Reminder - Re: [cayugabirds-l] Huge Cormorant Flock off East Shore Park

2021-04-22 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Just a reminder to scan over all D-c Cormorants for other potential goodies, 
such as Great Cormorant or Neotropic Cormorant!

For example, a single Neotropic Cormorant was found yesterday in Ottawa (still 
present today).

I’ll never forget this statement from Kevin McGowan: “bad weather = good 
birds!” It’s so true. :-)

Good birding!

Sincerely,
Chris T-H


On Apr 22, 2021, at 9:21 AM, Arnold Talentino 
mailto:arnold.talent...@cortland.edu>> wrote:

100 plus cormorants on Dryden Lake,  Wednesday 3:30 pm; also of note, 50 plus 
buffleheads

Arnold Talentino


From: 
bounce-125561293-28222...@list.cornell.edu
 
mailto:bounce-125561293-28222...@list.cornell.edu>>
 on behalf of david nicosia mailto:daven1...@yahoo.com>>
Sent: Tuesday, April 20, 2021 7:50 PM
To: Donna Lee Scott mailto:d...@cornell.edu>>; Sandy Podulka 
mailto:s...@cornell.edu>>
Cc: CAYUGABIRDS-L 
mailto:cayugabird...@list.cornell.edu>>
Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Huge Cormorant Flock off East Shore Park

I just estimated 200+ DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANTS Whitney Point Reservoir in 
Broome County this evening!


On Tuesday, April 20, 2021, 04:45:51 PM EDT, Donna Lee Scott 
mailto:d...@cornell.edu>> wrote:


Cormorants have been flying by to north in small flocks for at least an hour!

Donna Scott
Lansing
Sent from my iPhone

On Apr 20, 2021, at 3:31 PM, Donna Lee Scott 
mailto:d...@cornell.edu>> wrote:

Two days ago I saw a flock of about 10+ DC Cormorants flying north over Cayuga 
Lake.

Donna Scott
Lansing
Sent from my iPhone

On Apr 20, 2021, at 3:23 PM, Sandy Podulka 
mailto:s...@cornell.edu>> wrote:

John Greenly reports at 2:30 today that there was a flock of 132 +- 
Double-crested Cormorants off East Shore Park (SE corner of Cayuga Lake).


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
--
Cayugabirds-L List Info:
Welcome and Basics
Rules and Information
Subscribe, Configuration and 
Leave
Archives:
The Mail 
Archive
Surfbirds
BirdingOnThe.Net
Please submit your observations to eBird!
--
--
Cayugabirds-L List Info:
Welcome and Basics
Rules and Information
Subscribe, Configuration and 
Leave
Archives:
The Mail 
Archive
Surfbirds
BirdingOnThe.Net
Please submit your observations to eBird!
--
--
Cayugabirds-L List Info:
Welcome and Basics
Rules and Information
Subscribe, Configuration and 
Leave
Archives:
The Mail 
Archive
Surfbirds
BirdingOnThe.Net
Please submit your observations to eBird!
--
--
Cayugabirds-L List Info:
Welcome and Basics
Rules and Information
Subscribe, Configuration and 
Leave
Archives:
The Mail 
Archive
Surfbirds
BirdingOnThe.Net
Please submit your observations to eBird!
--

--
Chris Tessaglia-Hymes
PO Box 488
8 Etna Lane
Etna, NY 13062
607-351-5740


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME

Re:[cayugabirds-l] Brown-headed Cowbirds

2020-12-20 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
We’ve had a sizable number of (upwards of 21) Brown-headed Cowbirds visiting 
our feeders in Etna, today—on and off, throughout the day.

About 2/3 male, 1/3 female.

Sincerely,
Chris T-H

Sent from my iPhone



On Dec 20, 2020, at 12:16, Rachel Lodder 
mailto:rachel.lod...@outlook.com>> wrote:

I had one at my feeders this past week, too. In Newfield, the day before the 
storm. I haven't seen it since.


From: 
bounce-125235438-81221...@list.cornell.edu
 
mailto:bounce-125235438-81221...@list.cornell.edu>>
 on behalf of Regi Teasley mailto:rltcay...@gmail.com>>
Sent: Saturday, December 19, 2020 10:30 AM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L 
mailto:cayugabird...@list.cornell.edu>>
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Brown-headed Cow Birds

Just now (10:30 am) we have three Brown-Headed Cow Birds on our tray feeder and 
on the ground.

Regi Teasley
West Hill in the city


“The future of the world is nuts.”  Philip Rutter, founder of the American 
Chestnut Foundation

--
Cayugabirds-L List Info:
Welcome and Basics
Rules and Information
Subscribe, Configuration and 
Leave
Archives:
The Mail 
Archive
Surfbirds
BirdingOnThe.Net
Please submit your observations to eBird!
--
--
Cayugabirds-L List Info:
Welcome and Basics
Rules and Information
Subscribe, Configuration and 
Leave
Archives:
The Mail 
Archive
Surfbirds
BirdingOnThe.Net
Please submit your observations to eBird!
--

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


[cayugabirds-l] TEST - Disregard

2020-12-15 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
TEST - Disregard
--
Chris Tessaglia-Hymes
Listowner, Cayugabirds-L
Ithaca, New York
c...@cornell.edu
Cayugabirds-L – 
Archives
Cayugabirds-L – Welcome and 
Basics
Cayugabirds-L – Rules and 
Information
Cayugabirds-L – Subscribe, Configuration and 
Leave


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


[cayugabirds-l] ADMIN: GMAIL - HELD Issues

2020-12-15 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
For those who are able to receive this message, please be aware that I am 
working with the Cornell eList Manager to resolve this issue—if at least 
temporarily.

Sincerely,
Chris T-H

--
Chris Tessaglia-Hymes
Listowner, Cayugabirds-L
Ithaca, New York
c...@cornell.edu
Cayugabirds-L – 
Archives
Cayugabirds-L – Welcome and 
Basics
Cayugabirds-L – Rules and 
Information
Cayugabirds-L – Subscribe, Configuration and 
Leave


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


[cayugabirds-l] Magnificent Frigatebird: Fair Haven Beach State Park - Fwd: [eBird Alert] Cayuga County Rare Bird Alert

2020-10-27 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
See below and eBird report by Gregg Dashnau and link for pictures...

Begin forwarded message:

From: mailto:ebird-al...@cornell.edu>>
Subject: [eBird Alert] Cayuga County Rare Bird Alert 
Date: October 27, 2020 at 7:53:58 PM EDT
To: Undisclosed recipients:;

*** Species Summary:

- Spotted Sandpiper (1 report)
- Magnificent Frigatebird (1 report)
- Evening Grosbeak (1 report)

-
Thank you for subscribing to the  Cayuga County Rare Bird Alert.The 
report below shows observations of rare birds in Cayuga County.  View or 
unsubscribe to this alert at https://ebird.org/alert/summary?sid=SN35527
NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated.

eBird encourages our users to bird safely, responsibly, and mindfully. Please 
follow the recommendations of your local health authorities and respect any 
active travel restrictions in your area. For more information visit: 
https://ebird.org/news/please-bird-mindfully

Spotted Sandpiper (Actitis macularius) (1)
- Reported Oct 27, 2020 06:35 by Gregg Dashnau
- Fair Haven Beach SP, Cayuga, New York
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8=p=13=43.3435645,-76.6991904=43.3435645,-76.6991904
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S75502110
- Comments: "Late"

Magnificent Frigatebird (Fregata magnificens) (1)
- Reported Oct 27, 2020 06:35 by Gregg Dashnau
- Fair Haven Beach SP, Cayuga, New York
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8=p=13=43.3435645,-76.6991904=43.3435645,-76.6991904
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S75502110
- Media: 6 Photos
- Comments: "Very unusual sighting!! I first saw this bird circling and soaring 
over the bay, its comically long wings and deeply forked tail left no doubt 
about it being a Magnificent Frigatebird. Its white head, neck, and front make 
this an immature individual of unknown age. Its primary coverts were brown and 
I think that makes it female? The bill was light in color with a pronounced 
hook at the end. I watched it catch a sizable fish from the water's surface by 
scooping it up with its bill. It then headed off over the lake, soared high up 
on those long magnificent wings before proceeding west hugging the shore. It 
was in view for maybe 20 minutes. And yes, they really are magnificent."

Evening Grosbeak (Coccothraustes vespertinus) (2)
- Reported Oct 27, 2020 06:35 by Gregg Dashnau
- Fair Haven Beach SP, Cayuga, New York
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8=p=13=43.3435645,-76.6991904=43.3435645,-76.6991904
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S75502110
- Comments: "Two flyovers, calling"

***

You received this message because you are subscribed to eBird's Cayuga County 
Rare Bird Alert

Manage your eBird alert subscriptions:
https://ebird.org/alerts

eBird Alerts provide recent reports of regionally or seasonally rare species 
(Rarities Alerts) or species you have not yet observed (Needs Alerts) in your 
region of interest; both Accepted and Unreviewed observations are included. 
Some reports may be from private property or inaccessible to the general 
public. It is the responsibility of every eBirder to be aware of and respectful 
of access restrictions. For more information, see our Terms of Use: 
https://www.birds.cornell.edu/home/terms-of-use/

--
Chris Tessaglia-Hymes
PO Box 488
8 Etna Lane
Etna, NY 13062
607-351-5740


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

[cayugabirds-l] Fwd: [nysbirds-l] Two Swallow-tailed Kites - Orleans and Monroe Counties

2020-08-09 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
FYI...

Begin forwarded message:

From: Willie D'Anna 
mailto:dannapot...@roadrunner.com>>
Subject: [nysbirds-l] Two Swallow-tailed Kites - Orleans and Monroe Counties
Date: August 9, 2020 at 7:54:08 PM EDT
To: NYSBirds mailto:nysbird...@cornell.edu>>, 
mailto:geneseebird...@geneseo.edu>>, 
mailto:geneseebirds-googlegr...@geneseo.edu>>
Reply-To: Willie D'Anna 
mailto:dannapot...@roadrunner.com>>

There have been two SWALLOW-TAILED KITES for over a week near the Village of 
Kendall in Orleans County. A local resident notified Braddock Bay Raptor 
Research, who alerted birders. The birds were best seen today from Rt 272, 
Monroe-Orleans Countyline Rd. There is a church at the southwest corner of 
Kendall Creek Rd and Rt 272 that birders used for parking and viewing the bird 
from the parking lot. The birds were sometimes seen as far as 1.5 miles south 
of this location from the shoulder of Rt 272. The birds were only seen in 
flight as far as I am aware but they sometimes came right over us at the church 
parking lot.

The birds will disappear for several minutes at a time but will show up again 
at variable intervals. Sight lines in the area vary, as did the height of the 
birds during the day, but they were usually just a little over the treetops. 
Quite a spectacular bird for New York, much less two of them!

Good birding!
Willie
--
Willie D'Anna
Wilson, NY
dannapotterATroadrunnerDOTcom

--
NYSbirds-L List Info:
Welcome and Basics<http://www.northeastbirding.com/NYSbirdsWELCOME.htm>
Rules and Information<http://www.northeastbirding.com/NYSbirdsRULES.htm>
Subscribe, Configuration and 
Leave<http://www.northeastbirding.com/NYSbirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm>
Archives:
The Mail 
Archive<http://www.mail-archive.com/nysbirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html>
Surfbirds<http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L>
ABA<http://birding.aba.org/maillist/NY01>
Please submit your observations to eBird<http://ebird.org/content/ebird/>!
--

--
Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Field Applications Engineer
Center for Conservation Bioacoustics, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 
607-254-1132
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

Re:[cayugabirds-l] Report: Swallow-tailed Kites in Orleans County

2020-08-09 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Update from the RBA: “Swallow-tailed Kites are on rt. 272 about a mile and a 
half south of the original location.”

Sent from my iPhone



> On Aug 9, 2020, at 13:08, Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes  
> wrote:
> 
> Michael Gullo posted to an Upstate NY RBA: Two Swallow-tailed Kites are 
> continuing at 1951 County Line Road, Kendall, Orleans County.  Apparently the 
> birds have been here for the at least the last few days.
> 
> — Chris T-H
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
> 
> 

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

[cayugabirds-l] Report: Swallow-tailed Kites in Orleans County

2020-08-09 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Michael Gullo posted to an Upstate NY RBA: Two Swallow-tailed Kites are 
continuing at 1951 County Line Road, Kendall, Orleans County.  Apparently the 
birds have been here for the at least the last few days.

— Chris T-H

Sent from my iPhone



--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

Re:[cayugabirds-l] Cayuga Lake - TS Fay

2020-07-11 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
As I write this, Ithaca is right in the “eye” of a rotational low pressure 
system, trailing in the wake of TS Fay. Interesting radar pattern.

Sent from my iPhone



> On Jul 11, 2020, at 18:50, Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes  
> wrote:
> 
> Just out of curiosity, has anyone checked points along Cayuga Lake (or other 
> water locales) in the wake of Tropical Storm Fay?
> 
> Good birding!
> 
> Sincerely,
> Chris T-H
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
> 
> 

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

[cayugabirds-l] Cayuga Lake - TS Fay

2020-07-11 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Just out of curiosity, has anyone checked points along Cayuga Lake (or other 
water locales) in the wake of Tropical Storm Fay?

Good birding!

Sincerely,
Chris T-H

Sent from my iPhone



--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--



Re: [cayugabirds-l] Murder most Fowl - Saturday 5/30

2020-05-31 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Just throwing this out there as another possibility: weasel or ferret.

This is, as I understand it, classic kill method used by these Mustelids. 
They’ve been know to kill off an entire flock of chickens in a night, severing 
heads with minimal disruption to the rest of the body.

Thoughts?

Sincerely,
Chris T-H

Sent from my iPhone



On May 31, 2020, at 11:07, Sandy Podulka 
mailto:s...@cornell.edu>> wrote:

That is also one of my favorite places!

I have seen 4 male Mallards in that small pond consistently this spring (but 
not today, and I guess I now know why).
I have no idea what could kill so many birds in such an odd way except a 
hunter, or maybe a group of hunters--I would think an owl wouldn't have a 
chance at all of them at once, as the others would fly off.

So sorry to hear this. As we are learning in so many ways these days, people 
can be truly cruel.

Sandy Podulka

At 10:08 AM 5/31/2020, Gary Kohlenberg wrote:
Saturday I walked with my daughter down Shindagin Hollow Rd., in the State 
Forest, to the intersection with Gulf Creek Rd. for exercise, fun and to show 
her the area. It was very birdy and beautiful as usual especially the beaver 
pond at the bottom of the hill. This place always reminds me of the Adirondacks 
and is a favorite of mine.

There was a surprising amount of traffic on Shindagin Rd. both cars and 
mountain bikers savoring the nice day. Some out of state plates on cars of 
dozens parked at the intersection and FLT crossing. I was reminded how popular 
this area is and how much we need wild areas during a pandemic.

We were amazed at how many Red Newts were crossing the road. Some didn’t make 
it unharmed, but most of them did. I learned about their life cycle, that they 
are toxic, but contain off the charts cuteness. We tried to help a couple on 
the journey, but they are very independent minded and don’t need any 
intervention.

We noticed a dead bird in the pond by the outflow pipe under the road; a dead 
male Mallard. Kayla thought it quite interesting and checked to find it had no 
head. I thought that was weird, but I have seen it before, and guessed maybe an 
owl had decapitated it. I’m not actually positive owls would or could do 
this, but seem to remember some discussion about this. If anyone knows if it 
can be a thing please enlighten me.

I scanned the pond and saw movement which was another male Mallard struggling 
in the water. His body floated with the head hanging underwater unable to lift 
it up. He may have had a broken neck. I wasn’t able to reach the poor guy to 
end his misery which made me sad. More scanning found a third male Mallard 
floating in the pond dead. I didn’t see any more, but there could have been 
one in the grass. Three seems like a typical total for this small water to hold 
on any particular day.

My hypothesis is that they were all shot on the water with a shotgun. To 
cleanly decapitate a bird the shot would have to be at very close range. The 
other birds could have all been hit with the same shot if they had been 
swimming very together. This water is very small and birds not hit would have 
flown and probably circled around. It’s not likely they would have been shot 
in the air and fallen back into this small area.

This poaching event is very disturbing and we had another event like this in 
the same general area. I’m thinking of the eagle shooting over bait. No 
hunter would shoot birds in a barrel or sitting on the water even in season. In 
my opinion this is just criminal at any time.

We all have bigger social troubles overall, but felt compelled to document this 
as a complete view of birding in the finger lakes. The little things still go 
on.

Happier birding today,

Gary








--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--
--
Cayugabirds-L List Info:
Welcome and Basics
Rules and Information
Subscribe, Configuration and 
Leave
Archives:
The Mail 
Archive
Surfbirds
BirdingOnThe.Net
Please submit your observations to eBird!
--

--


[cayugabirds-l] ADMIN: Dog Owner Discussion

2020-05-27 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Hi Everyone,

Please discontinue the discussion on the topic of dog owner behavior and 
leashed vs unleashed dogs.

Cayugabirds-L is not an appropriate forum for this type discussion.

If anyone has issues or concerns pertaining to a witnessed dog owner event and 
believe this to be in violation of a local ordinance or law, this should be 
directed to the appropriate local law enforcement agency or a local 
representative—not discussed on Cayugabirds-L, in front of the nearly 1,000 
members.

Cayugabirds-L is an eList focused on the discussion of birds and birding in the 
Finger Lakes Region, centered on the Cayuga Lake Basin. The primary purpose of 
the eList is to disseminate information about wild bird sightings in and around 
the Finger Lakes Region in a timely manner and to provide an effective 
electronic forum for Upstate New York area birders.

Questions and limited discussion on topics such as bird behavior, 
identification, conservation, and distribution, especially as these subjects 
relate to wild birds in the Finger Lakes Region and the Cayuga Lake Basin, are 
welcomed and encouraged.

Thanks for adhering to the List 
Rules.

Sincerely,

Chris Tessaglia-Hymes

Listowner, Cayugabirds-L
Ithaca, NY


--
Chris Tessaglia-Hymes
Listowner, Cayugabirds-L
Ithaca, New York
c...@cornell.edu
Cayugabirds-L – 
Archives
Cayugabirds-L – Welcome and 
Basics
Cayugabirds-L – Rules and 
Information
Cayugabirds-L – Subscribe, Configuration and 
Leave


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


Re: [cayugabirds-l] Hawthorne question

2020-05-25 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
That’s the one, Marty!

I was just looking into that to see if they still sell it through the New York 
State Agricultural Experiment Station in Geneva. About 15 years ago, it was 
still available there for $10…

It’s on Amazon for $45… :-(

Thank you!

Sincerely,
Chris



On May 25, 2020, at 6:23 PM, Marty Schlabach 
mailto:m...@cornell.edu>> wrote:

Chris,

Is this the book you had in mind:

https://newcatalog.library.cornell.edu/catalog/1116828
Tortricid fauna of apple in New York (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae)
including an account of apples' occurrence in the state, especially as a 
naturalized plant
by P. J. Chapman and S. E. Lienk ; featuring 96 watercolor paintings ... by 
Haruo Tashiro ... and Joseph Keplinger

Marty
===
Marty Schlabach   m...@cornell.edu<mailto:m...@cornell.edu>
8407 Powell Rd. home  607-532-3467
Interlaken, NY 14847   cell315-521-4315
===



From: 
bounce-124653696-3494...@list.cornell.edu<mailto:bounce-124653696-3494...@list.cornell.edu>
 
mailto:bounce-124653696-3494...@list.cornell.edu>>
 On Behalf Of Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Sent: Monday, May 25, 2020 5:18 PM
To: k...@empireaccess.net<mailto:k...@empireaccess.net>; CAYUGABIRDS-L 
mailto:cayugabird...@list.cornell.edu>>
Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Hawthorne question

Hi John,

Based upon input from several people (in particular, Stuart Krasnof) over the 
years, the key food resource used by neotropical migrants at the Hawthorn 
Orchard (during normal years) are the larvae of the Tortricidae moth family, 
collectively known as leaf-rollers. This has been a cold year and those larvae 
that I have analyze appeared to be significantly underdeveloped for the time of 
spring.

There’s a great book on Tortricidae moths in New York. I’ll try to dig up the 
title and authors. It was put out by Cornell University Cooperative Extension 
several decades ago.

One other general thought about how the birds know when there’s good food 
supplies at the Hawthorn Orchard (and when there isn’t) has been a frequent 
topic of conversation I’ve had many times with Meena Haribal. Recent studies 
have shown that birds have very finely tuned olfactory receptors (despite 
earlier thoughts that birds, in general, have a poor sense of smell).

If I recall correctly, when plants are under attack by insects, or are being 
damaged, they can release distress chemicals. It is hypothesized that when 
plants are under attack like this, these released distress chemicals may be 
detected in the air by migrating insectivorous birds, which then may descend 
upon an affected plant (or entire region of affected plants (i.e., cuckoos 
descending upon forests under attack by gypsy moths or tent caterpillars) to 
eat the insects, thus being beneficial to the plant and for the foraging birds.

I would appreciate any more insight others may have on this topic.

Hope this limited understanding helps, John!

Sincerely,
Chris T-H

Sent from my iPhone



On May 25, 2020, at 16:10, 
"k...@empireaccess.net<mailto:k...@empireaccess.net>" 
mailto:k...@empireaccess.net>> wrote:
With all the neat birds reported annually from Hawthorne Orchard I wondered if 
anyone has studied the diet that attracts them or observed and followed up on 
the food they were getting? We know from the books that several species of 
moths are associated with Hawthorne and not sure what other caterpillars 
insects or other food sources there are drawing the birds. Anyone?

John
--
John and Sue Gregoire
5373 Fitzgerald Rd
Burdett, NY 14818-9626
"Conserve and Create Habitat"
N 42.44307 W 76.75784
--
Cayugabirds-L List Info:
Welcome and Basics<http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME>
Rules and Information<http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES>
Subscribe, Configuration and 
Leave<http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm>
Archives:
The Mail 
Archive<http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html>
Surfbirds<http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds>
BirdingOnThe.Net<http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html>
Please submit your observations to eBird<http://ebird.org/content/ebird/>!
--
--
Cayugabirds-L List Info:
Welcome and Basics<http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME>
Rules and Information<http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES>
Subscribe, Configuration and 
Leave<http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm>
Archives:
The Mail 
Archive<http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html>
Surfbirds<http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds>
BirdingOnThe.Net<http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html>
Please submit your observations to eBird<

Re: [cayugabirds-l] Hawthorne question

2020-05-25 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Hi Ed,

The Hawthorn Orchard (named several decades ago for the sizable grove of 
hawthorn trees) is located in East Ithaca, not far from East Hill Plaza.

Here’s a link to the eBird hotspot:


https://ebird.org/hotspot/L122418


Sincerely,

Chris T-H

Sent from my iPhone



On May 25, 2020, at 16:54, Ed Epstein 
mailto:edep...@gmail.com>> wrote:

Where is Hawthorne orchard? Thanks Ed Epstein

On Monday, May 25, 2020, mailto:k...@empireaccess.net>> 
wrote:
With all the neat birds reported annually from Hawthorne Orchard I wondered if 
anyone has studied the diet that attracts them or observed and followed up on 
the food they were getting? We know from the books that several species of 
moths are associated with Hawthorne and not sure what other caterpillars 
insects or other food sources there are drawing the birds. Anyone?

John
--
John and Sue Gregoire
5373 Fitzgerald 
Rd
Burdett, NY 
14818-9626
"Conserve and Create Habitat"
N 42.44307 W 76.75784
--
Cayugabirds-L List Info:
Welcome and Basics
Rules and Information
Subscribe, Configuration and 
Leave
Archives:
The Mail 
Archive
Surfbirds
BirdingOnThe.Net
Please submit your observations to eBird!
--
--
Cayugabirds-L List Info:
Welcome and Basics
Rules and Information
Subscribe, Configuration and 
Leave
Archives:
The Mail 
Archive
Surfbirds
BirdingOnThe.Net
Please submit your observations to eBird!
--

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


Re: [cayugabirds-l] YB Cuckoo, Olive-sided Flycatcher, Bay-breasted

2020-05-25 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Hi Sandy,

I did not make it to the Hawthorn Orchard today...maybe tomorrow!

Sincerely,
Chris T-H

Sent from my iPhone



> On May 25, 2020, at 16:13, Sandy Podulka  wrote:
> 
> Yellow-billed Cuckoo yesterday on Olsefski Rd (off Coddington), Olive-sided 
> Flycatcher hanging out by our house today (spotted by Eagle-eared and 
> Eagle-eyed daughter), and several Bay-breasted Warblers and a Canada Warbler 
> in our woods yesterday, in Brooktondale.  Just a few migrants around us 
> today--but heard Mourning, Black-and-white, and Blackburnian in places they 
> do not breed.
> 
> Has anyone been to the Hawthorns today?
> 
> Sandy Podulka
> 
> 
> --
> 
> Cayugabirds-L List Info:
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm
> 
> ARCHIVES:
> 1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
> 2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
> 3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html
> 
> Please submit your observations to eBird:
> http://ebird.org/content/ebird/
> 
> --

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--



Re: [cayugabirds-l] Hawthorne question

2020-05-25 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Hi John,

Based upon input from several people (in particular, Stuart Krasnof) over the 
years, the key food resource used by neotropical migrants at the Hawthorn 
Orchard (during normal years) are the larvae of the Tortricidae moth family, 
collectively known as leaf-rollers. This has been a cold year and those larvae 
that I have analyze appeared to be significantly underdeveloped for the time of 
spring.

There’s a great book on Tortricidae moths in New York. I’ll try to dig up the 
title and authors. It was put out by Cornell University Cooperative Extension 
several decades ago.

One other general thought about how the birds know when there’s good food 
supplies at the Hawthorn Orchard (and when there isn’t) has been a frequent 
topic of conversation I’ve had many times with Meena Haribal. Recent studies 
have shown that birds have very finely tuned olfactory receptors (despite 
earlier thoughts that birds, in general, have a poor sense of smell).

