[cayugabirds-l] out of basin warblers

2016-10-22 Thread Jody W Enck
Hello Cayuga Birders,

This week it has been my great pleasure to encounter some of our favorite birds 
of summer: numerous species of warblers, flycatchers, vireos, orioles, etc.  
No, it wasn’t around my house.  It was while visiting Honduras to start 
establishing sister birding club linkages between North and Central America.  
If you are interested in knowing a little about the birding culture, birds, and 
“wintering” habitat of some of our birds of summer, you can follow along on my 
blog over at www.modelbirder.blogspot.com<http://www.modelbirder.blogspot.com>.

Many thanks to members of the Cayuga Bird Club and the Lab of Ornithology for 
sending along some birding items to donate to clubs in Honduras.

Enjoy the birds of winter!
Jody

Jody W. Enck, PhD
Conservation Social Scientist, and
President of the Cayuga Bird Club


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[cayugabirds-l] Bring items to Club meeting to donate to Honduran birders

2016-10-09 Thread Jody W Enck
Hello Cayuga Birders,

  If you have any used, but working, binoculars or other birding 
equipment that you are willing to donate to birders in Honduras, please bring 
them to the Cayuga Bird Club meeting tomorrow night (Monday October 10th).  I 
am heading south on Tuesday, am I’m willing to carry down some items to donate 
to bird clubs in Honduras.  If you want to learn more about my trip to Honduras 
to try to establish sister birding clubs between North and Central America, or 
want to support some aspect of this effort, please email me privately at 
presid...@cayugabirdclub.org<mailto:presid...@cayugabirdclub.org>.

Thanks
Jody

Jody W. Enck, PhD
Conservation Social Scientist, and
President of the Cayuga Bird Club


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RE: [cayugabirds-l] Cayuga Bird Club Meeting- October 10

2016-10-07 Thread Jody W Enck
Hello Cayuga Birders,

Just to follow-up on Laura’s message about the Cayuga Bird Club meeting Monday 
night…

This meeting is our annual meeting where we hold officer elections.  Please see 
the most recent newsletter on our website at 
www.cayugabirdclub.org<http://www.cayugabirdclub.org> for the slate of 
candidates and their profiles.  All members who have paid their dues this fall 
are eligible to vote at the meeting.

One more reminder: the Club is exploring the idea of establishing sister 
birding clubs between here in North America and clubs in Central America where 
some of “our” birds of summer spend most of the year (up to seven months there, 
compared to maybe three or so here on the breeding grounds.  I leave Tuesday 
for Honduras to meet with birding clubs there to discuss this idea.  Please 
follow along on my blog 
www.modelbirder.blogspot.com<http://www.modelbirder.blogspot.com> as I 
chronicle this journey.  Plus, it’s not too late to support my in-country 
travel when I am in Honduras through my campaign at 
www.gofundme.com/2hra68nv<http://www.gofundme.com/2hra68nv>.

I look forward to seeing many of you at the meeting Monday night.

Jody

Jody W. Enck, PhD
Conservation Social Scientist, and
President of the Cayuga Bird Club

From: Laura Stenzler<mailto:l...@cornell.edu>
Sent: Thursday, October 6, 2016 9:43 PM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L<mailto:cayugabird...@list.cornell.edu>
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Cayuga Bird Club Meeting- October 10


Hi all,

 Monday, October 10, is the next meeting of the Cayuga Bird Club at the Lab of 
Ornithology in Ithaca.


Speaker:  Bob McGuire, Nature Recordist
Title: Matinicus Rocks!
Description: Bob will share his week on Matinicus Rock, 20 miles off the coast 
of Maine, home to a large variety of seabirds, including puffins, razorbills, 
guillemots, common and arctic terns, Leach’s storm-petrels and some surprises. 
Photos, videos, and sound files from a trip that he will never forget!

FOLLOWED BY a brief update by Rose Borzik on PROJECT PUFFIN.

The meeting is FREE and open to the public. Doors close when the room is full, 
so arrive on time!



Laura Stenzler
l...@cornell.edu
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[cayugabirds-l] Developing sister birding clubs to help protect neotropical migrants

2016-09-23 Thread Jody W Enck
Hello All,


 The Cayuga Bird Club has started an effort to establish a network of 
sister birding clubs in North and Central America linking the migratory 
pathways of neotropical songbirds.  Many of the colorful and familiar "Birds of 
Summer" that we enjoy so much in North America during the breeding season 
(e.g., think Wood Thrush and Golden-winged Warbler) are experiencing big 
decreases in their populations.  Among many factors are loss of habitat on the 
breeding and wintering areas.  While those of us in North America are aware of 
the general population declines for many neotropical migrants, Birding clubs in 
Central America are more aware and knowledgeable of the situation on the ground 
in their countries. Some of the benefits of establishing sister birding clubs 
is to share information, pictures, and stories with each other about what the 
habitat threats and situations are like, and what people on the "other end" of 
the migratory pathway can do or need help doing.



