Re: [cayugabirds-l] Fields being mowed.

2021-06-15 Thread darlingtonbets
Good! And let's try to get some publicity into the Ithaca Journal. BetsySent 
from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
 Original message From: Nancy Cusumano 
 Date: 6/15/21  4:28 PM  (GMT-05:00) To: "Kenneth V. 
Rosenberg"  Cc: Linda Orkin , 
CAYUGABIRDS-L  Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] 
Fields being mowed. Ken, May I use your words in my letters? I think I will go 
straight to the top with this issue. I will paraphrase...NancyOn Tue, Jun 15, 
2021 at 4:07 PM Kenneth V. Rosenberg  wrote:







Linda, thanks for bringing this mowing to everyone’s attention. In a nutshell, 
what is happening today in those fields, repeated over the entire U.S., is the 
primary cause of continued steep declines in Bobolink
 and other grassland bird populations. 
 
Last year, because of the delays in mowing due to Covid, the fields along 
Freeze and Hanshaw Roads were full of nesting birds, including many nesting 
Bobolinks that were actively feeding young in the nests
 at the end of June. In the first week of July, Cornell decided to mow all the 
fields. Jody Enck and I wrote letters and met with several folks at Cornell in 
the various departments in charge of managing those fields (Veterinary College, 
University Farm Services)
 – although they listened politely to our concerns for the birds, they went 
ahead and mowed that week as dozens of female bobolinks and other birds hovered 
helplessly over the tractors with bills filled food for their almost-fledged 
young.

 
The same just happened over the past couple of days this year, only at an 
earlier stage in the nesting cycle – most birds probably have (had) recently 
hatched young in the nest. While mowing is occurring across
 the entire region as part of “normal” agricultural practices (with continued 
devastating consequences for field-nesting birds), the question is whether 
Cornell University needs to be contributing to this demise, while ostensibly 
supporting biodiversity conservation
 through other unrelated programs. Jody and I presented an alternative vision, 
where the considerable acres of fields owned by the university across Tompkins 
County could serve as a model for conserving populations of grassland birds, 
pollinators, and other
 biodiversity, but the people in charge of this management were not very 
interested in these options.
 
And there we have it, a microcosm of the continental demise of grassland birds 
playing out in our own backyard, illustrating the extreme challenges of modern 
Ag practices that are totally incompatible with
 healthy bird populations. I urge CayugaBirders to make as much noise as 
possible, and maybe someone will listen.
 
KEN
 

Ken Rosenberg (he/him/his)
Applied Conservation Scientist
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
American Bird Conservancy
Fellow, Atkinson Center for a Sustainable Future
k...@cornell.edu
Wk: 607-254-2412
Cell: 607-342-4594

 
 

From:
bounce-125714085-3493...@list.cornell.edu 
 on behalf of Linda Orkin 

Date: Tuesday, June 15, 2021 at 3:02 PM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L 
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Fields being mowed.


After a couple year hiatus in which the Freese Road fields across from the 
gardens have been mowed late in the season allowing at least Bobolinks to be 
done with their nesting and for grassland birds to be lured
 into a false feeling of security so they have returned and I’ve counted three 
singing meadowlarks for the first time in years,  Cornell has returned to early 
mowing there as of today. And so the mayhem ensues. How many more multitudes of 
birds will die before
 we believe our own eyes and ears. Mow the grass while it’s still nutritious 
but are we paying attention to who is being fed. Grass taken from the land to 
pass through animals and in that inefficient process turning to food for humans.


Linda Orkin
Ithaca NY
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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Fields being mowed.