If I recall correctly, when plants are under attack by insects, or are being 
damaged, they can release distress chemicals. It is hypothesized that when 
plants are under attack like this, these released distress chemicals may be 
detected in the air by migrating insectivorous birds, which then may descend 
upon an affected plant (or entire region of affected plants (i.e., cuckoos 
descending upon forests under attack by gypsy moths or tent caterpillars) to 
eat the insects, thus being beneficial to the plant and for the foraging birds.

I would appreciate any more insight others may have on this topic.

Hope this limited understanding helps, John!

Sincerely,
Chris T-H

Sent from my iPhone



On May 25, 2020, at 16:10, 
"k...@empireaccess.net" 
mailto:k...@empireaccess.net>> wrote:

With all the neat birds reported annually from Hawthorne Orchard I wondered if 
anyone has studied the diet that attracts them or observed and followed up on 
the food they were getting? We know from the books that several species of 
moths are associated with Hawthorne and not sure what other caterpillars 
insects or other food sources there are drawing the birds. Anyone?

John
--
John and Sue Gregoire
5373 Fitzgerald Rd
Burdett, NY 14818-9626
"Conserve and Create Habitat"
N 42.44307 W 76.75784
--
Cayugabirds-L List Info:
Welcome and Basics
Rules and Information
Subscribe, Configuration and 
Leave
Archives:
The Mail 
Archive
Surfbirds
BirdingOnThe.Net
Please submit your observations to eBird!
--

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


[cayugabirds-l] Etna, NY: Orchard Orioles

2020-05-18 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
This morning, we were pleasantly surprised to find two Orchard Orioles 
frequenting our back yard flowering quince. Later, the male was heard singing 
from various trees in our yard. Details below:

8 Etna Lane, Tompkins, New York, US
May 18, 2020 7:29 AM
Protocol: Incidental
1 species

Orchard Oriole  1 Female. Foraging in our back yard flowering quince. First 
noted unfamiliar repeated series of rapid “chuck-chuck-chuck” or 
“chut-chut-chut-chut” notes. Then a bird near the source calls flew out and 
into the top of our side yard honeysuckle bushes. With binoculars in hand, 
briefly observed this bird as being a yellow oriole with two noticeable white 
wing bars. The bird quickly flew towards the trees in the front yard and was 
lost sight of. The sounds were very different than the rattles and alarm calls 
of the Baltimore Orioles which have been frequenting our oranges and Concord 
grape jam feeders. We have had upwards of 9-10 different BAORs simultaneously 
coming to our feeders. Although, it has been notably quiet so far this morning, 
outside of a couple of heard BAOR calls and whistled songs.

View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/checklist/S69255654

8 Etna Lane, Tompkins, New York, US
May 18, 2020 7:49 AM - 7:52 AM
Protocol: Stationary
2 species

Orchard Oriole  2 1st year male with black chin patch and female flew out 
of back yard flowering quince and up into Norway Spruce tree. 1st year male 
seen well, briefly. Heard repeated “chut-chut-chut” alarm notes.
Baltimore Oriole  1

View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/checklist/S69255941

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (https://ebird.org/home)

Sincerely,
Chris T-H

Sent from my iPhone



--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


[cayugabirds-l] Fwd: eBird Report - Hawthorn Orchard and East Ithaca Rec. Way, May 18, 2020

2020-05-18 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Very quiet at the Hawthorn Orchard on this drizzly morning...see my notes below.

Sincerely,
Chris T-H

Sent from my iPhone



Begin forwarded message:

From: mailto:ebird-checkl...@cornell.edu>>
Date: May 18, 2020 at 11:15:39 EDT
To: mailto:c...@cornell.edu>>
Subject: eBird Report - Hawthorn Orchard and East Ithaca Rec. Way, May 18, 2020

Hawthorn Orchard and East Ithaca Rec. Way, Tompkins, New York, US
May 18, 2020 8:58 AM - 10:57 AM
Protocol: Traveling
1.621 mile(s)
Checklist Comments: It was disconcertingly quiet today, and has been so 
generally all spring thus far. There was a drizzle and sprinkles throughout the 
morning. Solid overcast skies. Cool temps in the mid-40s. There is a light 
East-Southeast wind. The wind will continue to be predominantly Southeast over 
the next several days. There is very little leaf-out anywhere. The only trees 
currently flowering are pear trees and apple trees. Even the maple trees and 
oak trees do not have leaves and barely have leaf-out starting. This has been 
one of the coldest and slowest spring migrations witnessed in a couple of 
decades. Some of the very recent first arrivals of transients have included 
species that are typically observed in very early May (OCWA, GWWA, BWWA, BTNW, 
BLBW, among others), not mid-May. The entire migration through this region, in 
the Finger Lakes, appears to be behind normal by about two full weeks.
42 species (+2 other taxa)

Canada Goose  2
Mallard  3
Mourning Dove  2
Chimney Swift  6
Killdeer  2
Solitary Sandpiper  1 Seen and heard circling back over Tennis Center, 
giving higher frequency “peet-weet-weet!” call. Heard first, then seen in 
flight.
Red-bellied Woodpecker  1
Downy Woodpecker  2
Hairy Woodpecker  2
Least Flycatcher  1
Blue-headed Vireo  4
vireo sp.  1 Heard an infrequently singing Red-eyed Vireo in mixed 
oaks/pines in North Ravine, but cannot rule out Philadelphia Vireo. The 
intermittent song phrases were faster and not as “twangy” as Blue-headed Vireo, 
which was present, but the singing bird simply went unseen. In mid-summer, I 
would have easily called this singer a Red-eyed Vireo.
Blue Jay  6
American Crow  1
Black-capped Chickadee  3
Tufted Titmouse  2
Tree Swallow  1
Barn Swallow  2
White-breasted Nuthatch  2
House Wren  2
Carolina Wren  1
European Starling  7
Gray Catbird  6
Wood Thrush  4
American Robin  9
House Sparrow  4
House Finch  1
American Goldfinch  3
White-throated Sparrow  2
Song Sparrow  3
Eastern Towhee  1
Baltimore Oriole  5
Red-winged Blackbird  4
Brown-headed Cowbird  1
Common Grackle  2
Nashville Warbler  1
Common Yellowthroat  4
American Redstart  1
Yellow Warbler  3
Chestnut-sided Warbler  1
Pine Warbler  1 Singing from white pine grove across Mitchell Street from 
the Hawthorn Orchard.
Wilson's Warbler  1
warbler sp. (Parulidae sp.)  5
Northern Cardinal  4

View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/checklist/S69264764

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (https://ebird.org/home)

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


Hawthorn Orchard Update: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Hawthorns today?

2020-05-17 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Hi Laura and everyone,

Yesterday morning, Scott Anthony and I spent a bunch of time there.

Birds were foraging mostly in the flowering pear trees and apple trees. Only a 
very few hawthorns (Crataegus sp.) were visible with blossom buds about to pop. 
Most are still in initial leaf-out stages. With the warm moist weather, we can 
see a burst of activity through the next 2-3 days.

Best birds were: 1 adult male Golden-winged Warbler, 2 Brewster’s Warblers 
(hybrids), 1 Wilson’s Warbler, 1 Yellow-billed Cuckoo (flyby), and a Lincoln’s 
Sparrow.

Also, any recent visits to the Hawthorn Orchard and East Ithaca Recreation Way 
can be found here:

https://ebird.org/hotspot/L122418/activity?yr=all=

Below is our eBird checklist from yesterday with some details noted.

Please conduct and submit an eBird checklist for the official eBird Hotspot 
"Hawthorn Orchard and East Ithaca Rec. Way” should you make a visit, and please 
attempt to submit a “complete checklist."

Hawthorn Orchard and East Ithaca Rec. Way, Tompkins, New York, US
May 16, 2020 9:17 AM - 1:27 PM
Protocol: Traveling
1.511 mile(s)
59 species (+2 other taxa)

Canada Goose  2
Mallard  2
Mourning Dove  2
Yellow-billed Cuckoo  1 Flyby in NE corner, by pear tree with mayapples 
growing around it. Bird was sleek, long-tailed, and long winged. Large white 
tail-tip spots, bordered by black interior edging to the outer tail feathers. 
Rust coloration on top of wings.
Killdeer  2
Turkey Vulture  3
Sharp-shinned Hawk  1 Adult. Carrying fresh kill, dropped into Hawthorn 
Orchard to eat.
Red-tailed Hawk  2
Red-bellied Woodpecker  1
Downy Woodpecker  1
Hairy Woodpecker  3
Pileated Woodpecker  1 Foraging and calling from dead log on ground along 
West side of fire hydrant clearing at the NW corner of the Hawthorn Orchard 
property.
Least Flycatcher  8
Great Crested Flycatcher  1
Eastern Kingbird  1
Red-eyed Vireo  1
Blue Jay  13
American Crow  2
Black-capped Chickadee  5
Tufted Titmouse  2
Tree Swallow  1
Barn Swallow  10
Ruby-crowned Kinglet  1
House Wren  2
Carolina Wren  3
European Starling  10
Gray Catbird  16
Wood Thrush  6
American Robin  8
House Sparrow  4
Purple Finch  1
American Goldfinch  6
White-crowned Sparrow  1
White-throated Sparrow  8
Savannah Sparrow  1
Song Sparrow  4
Lincoln's Sparrow  1 Central portion of Eastern edge, near NE corner, but 
in the Hawthorn Orchard. Dainty, crested-looking sparrow, with delicate 
streaking on buffy sides. Buff malar stripe. Gray face with tiny beady eye. 
Skulking behind branches about 15 feet up. Camera-shy...
Eastern Towhee  2
Bobolink  1
Baltimore Oriole  6
Red-winged Blackbird  6
Brown-headed Cowbird  4
Common Grackle  2
Ovenbird  2
Northern Waterthrush  1
Golden-winged Warbler  1 Adult male seen well, and poorly photographed, 
silently foraging in a blooming pear tree in the NW corner, just East of the 
small white pine grove that is East of the clearing with the fire hydrant. Gray 
body, black throat, black mask, gold-colored wing bars. Associating with clean 
male Blue-winged Warbler and Nashville Warbler.
Blue-winged Warbler  2
Brewster's Warbler (hybrid)  2 Two Brewster’s Warblers. One with a male 
Blue-winged Warbler near interior NW corner. Earlier there was a singing 
“winged” warbler doing a classic high, thin “bzee-dzzt-dzzt-dzzt” song three 
times, in the Northeast corner, moving East toward the hedgerow along the 
softball field outfield. Later, the singing “winged” warbler was heard again 
along the hedgerow and seen well as a Brewster’s Warbler.
Nashville Warbler  4
Common Yellowthroat  4
American Redstart  1
Magnolia Warbler  1
Blackburnian Warbler  1
Yellow Warbler  3
Chestnut-sided Warbler  1
Pine Warbler  1 Singing distantly from Cemetery white pines on other side 
of Mitchell St from Hawthorn Orchard property.
Black-throated Green Warbler  1
Wilson's Warbler  1 Male foraging low along Trail in Northeast corner. 
Non-vocal.
warbler sp. (Parulidae sp.)  8
Northern Cardinal  7
Rose-breasted Grosbeak  2

View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/checklist/S69152895

Good birding!!


Sincerely,
Chris T-H


On May 16, 2020, at 8:39 PM, Laura Stenzler 
mailto:l...@cornell.edu>> wrote:

Did anyone bird the Hawthorn orchard today?

Laura

Laura Stenzler
l...@cornell.edu

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


--
Chris Tessaglia-Hymes
PO Box 488
8 Etna Lane
Etna, NY 13062
607-351-5740


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME

Hawthorn Orchard - Re: [cayugabirds-l] Mixed Flock

2020-05-12 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Hi everyone,

Glad to see some reports of warblers starting to trickle in. Cold Northwest 
winds are the damper for migration, for sure.

Here’s a link to the Hawthorn Orchard eBird Hotspot:

https://ebird.org/hotspot/L122418

In the right-most column, you can see a listing for “Recent Visits,” organized 
by date. Click on the date of any one of those recent visits to see that eBird 
checklist and any associated comments that may have been made.

I’ve not posted anything yet on Cayugabirds-L, because it’s been pretty darned 
quiet in there.

According to the current weather forecast, we should see our first substantial 
night migration overnight Wednesday night to Thursday morning, with the bulk 
being after midnight Thursday morning. We can expect a notable influx of birds 
on Thursday with probable continued diurnal overflight of birds taking 
advantage of continued favorable conditions, well into the morning (look 
skyward…).

Pick your favorite birding patch and go birding on Thursday morning, if at all 
possible. Can’t guarantee the Hawthorn Orchard, as the leaves were barely 
coming out just the other day. Lots of apples were in bloom, though. We need a 
handful more days of warmer weather for things to really pick up at that 
hotspot.

Please post sightings into eBird using the eBird App for iOS or Android, or 
later from a computer. If you go to the Hawthorn Orchard, please submit them 
using the hotspot tag for the "Hawthorn Orchard and East Ithaca Rec. Way.”

Good birding this spring everyone, and don’t forget to bring and wear a mask 
when birding at the more populated birding locales.

Sincerely,
Chris T-H


On May 12, 2020, at 6:48 PM, Suan Hsi Yong 
mailto:suan.y...@gmail.com>> wrote:

Had my first warbler flock of the season this morning down in Six-Mile Creek, 
where I don't often go for warblers (because looking up from the bottom of a 
gorge makes warbler necking that much worse, and because I'd never encountered 
too many warbler migrants before). The songs included buzzers (Norther Parula, 
Black-Throated Blue, and Black-Throated Green), wheezers (Black-and-white, 
American Redstarts singing black-and-white), and a lingering Blue-Headed Vireo. 
All while a/the Louisiana Waterthrush continued belting out its loud song from 
the opposite shore.

Yesterday and last friday I checked out the Hawthorn Orchards and basically 
found nada, despite some of the hawthorns flowering. An ovenbird, some wood 
thrushes, common yellowthroat, and eastern towhee were the only birds of note. 
Has anyone else been there and seen anything? I may try again tomorrow.

Suan

--
Cayugabirds-L List Info:
Welcome and Basics<http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME>
Rules and Information<http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES>
Subscribe, Configuration and 
Leave<http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm>
Archives:
The Mail 
Archive<http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html>
Surfbirds<http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds>
BirdingOnThe.Net<http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html>
Please submit your observations to eBird<http://ebird.org/content/ebird/>!
--

--
Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Field Applications Engineer
Center for Conservation Bioacoustics, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 
607-254-1132
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


[cayugabirds-l] Sedge Wren: Goetchius Preserve

2020-05-02 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Jeff Gerbracht posted to the Cayuga RBA just moments ago of a singing Sedge 
Wren at Goetchius Preserve, between two ponds just West of the parking area.


https://www.fllt.org/preserves/goetchius/


I’m sure he will share more later. Nice springtime find!

Sincerely,
Chris T-H

Sent from my iPhone



--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


[cayugabirds-l] Fwd: [OneidaBirds] Derby Hill Bird Observatory (28 Apr 2020) 8371 Raptors

2020-04-29 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Mid-afternoon yesterday, it became apparent that there was a substantial push 
of Broad-winged Hawks and other raptors. I had stepped outside and immediately 
observed two small kettles of swirling Broad-wings overhead. Unfortunately, I 
didn’t have much time to spend looking skyward.

Below is the tally from Derby Hill Hawk Watch on Lake Ontario’s southeast 
shoreline.

Good birding!

Sincerely,
Chris T-H


Begin forwarded message:

From: "repo...@hawkcount.org [oneidabirds]" 
mailto:oneidabirds-nore...@yahoogroups.com>>
Subject: [OneidaBirds] Derby Hill Bird Observatory (28 Apr 2020) 8371 Raptors
Date: April 28, 2020 at 9:35:11 PM EDT
To: oneidabi...@yahoogroups.com
Reply-To: repo...@hawkcount.org


Derby Hill Bird Observatory
Mexico, New York, USA


Daily Raptor Counts: Apr 28, 2020
Species Day's Count Month Total Season Total
Black Vulture   0   0   0
Turkey Vulture  243 17272   28612
Osprey  27  145 161
Bald Eagle  35  181 385
Northern Harrier21  234 314
Sharp-shinned Hawk  289 15441794
Cooper's Hawk   12  113 232
Northern Goshawk0   3   4
Red-shouldered Hawk 9   119 634
Broad-winged Hawk   768099649964
Red-tailed Hawk 43  10332535
Rough-legged Hawk   0   15  62
Golden Eagle0   4   34
American Kestrel11  194 272
Merlin  1   22  39
Peregrine Falcon0   5   13
Unknown Accipiter   0   0   0
Unknown Buteo   0   0   0
Unknown Falcon  0   0   0
Unknown Eagle   0   0   0
Unknown Raptor  0   0   0
Total:  837130848   45055


Observation start time: 05:00:00
Observation end time:   17:00:00
Total observation time: 12 hours
Official CounterKarl Bardon
Observers:  Bill Purcell, Judy Thurber, Kevin McGann


Weather:
Mostly cloudy with light S-SE wind in the morning, then moderate N-NE wind in 
the afternoon

Raptor Observations:
A very enjoyable morning with large kettles of Broad-wings over the North 
Lookout in the morning, but a lake breeze kicked in after noon and the rest of 
the day was spent staring at very distant birds through the scope well inland 
from the South Lookout

Non-raptor Observations:
140 Northern Flickers, 3 Pine Warblers, 4 Yellow-rumped Warblers, 8400 
Red-winged Blackbirds, 125 Rusty Blackbirds, 2200 Common Grackles

Predictions:
Strong SE wind, mostly cloudy with a 30% chance of rain between 9 am and 1 pm, 
high of 61 degrees F, should be good migration


Report submitted by Karl Bardon ()
Derby Hill Bird Observatory information may be found at: 
http://onondagaaudubon.com/derby-hill-bird-observatory/
More information at hawkcount.org: [Site 
Profile] [Day 
Summary]
 [Month 
Summary]
Count data submitted via Dunkadoo - [Project 
Details]

__,_._,___

--
Chris Tessaglia-Hymes
PO Box 488
8 Etna Lane
Etna, NY 13062
607-351-5740


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


[cayugabirds-l] Etna: Low Sandhill Crane Flyover

2020-04-28 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Around 10:45 this morning, as I was working at home with the window open, I 
heard a single SANDHILL CRANE give out it’s loud, prehistoric-sounding, bugling 
calls, twice. I scrambled downstairs with sunglasses, binoculars, and camera, 
expecting a high-flying migrant.

To my surprise, the bird was actually quite low, perhaps only 200 feet up. It 
was flying roughly from ENE to WSW, perhaps angling more Westward as it went 
out of sight, seemingly following above the Route 366 and Route 13 side of Fall 
Creek in Etna. This bird was bugling repeatedly, about once every 5-10 seconds.

Because it was so low, and with so many trees in the way, I was only able to 
snap a single distant and blurry butt-end shot of the bird flying away.

Classic Sandhill Crane with long straight neck, long trailing legs, long broad 
wings with noticeable primaries, and shallow, quick-snapping wingbeats.

Hope someone else also saw this bird or relocates it in a wet field somewhere, 
such as the Hanshaw Road or Freese Road fields or other fields near Varna—so 
many possibilities.

First Sandhill Crane in Etna for me!

Sincerely,
Chris T-H

--
Chris Tessaglia-Hymes
PO Box 488
8 Etna Lane
Etna, NY 13062
607-351-5740


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


Re:[cayugabirds-l] [VTBIRD] BBS cancelled

2020-04-15 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Below is what I’ve gleaned online, Marie. Also, John and Sue, I hadn’t 
considered that many Federal and State roads are now closed to access, thereby 
preventing ability to conduct many BBS routes.

https://ornithologyexchange.org/forums/topic/42854-breeding-bird-survey-cancelled-for-2020/?tab=comments#comment-46346

This was posted by Ellen Paul, an administrator on the Ornithology Exchange:

Posted Friday at 04:18 
PM<https://ornithologyexchange.org/forums/topic/42854-breeding-bird-survey-cancelled-for-2020/?do=findComment=46346>

We hope you and your loved ones are doing well during this trying time. After 
much careful deliberation, the U.S. Geological Survey, Canadian Wildlife 
Service, and Mexican National Commission for the Knowledge and Use of 
Biodiversity have decided to cancel all North American Breeding Bird Survey 
(BBS) field activities for 2020.

We would prefer to be in the field collecting BBS data this spring, however, 
potential exposure to the health risks and hardships of COVID-19 is too great. 
Furthermore, the suspension of nonessential travel and activities in many 
locales as well as diminished access to roadways used by BBS routes due to 
public land closures would make conducting a BBS route illegal, if not 
impossible in many areas. Also, with national BBS staff having to work from 
home, we are unable to prepare or mail out your annual BBS packets/kits this 
season. As a result, we have decided that it is in the best interests of 
everyone to cancel the survey, to help ensure that we have a healthy team of 
participants for the 2021 season.

The BBS staff at the national offices will not be idle during this time. We 
will instead take advantage of the next few months to make progress on exciting 
new developments outlined in the forthcoming “Strategic Plan of the North 
American Breeding Bird Survey: 2020-2030", which we will share with you soon.

In the meantime, we hope that you will safely continue to sharpen your birding 
skills, using resources such as Dendroica or Merlin, in anticipation of the 
2021 field season when we will continue our important BBS work. Please stay 
safe by following national and local COVID-19 response guidelines. Take care of 
yourself and of your families.

Sincerely,

BBS National Offices

Sincerely,
Chris T-H


On Apr 15, 2020, at 7:35 AM, Marie P. Read 
mailto:m...@cornell.edu>> wrote:

Is this for real? I’m still not seeing any mention of cancellation on the USGS 
site, PWRC site or on eBird.

Marie

Ps Merlins were copulating at Myers Park yesterday morning

!
Marie Read Wildlife Photography
452 Ringwood Road
Freeville NY  13068 USA

e-mail   m...@cornell.edu<mailto:m...@cornell.edu>
Website: http://www.marieread.com

AUTHOR of:
Mastering Bird Photography: The Art, Craft, and Technique of Photographing 
Birds and Their Behavior

https://rockynook.com/shop/photography/mastering-bird-photography/?REF=101/

From: bounce-124548385-5851...@list.cornell.edu 
[bounce-124548385-5851...@list.cornell.edu] on behalf of Christopher T. 
Tessaglia-Hymes [c...@cornell.edu]
Sent: Tuesday, April 14, 2020 4:37 PM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Fwd: [VTBIRD] BBS cancelled

FYI...I hadn’t heard this and am somewhat surprised.

Sent from my iPhone



Begin forwarded message:

From: Gretchen Nareff mailto:marshbir...@gmail.com>>
Date: April 14, 2020 at 16:17:39 EDT
To: vtb...@list.uvm.edu<mailto:vtb...@list.uvm.edu>
Subject: [VTBIRD] BBS cancelled
Reply-To: Vermont Birds mailto:vtb...@list.uvm.edu>>

This was announced on Friday, but I learned today that the entire North
American Breeding Bird Survey was cancelled for 2020. I suspect this has
never happened before, so although it is understandable in these crazy
times, I was shocked to hear it. It was announced on Ornithology Exchange—it's
not showing on the USGS BBS website yet.
--
Gretchen E. Nareff
Bennington, VT
--
Cayugabirds-L List Info:
Welcome and Basics<http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME>
Rules and Information<http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES>
Subscribe, Configuration and 
Leave<http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm>
Archives:
The Mail 
Archive<http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html>
Surfbirds<http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds>
BirdingOnThe.Net<http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html>
Please submit your observations to eBird<http://ebird.org/content/ebird/>!
--

--
Chris Tessaglia-Hymes
PO Box 488
8 Etna Lane
Etna, NY 13062
607-351-5740


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.

[cayugabirds-l] Fwd: [VTBIRD] BBS cancelled

2020-04-14 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
FYI...I hadn’t heard this and am somewhat surprised.

Sent from my iPhone



Begin forwarded message:

From: Gretchen Nareff mailto:marshbir...@gmail.com>>
Date: April 14, 2020 at 16:17:39 EDT
To: vtb...@list.uvm.edu
Subject: [VTBIRD] BBS cancelled
Reply-To: Vermont Birds mailto:vtb...@list.uvm.edu>>

This was announced on Friday, but I learned today that the entire North
American Breeding Bird Survey was cancelled for 2020. I suspect this has
never happened before, so although it is understandable in these crazy
times, I was shocked to hear it. It was announced on Ornithology Exchange—it's
not showing on the USGS BBS website yet.
--
Gretchen E. Nareff
Bennington, VT

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


[cayugabirds-l] Fwd: [OneidaBirds] History of Howland's Island presentation at 11 am TODAY

2020-04-11 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
FYI, for those interested...

Begin forwarded message:

From: "'Johnson, Alyssa' 
alyssa.john...@audubon.org [oneidabirds]" 
mailto:oneidabirds-nore...@yahoogroups.com>>
Subject: [OneidaBirds] History of Howland's Island presentation at 11 am TODAY
Date: April 11, 2020 at 9:49:50 AM EDT
To: CayugaBirds post 
mailto:Cayugabirds-L@cornell.edu>>, Oneida Birds 
mailto:oneidabi...@yahoogroups.com>>, 
"geneseebird...@geneseo.edu" 
mailto:geneseebird...@geneseo.edu>>
Reply-To: "Johnson, Alyssa" 
mailto:alyssa.john...@audubon.org>>



Good morning,

I will be offering a live presentation about the history of the last 90 years 
of Howland’s Island. If you are unfamiliar, this is a part of the NYSDEC 
Northern Montezuma Wildlife Management Area and is fantastic for birding, 
hiking, paddling, and many other outdoor activities!

This is a free presentation, offered on Zoom. If you do not have Zoom, you may 
be prompted to download a free app (also available on Android and iOS mobile 
devices). Here is the link to access the presentation:

https://audubon.zoom.us/j/345982536

You will not be able to join until after 11 am, so just be patient if you get a 
screen that tells you something along those lines. I have blocked off 2 hours 
to do this, but it will not take that long. I just wanted to account for 
questions and anything else that may pop up.

I will be recording as well, and the presentation will be shared for those who 
could not join us live.

Hope you can join me!

