/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8qid=1402234001sr=8-1keywords=kroodsma
by Donald Kroodsma.  The book discusses Northern Mockingbird among other
species, comes with a CD, and is full of sonograms.

-Mike


On Sat, Jun 7, 2014 at 8:25 AM, Richard Tkachuck rictkal...@gmail.com
wrote:

 A mockingbird has selected our house as a place to display his wide
 variety of sounds from early morning until the sun sets. This has raised
 some questions.
 1, How large a collection of different sounds can one bird make?
 2. I recognize some of the sounds. Would a cardinal be confused in hearing
 his call?
 3. Are the sonograms of a mockingbird and a cardinal about the same, or
 can you tell them apart.
 4. Mockingbirds migrate. Can you tell where they spent the winter by the
 songs they sing?
 5. Do mockingbirds make calls of predators like owls or hawks?

 Thanks,
 Richard Tkachuck
 --


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

[cayugabirds-l] Woodcock on Sapsucker Woods Rd

2014-03-23 Thread Mike Pitzrick
Today at 3:00 PM I flushed a woodcock from the ditch along Sapsucker Woods
Rd, across from where Sanctuary Dr intersects.  It flew only about 30 feet
from the road before landing on the forest floor.

-Mike

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

Re: [cayugabirds-l] A hint of things to come...

2014-03-05 Thread Mike Pitzrick
I just located this 2012 review paper on the topic: Photoperiodic Control
of Seasonality in Birds http://jbr.sagepub.com/content/16/4/365.abstract.
In case you can't see that link from where you are, here's a brief excerpt
from the abstract.

This review examines how birds use the annual cycle in photoperiod to
 ensure that seasonal events--breeding, molt, and song production--happen at
 the appropriate time of year ... In predictable breeders (most nontropical
 species), photoperiod is the predominant proximate factor. Increasing
 photoperiods of spring stimulate secretion of gonadotropin-releasing
 hormone (GnRH) and consequent gonadal maturation.



-Mike





On Wed, Mar 5, 2014 at 10:25 AM, Linda Post Van Buskirk l...@cornell.eduwrote:

  I assume it's hours of daylight rather than temperature that triggers
 behaviors.



 *From:* bounce-112921516-3493...@list.cornell.edu [mailto:
 bounce-112921516-3493...@list.cornell.edu] *On Behalf Of *Robin Cisne
 *Sent:* Wednesday, March 05, 2014 9:33 AM
 *To:* Marie P. Read
 *Cc:* CAYUGABIRDS-L
 *Subject:* Re: [cayugabirds-l] A hint of things to come...



 Yet another reason to love birds:  after a certain point in late winter,
 they say, To hell with the temperature, I'm getting on with it!



 On Wed, Mar 5, 2014 at 9:01 AM, Marie P. Read m...@cornell.edu wrote:

 Things are looking up. Mr. Cardinal just fed Mrs. Cardinal in a tree near
 my feeders.

 Think Spring!

 Marie


 Marie Read Wildlife Photography
 452 Ringwood Road
 Freeville NY  13068 USA

 Phone  607-539-6608
 e-mail   m...@cornell.edu

 http://www.marieread.com

 ***NEW***  Music of the Birds Vol 1 ebook for Apple iPad now available
 from iTunes

 http://itunes.apple.com/us/book/music-of-the-birds-v1/id529347014?mt=11
 --

 Cayugabirds-L List Info:
 http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
 http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
 http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

 ARCHIVES:
 1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
 2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
 3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

 Please submit your observations to eBird:
 http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

 --




 --

 You can observe a lot just by watching. -- Yogi Berra

 --

 *Cayugabirds-L List Info:*

 Welcome and Basics http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME

 Rules and Information http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES

 Subscribe, Configuration and 
 Leavehttp://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

 *Archives:*

 The Mail 
 Archivehttp://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html

 Surfbirds http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds

 BirdingOnThe.Net http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

 *Please submit your observations to eBird
 http://ebird.org/content/ebird/!*

 --
  --
 *Cayugabirds-L List Info:*
 Welcome and Basics http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
 Rules and Information http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
 Subscribe, Configuration and 
 Leavehttp://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm
 *Archives:*
 The Mail 
 Archivehttp://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
 Surfbirds http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
 BirdingOnThe.Net http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html
 *Please submit your observations to eBird
 http://ebird.org/content/ebird/!*
 --




--

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--