2021-06-15 Thread darlingtonbets
Can someone take on writing a letter to the Ithaca Journal - if possible, with 
some photos?  How about a petition, too?It's one thing if it's farmers who have 
to support themselves, but CORNELL?! I can just imagine all their 
rationalizations!BetsySent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
 Original message From: Melissa Groo  Date: 
6/15/21  4:53 PM  (GMT-05:00) To: Nancy Cusumano  
Cc: CAYUGABIRDS-L , "Kenneth V. Rosenberg" 
, Linda Orkin  Subject: Re: 
[cayugabirds-l] Fields being mowed. Also, if anyone would get photos of the 
distressed parents flying/hovering in the same frame as the mowers, those 
photos would go a long way too. (I would volunteer but I’m out of town right 
now.)The photos could be used in an article or editorial of some kind, that 
needs to be written.MelissaOn Tue, Jun 15, 2021 at 2:28 PM Nancy Cusumano 
 wrote:Ken, May I use your words in my letters? I 
think I will go straight to the top with this issue. I will 
paraphrase...NancyOn Tue, Jun 15, 2021 at 4:07 PM Kenneth V. Rosenberg 
 wrote:







Linda, thanks for bringing this mowing to everyone’s attention. In a nutshell, 
what is happening today in those fields, repeated over the entire U.S., is the 
primary cause of continued steep declines in Bobolink
 and other grassland bird populations. 
 
Last year, because of the delays in mowing due to Covid, the fields along 
Freeze and Hanshaw Roads were full of nesting birds, including many nesting 
Bobolinks that were actively feeding young in the nests
 at the end of June. In the first week of July, Cornell decided to mow all the 
fields. Jody Enck and I wrote letters and met with several folks at Cornell in 
the various departments in charge of managing those fields (Veterinary College, 
University Farm Services)
 – although they listened politely to our concerns for the birds, they went 
ahead and mowed that week as dozens of female bobolinks and other birds hovered 
helplessly over the tractors with bills filled food for their almost-fledged 
young.

 
The same just happened over the past couple of days this year, only at an 
earlier stage in the nesting cycle – most birds probably have (had) recently 
hatched young in the nest. While mowing is occurring across
 the entire region as part of “normal” agricultural practices (with continued 
devastating consequences for field-nesting birds), the question is whether 
Cornell University needs to be contributing to this demise, while ostensibly 
supporting biodiversity conservation
 through other unrelated programs. Jody and I presented an alternative vision, 
where the considerable acres of fields owned by the university across Tompkins 
County could serve as a model for conserving populations of grassland birds, 
pollinators, and other
 biodiversity, but the people in charge of this management were not very 
interested in these options.
 
And there we have it, a microcosm of the continental demise of grassland birds 
playing out in our own backyard, illustrating the extreme challenges of modern 
Ag practices that are totally incompatible with
 healthy bird populations. I urge CayugaBirders to make as much noise as 
possible, and maybe someone will listen.
 
KEN
 

Ken Rosenberg (he/him/his)
Applied Conservation Scientist
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
American Bird Conservancy
Fellow, Atkinson Center for a Sustainable Future
k...@cornell.edu
Wk: 607-254-2412
Cell: 607-342-4594

 
 

From:
bounce-125714085-3493...@list.cornell.edu 
 on behalf of Linda Orkin 

Date: Tuesday, June 15, 2021 at 3:02 PM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L 
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Fields being mowed.


After a couple year hiatus in which the Freese Road fields across from the 
gardens have been mowed late in the season allowing at least Bobolinks to be 
done with their nesting and for grassland birds to be lured
 into a false feeling of security so they have returned and I’ve counted three 
singing meadowlarks for the first time in years,  Cornell has returned to early 
mowing there as of today. And so the mayhem ensues. How many more multitudes of 
birds will die before
 we believe our own eyes and ears. Mow the grass while it’s still nutritious 
but are we paying attention to who is being fed. Grass taken from the land to 
pass through animals and in that inefficient process turning to food for humans.