Best,
Alyssa

--
Alyssa Johnson
Environmental Educator
315.365.3588

Montezuma Audubon Center
2295 State Route 89
P.O. Box 187
Savannah, New York 13146
montezuma.audubon.org
Montezuma Audubon Center on 
Facebook


__._,_.___

Posted by: "Johnson, Alyssa" 
mailto:alyssa.john...@audubon.org>>

Reply via web 
post
   •   Reply to sender 

   •   Reply to group 

   •   Start a New 
Topic
 •   Messages in this 
topic
 (1)
Visit Your 
Group

[Yahoo! 
Groups]
• Privacy • 
Unsubscribe 
• Terms of Use

.


__,_._,___

--
Chris Tessaglia-Hymes
PO Box 488
8 Etna Lane
Etna, NY 13062
607-351-5740


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

[cayugabirds-l] Muckrace Results?

2019-09-18 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Quick question:

Does anyone know how the Montezuma Muckrace went?

Thanks!

Sincerely,
Chris T-H

Sent from my iPhone



--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--



[nysbirds-l] Dryden, NY - Hammond Hill State Forest Birding: Few Birds

2019-06-22 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Good evening,

This morning I was joined by Bartels Science Illustrator, Jessica French, for a 
birding trip to Hammond Hill State Forest. It was disconcertingly quiet up 
there. I probably should not have had such high expectations, given how quiet 
this spring has been (a handful of very quiet trips to the Hawthorn Orchard) 
and how few night flight calls were recorded over our house in Etna. I’m still 
analyzing my night flight call data, but those data from May 3 through May 24 
are concerning, to say the least. I have also read postings from VINS and 
notable Bicknell’s Thrush researcher, Chris Rimmer, making similar observations 
about his Mount Mansfield, VT, field site this spring (“disquietingly low” 
vocal activity and mist net captures).

Here are two checklists completed from our two, approximate four-mile, 
bushwhack walks this morning. Nice habitat. Few insects. Few birds. No ticks 
(but not complaining).

Loop to SE of Star Stanton and Canaan Rd Intersection:

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S57605395

Notably absent or low numbers of birds --
Barred Owl
Red-bellied Woodpecker
Pileated Woodpecker
Least Flycatcher
Great Crested Flycatcher
Red-eyed Vireo (very low numbers)
Winter Wren
Wood Thrush
Baltimore Oriole
Mourning Warbler
Hooded Warbler
American Redstart
Chestnut-sided Warbler
Black-throated Blue Warbler
Black-throated Green Warbler
Canada Warbler
Scarlet Tanager (very low numbers)
Rose-breasted Grosbeak

Loop between Hammond Hill and Canaan Rd:

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S57605776

Notably absent or low numbers of birds --
Barred Owl
Red-bellied Woodpecker
Pileated Woodpecker
Least Flycatcher
Great Crested Flycatcher
Red-eyed Vireo (very low numbers)
Winter Wren
Wood Thrush
Baltimore Oriole
Mourning Warbler
Hooded Warbler
American Redstart
Chestnut-sided Warbler
Black-throated Blue Warbler
Black-throated Green Warbler
Canada Warbler
Scarlet Tanager (very low numbers)
Rose-breasted Grosbeak

Concerned,
Chris T-H

--
Chris Tessaglia-Hymes
PO Box 488
8 Etna Lane
Etna, NY 13062
607-351-5740


--

NYSbirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsWELCOME.htm
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsRULES.htm
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/nysbirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L
3) http://birding.aba.org/maillist/NY01

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


[cayugabirds-l] Hawthorns - ID Guide

2019-05-20 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
This is indirectly related to birds, in that the insects the birds are feeding 
upon (such as leafrollers, or Tortricidae moth larvae, which may have irruptive 
cycles), may predominantly be found on the leaves of certain species of 
hawthorns. If one could identify the species of hawthorns in your back yard, 
neighborhood, town park, or birding patch, and if we had a better understanding 
of the insect ecology or lifecycle, or other external factors such as weather, 
we may better be able to predict which hawthorns may be a desirable foraging 
species for neotropical migratory birds on any given year.

On the topic of identifying different species of hawthorns, I recently stumbled 
upon an excellent reference guide to identifying hawthorn tree species. While 
visiting the Collectors’ Corner at the Friends of the Library Book Sale in 
Ithaca, I found and purchased a signed copy of Haws: A guide to Hawthorns of 
the Southeastern United States. This book is an amazingly detailed 518 page 
one-of-a-kind field guide with various dichotomous keys, tons of color 
photographs, full of species descriptions and the natural history of hawthorns. 
This book does wonders toward dispelling the myth and previous notion that 
hawthorns are only a complex mass of cross-bred and unidentifiable hybrids.

If interested, I found the author’s main site where you can obtain a hard copy: 
http://www.floramontivaga.com/about-us.html

E-books are available from various sites, including Amazon (Kindle): 
https://www.amazon.com/Guide-Hawthorns-Southeastern-United-States-ebook/dp/B00OPNWFEM

Hopefully this guide may be useful to those who wish to tease apart the 
hawthorn ID mystery, as it relates to neotropical migratory bird foraging 
strategies.

Good birding!

Sincerely,
Chris T-H

--
Chris Tessaglia-Hymes
PO Box 488
8 Etna Lane
Etna, NY 13062
607-351-5740


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


[cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard and East Ithaca Rec. Way, May 19, 2019

2019-05-19 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Thanks to Diane Morton, Ken Kemphues, and Paul Anderson for co-leading the 
Cayuga Bird Club field trip to the Hawthorn Orchard this morning. Another 
relatively quiet morning, despite favorable overnight conditions. There were 
many high flying migrating warblers throughout the morning.

Please see my thoughts on Tortricidae moth larvae, below.

Good birding!

Sincerely,
Chris T-H

> Hawthorn Orchard and East Ithaca Rec. Way, Tompkins, New York, US
> May 19, 2019 6:15 AM - 10:23 AM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 1.0 mile(s)
> Comments: Repeat of Cayuga Bird Club field trip to the Hawthorn Orchard, 
> in the hopes of better migrants stopping in to forage.
> 
> There is very little evidence of leafroller moth larvae (Tortricidae) being 
> pervasive throughout the Hawthorn Orchard this year. Most hawthorn trees and 
> leaves appear quite healthy and undamaged.
> 
> The significantly reduced findings of many warblers or vireos actively 
> foraging in or making use of the hawthorns as a good food source, supports 
> the idea and observation that the neotropical migrants are primarily 
> targeting this location for the periodic abundance of food. The occurrence of 
> leafroller moth larvae may be a biennial event or at least having some 
> cyclical nature—hopefully the notable lack of larvae this year is not another 
> example of the mass die-off of our insects.
> 
> 56 species (+1 other taxa)
> 
> Canada Goose  2
> Mallard  1
> Mourning Dove  5
> Black-billed Cuckoo  1 Seen poorly by most, and in flight, in trees near 
> large square retention pond to West of South rugby ball field.
> Chimney Swift  1
> Killdeer  1
> Ring-billed Gull  1
> Turkey Vulture  2
> Osprey  1
> Cooper's Hawk  1 Imm.
> Red-bellied Woodpecker  2
> Downy Woodpecker  1
> Hairy Woodpecker  1
> Eastern Wood-Pewee  1
> Alder Flycatcher  1 Heard Pip and Reer notes heard well, near large 
> square retention pond, West of South rugby ball field.
> Least Flycatcher  2
> Great Crested Flycatcher  1
> Eastern Kingbird  1
> Warbling Vireo  2
> Red-eyed Vireo  7 Mostly foraging and singing in oaks along ravine, 
> especially in NW corner clearing.
> Blue Jay  54 Mostly low flying migrating flocks.
> American Crow  1
> Tree Swallow  2
> Barn Swallow  7
> Black-capped Chickadee  4
> White-breasted Nuthatch  1
> House Wren  2
> Carolina Wren  2
> Veery  1
> Wood Thrush  4
> American Robin  13
> Gray Catbird  15
> European Starling  12
> Cedar Waxwing  4
> House Finch  1
> Purple Finch  2
> American Goldfinch  5
> Savannah Sparrow  1
> Song Sparrow  10
> Eastern Meadowlark  1
> Baltimore Oriole  11
> Red-winged Blackbird  12
> Brown-headed Cowbird  8
> Common Grackle  4
> Tennessee Warbler  4
> Nashville Warbler  1 Singing in oaks just South of the NW corner clearing.
> Common Yellowthroat  2
> American Redstart  2
> Cape May Warbler  1 Heard flight notes only
> Bay-breasted Warbler  2 Two different adults. Migrating/foraging through 
> oaks and maples along North ravine.
> Yellow Warbler  2
> Blackpoll Warbler  1 One bird singing early AM from inside Hawthorn 
> Orchard.
> warbler sp. (Parulidae sp.)  15 Continuous high flyover migrants and a 
> couple of fast moving warbler flocks, through tops of oaks.
> Scarlet Tanager  6 Daytime migrating birds. Perch-sing-fly, continuing in 
> general ENE direction.
> Northern Cardinal  5
> Indigo Bunting  3 Adult male seen in Northwest corner clearing; several 
> buzzy flight notes heard from other migrants.
> House Sparrow  6
> 
> View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S56485576
> 
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (https://ebird.org/home)

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

[cayugabirds-l] eBird Report - Hawthorn Orchard and East Ithaca Rec. Way, May 18, 2019

2019-05-18 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
This morning, I lead another local Cayuga Bird Club field trip to the Hawthorn 
Orchard. This was co-lead by Ken Kemphues and Bob McGuire, with addition 
support from Suan Yong.

It was unprecedentedly quiet this morning for peak migration. Despite the 
apparent lack of migration, we did have really nice views of several of the 
species listed below. A few highlights include an early morning Tennessee 
Warbler, mid-morning Nashville Warbler, and a late morning Wilson’s Warbler and 
American Redstart (on our way back to the cars).

The only thing missing from the astounding quiet this morning were some late 
summer crickets! ;-)

Good birding!

Sincerely,
Chris T-H

Sent from my iPhone

Begin forwarded message:

> Hawthorn Orchard and East Ithaca Rec. Way, Tompkins, New York, US
> May 18, 2019 6:20 AM - 10:13 AM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 1.0 mile(s)
> Comments: Cayuga Bird Club field trip, co-lead by Ken Kemphues and Bob 
> McGuire. Very sunny day. Cool North breeze. Light north winds overnight may 
> have hindered new migrants into this region from the South. Unprecedentedly 
> quiet for this time of year during historically peak migration.
> 48 species
> 
> Canada Goose  2
> Mallard  2
> Mourning Dove  3
> Chimney Swift  1 Flyover
> Ruby-throated Hummingbird  2 1 flyby, 1 female feeding on honeysuckle
> Killdeer  2
> Osprey  1 Flyover
> Red-bellied Woodpecker  2
> Downy Woodpecker  1
> Hairy Woodpecker  1
> Northern Flicker  1
> Least Flycatcher  2
> Warbling Vireo  1
> Red-eyed Vireo  1
> Blue Jay  18 Some migrants.
> American Crow  2
> Tree Swallow  2
> Barn Swallow  5
> Black-capped Chickadee  5
> White-breasted Nuthatch  1
> House Wren  2
> Carolina Wren  1 Heard singing early AM.
> Wood Thrush  3
> American Robin  11
> Gray Catbird  9
> European Starling  12
> Cedar Waxwing  10
> American Goldfinch  8
> White-throated Sparrow  1
> Savannah Sparrow  3
> Song Sparrow  6
> Baltimore Oriole  7
> Red-winged Blackbird  12
> Brown-headed Cowbird  5
> Common Grackle  4
> Ovenbird  2 Two ovenbirds interacting just in Northeast corner. One only 
> “chittering” contact notes from near ground, while another sang from nearby 
> perch.
> Tennessee Warbler  4 Some sporadic singing from within the Hawthorn 
> Orchard; later two birds observed foraging in the very tops of the oak grove 
> in the Northwest clearing.
> Nashville Warbler  1 Very cooperative bird, regularly singing from oak 
> trees in NW corner clearing.
> Common Yellowthroat  2
> American Redstart  1 Adult male singing in wooded knoll near retention 
> pond located to the West of the outdoor horse paddocks of the Oxley 
> Equestrian Center.
> Yellow Warbler  2
> Chestnut-sided Warbler  1 Quietly foraging in North ravine maples and 
> oaks near the large oak tree in the NW corner.
> Pine Warbler  1 Heard singing from pines across Mitchell Street.
> Yellow-rumped Warbler  1 Heard a few songs from a distant bird.
> Wilson's Warbler  1 Adult male singing in wooded knoll near retention 
> pond located to the West of the outdoor horse paddocks of the Oxley 
> Equestrian Center. Very cooperative and seen well by everyone present.
> Northern Cardinal  5
> Indigo Bunting  1 Single female seen and heard giving ringing buzz flight 
> notes.
> House Sparrow  3
> 
> View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S56441128
> 
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (https://ebird.org/home)

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

[cayugabirds-l] Cayuga Bird Club Trip: Hawthorn Orchard and East Ithaca Rec. Way (May 12, 2019)

2019-05-17 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
This past Saturday, I lead a group of intrepid souls who turned out for a 
special Cayuga Bird Club birding trip to the Hawthorn Orchard, and for what was 
destined to be a very cold and wet (and relatively birdless) morning. I think 
the temperature barely topped 42º while drizzling almost the entire time.

Thanks to the ~20 folks for surviving!!! ;-)

Sincerely,
Chris T-H

Hawthorn Orchard and East Ithaca Rec. Way, Tompkins, New York, US
May 12, 2019 8:13 AM - 10:43 AM
Protocol: Traveling
2.0 mile(s)
Comments: Cayuga Bird Club field trip led by Chris Tessaglia-Hymes.  Cold 
and raining - but many participants despite the weather.
33 species

Canada Goose  2
Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon)  1
Killdeer  1
Downy Woodpecker  1
Hairy Woodpecker  1
Eastern Kingbird  2
Blue Jay  8
Barn Swallow  1
Black-capped Chickadee  3
House Wren  1 Heard
Veery  1 Heard
Wood Thrush  3
American Robin  6
Gray Catbird  6
Brown Thrasher  1 Heard
European Starling  25 At parking lot
Cedar Waxwing  9
American Goldfinch  3
White-throated Sparrow  10
Song Sparrow  4
Lincoln's Sparrow  1 Heard
Eastern Meadowlark  1 Heard by Tom Hoebbel
Red-winged Blackbird  4
Brown-headed Cowbird  4
Common Grackle  1
Ovenbird  1 Heard once
Nashville Warbler  4
Common Yellowthroat  1
American Redstart  3
Northern Parula  1
Yellow Warbler  3
Northern Cardinal  2
Rose-breasted Grosbeak  1

View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S56178389

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (https://ebird.org/home)

--
Chris Tessaglia-Hymes
PO Box 488
8 Etna Lane
Etna, NY 13062
607-351-5740


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


[cayugabirds-l] Dryden Rail Trail: Freeville to George Road Section (May 11, 2019)

2019-05-17 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Before this totally escapes me, I want to first thank our three Cayuga Bird 
Club field leaders for assisting in leading a chilly early morning bird walk 
along the Freeville to George Road section of the Dryden Rail Trail. This was 
part of the grand opening celebration by the Friends of Dryden Rail Trail for 
the newly opened section of rail trail. Thank you, Ken Kemphues, Bob McGuire, 
and Laura Stenzler! We didn’t know how many people to expect: a total of 17 
(all-inclusive) birders braved the cold to make the best of what turned out to 
be a perfect day for an opening celebration.

Below is the complete eBird checklist that was maintained by Bob McGuire and 
reviewed upon our final stopping point at the George Road Crossing. When you 
walk this new section of trail, please use the newly created eBird hotspots to 
report your bird sightings using the free eBird App: “Dryden Rail 
Trail—Freeville to George Rd,” Dryden Rail Trail—George Rd Crossing,” or 
“Dryden Rail Trail—George Rd to Springhouse Rd.”

Thanks again and good birding!

Sincerely,
Chris T-H


Rail Trail - Freeville/Dryden Sectionj, Tompkins, New York, US
May 11, 2019 7:29 AM - 10:09 AM
Protocol: Traveling
1.5 mile(s)
Comments: Bird Walk led by Chris Tessaglia-Hymes for dedication of the 
Dryden-Freeville Rail Trail.
57 species

Canada Goose  7
Wood Duck  1
Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon)  2
Mourning Dove  5
Chimney Swift  4
Turkey Vulture  4
Osprey 1
Broad-winged Hawk  1
Red-tailed Hawk  1
Belted Kingfisher  1
Red-bellied Woodpecker  4
Pileated Woodpecker  1
Northern Flicker  2
Eastern Kingbird  3
Blue-headed Vireo  1
Warbling Vireo  3
Blue Jay  7
American Crow  2
Common Raven  1
Northern Rough-winged Swallow  2
Barn Swallow  5
Black-capped Chickadee  6
Tufted Titmouse  2
Red-breasted Nuthatch  1
White-breasted Nuthatch  1
House Wren  3
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher  1
Ruby-crowned Kinglet  1
Eastern Bluebird  2
Wood Thrush  3
American Robin  8
Gray Catbird  7
European Starling  6
Purple Finch  3
American Goldfinch  24
White-throated Sparrow  2
Song Sparrow  10
Swamp Sparrow  3
Bobolink  6
Baltimore Oriole  7
Red-winged Blackbird  17
Brown-headed Cowbird  3
Common Grackle  4
Common Yellowthroat  10
American Redstart  5
Cape May Warbler  1 Flyover
Northern Parula  1
Blackburnian Warbler  1
Yellow Warbler  10
Chestnut-sided Warbler  2
Black-throated Blue Warbler  1
Palm Warbler  3
Pine Warbler  1
Yellow-rumped Warbler  23
Scarlet Tanager  1
Northern Cardinal  3
Rose-breasted Grosbeak  6
House Sparrow  2

View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S56147977

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (https://ebird.org/home)

--
Chris Tessaglia-Hymes
PO Box 488
8 Etna Lane
Etna, NY 13062
607-351-5740


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


[cayugabirds-l] Fwd: eBird -- Hawthorn Orchard and East Ithaca Rec. Way -- May 17, 2019

2019-05-17 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
It was a relatively quiet day today. Most of the migrants could be seen and 
heard passing right overhead well into the morning. The few that stopped in 
were silent or gone by 10:30AM. Initially birded alone, then was joined by 
Asher Hockett for a bit, followed by Reuben Stoltzfus, after which I was joined 
by my colleague Dave Winiarski. Saw several other birders there as the morning 
progressed. But, it was disappointingly quiet, given the weather and time of 
year.

Highlights are in bold, below.

Not sure what the next few days will have in store for us.

It’s very muddy in there!

Good birding!

Sincerely,
Chris T-H

For map and trail info, see this message: 
https://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/msg22115.html



Begin forwarded message:

From: "Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes" 
mailto:c...@cornell.edu>>
Subject: eBird -- Hawthorn Orchard and East Ithaca Rec. Way -- May 17, 2019
Date: May 17, 2019 at 12:33:48 PM EDT
To: "Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes" mailto:c...@cornell.edu>>

Hawthorn Orchard and East Ithaca Rec. Way
May 17, 2019
06:33
Traveling
1.75 miles
330 Minutes
All birds reported? Yes
Comments: Submitted from eBird for iOS, version 1.6.5 Build 36

2 Canada Goose
5 Mallard
9 Mourning Dove
1 Black-billed Cuckoo -- Never heard, but seen well, briefly; even saw an 
obvious red eye-ring. Very cool. Bird was perched down low, at Eastern edge of 
pasture on South side of Hawthorn Orchard, very near the flowing creek. Turned 
and took off from perch, flying into hedgerow thicket, headed upstream.
1 Chimney Swift
2 Killdeer
3 Ring-billed Gull
5 Common Loon -- Mid-height flying group descending toward Cayuga Lake from SE 
to NW.
1 Turkey Vulture
1 Northern Harrier -- High flyover female/imm. just ahead of only rain shower 
of the morning. Headed North.
1 Broad-winged Hawk -- With recently filled crop!
1 Red-tailed Hawk
1 Red-bellied Woodpecker
1 Downy Woodpecker
2 Hairy Woodpecker
6 Least Flycatcher -- Several throughout. Initially calling and singing, but 
fell silent as morning progressed.
3 Red-eyed Vireo
108 Blue Jay -- Most of these were high flying migrating groups of Jays. All 
headed generally NE. Groups of 5-15 birds. Mostly early AM.
7 American Crow
1 Common Raven
1 Northern Rough-winged Swallow -- Low flying just over treetops, headed North.
3 Tree Swallow
9 Barn Swallow
1 swallow sp. -- High flying, direct flight, square tail, dark, early AM, 
backlit. Possible Cliff Swallow.
1 Black-capped Chickadee
1 Tufted Titmouse
2 House Wren
1 Carolina Wren
1 Veery -- Heard calling just South of NE corner.
1 Swainson's Thrush -- Seen foraging inside Hawthorn Orchard, just SE of the 
tall oak in the NW corner.
4 Wood Thrush
13 American Robin
15 Gray Catbird
15 European Starling
11 Cedar Waxwing
18 American Goldfinch
2 Chipping Sparrow
3 White-throated Sparrow
1 Savannah Sparrow -- Singing from top of outdoor tennis court fence.
9 Song Sparrow
1 Lincoln's Sparrow -- Wet and bedraggled individual along Southern paths just 
inside Hawthorn Orchard. Seen well by Reuben Stoltzfus and me. Buffy chest, 
dainty streaks coming to neat dainty central spot. Buffy malar with gray 
supercilium. Peaked/alert crown. Nervous wing flits.
6 Baltimore Oriole
11 Red-winged Blackbird
6 Brown-headed Cowbird -- Whenever a cowbird appears at a perch, giving 
whistles, most singing birds in immediate vid unity would fall silent for a 
period of several minutes until the cowbird left perch and flew away.
11 Common Grackle
2 Ovenbird
3 Tennessee Warbler
1 Orange-crowned Warbler -- Uncommon here but periodic in spring. seen very 
well. Dull olive warbler, yellowish wash on breast with duller green streaking. 
Yellowish undertail coverts. Eye arcs around faint eye line. Zeep flight notes. 
Located along North ravine trail, foraging in hawthorns and oak leaf clusters.
5 Nashville Warbler
4 Common Yellowthroat
1 Northern Parula
5 Yellow Warbler
1 Chestnut-sided Warbler
17 warbler sp. (Parulidae sp.) -- Early AM high flyovers, mostly headed 
North-Northeast. Continued well into the morning.
11 Northern Cardinal
2 Indigo Bunting -- High flyovers. Musically ringing, buzzy, zhee flight notes.
4 House Sparrow

Number of Taxa: 57

--
Chris Tessaglia-Hymes
PO Box 488
8 Etna Lane
Etna, NY 13062
607-351-5740


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


[cayugabirds-l] Etna: Tennessee Warbler

2019-05-15 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Tennessee Warblers are probably working their way through the area now. Heard a 
single bird singing its loud, three-parted, metallic song this morning as it 
moved through the trees in our yard and into our neighbor’s back yard.

Sincerely,
Chris

--
Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Field Applications Engineer
Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 
607-254-1132
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


[cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard Trails Info and Map

2019-05-14 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Good afternoon, birders!

I was having an offline conversation about the Hawthorn Orchard trails, 
descriptions, the desire for a map, etc. and thought it would be helpful to 
share the following trail descriptions and “map” of the Hawthorn Orchard with 
the greater birding community.

First, a note on parking. Park in the right rear dirt trailer parking lot of 
the Oxley Equestrian Center (220 Pine Tree Road, Ithaca, NY). You may also 
continue along the dirt road at the right rear corner of the Oxley Equestrian 
Center trailer parking lot and park near the corner of the outdoor tennis 
courts. Parking in the main Reis Tennis Center parking lot is discouraged.

Link to the map and more completed trail color descriptions are below. Please 
note, there are no trail or color markings within the actual Hawthorn Orchard.

I think it’s important to understand the geography when visiting. The main 
Hawthorn Orchard is a large, roughly 13-acre, rectangular parcel, running 
lengthwise in a North-South direction. There’s the steep ravine as the North 
boundary, an old horse pasture as the South boundary, a large 
soccer/rugby/intramural sports ball field and the Reis Tennis Center as the 
East boundary, and the East Ithaca Recreation Way as the West boundary. The 
Hawthorn Orchard land slopes in an overall Southwest direction.

It’s easy to get disoriented in there, but you cannot get lost. You can use 
your hearing to identify where you are within the Hawthorn Orchard. Listen for 
trail walkers along the East Ithaca Recreation Way. Listen for people playing 
tennis at the outdoor tennis courts. Listen for the road noise from Mitchell 
Street traffic just beyond the North Ravine. I often forget to mention that I 
use these helpful auditory cues to keep myself oriented when birding over there.

As for trails and entrances, there is a well defined East-West trail (Map: teal 
colored trail) that connects the Northwest corner clearing, by the East Ithaca 
Recreation Way in view of the Black Oak Lane Townhouses, to the Northeast 
corner where there are a couple of defined entrances.

One of the Northeast corner defined entrances is just Northwest of a small 
equipment shed on the North side of the ball field located behind and on the 
West side of the Reis Tennis Center outdoor tennis courts. The other Northeast 
corner entrance is located to the Northeast of and just beyond the previously 
mentioned shed, and is adjacent to the outfield boundary fence of the softball 
field (located on the North side of the Reis Tennis Center). This latter 
entrance (Map: orange colored trail) brings you into a very open maple forest 
that slopes down into the North-side ravine. The trail here follows along the 
uphill side of the ravine and connects near the previously-mentioned Northeast 
entrance area (Map: teal colored trail).

There is another trail one can navigate (Map: red colored trail) which runs 
from the Northeast entrance (to the Northwest of the shed) along an inside 
track all the way along the Easternmost edge of the Hawthorn Orchard, that 
brings you out to the very Southeast entrance. There’s also the various wide 
passages along the Southern interior section of the Hawthorn Orchard (Map: 
purple colored trail); those were previously used by equestrians years ago, but 
are no longer maintained for that purpose. Those wide paths meander along the 
Southern section and bring you from the Southeast corner to the Southwest 
corner.

Some historical aerial images may be accessed by visiting this link here:

http://bit.ly/HawthornHistAerials

The latter historical aerial image was taken in 2006 for me by Bill Hecht. I’ve 
used that flyover image to create a PDF map with color-indicated trails for 
descriptive purposes. Again, please note, there are no trail or color markings 
within the actual Hawthorn Orchard.

The trail map PDF may be accessed by visiting this link here:

http://bit.ly/HawthornTrails

  *   The teal colored trail is the main East-West trail near and along the 
North ravine edge.
  *   The orange colored trail is the one that goes into the open section of 
maples closest to the softball field and connects to the teal colored trail.
  *   The red colored trail is the main North-South trail along the Easternmost 
edge of the Hawthorn Orchard.
  *   The purple colored trail is the one that meanders along the old 
equestrian trails on the South side of the Hawthorn Orchard.
  *   The white colored trails are purely deer paths. Only navigate if you feel 
confident or adventurous.
  *   The gray colored trail is a poorly-defined deer path as well, but is nice 
to poke along for warblers and especially for Yellow-bellied Flycatcher in late 
May and early June.

A final reminder that it is often extremely muddy here. Wear muck boots and be 
prepared to get wet and muddy, especially following recent rainfall.

Hope these resources are useful for birders visiting the Hawthorn Orchard for 
the first time, or if 

[cayugabirds-l] Weather Forecasting Tools

2019-05-14 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
I was having an offline conversation with Laura Stenzler and Ton Schat about 
what days might be the best in the forecast for their personal 24-hour 
bird-a-thon. Laura thought it would be helpful to share some of the information 
below with the broader Cayugabirds-l group!

=

Upon initial review of the forecasts yesterday, the weekend was looking good. 
Now, upon review, the forecasts have changed. The warming trend that was 
shaping up looks like instead it will be blocked by a northern flow of air 
coming down from Canada and the Great Lakes starting Saturday morning. One 
forecast model shows the warm air hitting a hard brick wall by Sunday as far 
south as a line stretching from around Indianapolis through Columbus and 
southeast to Washington DC. That being said, both models show a southern 
airflow from Thursday night through Friday morning; albeit chilly, the air will 
be from the correct direction to assist migrants attempting to leap-frog their 
way north.

I use a combination of weather sites to make inferences (constantly changing…).

Magic Seaweed is one such site. Making sure the time zone is correctly set (top 
left option), I choose my region (bottom left menu) and alternate between wind 
and pressure (bottom right options; toggle on/off multiple panes at a time, or 
just one pane).

Try this link for Great Lakes region, wind, EDT:

https://magicseaweed.com/Great-Lakes-Surf-Chart/76/?type=wind=America%2FNew_York
[https://charts-s3.msw.ms/live/wave/2019051400/940/76-1557835200-30.gif]

Great Lakes Charts - 
Magicseaweed.com
magicseaweed.com
Global surf forecasting charts. With various chart types including swell, surf, 
pressure, wind, MSLP, ECM and sea surface temperature - 
Magicseaweed.com


Try this link for Northeastern seaboard region, wind, EDT:

https://magicseaweed.com/US-Northeastern-Seaboard-Surf-Chart/20/?type=wind=America%2FNew_York

Move your mouse across the bottom from left to right to move through the 
forecast dates at the bottom. The closer you are to the current date, the more 
accurate the forecast.

Another site is Windy.com.

Lots of custom configuration and tools available, probably the most versatile 
site.

The following link has a pin drop positioned approximately over Ithaca with 
Temperature selected. Slide the bottom bar across to view the forecast. 
Different models can be selected at bottom right (NAM is most accurate and 
short-term, ECMWF and GFS are two longer-term models). Top right allows you to 
select different element views (wind, temperature, rain, etc.).

https://www.windy.com/-Temperature-temp?temp,38.013,-79.739,6,m:ePOad1V

I found it most interesting to view Temperature element view for the particular 
interest of bird migration. The wind always shows as moving white lines. As you 
slide the forecast bar across the bottom, you can see how there is a strong 
line of demarcation that develops by Saturday morning, the one I described 
above. That may hinder migration coming in from the South.

Based upon the current forecast models, it looks like there could be good 
fallout conditions along the Lake Erie and Lake Ontario shorelines, or even 
here in Ithaca as well. We shall see—forecasts are dynamically changing by the 
minute.

Hope this helps!

Sincerely,
Chris

--
Chris Tessaglia-Hymes
PO Box 488
8 Etna Lane
Etna, NY 13062
607-351-5740


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

[cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard Trails

2019-05-10 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Just a note about the Hawthorn Orchard Trails:

Tonight, I went back to the Hawthorn Orchard and re-opened the North-South 
passage along the Eastern edge of the Hawthorn Orchard. This route connects the 
Northeast corner entrance to the Southeast corner entrance. At the muddy 
Northeast corner entrance, you will bear left (through the muddy pool…) to 
access this passage.

Be forewarned, it is extremely muddy. The North-South passage trail is very wet 
and muddy and requires at least calf-high muck boots. If you wear regular 
hiking boots, your shoes will become wet and muddy. There’s just no avoiding it 
this year, as wet as this spring has been.

The North Ravine trail that connects the Northeast corner to the Northwest 
corner is not that muddy. To avoid most of the mud, you can enter the 
previously hidden trailhead close to the softball outfield fence (the Cornell 
Botanic Garden installed a trailhead sign at this location, and others). For 
those familiar, you will find that I made this entrance (and the entire North 
Ravine trail section) safer and more navigable Thursday night.

Hope this helps make your visits to the Hawthorn Orchard a little more 
enjoyable.

Good birding!

Sincerely,
Chris T-H

--
Chris Tessaglia-Hymes
PO Box 488
8 Etna Lane
Etna, NY 13062
607-351-5740


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


[cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard: May 10th

2019-05-10 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
This morning, I made a quick run through the Hawthorn Orchard in-between the 
rain showers.

Not too much, but a male HOODED WARBLER was very cooperative for me. The Hooded 
Warbler was located near the Northwest entrance to the Hawthorn Orchard, right 
off the East Ithaca Recreation Way, along the hillside that slopes down on the 
West side of the pond below the Black Oak Lane townhouses. The bird was singing 
periodically and foraging on or near the ground.

Last night I did some trail clearing at the Hawthorn Orchard along the entire 
North Ravine trail and at the two Northeast trailhead entrances into the 
Hawthorn Orchard. Makes for a little easier navigation. Definitely wear muck 
boots when birding here, it’s pretty wet and muddy.

Below is my complete list from this morning.

Sincerely,
Chris T-H


Hawthorn Orchard and East Ithaca Rec. Way
May 10, 2019
08:56
Traveling
0.50 miles
65 Minutes
All birds reported? Yes
Comments: Submitted from eBird for iOS, version 1.6.5 Build 36

2 Canada Goose
3 Turkey Vulture
1 Merlin
1 Great Crested Flycatcher
1 Yellow-throated Vireo
1 Blue-headed Vireo
2 Red-eyed Vireo
9 Blue Jay
3 American Crow
2 Black-capped Chickadee
3 Tufted Titmouse
2 White-breasted Nuthatch
3 House Wren
1 Carolina Wren
5 Wood Thrush
2 American Robin
7 Gray Catbird
2 European Starling
5 American Goldfinch
1 Chipping Sparrow
16 White-throated Sparrow
4 Song Sparrow
2 Baltimore Oriole
2 Red-winged Blackbird
3 Brown-headed Cowbird
2 Nashville Warbler
3 Common Yellowthroat
1 Hooded Warbler
1 American Redstart
1 Northern Parula
1 Magnolia Warbler
2 Yellow Warbler
2 Chestnut-sided Warbler
7 Northern Cardinal

Number of Taxa: 34


--
Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Field Applications Engineer
Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 
607-254-1132
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


[cayugabirds-l] Summer Tanager: Tompkins County (May 9th)

2019-05-10 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
This came over the GroupMe CayugaRBA earlier this morning and via email in an 
eBird alert for Tompkins County. This bird was originally reported yesterday 
evening (May 9). Photos of Summer Tanager are in the checklist.

Sincerely,
Chris T-H


Summer Tanager (Piranga rubra) (1)
- Reported May 09, 2019 18:00 by Wendy Fuller
- My Home, Tompkins, New York
- Map: 
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8=p=13=42.5137383,-76.6219649=42.5137383,-76.6219649
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S56076916
- Media: 2 Photos
- Comments: "Same Bird - Sorry I only have an Iphone camera!  Really red all 
over, straightish light colored beak. Smaller then a robin and sleeker.  Does 
NOT hop on the ground like our cardinals.  I don't know a lot about birds but I 
do know it is not a cardinal.  Is hanging out by porch roof, there are 
carpenter bee traps (hence bees) hanging from the porch.  I also thought it 
looked pink ... we had Indigo buntings, Baltimore Orioles and cardinals, so I 
was like .."Did I just see a pink bird?"  Sorry I'm not a birder and can't give 
you really good birder info. The Sedlaceks (Karel and Cynthia)  helped me 
identify the bird.”


--
Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Field Applications Engineer
Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 
607-254-1132
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


[cayugabirds-l] Dryden Rail Trail Bird Walk this Saturday: Freeville, NY

2019-05-09 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Hello Cayugabirders!

This Saturday, May 11, the Friends of the Dryden Rail Trail will be hosting an 
opening celebration of the Village of Freeville to Village of Dryden section of 
the Dryden Rail Trail. As part of the opening celebration, there will be an 
early morning bird walk lead by Cayuga Bird Club members Chris Tessaglia-Hymes, 
Ken Kemphues, Bob McGuire, and Laura Stenzler.

If you are interested in birding along the newly opened section of the Dryden 
Rail Trail, please join us at 7:30AM at the Freeville Village Hall trailhead, 
located at 5 Factory Street, Freeville, NY 13068.

PARKING: Parking spaces at the Village Hall are limited. Additional parking is 
being allowed in the parking lot on the left (South-facing) side of the 
Freeville Village Fire Station which is located across the street from the 
Village Hall. If you must park on the street, please do not park anywhere in 
front of the Freeville Village Fire Station, the fire engine bays, nor in their 
semicircular driveway to the right of the Station.

After meeting at 7:30AM, we will plan to go birding from the Village of 
Freeville towards the George Road crossing, a distance of about 1-1/2 miles. 
For those interested in walking the complete trail length, it is an additional 
1-1/4 miles beyond the George Road crossing to the Village of Dryden.

The official event celebration will be located at the George Road crossing. 
During the event, disability parking will be allowed at Old George Road. 
Starting at 10:00AM, participants are encouraged to walk or bike with their 
friends and families from either Freeville or Dryden toward the George Road 
crossing event center.

The official celebration will commence at 10:00AM and last until 3:00PM. 
Additional details for this event are described in the email below.

If you use Facebook and plan to attend the official celebration at 10:00AM, 
please indicate “going” or “interested” at the Facebook Event page, here: 
bit.ly/DRT_Event-0511

A PDF of the opening celebration flier with schedule for the day is here: 
bit.ly/DRT_EventSchedule-0511

A map overview flier with trail distances is here: 
bit.ly/DRT_Map

Please don't hesitate to contact me with questions about the early morning bird 
walk.

Thanks and good birding!

Sincerely,
Chris T-H

--
Chris Tessaglia-Hymes
PO Box 488
8 Etna Lane
Etna, NY 13062
607-351-5740



From: "Alice W. Green" mailto:a...@cornell.edu>>
Subject: [rail trail] Dryden-Freeville Section Opening: 10-3 Saturday 5/11
Date: May 6, 2019 at 2:50:29 PM EDT
To: Friends of Dryden Rail Trail 
mailto:friends-of-dryden-rail-tr...@googlegroups.com>>

Dear Friend of the Dryden Rail Trail,

Please consider this your invitation to the official opening of the Dryden to 
Freeville section of the Dryden Rail Trail,   from 10 am to 3 pm on Saturday, 
May 11.

The railroad-themed celebration, hosted by the Town of Dryden and the Rail 
Trail Task Force, will feature  a 5-K fun run,  local celebrities, music, 
raffles, children’s games,  food trucks and more!

All participants, except 5K runners and walkers, are invited to park in 
Freeville or Dryden and walk along the trail to the event site on Old George 
Road.

Read on for the details:

Before the main festivities, the Cayuga Bird Club will host an early-morning 
bird walk on the trail at 7:30 am.

At 10 am, community members will meet at the trailhead kiosks in Dryden and 
Freeville, and walk with their respective mayors, Mike Murphy and David Fogel, 
to the event headquarters pavilion at Old George Road, the midpoint of the 
3-mile trail section.

Lime Bikes will be available at the trailheads and leashed dogs are encouraged 
to join the celebration!

Syndicated columnist, author, and Freeville native Amy Dickinson will emcee the 
opening ceremony starting at 11:15 am. Instead of a ribbon cutting, the village 
mayors will drive a golden spike into the ground at the trail midpoint, to 
commemorate the golden “Last Spike” that connected the First Transcontinental 
Railroad to the Central Pacific and Union Pacific railroads and was hammered 
into place exactly 150 years and one day earlier.

Invited speakers include Assemblywoman Barbara Lifton; Trail Task Force chair 
Bob Beck; leader of the Friends of Dryden Rail Trail Bruno Schickel; Tompkins 
County legislator Mike Lane; the village mayors, and Town of Dryden Supervisor 
Jason Leifer.

On-site registration  begins at 9:30 am for  the “Almost 5-K Run” which leaves 
at 10 am from the Old George Rd. pavilion and goes to the Freeville Village 
kiosk and back. Runners and walkers of all ages can join.   The $10 fee will 
support the Dryden PTA and the first 60 to sign up will receive railroad 
whistles. Parking, for Fun Run participants and their families only, will be 
available at the William George Agency main lot, about a half mile from the 
starting line, 

[cayugabirds-l] Migrating American Crows

2018-11-12 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
This morning, there has been a near constant river of American Crows migrating 
from NNW to the SSE across the area spanning from Warren Road to Sapsucker 
Woods Road over Route 13. In the distance I could see a huge swarming kettle of 
several hundred American Crows rising up at a location just ENE of the 
intersection of Freese Road and Hanshaw Road. I’d estimate there are several 
thousand American Crows in migration this morning.

Sincerely,
Chris T-H

--
Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Field Applications Engineer
Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 
607-254-1132
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


[cayugabirds-l] Common Redpoll - Dryden Lake Park

2018-10-27 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Details below. I believe this is shaping up to be a good irruption of Common 
Redpolls, based upon the sightings well North of us, as well as around coastal 
US regions in the Northeast.

Good birding!

Sincerely,
Chris T-H


W Lake Rd, Dryden US-NY (42.4635,-76.2797), Tompkins, New York, US
Oct 27, 2018 5:00 PM - 5:05 PM
Protocol: Stationary
3 species

Common Redpoll  1 This bird was in a crabapple tree at the entrance to 
Dryden Lake Park, associating with three Chipping Sparrows and two Dark-eyed 
Juncos. I was pleasantly surprised to have this individual be the first to 
observe when scanning the tree with my bins. Petite finch; stubby yellowish 
bill, black chin patch and lores; dark red forehead cap, dusky streaked sides 
and undertail coverts, forked tail; no pink tinge to breast feathers; probable 
adult female or first year female. No vocalizations heard.
Chipping Sparrow  3
Dark-eyed Junco  2

View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S49502319
--
Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Field Applications Engineer
Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 
607-254-1132
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

[cayugabirds-l] Wood-Pewee Images

2018-10-21 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes



--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--





Sent from my iPhone




[cayugabirds-l] Possible Western Wood-Pewee: Myers Point Area, Ladoga Park, Lansing, NY

2018-10-21 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Ken Rosenberg reports a "Wood pewee right now at Myers Point. Looks good for 
Western," "On road to Lagoda. Red house w feeders."

Bird has nearly all dark bill.

Bending rules for images, to come...

Sincerely,
Chris T-H






Sent from my iPhone



--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--



[cayugabirds-l] Sparrows

2018-10-05 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
There appears to have been a significant movement of sparrows overnight, 
judging by the oodles of various sparrows scattering up from the roadsides this 
morning. Nelson's Sparrows anyone...?

Good luck searching!

Sincerely,
Chris T-H

Sent from my iPhone



--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--



[cayugabirds-l] eBird Report - Cornell University--Schoellkopf Field, Oct 1, 2018

2018-10-03 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Thought I would share this eBird list from the other night (Monday night). 
These are estimates, or specific call counts, of night migrants heard or seen 
flying in the airspace around Schoellkopf Stadium at Cornell University in 
Ithaca, NY. That night was nowhere near the epic night migration on 11 October 
2005, as described in this Wilson Journal of Ornithology article: 
https://www.jstor.org/stable/20456044 (not sure everyone has access to view…). 
There were no birds visibly in distress. If anything, calling rates were simply 
higher around the ambient light reflecting off the low foggy cloud ceiling.

Good night listening!

Sincerely,
Chris T-H

Cornell University--Schoellkopf Field, Tompkins, New York, US

Oct 1, 2018 8:24 PM - 9:50 PM

Protocol: Stationary

Comments: Excellent night migration. Predicted, suspected. Low foggy cloud 
ceiling, bright ambient lights at Schoellkopf Stadium. No practice or game, so 
little other acoustic disturbances for listening. This was the second best 
night migration I have personally experienced at this locale. Numbers are not 
call counts, but best estimates of numbers of individuals. Extremely 
conservative. Actual call count could easily be quadrupled or more. Very few 
birds continued to circle around more than once, if rarely twice; most could be 
heard audibly transiting over this area, with calling rates increasing while 
over brightly lit area. Once lights were extinguished, all calls ceased 
immediately.
12 species (+3 other taxa)

Gray-cheeked Thrush  48
NFC 48 | extremely conservative estimate of number of individuals.

Swainson's Thrush  102
NFC 102 | extremely conservative estimated number of individuals.

Wood Thrush  2
NFC 2

sparrow sp.  2
NFC 2 | one possibly was White-throated, but uncertain.

Common Yellowthroat  4
NFC 4 | distinct individuals

Cape May Warbler  5
NFC 5 Distinct night flight calls from this species heard directly overhead 
with several minutes between calls.

Bay-breasted Warbler  1
NFC 1 | Loudly calling individual, later observed flying and foraging in 
enclosed portion of upper Crescent. Logan confirmed visual ID.

Chestnut-sided Warbler  2
NFC 2 | audibly distinct calls from this species.

Blackpoll Warbler  6
NFC 6 | observed birds flying low, visible in the lights as well as foraging in 
ambient lit treetops. Majority of warbler NFCs were likely Blackpoll zeeps.

Black-throated Blue Warbler  12
NFC | 12 estimated number of distinct individuals

warbler sp. (Parulidae sp.)  205
NFC 205 | this is an extremely conservative best estimate of individuals 
passing through the stadium area during this count period. Likely hundreds more 
in broader audible range.

Scarlet Tanager  3
NFC 3 | distinct "pew-weet" or "pee-vee" calls from this species, audible 
during earlier time of listening period.

Rose-breasted Grosbeak  5
NFC 5 | audible clear squeaky "eek" notes heard during earlier portion of count 
period.

Indigo Bunting  2
NFC 2 | clearly musical sounding buzzes heard of a group of individuals 
occurring over a short time span

passerine sp.  1
NFC 1 | particularly intriguing low frequency sounding ringing buzz, 
reminiscent of the overlap of Indigo Bunting and Blue Grosbeak flight call. 
Beefier sounding. Around 21:02. Recorded.

View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S48899858

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)

--
Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Field Applications Engineer
Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 
607-254-1132
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


[cayugabirds-l] Migration This Evening/Overnight?

2018-10-01 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
The weather forecast looks rather interesting for tonight,  especially at 
locations with high levels of light pollution (i.e., Schoellkopf Field/Stadium).

Tomorrow and over the next few days is also near peak for finding fallout 
migrant Nelson's Sparrows (Hog Hole, other large wet/flooded fields, sparrow 
spots, etc...).

Keep your eyes open and good luck finding these and other gem birds!

Sincerely,
Chris T-H

Sent from my iPhone



--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--



ADMIN: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Scouting party or wrecking crew?

2018-08-11 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Dave K, et. al.,

First, let me state that I was not a participant of either of these trips, and 
am only responding with my eList administrator hat on. While I don’t doubt some 
frustration that may have been felt by you or others in having missed the Ruff 
on Friday or Saturday, it is not uncommon for field leaders to have authorized 
or planned scouting trips ahead of schedule field trips. That being said, it is 
not okay to publicly call out people in this way, especially as identified by 
religion. Please be respectful of your fellow birders on this eList!

If you were to take a moment to review the eBird checklists from the morning of 
the scouting trip as compared to morning of the planned field trip, you will 
see very little variation in the species and abundance, with the exception of 
the following (Species Name #Friday AM vs #Saturday AM):

Wood Duck 50 vs 5
Gadwall 0 vs 5
Mallard 150 vs 100 (estimated)
American Black Duck 1 vs 0
Green-winged Teal 20 vs 12
Great Egret 35 vs 1
Green Heron 1 vs 45
Black-crowned Night-Heron 4 vs 25
Common Gallinule 6 vs 1
Sandhill Crane 3 vs 11
Semipalmated Plover 50 vs 55
Killdeer 25 vs 15
RUFF 1 vs 0
Stilt Sandpiper 1 vs 2
Least Sandpiper 100 vs 75
White-rumped Sandpiper 2 vs 1
Pectoral Sandpiper 50 vs 25 (estimated)
Peep sp. 0 vs 100 (estimated)
Greater Yellowlegs 3 vs 6
Lesser Yellowlegs 75 vs 150 (estimated)
Ring-billed Gull 28 vs 45 (estimated)

Here are the two eBird checklists these numbers were pulled from:

Friday morning: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S47759874

Saturday morning: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S47787278

If one were to look at the other aspect affecting species mix and numbers, 
i.e., the weather, you will see that there was the passage of a cold front 
producing favorable migration conditions on the morning of the 10th (the day of 
the scouting trip) through the late evening of the 10th (the night before the 
field trip). It would not be unexpected to see the species mix and numbers 
become affected by the passage of this cold front. Given the time of year and 
the turnover of numbers of species, I’m not surprised, and daily variation is 
to be expected. It is highly unlikely that the scouting trip on the morning of 
the 10th caused this kind of turnover.

It has been claimed that repeated human traffic near mudflat habitat would 
cause fewer shorebirds to use or return to that space; however, it has been 
arguably demonstrated that once mudflat-using shorebirds are exposed to daily 
routines of humans and nearby cars traveling on dikes, those mudflat-using 
shorebirds will become accustomed to and less skittish of humans or cars near 
them. Please note, this is not the same thing as the impact that humans can 
have upon coastal beachfront-using migratory shorebirds—that’s a completely 
different habitat type and scenario.

In the future, if there are any concerns or complaints associated with other 
birders or their activities, please either contact them directly off-list, or 
reach out to me in private first, and not to the entire Cayugabirds-L eList 
community of 930 subscribers.

Thank you!

Sincerely,
Chris T-H

Listowner, Cayugabirds-L
Ithaca, NY



On Aug 11, 2018, at 5:17 PM, Dave K 
mailto:fishwatch...@hotmail.com>> wrote:

A group of the usuals (minus one plus an Amish guy) went on a 'scouting trip' 
at Knox-Marcellus on Friday preceding Saturdays 'Public Walk'.
Of course, they flushed many of the birds, pushing them away from the dikes and 
some, including the Ruff, out of the area.
How could any right minded person think this scouting adventure would have a 
positive impact on so many who waited until the scheduled time Saturday morning.
I've only seen reports from one scout so I don't know if any of the others even 
bothered to show up today. But hey., they got theirs, right?
Today's participants deserved better.
So elitist and exclusionary.
--
Cayugabirds-L List Info:
Welcome and Basics
Rules and Information
Subscribe, Configuration and 
Leave
Archives:
The Mail 
Archive
Surfbirds
BirdingOnThe.Net
Please submit your observations to eBird!
--

--
Chris Tessaglia-Hymes
Listowner, Cayugabirds-L
Ithaca, New York
c...@cornell.edu
Cayugabirds-L – 
Archives
Cayugabirds-L – Welcome and 
Basics
Cayugabirds-L – Rules and 
Information
Cayugabirds-L – Subscribe, Configuration and 

Re: [cayugabirds-l] Where are the birds?

2018-06-20 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
cs<http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME>
Rules and Information<http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES>
Subscribe, Configuration and 
Leave<http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm>
Archives:
The Mail 
Archive<http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html>
Surfbirds<http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds>
BirdingOnThe.Net<http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html>
Please submit your observations to eBird<http://ebird.org/content/ebird/>!
--



--
asher

--
Cayugabirds-L List Info:
Welcome and Basics<http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME>
Rules and Information<http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES>
Subscribe, Configuration and 
Leave<http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm>
Archives:
The Mail 
Archive<http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html>
Surfbirds<http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds>
BirdingOnThe.Net<http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html>
Please submit your observations to eBird<http://ebird.org/content/ebird/>!
--
--
Cayugabirds-L List Info:
Welcome and Basics<http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME>
Rules and Information<http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES>
Subscribe, Configuration and 
Leave<http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm>
Archives:
The Mail 
Archive<http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html>
Surfbirds<http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds>
BirdingOnThe.Net<http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html>
Please submit your observations to eBird<http://ebird.org/content/ebird/>!
--
--
Cayugabirds-L List Info:
Welcome and Basics<http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME>
Rules and Information<http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES>
Subscribe, Configuration and 
Leave<http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm>
Archives:
The Mail 
Archive<http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html>
Surfbirds<http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds>
BirdingOnThe.Net<http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html>
Please submit your observations to eBird<http://ebird.org/content/ebird/>!
--

--
Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Field Applications Engineer
Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 
607-254-1132
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

[cayugabirds-l] Yellow-bellied Flycatcher: Hawthorn Orchard and East Ithaca Rec. Way, May 15, 2018

2018-05-15 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
After the deluge of rainfall this morning, I stopped in at the Hawthorn Orchard 
for the first time this spring. Spent much of my time birding with Reuben 
Stolzfus who was making his second ever visit this morning. Had a great time 
and may not have stumbled across the Yellow-bellied Flycatcher in the Southwest 
corner, had we not been birding together (thanks, Reuben and great meeting 
you!).