Linda Orkin
Ithaca NY
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[cayugabirds-l] Fwd: Steve

2021-03-09 Thread darlingtonbets
Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
 Original message From: Jerry Skinner  Date: 
3/9/21  11:31 AM  (GMT-05:00) To: darlingtonb...@gmail.com Subject: Steve Hi 
Betsy, Might you post this to the list?  I don’t have access.Jerry Let me add 
another aspect of Steve’s legacy.  I am one of the hundreds of ‘Puffineers’ who 
served as researchers, interns, and volunteers on Project Puffin.  So many 
conservation careers have been launched and furthered over the past 45 
years!Thank you, Steve, for lifetime memories and experiences!Check out the 
book Project Puffin by Steve and Derrick Jackson to learn details of the 
project’s rocky beginning.

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[cayugabirds-l] Free 35 mm film

2021-03-07 Thread darlingtonbets
I have 3 rolls of unused 35mm film - 200 ASA, 24 exp., that I want to give 
away.  If you'd like to have them, please contact me at 273-0707 or 
Darlingtonbets@gmail.comBetsySent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Angry birds (Am robins!)

2019-10-26 Thread darlingtonbets
A number of years ago, I asked poisonous plant expert, John Kingsbury, about 
pokeweed. He's a retired professor of botany from Cornell and was lecturer in 
phytotoxicology at Cornell's Vet. College. And author of "Deadly Harvest," an 
excellent book on poisonous plants. He told me that a group of medical 
researchers who were studying pokeweed, and handling the plant, all developed 
leukemia-like symptoms. (I don't know what happened after that. Did they 
recover, once they stopped handling it?)  He recommended wearing gloves, if 
handling the plant. I think he said that the berries were the least toxic part 
of the plant. Just because a plant is toxic to humans, of course, doesn't mean 
it should be destroyed, just that people should be cautious in using, handling 
or eating it.  And many plants that are toxic to humans are fine for birds and 
other animals.  Pokeweed is a beautiful, interesting plant. Just don't eat it 
or handle it without gloves.BetsySent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
 Original message From: Maryfaith Miller 
 Date: 10/26/19  12:08 PM  (GMT-05:00) To: 
anneb.cl...@gmail.com Cc: Regi Teasley , 
bluewing-gr...@googlegroups.com, CAYUGABIRDS-L  
Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Angry birds (Am robins!) I have used pokeweed 
berries in my forest kindergarten class to dye wool an intensely beautiful 
shade of purple. 5-6-7 year olds, harvested, crushed, boiled over a campfire 
and stirred the pot full of wool roving and pokeweed berries. My students love 
knowing which plants are deadly poisonous. I have taught them a lot about 
mushrooms, and all of them can identify a destroying angel, jack o'lanterns, 
etc. Knowledge is power, and children love having this knowledge. They know 
where all the pokeweed plants are at Lime Hollow and love to inform people 
about them. But this is a bird list, and the question is about bird 
behavior...I'd love to hear about the OP's question re American Robin 
aggression if anyone knows more about that.Maryfaith Decker MillerOn Sat, Oct 
26, 2019 at 11:38 AM  wrote:And I am living proof that 
eating young pokeweed is not deadly. We didn’t use 3 waters either, although 
drained it. But I am NOT suggesting everyone try it. Young spinach causes less 
panic. Or try lambs quarters. Anne Sent from my iPhoneOn Oct 26, 2019, at 9:56 
AM, Regi Teasley  wrote:I understand Pokeweed is poisonous 
to humans.  Your thoughts on keeping these plants?RegiWhat good is a house if 
you don’t have a tolerable planet to put it in?  Henry David ThoreauOn Oct 26, 
2019, at 9:01 AM, anneb.cl...@gmail.com wrote:This morning I have a large 
number of robins all age/sexes foraging on my productive pokeweed berries and 
scratching leaves AND chasing each other hard and long.  More athletic long 
chases than I am used to associating with robins. They are not just chasing 
around the berries although I watched some head lowered face offs ( before a 
chase) on the fence near pokeweed. Anne Sent from my iPhone--Cayugabirds-L List 
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