I’ve uploaded audio of the Yellow-bellied Flycatcher to the checklist. Once it 
has been processed, it should be playable. This was an odd repeated “peer!” 
call I’ve not heard being made by Yellow-bellied Flycatchers at the Hawthorn 
Orchard. When I’ve heard them there, they usually only produce soft “chu-wee” 
calls.

Most of the warblers and vireos were foraging along the ravine edge, in the 
tops of the oaks and maples. I imagine things should be pretty good in the 
Hawthorn Orchard by this weekend.

Good birding!

Sincerely
Chris T-H


https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S45702133

Hawthorn Orchard and East Ithaca Rec. Way, Tompkins, New York, US
May 15, 2018 10:05 AM - 12:05 PM
Protocol: Traveling
0.75 mile(s)
41 species

Turkey Vulture  2
Killdeer  1
Ring-billed Gull  2
Mourning Dove  2
Chimney Swift  1
Ruby-throated Hummingbird  1
Red-bellied Woodpecker  2
Hairy Woodpecker  1
Northern Flicker  1
YELLOW-BELLIED FLYCATCHER  1 Southwest corner of Hawthorn Orchard.
Great Crested Flycatcher  1
Philadelphia Vireo  1
Red-eyed Vireo  4
Blue Jay  3
American Crow  2
Barn Swallow  4
Black-capped Chickadee  4
Tufted Titmouse  2
House Wren  1
Swainson's Thrush  2
Wood Thrush  3
American Robin  9
Gray Catbird  4
European Starling  6
Black-and-white Warbler  1
Tennessee Warbler  2
Common Yellowthroat  3
American Redstart  2
Cape May Warbler  1
Magnolia Warbler  3
Blackburnian Warbler  1
Yellow Warbler  1
Black-throated Blue Warbler  1
Black-throated Green Warbler  1
Song Sparrow  2
Scarlet Tanager  1
Northern Cardinal  6
Rose-breasted Grosbeak  2
Baltimore Oriole  2
Brown-headed Cowbird  3
American Goldfinch  5

View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S45702133

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)

--
Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Field Applications Engineer
Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 
607-254-1132
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


[cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard: WHIP-POOR-WILL

2018-05-03 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
I just received word through the eBird alert system for Tompkins County, that a 
WHIP-POOR-WILL was flushed by a group of birders bushwhacking through the 
Hawthorn Orchard around 6:00AM this morning. The bird flushed up, perched, and 
was seen well by the group. Approximate location was here: 
N42.4357931,W76.4687685

No further information is available.

Sincerely,
Chris

--
Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Field Applications Engineer
Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 
607-254-1132
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

Re: [cayugabirds-l] What a Morning!

2018-04-23 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Watch the skies for Broad-winged Hawks!!

Sincerely,
Chris

On Apr 23, 2018, at 11:43 AM, bob mcguire 
<bmcgu...@clarityconnect.com<mailto:bmcgu...@clarityconnect.com>> wrote:

What a morning!

I went out first thing every morning last week to my favorite Louisiana 
Waterthrush spot on Leonard Road (Caroline), watching for the bird’s first 
arrival. For the past two years I have recorded one, sometimes two, LOWA 
singing an aberrant (and unique) song, and I was interested to see if the same 
bird would return this year. I went out again this morning and - bingo - the 
bird was singing as I drove up the road. I really don’t know if it IS the same 
bird as in the past two years, but it was singing the same (or similar) song. I 
will have to download my recordings and look at it more closely.

While there I was hit by number of newly-arrived (and singing) birds. A HERMIT 
THRUSH called softly (not yet singing). A PILEATED WOODPECKER called maniacally 
in the distance (thanks Dave Nutter for that description - I think it fits 
beautifully), A COOPER’S HAWK flew in, perched for a bit, then flew off. And, 
finally, my first-of-year BLUE HEADED VIREO was singing as I drove back down 
the road.

After all that, it seemed like everyone I ran into downtown was smiling! It 
must be the change in weather. For me, it’s the birds.

Bob McGuire



--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME<http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME>
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


--
Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Field Applications Engineer
Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 
607-254-1132
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


[cayugabirds-l] WESTERN Meadowlark - Armitage Road, Seneca County

2018-04-14 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Just saw this come over my saved eBird alerts for Seneca County:

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S44570322

Sincerely,
Chris T-H


--
Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Field Applications Engineer
Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 
607-254-1132
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

[cayugabirds-l] Seneca County Gyrfalcon

2018-02-12 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
With permission, I thought I would share an offline conversation I had with 
falconer Tim Gallagher a few weeks ago (below). The discussion started because 
I questioned why eBird was blocking eBird RBA alerts of Gyrfalcon sightings 
while at the same time possibly instilling fear in people wanting to share 
sightings of this species to a broader audience due to the “sensitive” nature 
for this species.

Apparently, licensed falconers (and only licensed falconers) may attempt to 
trap and may only keep young wild Gyrfalcons as falconry birds during a very 
narrow window during the fall and into the first 42 days of winter. As this 
bird is not a young bird, and as it is now outside the legal window of time to 
attempt to trap, there should be no fear in reporting it. Further, the eBird 
RBA alert ban (in my option) should be lifted or modified to allow greater 
visibility of Gyrfalcon sightings outside of the legal trapping window.

If anything, far more sensitive species, such as Snowy Owls, should have more 
restrictive eBird RBA alert reporting; perhaps in proximity to more populated 
areas. As we have seen in areas near major population centers, Snowy Owls are 
often placed under far more stress by being repeatedly flushed by persons 
trying to get closer to the owls.

It does not make sense to hide sightings of a species as awesome as a Gyrfalcon 
from the general birdwatching public, if there is no concern or threat of legal 
of capture. If anything, this could be a great educational opportunity for 
beginning and non-birders alike.

I’m open to being convinced otherwise.

Sincerely,
Chris T-H

Here’s an excerpt from Tim:

From: Tim Gallagher <t...@cornell.edu<mailto:t...@cornell.edu>>
Subject: Re: Falconry Laws?
Date: January 20, 2018 at 5:14:17 AM GMT+13
To: "Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes" <c...@cornell.edu<mailto:c...@cornell.edu>>

They can only be captured during the period from September 1 to January 31 of 
their first year, so it's a very limited window. There are only 12 days 
remaining to legally trap a hatch-year 2017 raptor. Any birds from earlier 
hatch years are already illegal to take into captivity.

I should add that falconers suggested these rules to the federal government—and 
also rules requiring would-be falconers to serve an apprenticeship of at least 
two years under an experienced falconer. The U.S. has the most stringent 
falconry regulations in the world, and they were designed by falconers. The 
well-being of raptor populations is our foremost concern.

Here are the pertinent section of the falconry rules relating to trapping 
(173.3 -- Acquisition of Raptors):

(h) First year passage birds may only be captured from September 1st through 
January 31st inclusive.

(i) A falconer who captures a raptor in adult plumage must immediately release 
that raptor at the site of capture.



On Feb 13, 2018, at 8:47 AM, Bird observations from western New York 
<geneseebird...@geneseo.edu<mailto:geneseebird...@geneseo.edu>> wrote:

The Seneca County Gyfalcon in discussion is an adult "slate-gray" colored 
Gyrfalcon.  Although the bird in question has white on the underside, it is not 
a "white" Gyrfalcon which would be completely white (similar to the plumage of 
a Snowy Owl). This bird is likely a annual returning wintering bird to the 
Seneca County quarry.  You can see a photo I took of it on my Flicker page at:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/brad_carlson/

[https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4628/40228792871_b8e1088858_q.jpg]<https://www.flickr.com/photos/brad_carlson/40228792871/>[https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4661/39809892322_fbeecf3c9e_q.jpg]<https://www.flickr.com/photos/brad_carlson/39809892322/>[https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4614/25916312618_a8475e17a5_q.jpg]<https://www.flickr.com/photos/brad_carlson/25916312618/>[https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4616/28010285729_6be5abdf33_q.jpg]<https://www.flickr.com/photos/brad_carlson/28010285729/>[https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4717/25916312808_8e41e5d5fc_q.jpg]<https://www.flickr.com/photos/brad_carlson/25916312808/>[https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4655/38798884375_92452a47d9_q.jpg]<https://www.flickr.com/photos/brad_carlson/38798884375/>[https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4754/39696420521_03142b9dff_q.jpg]<https://www.flickr.com/photos/brad_carlson/39696420521/>[https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4613/27917261039_97c81f6005_q.jpg]<https://www.flickr.com/photos/brad_carlson/27917261039/>



Regards,
Brad Carlson
bradcarls...@hotmail.com<mailto:bradcarls...@hotmail.com>
___
GeneseeBirds-L mailing list  -  
geneseebird...@geneseo.edu<mailto:geneseebird...@geneseo.edu>
https://mail.geneseo.edu/mailman/listinfo/geneseebirds-l

--
Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Field Applications Engineer
Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New 

Re: [cayugabirds-l] Gyrfalcon update please

2018-01-19 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
To that point…

I don’t fully understand how a Gyrfalcon in winter (in the Lower 48), or any 
falcon in winter for that matter, is considered a “sensitive species” such that 
it gets blocked by eBird.

Snowy Owls actually make more sense to block over a Gyrfalcon, any day. Way too 
much stress is put on them, at least for those which show up closer to more 
densely populated cities.

Any thoughts on changing Gyrfalcon in eBird? Reasons?

Thanks!

Sincerely,
Chris




On Jan 19, 2018, at 8:42 AM, Gary Kohlenberg 
<jg...@cornell.edu<mailto:jg...@cornell.edu>> wrote:

I'll echo this appeal, please post to the list serve. We have to go old-school 
again with Ebird blocking some sightings.

Gary

-Original Message-
From: 
bounce-122206716-3493...@list.cornell.edu<mailto:bounce-122206716-3493...@list.cornell.edu>
 [mailto:bounce-122206716-3493...@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Joe DeVito
Sent: Friday, January 19, 2018 7:56 AM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L 
<cayugabird...@list.cornell.edu<mailto:cayugabird...@list.cornell.edu>>
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Gyrfalcon update please

Birders,

If anyone can offer an update on the Gyrfalcon I would greatly appreciate it. 
I'm planning on heading that way tomorrow

Thank you!


Sent from my iPhone

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME<http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME>
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


--
Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Field Applications Engineer
Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 
607-254-1132
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


Re: [cayugabirds-l] Cayuga Bird Club Trip Sunday

2018-01-15 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
PS - One more thought: has a falconry bird been ruled out?

Thanks

Sincerely,
Chris

On Jan 15, 2018, at 3:05 PM, bob mcguire 
<bmcgu...@clarityconnect.com<mailto:bmcgu...@clarityconnect.com>> wrote:

Here is my report on yesterday’s trip around the lake. Of particular note: 3 
Snowy Owls, Gryfalcon, Wood Duck, Glaucous Gull.

Bob McGuire


Cayuga Bird Club Field Trip 14 January 2108

Seven well-bundled up folks joined Ken and me for a day-long jaunt around the 
lake. This trip was postponed from the previous weekend due to the cold and 
wind. The conditions today were not much better, starting out around zero but 
no wind.

Because the south end of the lake was misted over, we began to bird in earnest 
at Ladoga where we quickly got on a pair of Trumpeter Swans. Trumpeters are not 
unusual in the Basin, but they are a rare sight in Tompkins County. Our ABA on 
the birds brought several more birders out to see them. Then, following up on 
the sound of distant Cardinal, we are drawn to nearby feeders and were able to 
add Pine Siskin and Northern Mockingbird to several people’s year lists. From 
the spit at Myers we were able to look past a couple of hunters to add two 
Long-tailed Ducks.

The next stop was Belltown Dairy to try for field birds. We were hugely 
rewarded with a large flock of Snow Buntings, Horned Larks, and two Lapland 
Longspurs feeding intermittently in the middle of the road and in the adjacent 
field. The view of a Longspur on stubby legs, hunkered in the middle of the 
road some 50 feet away, was the best that I have ever had!

We picked up Wild Turkey along Route 90 north of King Ferry and the continuing 
Glaucous Gull from the bluffs just south of Aurora. There we also had our first 
and rather small flock of Aythya ducks plus four White-winged Scoters and a 
couple of Horned Grebes. I should note there that we never did come across the 
large numbers of Aythya (numbering in the thousands) that had been seen the 
previous week along the east side of the lake.

In Union Springs, the Factory Pond held the usual collection of Gadwall, 
Buffleheads, Mallards, and Black Ducks as well as three Green-winged Teal and a 
single Common Goldeneye. On to the Mill Pond we were able to pick out the 
single Wood Duck amid the thousands of Canada Geese and assorted Aythya, 
Mallards, Wigeon, and Gadwall. A quick check of the outlet creek yielded the 
day’s only Belted Kingfisher and Song Sparrow. At this point we were already 
well past lunch time and took a short break at the Nice ’n Easy - where we ran 
into Gary Kohlenberg with great directions to the Seneca Falls Snowy Owl.

We found the first Snowy in a field just east of the airport runway and a 
second one perched atop one of the hangers. At that point we were pretty much 
done for the day and headed south to check on an earlier report of another owl. 
As we passed the quarry on Hoster Road Diane said something like “That looks 
the right shape for a falcon”. We stopped and, for the next hour, with help 
from Kevin McGowan, tried for good scope views of a large, dark bird with a 
consistently dark face that was perched in the tall trees above the quarry and, 
maddeningly, obscured by branches. Photos were taken and the field marks were 
discussed, to the ultimate conclusion that there was, again this year, a 
Gyrfalcon in the area.

After that we really did head for home, with a quick stop along Ridge Road for 
the third Snowy Owl of the day. The trip went a little longer than planned, but 
the weather really wasn’t a deterrent. I’d have to say that it was a successful 
trip!


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME<http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME>
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


--
Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Field Applications Engineer
Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 
607-254-1132
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

Re: [cayugabirds-l] Cayuga Bird Club Trip Sunday

2018-01-15 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Thanks also for these details, Bob.

Some questions I have are: is there any reason to suggest this was the 
identical individual Gyrfalcon as the one seen last year? Or, is there a 
possibility that this is a new/different bird? If the latter, how did this one 
come to settle near or at the same quarry as the Gyrfalcon from last year?

Thanks

Sincerely,
Chris


On Jan 15, 2018, at 3:05 PM, bob mcguire 
<bmcgu...@clarityconnect.com<mailto:bmcgu...@clarityconnect.com>> wrote:

Here is my report on yesterday’s trip around the lake. Of particular note: 3 
Snowy Owls, Gryfalcon, Wood Duck, Glaucous Gull.

Bob McGuire


Cayuga Bird Club Field Trip 14 January 2108

Seven well-bundled up folks joined Ken and me for a day-long jaunt around the 
lake. This trip was postponed from the previous weekend due to the cold and 
wind. The conditions today were not much better, starting out around zero but 
no wind.

Because the south end of the lake was misted over, we began to bird in earnest 
at Ladoga where we quickly got on a pair of Trumpeter Swans. Trumpeters are not 
unusual in the Basin, but they are a rare sight in Tompkins County. Our ABA on 
the birds brought several more birders out to see them. Then, following up on 
the sound of distant Cardinal, we are drawn to nearby feeders and were able to 
add Pine Siskin and Northern Mockingbird to several people’s year lists. From 
the spit at Myers we were able to look past a couple of hunters to add two 
Long-tailed Ducks.

The next stop was Belltown Dairy to try for field birds. We were hugely 
rewarded with a large flock of Snow Buntings, Horned Larks, and two Lapland 
Longspurs feeding intermittently in the middle of the road and in the adjacent 
field. The view of a Longspur on stubby legs, hunkered in the middle of the 
road some 50 feet away, was the best that I have ever had!

We picked up Wild Turkey along Route 90 north of King Ferry and the continuing 
Glaucous Gull from the bluffs just south of Aurora. There we also had our first 
and rather small flock of Aythya ducks plus four White-winged Scoters and a 
couple of Horned Grebes. I should note there that we never did come across the 
large numbers of Aythya (numbering in the thousands) that had been seen the 
previous week along the east side of the lake.

In Union Springs, the Factory Pond held the usual collection of Gadwall, 
Buffleheads, Mallards, and Black Ducks as well as three Green-winged Teal and a 
single Common Goldeneye. On to the Mill Pond we were able to pick out the 
single Wood Duck amid the thousands of Canada Geese and assorted Aythya, 
Mallards, Wigeon, and Gadwall. A quick check of the outlet creek yielded the 
day’s only Belted Kingfisher and Song Sparrow. At this point we were already 
well past lunch time and took a short break at the Nice ’n Easy - where we ran 
into Gary Kohlenberg with great directions to the Seneca Falls Snowy Owl.

We found the first Snowy in a field just east of the airport runway and a 
second one perched atop one of the hangers. At that point we were pretty much 
done for the day and headed south to check on an earlier report of another owl. 
As we passed the quarry on Hoster Road Diane said something like “That looks 
the right shape for a falcon”. We stopped and, for the next hour, with help 
from Kevin McGowan, tried for good scope views of a large, dark bird with a 
consistently dark face that was perched in the tall trees above the quarry and, 
maddeningly, obscured by branches. Photos were taken and the field marks were 
discussed, to the ultimate conclusion that there was, again this year, a 
Gyrfalcon in the area.

After that we really did head for home, with a quick stop along Ridge Road for 
the third Snowy Owl of the day. The trip went a little longer than planned, but 
the weather really wasn’t a deterrent. I’d have to say that it was a successful 
trip!


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME<http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME>
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


--
Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Field Applications Engineer
Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 
607-254-1132
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbir

GYRFALCON - Re: [cayugabirds-l] Thorpe Rd. Snowy Owl on MLK Day

2018-01-15 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
What GYRFALCON...?

Is this being kept secret? Is it on private land?

Thanks in advance for any more details anyone can take the time to provide and 
share with the broader group.

Sincerely,
Chris

Sent from my iPhone



> On Jan 15, 2018, at 10:29, Gary Kohlenberg  wrote:
> 
> One Snowy Owl is on Thorpe Rd. by the Fingerlakes Airport again this morning. 
> 
> No sign of the Gyrfalcon yet today. 
> 
> Gary 
> --
> 
> Cayugabirds-L List Info:
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm
> 
> ARCHIVES:
> 1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
> 2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
> 3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html
> 
> Please submit your observations to eBird:
> http://ebird.org/content/ebird/
> 
> --
> 

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--



[cayugabirds-l] ADMIN: eList Update

2017-11-15 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
As many of you are aware, this eList service experienced an unplanned outage 
from early on 13 November until just this morning. This resulted from a major 
outage caused by a failure in a storage array in the server farm housing many 
Cornell University services. Cornell Information Technology (CIT) has been 
working around the clock to bring everything back online again. Several 
University services are still offline.

Details and updates about this unplanned outage may be monitored here: 
https://itservicealerts.hosting.cornell.edu/view/4982

As far as I understand, older submissions to this eList remain in the queue and 
should be sent out as soon as the eList comes completely back online.

If you don’t see your previously submitted message posted here 
https://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
 (Google: The Mail Archive, Cayugabirds-L), and if you feel it is still 
relevant today, please feel free to re-send to the eList once again and verify 
that it appears at The Mail Archive.

We have grown so accustomed to having certain internet services at our 
fingertips, that when these relied-upon services disappear, it can be quite a 
shock.

Thanks for your patience and understanding, and good birding!

Sincerely,
Chris T-H

--
Chris Tessaglia-Hymes
Listowner, Cayugabirds-L
Ithaca, New York
c...@cornell.edu
Cayugabirds-L – 
Archives
Cayugabirds-L – Welcome and 
Basics
Cayugabirds-L – Rules and 
Information
Cayugabirds-L – Subscribe, Configuration and 
Leave


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


[cayugabirds-l] Tropical Storm Birds?

2017-10-09 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Just curious, does anyone plan on checking Cayuga Lake or Lake Ontario for 
unusual birds tossed around by the remnants of Hurricane Nate?

The storm system was centered just North of Mobile, Alabama on Sunday morning 
at 5AM. Only 30 hours later, the remnants of this storm was centered over 
Buffalo, New York, and is forecast to move East-Northeast from there into New 
England.

With such a rapidly moving storm, I wouldn’t be surprised if something 
interesting gets deposited onto Lake Erie or Ontario, with the possibility for 
something showing up on any of the Finger Lakes over the next 24-48 hours. It’s 
a long shot, but worth keeping alert for weird stuff.

Good birding!

Sincerely,
Chris T-H

--
Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Field Applications Engineer
Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 
607-254-1132
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


Re: No birds - Re: [cayugabirds-l] Tree swallow

2017-06-17 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Exactly, Terry. The issue is that the birds are in the prime habitat (such as 
at your campsite) but they are not as prevalent in the sub-prime habitat or 
traditional backyard habitat…

Thanks for trying… :-)

Sincerely,
Chris



On Jun 17, 2017, at 11:32 AM, Terry P. Mingle 
<tmin...@twcny.rr.com<mailto:tmin...@twcny.rr.com>> wrote:

We have a TON of Ruby-throated Hummingbirds at camp (Forest Lake Campground, in 
Truxton<https://forestlakecampground.com/>).  Not so many in Cortland (where we 
live).

Also I've seen almost all the usual suspects in Cortland this year (sans the 
hummingbirds).

At camp, plenty of assorted swallows (Tree and Barn) Rose-breasted Grosbeaks, 
Scarlet Tanagers, and assorted warblers, along with our resident Barred Owl, 
hawks, etc.

Oh, and insects, too.  (Which I guess, is good AND bad…. could sure do without 
the flies and mosquitoes!)

Hoping to re-energize the "party"….   :-D

--Terry

=

On Jun 17, 2017 , at 11:20 AM, "Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes" 
<c...@cornell.edu<mailto:c...@cornell.edu>> wrote:

Oh, yeah. I forgot about Ruby-throated Hummingbirds. I remember when we used to 
have them in the Northeast. They used to be a really common and cheerful 
species of the summer. People used to put out these feeders filled with 
sugar-water to attract them to their house for viewing pleasure. They were 
these super tiny birds, about the size of a very large bee, and used to hover 
from flower to flower feeding on nectar, and would glean insects from spider 
webs from under the eaves of our house.

I’m obviously being facetious, but I’m greatly concerned that we are now 
beginning to visibly see the effects of the greatest environmental catastrophe 
since the fifth mass extinction – and this one being entirely caused by human 
activity. Are we seeing the death of the canaries in the coal mine? Is this 
finally becoming more visible and working it’s way up the food chain? I haven’t 
seen a single fly-by Ruby-throated Hummingbird or heard any chittery 
territorial calls from them this season.

Past few summers, insect numbers have been WAY down. Remember those longer road 
trips across country, or just after a road trip for a few hours? My windshield 
would get smattered solid with insect splatter – not so much any more.

I’m concerned that we are all becoming complacent with these changes, and 
accepting them as the “new norm”. This isn’t normal, this is a huge red flag, 
and something should be done about it – the question is: what?

Party-pooper,
Chris

--
Cayugabirds-L List Info:
Welcome and Basics<http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME>
Rules and Information<http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES>
Subscribe, Configuration and 
Leave<http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm>
Archives:
The Mail 
Archive<http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html>
Surfbirds<http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds>
BirdingOnThe.Net<http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html>
Please submit your observations to eBird<http://ebird.org/content/ebird/>!
--

--
Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Field Applications Engineer
Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 
607-254-1132
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

Re: No birds - Re: [cayugabirds-l] Tree swallow

2017-06-17 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Oh, yeah. I forgot about Ruby-throated Hummingbirds. I remember when we used to 
have them in the Northeast. They used to be a really common and cheerful 
species of the summer. People used to put out these feeders filled with 
sugar-water to attract them to their house for viewing pleasure. They were 
these super tiny birds, about the size of a very large bee, and used to hover 
from flower to flower feeding on nectar, and would glean insects from spider 
webs from under the eaves of our house.

I’m obviously being facetious, but I’m greatly concerned that we are now 
beginning to visibly see the effects of the greatest environmental catastrophe 
since the fifth mass extinction – and this one being entirely caused by human 
activity. Are we seeing the death of the canaries in the coal mine? Is this 
finally becoming more visible and working it’s way up the food chain? I haven’t 
seen a single fly-by Ruby-throated Hummingbird or heard any chittery 
territorial calls from them this season.

Past few summers, insect numbers have been WAY down. Remember those longer road 
trips across country, or just after a road trip for a few hours? My windshield 
would get smattered solid with insect splatter – not so much any more.

I’m concerned that we are all becoming complacent with these changes, and 
accepting them as the “new norm”. This isn’t normal, this is a huge red flag, 
and something should be done about it – the question is: what?

Party-pooper,
Chris



On Jun 17, 2017, at 10:54 AM, Alicia Plotkin 
<t...@fltg.net<mailto:t...@fltg.net>> wrote:

Thank you for sending this - it is exactly my experience & my concern.  I don't 
worry quite so much about migration, which can skip over us easily due to 
weather patterns.  In fact there was an odd weather pattern in late April that 
seemed to sling a lot of 'my' warblers up to the coast of Maine where the 
fallout was welcomed with delight and surprise.

However the lack of nesters anywhere but prime habitat is far more worrisome, 
especially without any readily identifiable weather event to explain it.  It's 
deeply concerning and I have wondered why no one is talking about it.  Thank 
you for bringing it up!

Alicia

P.S.  You left off hummingbirds, which are non-existent or in very low numbers 
for everyone I know, both folks with feeders and people like me whose plantings 
are tailored to their tastes.  I have not seen a single one in my yard yet.  
This is hard to believe, our habitat is pretty prime: we live in a large 
clearing in the woods that is filled with wildflowers, additional 
hummingbird-favored plants we have added, plenty of water, trees with perfect 
forks for their nests (based on their past preference), and a neighbor who puts 
fresh nectar in her feeder every day.

On 6/17/2017 9:52 AM, Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes wrote:
Everyone,

Just pointing out the obvious here, but bird numbers in my immediate area of 
Upstate NY are way down this year. I mean, WAY down. John, if you have full 
capacity of nesting Tree Swallows, it may be that the sites you host are prime 
and being filled to capacity because they are the best locations. It sounds to 
me like the sub-par sites are not being filled.

Acoustically, birds are seriously lacking this year. Visually, birds are 
lacking this year. Birding at the Hawthorn Orchard was a disaster, yet there 
was food and everything was primed to receive birds. Regular numbers of 
expected birds were hugely lacking. What happened to the Tennessee Warblers and 
Blackpoll Warblers? I think I recorded something like three Tennessee Warblers 
at most on one day at the Hawthorn Orchard, then they were just done. Blackpoll 
Warblers…you were lucky to see or hear a single bird this spring. Blackpoll 
Warblers used to come through here in droves – just driving around, you would 
pass singing Blackpoll Warbler after Blackpoll Warbler, during their peak 
migration through this area. Remember? When all of those Blackpoll Warblers 
came through, that marked the “end” of that spring migration – the cleanup 
species – this simply didn’t happen.

In overflow areas, where habitat may not be the best, or is sub-par, and which 
normally fills in because the best habitats are already taken by other birds, 
the birds simply are not there.

Yellow Warblers, everywhere? Nope.
Rose-breasted Grosbeaks, everywhere? Nope.
Baltimore Orioles, everywhere? Nope.
Red-eyed Vireos, everywhere? Nope.
Chipping Sparrows, everywhere? Nope.
Common birds absolutely everywhere? Nope.

I’m just talking about the regular comings and goings of my own personal 
activities of driving around, walking in and out of buildings, coming and going 
from home, work, shopping, etc. I’m just not seeing or hearing the abundance of 
birds that I’m used to seeing or hearing. It just seems deadly quiet this year, 
if you look at the whole picture – the gestalt of bird abundance this year.

Sure, prime habitats may seem to have the “regular” 

No birds - Re: [cayugabirds-l] Tree swallow

2017-06-17 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
m/CayugabirdsRULES>
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm<http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm>

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

--
Cayugabirds-L List Info:
Welcome and Basics<http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME>
Rules and Information<http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES>
Subscribe, Configuration and 
Leave<http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm>
Archives:
The Mail 
Archive<http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html>
Surfbirds<http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds>
BirdingOnThe.Net<http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html>
Please submit your observations to eBird<http://ebird.org/content/ebird/>!
--

--
Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Field Applications Engineer
Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 
607-254-1132
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


Re: [cayugabirds-l] Hawthorns Today

2017-05-16 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Bob, et. al.,

I didn’t arrive until later this morning, but the best birding was restricted 
to the oak trees along the North ravine edge. Most birds seem to be feeding 
among the oak leaf clusters. Very few birds were down in the hawthorns, as of 
yet. It was a cold start to the morning, too. I imagine that tomorrow will be 
the first real push of migrants into this area, with favorable conditions 
overnight tonight and possibly tomorrow night as well.

Below is my eBird checklist, with highlights being Philadelphia Vireos, Cliff 
Swallow, Cape May Warblers, Bay-breasted Warblers, Tennessee Warblers, and 
Canada Warbler.

Canada Goose  2
Great Blue Heron  1 Distant circling bird
Turkey Vulture  2
Red-tailed Hawk  2
Herring Gull  1
Mourning Dove  1
Chimney Swift  1
Red-bellied Woodpecker  2
Downy Woodpecker  1
Least Flycatcher  3
Great Crested Flycatcher  1
Philadelphia Vireo  3 Foraging in oak trees along North ravine edge.
Red-eyed Vireo  2 Foraging in oak trees along North ravine edge.
Blue Jay  9
American Crow  3
Tree Swallow  4
Barn Swallow  4
Cliff Swallow  1 This was a surprise sighting. Presumed migrant, flying 
well above treetop level, headed ENE.
Black-capped Chickadee  5
Tufted Titmouse  2
White-breasted Nuthatch  1
House Wren  1
Carolina Wren  1
Ruby-crowned Kinglet  1
Wood Thrush  2
American Robin  16
Gray Catbird  13
Northern Mockingbird  1
European Starling  11
Tennessee Warbler  3
Nashville Warbler  1
Common Yellowthroat  4
American Redstart  1
Cape May Warbler  2 Foraging in oak trees along North ravine edge. Both 
appeared to be females.
Magnolia Warbler  4
Bay-breasted Warbler  2 Foraging in oak trees along North ravine edge. Male 
birds.
Blackburnian Warbler  3
Yellow Warbler  4
Chestnut-sided Warbler  1 Probably a first year bird, plumage was 
predominantly "fall"-type, which was surprising.
Black-throated Blue Warbler  1 Foraging in oak trees along North ravine 
edge. Female.
Black-throated Green Warbler  1 Foraging in oak trees along North ravine 
edge. Male
Canada Warbler  1 Male singing low in hedgerow in Northeast corner.
Song Sparrow  2
Scarlet Tanager  2
Northern Cardinal  7
Rose-breasted Grosbeak  1
Indigo Bunting  1 Flyover migrant
Red-winged Blackbird  4
Common Grackle  2
Brown-headed Cowbird  3
Baltimore Oriole  8 Several foraging and singing birds around, including 
visible redetermined migration.
House Finch  2
American Goldfinch  5
House Sparrow  3

Good birding!

Sincerely,
Chris T-H



On May 16, 2017, at 9:51 AM, bob mcguire 
<bmcgu...@clarityconnect.com<mailto:bmcgu...@clarityconnect.com>> wrote:

Most of the action in the Hawthorn Orchard this morning was in the NE corner - 
best observed from the edge of the softball field. Birds of most interest 
included:

Black-and-white Warbler 2
Nashville Warbler 2
Mourning Warbler (singing) 1
American Redstart 1
Magnolia Warbler 2
Blackburnian Warbler 1
Chestnut-sided Warbler 1
Black-throated Green Warbler 2
Canada Warbler (singing) 1
Yellow Warbler 4

In addition there were several Wood Thrushes (both calling and singing), Least 
Flycatchers, and a “traill’s” - type flycatcher which never vocalized for me.

As I was leaving I noticed Chris T-Hymes heading into the tangle and now 
eagerly await his report.

Bob McGuire
--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME<http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME>
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


--
Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Field Applications Engineer
Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 
607-254-1132
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

[cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard: 2 May 2017 - Golden-winged Warbler

2017-05-02 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
This morning, while birding the Hawthorn Orchard, I came upon a silently 
foraging adult male GOLDEN-WINGED WARBLER. This bird was located in the 
Southwest portion of the Hawthorn Orchard, about 100 yards to the East of the 
single shagbark hickory tree in the SW area. After messaging the Cayuga RBA 
GroupMe, Jay McGowan relocated the bird in the same general area as before. 
While Jay was there, it was joined by a singing Blue-winged Warbler. Soon 
after, the Golden-winged Warbler also sang. Jay got pictures and some audio 
documentation of this bird. Later, I ran into Ann Mitchell, Gary Kohlenberg, 
and Ken Kemphues, who all came from successfully seeing and hearing the 
Golden-winged Warbler, all in the same spot.

Just a heads-up that the hawthorns and other plants are leaving out nicely and 
the birds are harvesting Tortricid moth larvae from the hawthorn leaf clusters. 
This could turn out to be a banner year at the Hawthorn Orchard. The plants and 
insects are about a good 10+ days ahead of schedule at this spot.

Good birding!

Sincerely,
Chris T-H

--
Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Field Applications Engineer
Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 
607-254-1132
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

Re: [cayugabirds-l] Mystery bird revealed!

2017-04-29 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Hi Betsy,

I had skipped your description of "clear whistles" and got hung up on the sound 
of a violin, which can sound more wailing or moaning (to me) than clear or 
whistling. Tufted Titmouse was definitely the other bird of consideration, and 
I should have mentioned that.

Glad you found your mystery singer!

Bird sound ID - fun stuff!!

Sincerely,
Chris T-H

Sent from my iPhone



On Apr 29, 2017, at 09:04, Betsy Darlington 
> wrote:

Well, my mystery bird is a Tufted Titmouse!  It finally landed on a nearby 
branch, continued to toot that same high-ish E, and was soon joined by what was 
probably a female, since the singer didn't chase it away.  I have never heard a 
titmouse make that sound.  Must have been pretty appealing to his lady friend!
Betsy
--
Cayugabirds-L List Info:
Welcome and Basics
Rules and Information
Subscribe, Configuration and 
Leave
Archives:
The Mail 
Archive
Surfbirds
BirdingOnThe.Net
Please submit your observations to eBird!
--

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


Re: [cayugabirds-l] Bird song puzzle

2017-04-29 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Hi Betsy,

I'm not musically inclined, but Diane and I used an app called Cadenza to 
verify the frequency and replicate the notes you described, using a recorder. 
We believe the bird you are describing may possibly be a Mourning Dove. The 
past few mornings, they have been singing repeatedly in our neighborhood as 
well. The variable note immediately following the introductory note has not 
always been audible, making them sound like a series of E notes in succession.

Might that be your bird?

We were very impressed that you could hear this note in nature and easily 
identify it to a specific musical tone - something neither of us can do without 
the help of an app like Cadenza. :-)

Sincerely,
Chris T-H

Sent from my iPhone



On Apr 29, 2017, at 04:16, Betsy Darlington 
> wrote:

Yesterday morning and early evening, around our house and neighborhood east of 
Collegetown, I kept hearing a totally unfamiliar bird song. It was 3 to 7 or 8 
repeated, loud, clear whistles, all on the same note (E of the E string on a 
violin). Very easy to imitate, so I whistled it a few times, hoping to draw the 
bird closer, but only chickadees came near. Just once, I saw the bird zoom from 
the top of a tree to somewhere behind our house, but couldn't see what it 
looked like, except that it was about the size of a sparrow. It was back-lit, 
so it was impossible to see what color it was.
Do tufted titmice ever sing such a tune?  It was even clearer than their usual 
song, and entirely on one note. (Not much of a composer!)
Betsy
--
Cayugabirds-L List Info:
Welcome and Basics
Rules and Information
Subscribe, Configuration and 
Leave
Archives:
The Mail 
Archive
Surfbirds
BirdingOnThe.Net
Please submit your observations to eBird!
--

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


[cayugabirds-l] Spotting Scope

2016-12-17 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
I don’t know if anyone is in the market for a spotting scope, but I just saw 
that someone is selling their Swarovski ATS-80 HD on the Ithaca Craigslist:

http://ithaca.craigslist.org/for/5903608363.html

Sincerely,
Chris T-H


--
Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Field Applications Engineer
Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 
607-254-1132
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


[cayugabirds-l] DICKCISSEL: Hanshaw Road Grass Plots near Cornell Recreation Center

2016-10-04 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
This morning, while checking a couple of areas for possible sparrows of 
interest, I came upon a female DICKCISSEL in one of the grassy lanes to the 
Northwest of the Cornell Recreation Center, located South of Hanshaw Road in 
the Town of Dryden.

The bird was seen a couple of times and photographed poorly by me (digiscoped 
through Leica binoculars with iPhone, at great distance). Later, after Kevin 
and Jay McGowan arrived, the bird was subsequently relocate and photographed 
much better. We also heard the bird produce a series of very peculiar low 
frequency “chup” or “drip”-like sounding calls; these were atypical and not the 
classic flatulant-sounding “bt!” that we often hear as a flight call (esp. 
at night).

Also at this location was a single LINCOLN’S SPARROW and a couple of PALM 
WARBLERS, among other sparrows (Song, Savannah, Swamp, White-throated).

eBird checklist (and map point) with crappy photo can be viewed here:

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S31888389

Sincerely,
Chris T-H

--
Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Field Applications Engineer
Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 
607-254-1132
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


[cayugabirds-l] Nelson's Sparrows...anyone?

2016-10-03 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Just a heads-up that tonight looks to be a fairly decent migration night and 
might be productive for new fall arrivals in the morning, such as Nelson’s 
Sparrows...

Good luck and good birding!

Sincerely,
Chris T-H

--
Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Field Applications Engineer
Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 
607-254-1132
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


[cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard: May 20, 2016

2016-05-20 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Just a really quick note. The Hawthorn Orchard was initiatilaly devoid of 
migrants. Eventually, by about 7:20, birds started arriving via the SW corner 
from the West (from wherever they roost). Wood Thrushes have become much more 
territorial IN the Hawthorn Orchard, which is nice. First time in a few years.

Good birding!

Sincerely,
Chris T-H

Hawthorn Orchard
May 20, 2016
06:45
Traveling
1.50 miles
75 Minutes
All birds reported? Yes
Comments: Extremely quiet start to the morning. Eventually encountered a flock 
of six Tennessee warblers in a hawthorn tree in the southwest corner, then the 
Tennessee warblers began to appear in the Hawthorn Orchard, along with others. 
This was around 7:15am. Cool, quiet, sunny.
Submitted from eBird for iOS, version 1.2.1 Build 65

2 Canada Goose
1 Killdeer
2 Mourning Dove
1 Red-bellied Woodpecker
1 Downy Woodpecker
1 Hairy Woodpecker
1 Northern Flicker
1 Eastern Phoebe
1 Red-eyed Vireo (Northeast corner, seen/heard)
3 Blue Jay
1 Tree Swallow
2 Barn Swallow
2 Black-capped Chickadee
1 Veery
4 Wood Thrush (now seeming strongly territorial IN the Hawthorn Orchard)
8 American Robin
8 Gray Catbird
1 Brown Thrasher (visibly singing very loudly from the top of the oak tree just 
South of the Northeast corner)
5 European Starling

8 Tennessee Warbler (May be more, but I didn’t have time to stick around)
1 Nashville Warbler (NE corner)
5 Common Yellowthroat (including two observed copulating)
1 American Redstart
1 Magnolia Warbler
1 Yellow-rumped Warbler
3 Wilson's Warbler (1 NE corner, 1 East side, 1 SW corner, all distinctly 
different birds, based upon repeated observations from those locations)

1 Song Sparrow
1 Eastern Towhee (This was a new bird this year for me, this was singing loudly 
from the meadow at the Northwest corner)
6 Northern Cardinal
1 Rose-breasted Grosbeak
1 Indigo Bunting (Southwest corner)
5 Red-winged Blackbird
1 Eastern Meadowlark
2 Common Grackle
2 Brown-headed Cowbird
3 Baltimore Oriole
1 Purple Finch
3 American Goldfinch
3 House Sparrow

Number of Taxa: 39


Sent from my iPhone



--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


[cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard: May 17, 2016 - 16 Warbler Species

2016-05-17 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Hawthorn Orchard
May 17, 2016
07:25
Traveling
1.50 miles
90 Minutes
All birds reported? Yes
Comments: I didn't expect to encounter much this morning, so was pleasantly 
surprised with the abundance of birds foraging throughout the Hawthorn Orchard. 
There appears to be plenty of food now throughout for the birds to gorge 
themselves with.
Submitted from eBird for iOS, version 1.2.0 Build 62

1 Chimney Swift
1 Downy Woodpecker
1 Hairy Woodpecker
1 Willow Flycatcher -- Single bird observed giving "whit" notes, no noticeable 
eyering.
7 Least Flycatcher -- These birds were scattered throughout; this number may be 
low.
1 Eastern Phoebe
1 Blue-headed Vireo
1 Warbling Vireo
1 Philadelphia Vireo -- Observed singing northeast corner
2 Red-eyed Vireo
2 Blue Jay
1 American Crow
6 Barn Swallow
3 Black-capped Chickadee
1 Tufted Titmouse
1 White-breasted Nuthatch
2 Veery -- One bird was in the same area as the Indigo Bunting, just southwest 
of the northeast corner; the other bird was in the same area as the Ovenbird, 
in the central southern area.
1 Swainson's Thrush -- Easily visible bird foraging in the upper treetops of 
the hawthorns, just west of the northeast corner.
4 Wood Thrush
11 American Robin
14 Gray Catbird
6 European Starling

1 Ovenbird -- Single song burst in the central southern portion.
1 Blue-winged Warbler -- One singing male in the northeast corner
25 Tennessee Warbler -- Mostly males, a few females have moved in. Evenly 
distributed throughout the Hawthorn Orchard.
4 Nashville Warbler -- All in the southwest corner
7 Common Yellowthroat
6 American Redstart -- Males and females scattered throughout
3 Cape May Warbler -- All females in the top of the oak trees at the northeast 
corner.
2 Northern Parula -- Softly singing males. One in the northeast corner, one in 
the southwest corner
6 Magnolia Warbler -- Several singing males and at least one female mostly in 
the northeast corner and also in the southwest corner
1 Blackburnian Warbler -- Singing male in the northeast corner
8 Yellow Warbler -- Males and females scattered throughout
1 Chestnut-sided Warbler -- Singing male northeast corner
1 Black-throated Blue Warbler -- Singing male in the northeast corner
7 Yellow-rumped Warbler
1 Black-throated Green Warbler -- Foraging female along the east edge
1 Canada Warbler -- Singing in the northeast corner

6 White-throated Sparrow -- Along the gravel path from the East Ithaca 
Recreation Way to the ballfields.
3 Song Sparrow
1 Scarlet Tanager -- Calling, Northeast corner
5 Northern Cardinal
1 Rose-breasted Grosbeak -- Calling, Northeast corner
1 Indigo Bunting -- Bright blue male silently foraging just Southwest of the 
northeast corner
4 Red-winged Blackbird
2 Common Grackle
2 Brown-headed Cowbird
6 Baltimore Oriole
2 American Goldfinch
6 House Sparrow

Number of Taxa: 50

--
Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Field Applications Engineer
Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 
607-254-1132
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

[cayugabirds-l] CBC Trip - Hawthorn Orchard: May 15, 2016

2016-05-15 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
This morning, 15 souls braved the crisp WNW winds for a morning walk at the 
Hawthorn Orchard for the Cayuga Bird Club. Despite the conditions, everyone got 
really nice looks at several accommodating individuals.

Also, I was informed today that I had my count off from yesterday’s tally of 
participants…there were actually at least 27 people in the CBC walk at the 
Hawthorn Orchard. Wow! Again, thanks to Bob Mcguire for being there, as well as 
some other experienced spotters who helped get people on birds yesterday!

The species list below includes my initial walk through the Hawthorn Orchard 
from 6:30-7:45am, and the main 8:00am to 10:45am walk. Highlights include 10 
warbler species seen today, which is fewer than yesterday, with TENNESSEE 
WARBLER once again being the most abundant species; several very showy NORTHERN 
PARULAS; One very cooperative BLACK-THROATED BLUE WARBLER; several AMERICAN 
REDSTARTS, including at least one 1st-year male. Also, Bob and Joan Horn heard 
a Yellow-billed Cuckoo calling from just North of the Northeast corner, 
independent of the CBC walk.

Hawthorn Orchard
May 15, 2016
06:30
Traveling
1.50 miles
240 Minutes
All birds reported? Yes
Comments: Lead a field trip for the Cayuga Bird Club at the Hawthorn Orchard. 
Good turnout of participants (15) and good looks at birds despite the cold and 
blustery conditions!
Submitted from eBird for iOS, version 1.2.0 Build 62

2 Canada Goose
1 Double-crested Cormorant
2 Turkey Vulture
1 Osprey
2 Ring-billed Gull
1 Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon)
3 Mourning Dove
1 Red-bellied Woodpecker
1 Downy Woodpecker
1 Hairy Woodpecker
2 Empidonax sp. (“whit” notes heard)
2 Warbling Vireo
2 Red-eyed Vireo
3 Blue Jay
1 American Crow
1 Common Raven
7 Barn Swallow
3 Black-capped Chickadee
1 Tufted Titmouse
2 White-breasted Nuthatch
1 House Wren
1 Ruby-crowned Kinglet (probably among the last to pass through the area this 
spring)
1 Wood Thrush
6 American Robin
10 Gray Catbird
4 European Starling
1 Cedar Waxwing

1 Blue-winged Warbler (very accommodating!)
20 Tennessee Warbler (everywhere…)
1 Nashville Warbler
3 Common Yellowthroat
3 American Redstart
3 Northern Parula
4 Magnolia Warbler
1 Blackburnian Warbler (female)
4 Yellow Warbler
1 Black-throated Blue Warbler

2 Song Sparrow
5 Northern Cardinal
1 Rose-breasted Grosbeak
4 Red-winged Blackbird
6 Common Grackle
2 Brown-headed Cowbird
4 Baltimore Oriole
2 House Finch
1 Purple Finch
4 American Goldfinch
8 House Sparrow

Number of Taxa: 48

Thanks again to all who participated and good birding!

Sincerely,
Chris T-H

--
Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Field Applications Engineer
Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 
607-254-1132
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


[cayugabirds-l] CBC Trip - Hawthorn Orchard: May 14, 2016

2016-05-14 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Today, I lead a Cayuga Bird Club trip at the Hawthorn Orchard. There were about 
20 participants, which made for an interesting challenge of getting people to 
see various birds, but I greatly thank everyone for helping each other out 
spotting birds that were seen – this was definitely teamwork! I especially want 
to call out Bob McGuire who stepped in to help out with the other end of the 
group: thank you, Bob!!

Not all of the species below were seen by everyone in the group; additionally, 
some were only seen or heard during the early morning scouting with Bob McGuire.

Highlight was most certainly the abundance of TENNESSEE WARBLERS (18-20 
individuals). This species was seen and heard well by all. The abundance of 
this species presented an ideal opportunity to demonstrate how to estimate the 
number of individuals being seen or heard from a single location. By the end of 
the trip, everyone was confident in the identification of Tennessee Warblers 
both by sight and sound.

There were a total of 15 warbler species seen or heard today.

Other notables are in bold, in the list below.

Hawthorn Orchard, Tompkins, New York, US
May 14, 2016 6:15 AM - 11:45 AM
Protocol: Traveling
2.0 mile(s)
Comments: Lead a Cayuga Bird Club field trip at this location from 8:00am 
to 11:30am. Bob McGuire and I birded together from 6:15am until 8:00am. Submitted from eBird for iOS, version 1.2.0 Build 62
68 species (+1 other taxa)

Canada Goose  9
Mallard  2
Turkey Vulture  1
Cooper's Hawk  1
Broad-winged Hawk  1
Red-tailed Hawk  3
Killdeer  2
Ring-billed Gull  2
Mourning Dove  3
Yellow-billed Cuckoo  1 (heard calling, Northeast corner)
Chimney Swift  1
Red-bellied Woodpecker  1
Downy Woodpecker  1
Hairy Woodpecker  1
Northern Flicker  1
Pileated Woodpecker  1
American Kestrel  1
Merlin  1 (Flyover, only seen by a few)
Least Flycatcher  1
Empidonax sp.  1 (heard “whit” notes only, probably Least)
Great Crested Flycatcher  1
Blue-headed Vireo  1
Warbling Vireo  1
Philadelphia Vireo  1 (actively singing and foraging in the mid-Eastern portion)
Blue Jay  8
American Crow  2
Barn Swallow  2
Black-capped Chickadee  2
Tufted Titmouse  2
White-breasted Nuthatch  1
House Wren  3
Ruby-crowned Kinglet  1
Eastern Bluebird  1
Swainson's Thrush  1 (silent forager in Northeast corner)
Wood Thrush  3
American Robin  10
Gray Catbird  8
European Starling  4
Cedar Waxwing  9

Blue-winged Warbler  1
Tennessee Warbler  18 (everywhere)
Nashville Warbler  2
Common Yellowthroat  3
American Redstart  1
Cape May Warbler  1 (mid-North side)
Northern Parula  1 (mid-Eastern edge and North edge)
Magnolia Warbler  2
Bay-breasted Warbler  1 (Northeast corner)
Yellow Warbler  4
Chestnut-sided Warbler  2
Blackpoll Warbler  1 (mid-East area)
Black-throated Blue Warbler  2 (Northeast corner and maple wooded ravine)
Yellow-rumped Warbler  2
Wilson's Warbler  1 (along North side)

Song Sparrow  2
Scarlet Tanager  2 (Northeast corner)
Northern Cardinal  4
Rose-breasted Grosbeak  1
Indigo Bunting  2 (flyover and singer in Northeast corner)
Bobolink  2 (flyovers)
Red-winged Blackbird  5
Eastern Meadowlark  1
Common Grackle  5
Brown-headed Cowbird  3
Baltimore Oriole  5
House Finch  4
Purple Finch  2 (very accommodating pair feeding on berries in maple wooded 
ravine near Northeast corner)
American Goldfinch  4
House Sparrow  8

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S29647017
This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)

Please don’t hesitate to contact me with any questions.

Good birding!

Sincerely,
Chris T-H


--
Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Field Applications Engineer
Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 
607-254-1132
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


[cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard: May 10, 2016

2016-05-10 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
This morning, it was significantly colder than yesterday morning at the same 
time. Fewer birds in general (except for White-throated Sparrows) and fewer 
warbler species. A single Blue-winged Warbler was singing incessantly from near 
the middle of the Hawthorn Orchard throughout much of my time there.

Highlight was the huge flock of about 62 White-throated Sparrows which are 
frequenting the hedgerow near the softball field. I got a fairly accurate count 
of that flock as they passed me from the East to the West along the hedgerow. 
They were headed to the grassy field beyond the softball field to feed on 
dandelion seeds. There was at least one White-crowned Sparrow here as well.

On my way back to the truck, I encountered another three White-crowned Sparrows 
– two apparent males and an apparent female. They were just inside the fencing 
on the green of the outside tennis courts. The two males were in an apparent 
singing and displaying duel – something I’ve never observed before. The two 
males took turns singing. As one male sang upright, the other male would crouch 
down with back in horizontal and bill down with cap pointed at the singing 
male, subtly jerking its head back and forth and gently hopping side to side. 
Then, they would switch, with the previously singing male now taking a 
horizontal pose with bright black-and-white striped cap facing the now upright 
and singing opponent. They repeated this for at least a couple of minutes, each 
bird singing one song before getting into the horizontal pose again; this all 
happening while the non-vocal, apparent female, was hopping around nearby, 
watching from the sidelines. This was almost rapid-fire, like a tennis ball 
being hit back-and-forth across the net during a match.

I think we need a few good days of warm weather to bring out the hawthorn 
flowers…

Good birding!

Sincerely,
Chris T-H

Hawthorn Orchard
May 10, 2016
06:30
Traveling
1.00 miles
149 Minutes
All birds reported? Yes
Comments: Cold start to the morning. ~ 30°
Submitted from eBird for iOS, version 1.2.0 Build 62

9 Canada Goose
1 Great Blue Heron
2 Killdeer
2 Ring-billed Gull
3 Mourning Dove
2 Red-bellied Woodpecker
2 Downy Woodpecker
1 Hairy Woodpecker
2 Least Flycatcher
1 Eastern Phoebe
23 Blue Jay
2 American Crow
11 Tree Swallow
1 Barn Swallow
7 Black-capped Chickadee
2 Tufted Titmouse
1 White-breasted Nuthatch
2 House Wren
6 Ruby-crowned Kinglet
3 Wood Thrush
14 American Robin
12 Gray Catbird
1 Brown Thrasher
8 European Starling
2 Cedar Waxwing
1 Ovenbird
2 Blue-winged Warbler
1 Black-and-white Warbler
9 Nashville Warbler
2 Common Yellowthroat
2 American Redstart
4 Magnolia Warbler
1 Yellow Warbler
1 Black-throated Blue Warbler
6 Yellow-rumped Warbler
1 Chipping Sparrow
4 White-crowned Sparrow
78 White-throated Sparrow
3 Song Sparrow
1 Scarlet Tanager
11 Northern Cardinal
1 Rose-breasted Grosbeak
8 Red-winged Blackbird
1 Eastern Meadowlark
6 Common Grackle
5 Brown-headed Cowbird
4 Baltimore Oriole
1 Purple Finch
1 Pine Siskin
10 American Goldfinch

Number of Taxa: 50

--
Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Field Applications Engineer
Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 
607-254-1132
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


[cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard: May 9, 2016

2016-05-09 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Today was a cold but nice morning to be at the Hawthorn Orchard. I was 
pleasantly surprised by the appearance of many neotropical migrants in at least 
a few different flocks.

Highlights include: 12 species of warblers, 21 Ruby-crowned Kinglets 
(everywhere), and at least 42 White-throated Sparrows (several large rolling 
flocks through different spots in the Hawthorn Orchard), a male and female 
Brown Thrasher at the SW corner, and at least 5 Scarlet Tanagers (two females 
and one male in one tree, plus other singers passing through).

Many of the warblers were quietly probing the newly-formed leaf clusters in the 
Hawthorn Orchard for hopeful finds of Tortricid (leaf-roller) moth larvae. It’s 
a little early, but it should be a good year for the leaf-rollers, due to the 
relatively mild winter.

Good birding!

Sincerely,
Chris T-H


Hawthorn Orchard
May 9, 2016
06:29
Traveling
1.00 miles
119 Minutes
All birds reported? Yes
Comments: Submitted from eBird for iOS, version 1.2.0 Build 62

1 Double-crested Cormorant
1 Turkey Vulture
1 Cooper's Hawk
2 Killdeer
2 Mourning Dove
1 Red-bellied Woodpecker
2 Downy Woodpecker
1 Hairy Woodpecker
1 Northern Flicker
5 Least Flycatcher
1 Eastern Phoebe
2 Great Crested Flycatcher
1 Yellow-throated Vireo
1 Warbling Vireo
7 Blue Jay
5 American Crow
6 Black-capped Chickadee
4 Tufted Titmouse
4 White-breasted Nuthatch
3 House Wren
1 Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
21 Ruby-crowned Kinglet
3 Wood Thrush
16 American Robin
9 Gray Catbird
2 Brown Thrasher
1 Northern Mockingbird
11 European Starling
2 Ovenbird
2 Blue-winged Warbler
2 Black-and-white Warbler
8 Nashville Warbler
2 Common Yellowthroat
1 American Redstart
3 Northern Parula
6 Magnolia Warbler
3 Yellow Warbler
3 Chestnut-sided Warbler
7 Yellow-rumped Warbler
2 Black-throated Green Warbler
2 Chipping Sparrow
42 White-throated Sparrow
6 Song Sparrow
6 Scarlet Tanager
7 Northern Cardinal
2 Rose-breasted Grosbeak
4 Red-winged Blackbird
2 Common Grackle
5 Brown-headed Cowbird
2 Baltimore Oriole
16 American Goldfinch

Number of Taxa: 51


Sent from my iPhone



--
Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Field Applications Engineer
Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 
607-254-1132
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


[cayugabirds-l] Fwd: eBird -- Hawthorn Orchard -- May 4, 2016

2016-05-04 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
I did a quick walk through the Hawthorn Orchard this morning from 6:30-7:40am.

Highlights include: Least Flycatcher (calling along section of East Ithaca 
Recreation Way, close to the High Volt Lab near Mitchell Street), Great Crested 
Flycatcher (calling from area West of the East Ithaca Recreation Way down the 
ravine), two Wood Thrushes, two Gray Catbirds, one Ovenbird, 1-2 
Black-and-white Warblers, one Pine Warbler, and one Black-throated Green 
Warbler. The latter birds were in the Northeast corner of the Hawthorn Orchard, 
close to the ravine edge.

Good birding!

Sincerely,
Chris T-H

Begin forwarded message:

From: "Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes" 
<c...@cornell.edu<mailto:c...@cornell.edu>>
Subject: eBird -- Hawthorn Orchard -- May 4, 2016
Date: May 4, 2016 at 7:42:47 AM EDT
To: "Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes" <c...@cornell.edu<mailto:c...@cornell.edu>>

Hawthorn Orchard
May 4, 2016
06:30
Traveling
1.00 miles
71 Minutes
All birds reported? Yes
Comments: Submitted from eBird for iOS, version 1.1.5 Build 44

1 Red-bellied Woodpecker
2 Downy Woodpecker
1 Hairy Woodpecker
1 Northern Flicker
1 Least Flycatcher
1 Eastern Phoebe
1 Great Crested Flycatcher
1 Blue-headed Vireo
7 Blue Jay
2 American Crow
3 Black-capped Chickadee
3 White-breasted Nuthatch
2 House Wren
1 Ruby-crowned Kinglet
2 Wood Thrush
6 American Robin
2 Gray Catbird
1 Brown Thrasher
3 European Starling
6 Cedar Waxwing
1 Ovenbird
1 Black-and-white Warbler
1 Pine Warbler
1 Black-throated Green Warbler
15 White-throated Sparrow
1 Song Sparrow
6 Northern Cardinal
1 Rose-breasted Grosbeak
3 Red-winged Blackbird
4 Common Grackle
4 Brown-headed Cowbird
1 Purple Finch
2 Pine Siskin
11 American Goldfinch

Number of Taxa: 34


Sent from my iPhone



--
Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Field Applications Engineer
Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 
607-254-1132
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

[cayugabirds-l] Etna: House Wren

2016-04-23 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Did anyone else notice if House Wren arrived in their neighborhood today? One 
has been bubbling away in our yard all morning, bouncing from territory edge to 
territory edge.

Nice to hear them back.

Good birding!

Sincerely,
Chris T-H

--
Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Field Applications Engineer
Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 
607-254-1132
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

[cayugabirds-l] Ithaca: Northern Rough-winged Swallows

2016-04-14 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
I know that Jay McGowan posted a sighting of Northern Rough-winged Swallow from 
Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge on 26 March, but I thought I would mention 
that there were two Northern Rough-winged Swallows actively calling and flying 
around above the parking lot behind Gateway Center at the base of East State 
Street in Ithaca, this evening. This is a traditional location for this species 
to breed. They nest in the drainage pipes which empty from the concrete 
retaining wall of the parking lot into Six Mile Creek. It was nice to hear 
their quick raspy vocalizations again this spring.

Good birding!!

Sincerely,
Chris T-H

Sent from my iPhone



--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--



[cayugabirds-l] Western Tanager - Cornell University Campus

2016-02-25 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Not seen posted yet, but I thought I’d pass along word that a Western Tanager 
has been seen and photographed hopping around the ground behind Day Hall on 
central Cornell University Campus.

I don’t have many other details, but saw it posted to the text RBA.

Sincerely,
Chris T-H
--
Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Field Applications Engineer
Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 607-254-1132
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

[cayugabirds-l] GYRFALCON - Livonia, NY (2/21/2016)

2016-02-22 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Dianne McCullough found a Gyrfalcon on Decker Road in South Livonia, NY 
yesterday (Sunday), 21 February 2016 at 1:10pm and took the pictures provided 
at the link below:

https://onedrive.live.com/?authkey=%21ACYyHpMkICpH5a0=51DAE34C5E9053B0=51DAE34C5E9053B0%211078=51DAE34C5E9053B0%211076=OneUp

Please contact Dianne directly for any other specifics required. Dianne is not 
currently a subscriber to any of the eLists.

Great find, Dianne!!!

Thanks and good birding!

Sincerely,
Chris T-H


Begin forwarded message:

From: Dianne McCullough <diann...@frontier.com<mailto:diann...@frontier.com>>
Subject: Re: GYRFALCON
Date: February 22, 2016 at 6:58:02 PM EST
To: "Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes" <c...@cornell.edu<mailto:c...@cornell.edu>>

I saw it on Decker Rd. in South Livonia near Backus Rd. at 1:10 pm on 21, 
February 2016.
I would love to have you post on my behalf.
Would you be able to copy me in on it or where I can see it?
It’s pretty exciting.
Thank you again,
Dianne

From: Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes<mailto:c...@cornell.edu>
Sent: Monday, February 22, 2016 5:02 PM
To: Dianne McCullough<mailto:diann...@frontier.com>
Subject: Re: GYRFALCON

Dianne,

Do you have more specifics on where, precisely it was seen and when?

Once I have this information, may I post to the birding eLists on your behalf?

Thanks!

Sincerely,
Chris T-H

On Feb 22, 2016, at 4:53 PM, Dianne McCullough 
<diann...@frontier.com<mailto:diann...@frontier.com>> wrote:


<-146254221AEDF1D.png><https://onedrive.live.com/redir.aspx?cid=51dae34c5e9053b0=play=51DAE34C5E9053B0!1077=51DAE34C5E9053B0!1076=1=Photomail=SDX.Photos=!ACYyHpMkICpH5a0>
GYRFALCON<https://onedrive.live.com/redir.aspx?cid=51dae34c5e9053b0=browse=51DAE34C5E9053B0!1076=51DAE34C5E9053B0!105=5=!ACYyHpMkICpH5a0=Photomail=SDX.Photos>
VIEW SLIDE 
SHOW<https://onedrive.live.com/redir.aspx?cid=51dae34c5e9053b0=play=51DAE34C5E9053B0!1076=51DAE34C5E9053B0!105=5=!ACYyHpMkICpH5a0=Photomail=SDX.Photos>
  DOWNLOAD 
ALL<https://onedrive.live.com/redir.aspx?cid=51dae34c5e9053b0=downloadphotos=51DAE34C5E9053B0!1076=51DAE34C5E9053B0!105=5=Photomail=SDX.Photos=!ACYyHpMkICpH5a0>
This album has 3 photos and will be available on SkyDrive until 5/22/2016.

<16473960585B31EF14.png><https://onedrive.live.com/redir.aspx?cid=51dae34c5e9053b0=play=51DAE34C5E9053B0!1078=51DAE34C5E9053B0!1076=1=Photomail=SDX.Photos=!ACYyHpMkICpH5a0>

<574869455221B1212.png><https://onedrive.live.com/redir.aspx?cid=51dae34c5e9053b0=play=51DAE34C5E9053B0!1079=51DAE34C5E9053B0!1076=1=Photomail=SDX.Photos=!ACYyHpMkICpH5a0>
Here you go Chris.
Dianne

--
Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Field Applications Engineer
Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 607-254-1132
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp


--
Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Field Applications Engineer
Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 
607-254-1132
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

[cayugabirds-l] ADMIN - Posting Test

2015-12-29 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Please disregard. This is only a test.


--
Chris Tessaglia-Hymes
Listowner, Cayugabirds-L
Ithaca, New York
c...@cornell.edu
Cayugabirds-L – 
Archives
Cayugabirds-L – Welcome and 
Basics
Cayugabirds-L – Rules and 
Information
Cayugabirds-L – Subscribe, Configuration and 
Leave


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

Re: [cayugabirds-l] [nysbirds-l] Interesting Bird?? Take Off on Radar this morning

2015-12-25 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
I'm guessing these are a liftoff echoes of Canada Geese from Kinderhook Lake in 
Niverville, Columbia County, NY. Depending upon liftoff angle and altitude, the 
reflectivity echo may be off slightly from actual location of liftoff.

Good birding and Happy Holidays!

Sincerely,
Chris T-H

Sent from my iPhone



On Dec 25, 2015, at 10:59, David Nicosia 
> wrote:

That's a good point Ben. Plus why right at sunrise for geese??  We see this 
with swallows a lot which roost in marshes and take off in the morning to feed. 
Geese roost in the fields? I thought they fed in the fields. Interesting stuff 
nevertheless.

On Fri, Dec 25, 2015 at 10:24 AM, Benjamin Van Doren 
> wrote:
Interesting. I could well be wrong, but I wouldn't typically think of geese 
departing farm fields as doing so relatively uniformly on a broad circular 
front. Some groundtruthing might be worthwhile...

Benjamin
On Fri, Dec 25, 2015 at 10:20 AM David Nicosia 
> wrote:
thanks. I didn't think of geese. we often see swallows do this but it makes 
sense.

On Fri, Dec 25, 2015 at 8:25 AM, John Kent 
> wrote:
That is geese you're seeing. Large numbers of them roost in farm fields there 
at this time of year, and I have seen the same thing on radar in December 
before. It's probably mostly Canadas, but sometimes there are also lots of Snow 
Geese there.

John Kent
Selkirk, NY

On Dec 25, 2015, at 8:12 AM, David Nicosia 
> wrote:

All,

I noticed on the Albany National Weather Service radar between 617 am and 654 
am Christmas morning a circular pattern on radar like swallow morning take off 
patterns we see in the late summer. This pattern was seen originating from 
Valtie, NY... 42.41N and 73.68W (roughly). Below are 5 radar images that I 
grabbed which show this.

 https://www.flickr.com/photos/davenicosia/albums/72157662199366610

The question is...are these radar echoes even birds or maybe insects?? And, if 
so, what specie of bird (if they are birds)? I would say probably starlings???  
They couldn't be tree swallows since they should be long gone.  Anyway, I have 
never seen this in the winter before.  Any thoughts on this please share.

Merry Christmas to all

David Nicosia
--
NYSbirds-L List Info:
Welcome and Basics
Rules and Information
Subscribe, Configuration and 
Leave
Archives:
The Mail 
Archive
Surfbirds
BirdingOnThe.Net
Please submit your observations to eBird!
--

--
Cayugabirds-L List Info:
Welcome and Basics
Rules and Information
Subscribe, Configuration and 
Leave
Archives:
The Mail 
Archive
Surfbirds
BirdingOnThe.Net
Please submit your observations to eBird!
--

--
Cayugabirds-L List Info:
Welcome and Basics
Rules and Information
Subscribe, Configuration and 
Leave
Archives:
The Mail 
Archive
Surfbirds
BirdingOnThe.Net
Please submit your observations to eBird!
--

--

NYSbirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/nysbirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/NYSB.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

Re: [cayugabirds-l] and back to birds - MERLIN, LOONS

2015-11-17 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
I did approach them just this fall with this very question. Issue is they 
remove their vessel from the Inlet for the winter in the first week of 
November. Sometime, in the near future, the lake water levels are lowered and 
no deep-hulled vessels can traverse the Cayuga Inlet. Plus, the 
unpredictability of icing in area waterways or harbors, the additional cost of 
keeping a vessel operationally winterized, and the relatively low likelihood of 
tourist usage during the winter months, makes it economically unfeasible to 
keep open for the winter.

There are some operational vessels, but they are small, and often aren’t 
available because their operators depart this area for a warmer clime during 
the winter.

If there were enough interested persons to go out in late October, the cost per 
person for a group of 10-15 would amount to something like $75 per person for a 
chartered 8-hour day – those numbers are probably off a bit, but it was 
something like that.

I can see a very specialized charter after the passage of a very uniquely 
situated hurricane or tropical storm; but it would have to occur prior to them 
pulling the vessel from the water.

Sincerely,
Chris T-H

On Nov 17, 2015, at 3:11 PM, Geo Kloppel 
<geoklop...@gmail.com<mailto:geoklop...@gmail.com>> wrote:

Hi John, you wrote:

A Cayuga and/or Seneca "pelagic" would be a fun fall/winter cruise.

Yeah! Fun to dream, anyway.

A few weeks ago I dropped  some friends off at the dock for an Ithaca Boat Tour 
on the HAENDEL. I hadn't previously been up close to that steel-hulled vessel. 
It reminded me of the old LAKE DIVER IV over on Seneca Lake, which used to take 
research parties out weekly in all kinds of winter conditions. Pretty frigid 
sometimes (though there was a good-sized heated cabin)! Seeing the HAENDEL made 
we wonder if anyone has ever approached Ithaca Boat Tours about a winter 
birding charter?

-Geo
--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


--
Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Field Applications Engineer
Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 607-254-1132
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

Re: [cayugabirds-l] guns at Stewart Park

2015-11-13 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
 around 
Fuertes. She then came over to me and repeatd their story of being told before 
that what they were doing was okay. I think that was my opportunity to insist 
they be ticketed, but I didn't. I thanked the officer for looking up the law, 
but she credited the other officer. After the cops drove off, the leader of the 
guys, the big one, said I had won today, but if this happened again they'd call 
the cops on me for harassing them. I asked, if what happens? No answer to that.

So it has been established, at least among six people, that you are not allowed 
to bring your gun into Stewart Park, not even if you plan to shoot the ducks 
and geese. I wish I had also asked the officers to look up the boundaries of 
Stewart Park in the City Code, because Stewart Park extends north to the City 
Limit, which is a considerable distance out in the lake.

A lot of Buffleheads went about their business.

If you see a maroon Ford pickup 71642 KA or a dark gray Silverado pickup GTL 
7095 parked in Stewart Park while there are gunners in camo standing in the 
water nearby, perhaps with a small boat for their stuff, you can ask IPD to 
talk to them about whterh they brought their guns through the park after being 
told not to.

--Dave Nutter

--
Cayugabirds-L List Info:
Welcome and Basics<http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME>
Cayugabirds-L Welcome and Basics
Cayugabirds-L – List Welcome and Basics . Welcome to Cayugabirds-L! 
Cayugabirds-L is an email list (the List) focused on the discussion of birds 
and birding in the ...
Read more...<http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME>

Rules and Information<http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES>
Subscribe, Configuration and 
Leave<http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm>
Archives:
The Mail 
Archive<http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html>
Surfbirds<http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds>
BirdingOnThe.Net<http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html>
Please submit your observations to eBird<http://ebird.org/content/ebird/>!
--
--
Cayugabirds-L List Info:
Welcome and Basics<http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME>
Rules and Information<http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES>
Subscribe, Configuration and 
Leave<http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm>
Archives:
The Mail 
Archive<http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html>
Surfbirds<http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds>
BirdingOnThe.Net<http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html>
Please submit your observations to eBird<http://ebird.org/content/ebird/>!
--

--
Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Field Applications Engineer
Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 
607-254-1132
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

[cayugabirds-l] Fwd: [GeneseeBirds-L] Cave Swallows - Hamlin Beach SP

2015-11-06 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Keep your eyes open! Cave Swallows are being reported flying along the South 
shoreline of Lake Ontario near Rochester, NY.

Sincerely,
Chris T-H


Begin forwarded message:

From: Bird observations from western New York 
<geneseebird...@geneseo.edu<mailto:geneseebird...@geneseo.edu>>
Subject: [GeneseeBirds-L] Cave Swallows - Hamlin Beach SP
Date: November 6, 2015 at 11:24:48 AM EST
To: "geneseebird...@geneseo.edu<mailto:geneseebird...@geneseo.edu>" 
<geneseebird...@geneseo.edu<mailto:geneseebird...@geneseo.edu>>
Reply-To: <geneseebird...@geneseo.edu<mailto:geneseebird...@geneseo.edu>>

As of 11:10 a.m., 5 CAVE SWALLOWS had passed Hamlin Beach State Park going 
west.  Dave Tetlow picked up the first out over the lake at 10:50 and then a 
group of 4 came by over the parking lot at 11:05.

Andy Guthrie
Hamlin, NY
___
GeneseeBirds-L mailing list  -  
geneseebird...@geneseo.edu<mailto:geneseebird...@geneseo.edu>
https://mail.geneseo.edu/mailman/listinfo/geneseebirds-l

--
Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Field Applications Engineer
Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 607-254-1132
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

Re:[cayugabirds-l] [nysbirds-l] Prolonged mild southwest flow across the eastern U.S. next week: Cave Swallows in the northeast U.S???

2015-10-29 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
And…Brown-chested Martin…!

Thanks, Dave, for the analysis. Fingers crossed for some goodies to turn up for 
those out looking.

Good birding, everyone!

Sincerely,
Chris T-H

On Oct 29, 2015, at 7:22 PM, David Nicosia 
<daven102...@gmail.com<mailto:daven102...@gmail.com>> wrote:

Below is a trajectory analysis I did for Monday Nov 2-6. It shows air from
Texas will wind up in the northeast U.S aloft between 3000 and 8500 feet.
This could be a good set up for vagrants from Texas and surrounding areas
showing up in the northeast.

Cave Swallows??? This could be especially true along the coast. Maybe other
vagrants too. This will be an impressive weather patternand mild!!

Trajectory analysis is here 
https://www.flickr.com/photos/davenicosia/22586221435/

Best,
Dave Nicosia
Johnson City, NY
--
NYSbirds-L List Info:
Welcome and Basics<http://www.northeastbirding.com/NYSbirdsWELCOME>
Rules and Information<http://www.northeastbirding.com/NYSbirdsRULES>
Subscribe, Configuration and 
Leave<http://www.northeastbirding.com/NYSbirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm>
Archives:
The Mail 
Archive<http://www.mail-archive.com/nysbirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html>
Surfbirds<http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L>
BirdingOnThe.Net<http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/NYSB.html>
Please submit your observations to eBird<http://ebird.org/content/ebird/>!
--

--
Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Field Applications Engineer
Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 607-254-1132
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

Re: [cayugabirds-l] Hurricane Joaquin

2015-10-01 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Darn. Good for the people, good for the birds, unfortunate for inland hurricane 
bird seekers...

Latest forecast shows Hurricane Joaquin to make a Northeast turn and head out 
to the Atlantic. Appears that a building high pressure ridge over the Great 
Lakes and a stronger high pressure ridge over the Atlantic will encourage this 
latest forecast to hold true.

But, forecasts do change…

Good birding!

Sincerely,
Chris T-H

On Oct 1, 2015, at 8:10 AM, Peter 
<psara...@rochester.rr.com<mailto:psara...@rochester.rr.com>> wrote:

A couple of sites I use in my Meteorology class for folks interested in 
following the autumn migration:

World Wind Map
http://earth.nullschool.net/#current/wind/isobaric/1000hPa/orthographic=-103.57,27.93,378
(once loaded, you can click and drag the globe to locate it in any position 
you'd like)

U.S. Wind Map
http://hint.fm/wind/

Hope some can find some use for them.
Be well all.
Pete Saracino

On 9/30/2015 8:15 PM, David Nicosia wrote:
Chris,

You beat me to it. I have been so busy at work to send anything to the group. 
But early next week could be a great time for oceanic birds as you state. Some 
of our latest model guidance though suggests a landfall farther south now in NC 
or VA and then the storm comes up the eastern seaboard in a much weakened state 
through our area or just to the east. Sandy came in on the NJ coast to southern 
PA and we saw pelagic birds. If the storm trends south to NC on landfall but 
eventually works north I wonder if we would have a pelagic fallout? In any 
event, I think the potential will be there for a lot of grounded migrants so 
even if we don't see many pelagic birds there could be good fallouts of other 
species...like more Hudsonian Godwits, maybe an American avocet, or some 
othersso early next week could be awesome. Bad weather = good birds!!   Of 
course we do have a few models that veer the storm out to sea and we would see 
nice weather next week!!!

Stay tuned...

Dave Nicosia

On Tue, Sep 29, 2015 at 9:45 PM, Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes 
<<mailto:c...@cornell.edu>c...@cornell.edu<mailto:c...@cornell.edu>> wrote:
Just a heads-up…

I happened to check some of my weather references for the coming week and 
noticed that Tropical Storm Joaquin, currently just East of the Bahamas, is 
forecast to make landfall around the Delmarva Peninsula or Cape May, NJ areas 
as a Category 2 Hurricane (976mb) around 8am Sunday morning (10/4). This system 
will then weaken to a Category 1 Hurricane (992mb) as it moves North through 
central New York, just East of the Finger Lakes Region, on Monday morning 
(10/5) through midnight Monday night and gradually drifting Northeast through 
Tuesday and departing by Wednesday morning (10/7).

Be prepared and have a watchful eye for unexpected and typically pelagic 
seabirds on sizable lakes anytime Monday through Wednesday (10/5-10/7) and on 
the days following the departure of this system from our area, as birds filter 
from Lake Ontario back toward the ocean (10/7-10/9).

The only caveat with this alert is that this is a forecast, and forecasts 
change – especially forecasts greater than a few days out. So, everything 
mentioned above is purely meant as a heads-up to check your favorite weather 
forecast site for more information as Tropical Storm Joaquin develops into a 
Hurricane and heads our way.

Good luck and good birding!!

Sincerely
Chris T-H

PS - one of my favorite sites to evaluate large scale storm systems is Magic 
Seaweed: 
<http://magicseaweed.com/US-Northeastern-Seaboard-Surf-Chart/20/?chartType=PRATE>
 http://magicseaweed.com/US-Northeastern-Seaboard-Surf-Chart/20/?chartType=PRATE


--
Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Field Applications Engineer
Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 
607-254-1132
<http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp>http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp

--
Cayugabirds-L List Info:
Welcome and Basics<http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME>
Rules and Information<http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES>
Subscribe, Configuration and 
Leave<http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm>
Archives:
The Mail 
Archive<http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html>
Surfbirds<http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds>
BirdingOnThe.Net<http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html>
Please submit your observations to eBird<http://ebird.org/content/ebird/>!
--

--
Cayugabirds-L List Info:
Welcome and Basics<http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME>
Rules and Information<http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES>
Subscribe, Configuration and 
Leave<http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm>
Archives:
The Mail 
Archive<http://www.mail-archive.com/

[cayugabirds-l] Hurricane Joaquin

2015-09-29 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Just a heads-up…

I happened to check some of my weather references for the coming week and 
noticed that Tropical Storm Joaquin, currently just East of the Bahamas, is 
forecast to make landfall around the Delmarva Peninsula or Cape May, NJ areas 
as a Category 2 Hurricane (976mb) around 8am Sunday morning (10/4). This system 
will then weaken to a Category 1 Hurricane (992mb) as it moves North through 
central New York, just East of the Finger Lakes Region, on Monday morning 
(10/5) through midnight Monday night and gradually drifting Northeast through 
Tuesday and departing by Wednesday morning (10/7).

Be prepared and have a watchful eye for unexpected and typically pelagic 
seabirds on sizable lakes anytime Monday through Wednesday (10/5-10/7) and on 
the days following the departure of this system from our area, as birds filter 
from Lake Ontario back toward the ocean (10/7-10/9).

The only caveat with this alert is that this is a forecast, and forecasts 
change – especially forecasts greater than a few days out. So, everything 
mentioned above is purely meant as a heads-up to check your favorite weather 
forecast site for more information as Tropical Storm Joaquin develops into a 
Hurricane and heads our way.

Good luck and good birding!!

Sincerely
Chris T-H

PS - one of my favorite sites to evaluate large scale storm systems is Magic 
Seaweed: 
http://magicseaweed.com/US-Northeastern-Seaboard-Surf-Chart/20/?chartType=PRATE


--
Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Field Applications Engineer
Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 
607-254-1132
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

[cayugabirds-l] BARN OWL: Etna Night Migrant

2015-05-19 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Good morning!

Not expecting much overnight, given the long and heavy rainfall we received 
(nearly 2” of rain), after reviewing my night recording I am excited to report 
that I recorded a night migrating BARN OWL. This bird flew over our house in 
Etna, calling every 13-16 seconds, over the span of about two minutes from 3:32 
to 3:34 this morning.

For those interested, I have uploaded the full 2-minute file sequence to both 
SoundCloud and to Xeno-Canto. I’m not happy with SoundCloud because you can 
no-longer play a single track one time – immediately after a track plays, 
SoundCloud automatically begins playing another track of music that might be 
interesting to you. I have also uploaded the sequence to Xeno-Canto, but I was 
having some problems playing the clip in Safari (it played back fine using 
Chrome) – you can also download the file from either Xeno-Canto or SoundCloud 
and then play the file locally on your computer.

Here are the links:

http://www.xeno-canto.org/244100

https://soundcloud.com/cth4th/etna-ny-20150519033222-033422-barn-owl-calling-sequence-2-minutes

Night listening can be so cool!

Sincerely,
Chris T-H

--
Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Field Applications Engineer
Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
W: 607-254-2418tel:607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740tel:607-351-5740   F: 
607-254-1132tel:607-254-1132
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

[cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard: May 16, 2015

2015-05-16 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
I apologize for the brevity, but I wanted to at least share this morning's 
list. Excellent morning with highlight being singing Gray-cheeked Thrush, 
Swainson's Thrush, and Black-billed Cuckoo; and a non-vocal Mourning Warbler. 
I'll add details to my eBird list later.

Good birding!

Sincerely,
Chris T-H

cth4th
May 16, 2015
Hawthorn Orchard
Traveling
3 miles
128 Minutes
Observers: 1
All birds reported? Yes
Comments:  Fantastic morning!!! Additional notes to be added later.
2 Canada Goose
2 Mourning Dove
1 Black-billed Cuckoo
1 Yellow-bellied Sapsucker
1 Northern Flicker
1 Great Crested Flycatcher
1 Warbling Vireo
5 Red-eyed Vireo
6 Blue Jay
4 American Crow
5 Black-capped Chickadee
1 Tufted Titmouse
1 House Wren
1 Ruby-crowned Kinglet
1 Gray-cheeked Thrush
2 Swainson's Thrush
2 Wood Thrush
7 American Robin
15 Gray Catbird
1 Brown Thrasher
1 European Starling
16 Tennessee Warbler
2 Northern Parula
6 Yellow Warbler
1 Chestnut-sided Warbler
10 Magnolia Warbler
2 Cape May Warbler
1 Black-throated Blue Warbler
7 Bay-breasted Warbler
5 Blackpoll Warbler
4 American Redstart
1 Northern Waterthrush
1 Mourning Warbler
6 Common Yellowthroat
2 Canada Warbler
3 Song Sparrow
1 White-throated Sparrow
3 Scarlet Tanager
7 Northern Cardinal
1 Rose-breasted Grosbeak
3 Indigo Bunting
2 Red-winged Blackbird
4 Brown-headed Cowbird
3 Baltimore Oriole
1 Purple Finch
2 American Goldfinch


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--



[cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard: 15 May 2015

2015-05-15 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Just a quick note from today’s visit. I didn’t devote as much time actively 
birding today as I have on past days. But, it was a nice morning nonetheless. 
Others may post additional birds which I did not see or hear.

Again, if you visit the Hawthorn Orchard, please submit your sightings into 
eBird.orghttp://eBird.org for the “Hawthorn Orchard” hotspot – even if you 
only report a handful of birds seen or heard, every checklist is valuable 
toward preservation of this site.

Hawthorn Orchard, Tompkins, US-NY
May 15, 2015 8:25 AM - 9:45 AM
Protocol: Traveling
1.0 mile(s)

Comments: I didn't spend as much time searching and quantifying birds this 
morning as in past; Tennessee Warblers and Blackpoll Warblers seemed reduced in 
numbers, or just not singing as much today as yesterday. Others heard at least 
two Mourning Warblers earlier, as well as a flock of Swainson's Thrushes.

27 species

Merlin  1 Heard calling one of the two individual breeding birds which 
continue to be present opposite Mitchell Street from Hawthorn Orchard. If you 
drive up Mitchell Street from the City of Ithaca, look at the row of (blue?) 
spruce trees on the left side of the road immediately after the white house 
adjacent to the East Lawn Cemetery. A couple of spruces in along that row has 
an obvious dead branch sticking out. This is their preferred perch. I've seen 
the birds perched there while driving by in the afternoon and have seen them 
copulate on that branch a few times during AM birding (as visible from a couple 
spots in the Hawthorn Orchard).

Red-eyed Vireo  2
American Crow  1
House Wren  1

Gray-cheeked Thrush  1 Likely individual heard giving repeated soft NFC's 
in dense undergrowth at top of slope just North of the NE corner; in area 
nearby where others observed several (a flock of) Swainson's Thrushes earlier 
in the morning. This happened shortly after another birder had been reviewing 
the calls of Gray-cheeked Thrush; I suspect this unintentional playback may 
have triggered a response from this bird. My initial reaction was: is that 
your audio playing? When the response was no, I realized that I was hearing 
a softly calling GCTH. The bird repeated at least 10-12 times, then ceased 
altogether. An attempt for visual confirmation was not made.

Swainson's Thrush  1 One individual actively calling drip notes in top of 
hawthorns, just SW of NE corner.
Wood Thrush  1
Gray Catbird  5

Tennessee Warbler  6 fewer Tennessee Warblers today.
Common Yellowthroat  3
American Redstart  3 adult males
Cape May Warbler  1 female
Northern Parula  2 This is new for me this year. Two adult males singing 
and foraging together just SW of the NE corner.
Magnolia Warbler  12 Evenly distributed and actively vocal today.
Bay-breasted Warbler  5 3 adult males and at least 2 females; mostly in the 
general NE corner area and to SW of NE corner.
Yellow Warbler  2
Chestnut-sided Warbler  2
Blackpoll Warbler  3 Definitely seemed to be fewer birds today.
Black-throated Blue Warbler  2 Likely two individuals. One singing 
repeatedly at length in area just North of NE corner; one singing farther to 
the SW of the NE corner.
Canada Warbler  1 male singing to SW of NE corner.

Song Sparrow  2
Northern Cardinal  4
Indigo Bunting  1 Singing in area just SW of NE corner.
Brown-headed Cowbird  1
Baltimore Oriole  2
House Finch  1
House Sparrow  3

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23453355

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)

--
Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Field Applications Engineer
Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 607-254-1132
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

[cayugabirds-l] PLEASE READ - Hawthorn Orchard: May 14, 2015 - Nice!

2015-05-14 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
I’d like to urge everyone to be certain to submit *any* bird sightings, 
specifically from the Hawthorn Orchard and East Ithaca Recreation Way areas, to 
eBird.

There’s another resurgence of activity on the part of Cornell University to 
develop the East Hill proper; although, development of the Hawthorn Orchard 
does not specifically appear to be in the current plans, I would not put it 
past the developers to eye this location for student housing or as an extension 
to the proposed development.

Here’s a snippet from the master plan: 
http://www.masterplan.cornell.edu/doc/CMP_PART_1/land_use/cmp_lu_4_18_transform_the_east_hill_plaza_area_into_east_hill_village.pdf

Having a strong base of birding records from many *different* birders will help 
strengthen a case for preservation of this area in its current state as 
critical habitat for neotropical migrants, as opposed to outright development 
or modification and “improvement”.

Thank you!!

Sincerely,
Chris T-H

Details from today are in my eBird list below.


From: ebird-checkl...@cornell.edumailto:ebird-checkl...@cornell.edu
Subject: eBird Report - Hawthorn Orchard, May 14, 2015
Date: May 14, 2015 at 1:12:49 PM EDT
To: c...@cornell.edumailto:c...@cornell.edu

Hawthorn Orchard, Tompkins, US-NY
May 14, 2015 7:30 AM - 8:55 AM
Protocol: Traveling
1.5 mile(s)
Comments: Another really nice morning, albeit cold to start. The sun was a 
huge help in keeping birds active. Singing was nearly ever-present while I was 
there. Tennessee Warblers and Blackpoll Warblers dominated the soundscape.

Gray-cheeked thrush was giving soft (whispered) splee-er night flight notes, 
in repeated succession, from the small grove of white pines in NW corner area. 
I failed to produce a visual on this bird, but am fairly confident this was a 
Gray-cheeked Thrush and not a Bicknell's Thrush. The notes were on the high 
frequency end for Gray-cheeked, but not high enough for Bicknell's. Swainson's 
Thrushes were foraging in hawthorn treetops and periodically giving drip 
notes, with one of them whisper singing a brief series of songs.

All in all, another fantastic morning; wish I could have stayed longer.

br /Submitted from BirdLog NA for iOS, version 1.8
40 species

Canada Goose  1
Mourning Dove  1
Red-bellied Woodpecker  2
Hairy Woodpecker  1
Northern Flicker  1
Merlin  1
Willow Flycatcher  1 Calling, SE corner.
Eastern Kingbird  1
Philadelphia Vireo  1 Non-vocal; foraging in North-central area. Bright 
creamy yellow individual, from throat all the way to undertail coverts.
Red-eyed Vireo  3 Each of these singers was chased down and verified to be 
a singing Red-eyed.
Blue Jay  3
American Crow  2
Black-capped Chickadee  1
Tufted Titmouse  1
Gray-cheeked Thrush  1 Giving repeated whispered high frequency 
thin-sounding 'splee-er' night flight calls, from small pine stand in NW 
corner. On the high frequency end for Gray-cheeked.
Swainson's Thrush  2 Two birds foraging in hawthorn treetops of 
North-central area; soft songs from one; drip or pip notes from both.
Wood Thrush  1 Singing; North-central and ravine edge areas
American Robin  3
Gray Catbird  11
European Starling  5

Tennessee Warbler  14 Active singing everywhere
Common Yellowthroat  2
American Redstart  1 Ad. male in treetops along creek near softball field
Cape May Warbler  2 Two adult males singing song variants; North-central 
area
Magnolia Warbler  8 Males singing throughout
Bay-breasted Warbler  5 2 females, 3 males; singing and foraging in 
hawthorn treetops in North-central area.
Blackburnian Warbler  2 singing male from NW corner Oak treetop and maple 
treetops; female observed in North-central area.
Yellow Warbler  3
Chestnut-sided Warbler  6 Singing mostly the alternate songs; throughout, 
but mostly on Northern half of Hawthorn Orchard
Blackpoll Warbler  12 Very active and singing everywhere along Northeast, 
North-central and Northwest areas
Canada Warbler  1 One adult male singing periodically from North-central 
area, visible from edge of North ravine trail as you look South.

Song Sparrow  4
White-throated Sparrow  1
Northern Cardinal  6
Rose-breasted Grosbeak  1
Indigo Bunting  1 Nice adult male singing and foraging in Hawthorn Orchard 
near Canada Warbler; North-central edge, visible from North ravine trail
Red-winged Blackbird  4
Brown-headed Cowbird  1
Baltimore Oriole  1 Only a single bird was heard by me today; moving 
through WNW area.
American Goldfinch  2

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23435801

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)

--
Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Field Applications Engineer
Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 607-254-1132
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com

[cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard: 12 May 2015 - Fantastic!

2015-05-12 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
I was delayed arriving here on such a great morning, but managed to bird here 
for a short while before needing to leave. I know I missed many good birds and 
numbers of birds that others have already posted about, or will be posting 
about. Most notable for me was the amazing quantity of CAPE MAY WARBLERS!!! I 
tallied at least 13 birds, but I suspect I was missing more. Of the 13+ there 
were 4+ females and 9+ males. There were also a solid 12+ TENNESSEE WARBLERS 
singing in almost every section of habitat available.

Here’s my eBird list:

Comments: This was a fantastic morning, though I only wish I had been able 
to get here sooner and spend much longer here on such a great day. Today may 
possibly have yielded one of the highest number of Cape May Warblers I've 
tallied at this location. It was difficult, due to their silence at times. Many 
observed foraging on the same branches together at the same time. Due to my 
late arrival time, I know I missed lots of good birds. Others reported having 
seen a roving flock of Bay-breasted Warblers and Blackburnian Warbler, Canada 
Warblers, Yellow-bellied Flycatcher, among others. Great day, following 
overnight rain storms. Given general North-type winds in the forecast, these 
guys may be returning to the Hawthorn Orchard to continue foraging over the 
next couple of days.

br /Submitted from BirdLog NA for iOS, version 1.8

37 species (+1 other taxa)

Turkey Vulture  2
Killdeer  1
Mourning Dove  2
Alder/Willow Flycatcher (Traill's Flycatcher)  1 SE Corner; non-vocal
Eastern Kingbird  4 Calling flyover group of four birds.
Red-eyed Vireo  2
Blue Jay  4
American Crow  2
Black-capped Chickadee  2
House Wren  1
Swainson's Thrush  1 Singing, middle North section
Wood Thrush  1
American Robin  2
Gray Catbird  17 Several, actively foraging everywhere; I'm sure I'm 
underestimating.
European Starling  2

Black-and-white Warbler  2 1 male, 1 female (SE corner, NE corner)
Tennessee Warbler  12 This may be an underestimate; actively singing from 
every spot. Males.
Common Yellowthroat  2
Cape May Warbler  13 This may be an underestimate; Most prevalent just 
inside SE edge; middle Western section; Northeast area; 4+ females, 9+ males; 
males singing variety of songs-types; lots of regular flight notes given 
(seet)
Magnolia Warbler  6 All males; singing.
Yellow Warbler  3
Chestnut-sided Warbler  5 Singing variety of songs.
Blackpoll Warbler  2 Singing and silent.
Black-throated Blue Warbler  1 singing; middle Northern section
Yellow-rumped Warbler  2

Song Sparrow  2
White-throated Sparrow  1 Middle Western section
White-crowned Sparrow  1 SE corner
Scarlet Tanager  1
Northern Cardinal  6
Rose-breasted Grosbeak  1
Indigo Bunting  2
Red-winged Blackbird  2
Common Grackle  2
Brown-headed Cowbird  1
Baltimore Oriole  6
House Finch  2
American Goldfinch  4

Sincerely,
Chris T-H

--
Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Field Applications Engineer
Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 607-254-1132
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

[cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard: 10 May 2015

2015-05-10 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Very pleasant morning with nice views of good birds. Met up with Jay McGowan 
and we slowly worked our way around the Hawthorn Orchard; later, I made another 
quick pass through, adding some individuals. This may yet become another 
memorable year at the Hawthorn Orchard, depending upon what happens over the 
next couple of nights. Tuesday morning has the potential to get really 
interesting, if the weather forecast holds true (stationary front across 
central NY), or it could be a dud…gotta love weather and migration forecasting.

Best birds were the BAY-BREASTED WARBLERS and CAPE MAY WARBLERS, as well as a 
single silently foraging PHILADELPHIA VIREO.

Hawthorn Orchard, Tompkins, US-NY
May 10, 2015 7:55 AM - 9:54 AM
Protocol: Traveling
2.0 mile(s)
Comments: Mostly w/ Jay McGowan, then one more solo pass through. br 
/Submitted from BirdLog NA for iOS, version 1.8
52 species (+1 other taxa)

Osprey  1
Red-tailed Hawk  1
Mourning Dove  2
Red-bellied Woodpecker  1
Downy Woodpecker  1
Merlin  2 Copulating (visible from NE corner, looking North to spruce-tops; 
they really like perching on the one spruce that has a dead branch extending 
out to the right)
Alder/Willow Flycatcher (Traill's Flycatcher)  1 SW corner, non-vocal.
Great Crested Flycatcher  1
Eastern Kingbird  1
Blue-headed Vireo  1
PHILADELPHIA VIREO  1 NE Corner. Non-vocal.
Red-eyed Vireo  2
Blue Jay  9
American Crow  3
Barn Swallow  1
Black-capped Chickadee  3
Tufted Titmouse  2
White-breasted Nuthatch  1
House Wren  2
Wood Thrush  2
American Robin  6
Gray Catbird  7
European Starling  8
Cedar Waxwing  2

Blue-winged Warbler  1 NE Corner
Tennessee Warbler  8 Throughout, singing loudly (7 ad male, 1 female)
Common Yellowthroat  2
Cape May Warbler  5 SE part of Hawthorn Orchard for the most part (1 ad 
male, 4 female)
Magnolia Warbler  4
Bay-breasted Warbler  6 NE and SE corners (5 ad male, 1 female)
Blackburnian Warbler  2
Yellow Warbler  4
Chestnut-sided Warbler  3
Blackpoll Warbler  2 South-Southeast region (2 ad males)
Yellow-rumped Warbler  1
Wilson's Warbler  2 One in NE ravine area, one in SE area (2 ad males)

Chipping Sparrow  2
Song Sparrow  6
White-throated Sparrow  2
Scarlet Tanager  2
Northern Cardinal  6
Rose-breasted Grosbeak  2
Indigo Bunting  2
Bobolink  2
Red-winged Blackbird  4
Eastern Meadowlark  1
Common Grackle  2
Brown-headed Cowbird  3
Baltimore Oriole  3
House Finch  1
Pine Siskin  1
American Goldfinch  9
House Sparrow  5
--
Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Field Applications Engineer
Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
W: 607-254-2418tel:607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740tel:607-351-5740   F: 
607-254-1132tel:607-254-1132
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

[cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard: 8 May 2015

2015-05-08 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Good morning!

I stopped by the Hawthorn Orchard this morning a tad later than yesterday.

Ran into Nancy, Holly and Tom, and Jackie and Phil.

Dynamic, relatively quiet, got quieter as the sun got higher and the heat began 
to intensify. Northeast corner around maple treetops seemed most active.

As noted in my comment below, the hawthorn flowers are about to pop, which is 
probably the earliest I’ve ever observed. As a result, this could make for some 
very interesting birding there in the coming week or two, as food resources 
intensify. We could use some rain, though.

Best birds were the CAPE MAY WARBLERS (early, there were two adult males in the 
top of the maple at the NE corner, which flew to the South; later, there were 
two adult males and a female which flew from the NE corner black walnut tree 
(?) into the maple treetops (in a South to Northeast direction) then all took 
flight and headed East toward East Hill Plaza), 1 NORTHERN PARULA (foraging in 
the Northeast corner), the 2 MERLINS in the spruces and white pines across 
Mitchell Street from the Hawthorn Orchard (perched and calling), and a single 
flyover COMMON LOON (for some reason, I always enjoy seeing high migrating 
Common Loons, with their distinctively direct and rubbery-winged flight).

Good birding!

Sincerely,
Chris T-H




Hawthorn Orchard, Tompkins, US-NY
May 8, 2015 8:15 AM - 9:29 AM
Protocol: Traveling
1.0 mile(s)
Comments: Hawthorns flowers about to pop. Near unprecedentedly early. 85-90 
degrees today. br /Submitted from BirdLog NA for iOS, version 1.8
45 species

Common Loon  1
Turkey Vulture  2
Killdeer  1
Red-bellied Woodpecker  1
Downy Woodpecker  2
Northern Flicker  1
Merlin  2
Warbling Vireo  1
Red-eyed Vireo  1
Blue Jay  19
American Crow  2
Barn Swallow  1
Black-capped Chickadee  5
Tufted Titmouse  2
House Wren  1
Wood Thrush  2
American Robin  5
Gray Catbird  8
Brown Thrasher  1
European Starling  6
Cedar Waxwing  1
Nashville Warbler  3
Common Yellowthroat  3
American Redstart  1
Cape May Warbler  3 2 ad males, 1 female
Northern Parula  1
Yellow Warbler  3
Chestnut-sided Warbler  1
Yellow-rumped Warbler  1
Chipping Sparrow  2
Song Sparrow  5
White-throated Sparrow  2
Scarlet Tanager  1
Northern Cardinal  2
Rose-breasted Grosbeak  1
Indigo Bunting  1
Bobolink  1
Red-winged Blackbird  6
Eastern Meadowlark  1
Common Grackle  3
Brown-headed Cowbird  3
Baltimore Oriole  1
House Finch  2
American Goldfinch  4
House Sparrow  3
--
Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Field Applications Engineer
Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 607-254-1132
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

[cayugabirds-l] Fwd: [GeneseeBirds-L] Montezuma area yesterday highlights. Carncross shorebirds

2015-04-27 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
FYI



Begin forwarded message:

From: Bird observations from western New York 
geneseebird...@geneseo.edumailto:geneseebird...@geneseo.edu
Subject: [GeneseeBirds-L] Montezuma area yesterday highlights. Carncross 
shorebirds
Date: April 27, 2015 at 12:59:18 PM EDT
To: geneseebird...@geneseo.edumailto:geneseebird...@geneseo.edu
Reply-To: geneseebird...@geneseo.edumailto:geneseebird...@geneseo.edu

Carncross Road corn field: 75+ Greater, 6 Lesser Yellowlegs, 5 Dunlin, 18 Snipe 
(mostly at east end-probably many more). 1 Sandhill Crane.

Shorebird Flats: 1 Trumpeter Swan, 2 Greater Yellowlegs

Morgan Road: 1 Virginia Rail replying to a Pied-billed Grebe, 1 Trumpeter Swan

Knox-Marcellus Marsh: A lot of habitat for 1 Dunlin, 1 Greater Yellowlegs, 1 
pr. Common Mergansers, many Shoveler and GW Teal. Some Wigeon and Gadwall. 5 
Black-crowned Night Herons roosting in trees in the SW corner behind the house 
with the pond. Very difficult to see. Look east down the row of bluebird houses 
on the house property line.

Visitor center: 37 Caspian terns, 1 American Bittern flew up from the marsh 
west of the visitor center pond.  Nice numbers of BW Teal and Common gallinule 
around wildlife drive. 1 muskrat house alone had a nesting Canada Goose a pair 
of canvasback and a pair of ring-necks, all sleeping.

Gravel road south of route 318 in flooded field: 16 Greater Yellowlegs and I 
Snipe.
  Mike and Joann tetlow
___
GeneseeBirds-L mailing list  -  
geneseebird...@geneseo.edumailto:geneseebird...@geneseo.edu
https://mail.geneseo.edu/mailman/listinfo/geneseebirds-l

--
Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Field Applications Engineer
Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 607-254-1132
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

[cayugabirds-l] ADMIN: Location, location, location!

2015-04-25 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Good afternoon!

As a reminder, it is better to provide too much location information than not 
enough. Many of the subscribers, especially those who more regularly contribute 
sighting information to this eList, may be familiar with local or colloquial 
nomenclature; however, there are almost 900 subscribed email addresses to 
Cayugabirds-L. What this means, is that there are likely hundreds of users who 
read short postings with little or no information about how to get to a 
location where a bird was seen.

For future postings, please be a little more clear about where a sighting 
occurred relative to a nearby city, town, village, hamlet, or crossroads. This 
will become especially important as spring migration gets into full swing and 
there are lots of sightings to report and similarly lots of lurkers who want to 
go see these birds or bird at these birding locations.

Thanks very much and good birding!!

Sincerely,
Chris T-H

--
Chris Tessaglia-Hymes
Listowner, Cayugabirds-L
Ithaca, New York
c...@cornell.edumailto:c...@cornell.edu
Cayugabirds-L – 
Archiveshttp://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
Cayugabirds-L – Welcome and 
Basicshttp://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
Cayugabirds-L – Rules and 
Informationhttp://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
Cayugabirds-L – Subscribe, Configuration and 
Leavehttp://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

[cayugabirds-l] Renwick/Fall Creek Gnatcatchers (Monday)

2015-04-22 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
I haven’t seen this mentioned yet, so I thought I’d post it: on Monday late 
afternoon, there were two Blue-gray Gnatcatchers calling repeatedly and softly 
from a couple different treetop locations along Fall Creek, upstream from the 
green footbridge over Fall Creek, in the Stewart Park and Renwick area (City of 
Ithaca).

Good birding!

Sincerely,
Chris T-H

--
Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Field Applications Engineer
Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 607-254-1132
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

  1   2   3   >