 As president of the Cayuga Bird Club, I have contacted many birding clubs 
and Audubon Society chapters in NY and PA about the idea, and interest here in 
North America is high.  I will be traveling to Honduras later this fall to 
participate in the Honduras Birding Tour for Conservation (HBTC).  The HBTC is 
an effort to bring awareness to both the plight of birds in Honduras as well as 
the opportunities for tourists to experience the amazing bird life of that 
Central American country.  I also plan to meet with as many of the six existing 
birding clubs in Honduras as possible to discuss the sister birding club idea.  
He have made contacts with someone from most of those clubs, which are 
scattered around a country the size of Virginia.  Lacking any professional or 
institutional support for this effort, I have started a Go Fund Me campaign 
(www.gofundme.com/2rha68nv<http://www.gofundme.com/2rha68nv>) to raise funds to 
support my travel within Honduras to visit these clubs.



 Please consider making a donation to support this effort (even $5 or $10 
donations can help!).  Also, please contact me by email at 
presid...@cayugabirdclub.org if you are interested in knowing more about this 
effort or want to help in some other way.



Thanks so much!

Jody W. Enck, PhD
Conservation Social Scientist, and
President of the Cayuga Bird Club


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[cayugabirds-l] Cayuga Bird Club at Migration Celebration

2016-09-08 Thread Jody W Enck
Hello Cayuga Birders,

By now, you’ve all seen the notices of Migration Celebration happening at the 
Lab of Ornithology on Saturday the 17th of September.  The Cayuga Bird Club 
will be hosting a Club table at the Celebration.  If you are willing to help 
out by sitting at the table and answering any basic questions about the Club 
that day (for a two-hour shift), please email me as soon as possible.

Many Club members will be participating in the Muckrace up at Montezuma 
National Wildlife Refuge that day, so we need as many helpers to be at 
Migration Celebration as possible.

Thanks in advance, and see you at the Club meeting on Monday the 12th.

Jody

Jody W. Enck, PhD
Conservation Social Scientist
and
President, Cayuga Bird Club


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RE: [cayugabirds-l] Downy WP behavior

2016-08-12 Thread Jody W Enck
Hi Sara and all,

I have an oriole feeder with three ports, and have had a Downy Woodpecker 
drinking from it for about 6 weeks now.  Earlier this week, a female 
Ruby-throated Hummingbird was also drinking from it (and chasing away anything 
that got too close.  This morning a Black-capped Chickadee stopped by for a 
drink.  Yesterday, I finally got pictures of an actual Baltimore Oriole 
drinking from the oriole feeder.

Lots of fun for me.  Maybe not so much for the birds.
Jody

Jody W. Enck, PhD
Conservation Social Scientist
and
President, Cayuga Bird Club

From: Sara Jane Hymes<mailto:s...@cornell.edu>
Sent: Friday, August 12, 2016 10:16 AM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L<mailto:cayugabird...@list.cornell.edu>
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Downy WP behavior

Recently we have been seeing something we've never had occur at our feeders 
before.  A Downy Woodpecker has become a regular visitor to our hummingbird 
feeders!  Our H-bird feeders are of the 'flat' square variety attaching to 
window, and a round variety-but flat surface-hanging from a porch.  Anyway, we 
were surprised to see a woodpecker (tending to usually be a female) actively 
feeding from the feeder.  At first I thought the Downy might be getting 
insects, but then I could see the liquid moving-and realized it was actually 
sipping the nectar!!  We do have a 'dripping' bird bath water supply, but I 
guess it is just not enough for the Downy.  Has anyone else been having this 
occur at their h-bird feeders during this dry summer?
--

Sara Jane Hymes


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[cayugabirds-l] Annual Cayuga Bird Club picnic tomorrow

2016-06-12 Thread Jody W Enck
Hello Everyone,

Just a reminder that the annual picnic will be Monday the 13th at Myers Park in 
Lansing.  Please plan to arrive between 6 and 6:30pm.  Here is the announcement 
from the Club website:

The annual dish-to-pass dinner will be held at Myers Park in Lansing. Bring a 
generous dish to share—main dish, appetizer, or dessert. Also bring your own 
place setting, something to drink, and binoculars. There will be a short bird 
walk after dinner. Come meet and socialize with your fellow bird club members!

I am offering to drive with anyone who wants to carpool with me.  Please email 
me directly if you are interested.

thanks
Jody


Jody W. Enck, PhD
Public Engagement in Science
Cornell Lab of Ornithology


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[cayugabirds-l] Bobolink

2016-05-24 Thread Jody W Enck
Hello Everyone,

Heard/saw my first-of-year Bobolink (just one) singing/displaying just to the 
west of the pond near the Bee Lab off of Freese Road this evening about 7:30pm.

Nice to hear its jingle again.
Jody

Jody W. Enck, PhD
Public Engagement in Science
Cornell Lab of Ornithology


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[cayugabirds-l] More Sapsucker Natural History

2016-05-15 Thread Jody W Enck
I want to share two more observations I’ve made of Yellow-bellied Sapsucker 
behavior near their nest, which is easily visible from my stationary eBird 
count in the woods beside my house.  The first is from one of my counts during 
yesterday’s Global Big Day.

I have had the fortune of watching this pair stake out a territory and then 
excavate their nest only about 20 yards away from my count location.  Twice 
during my many observations of the nest, I believe I observed the female enter 
the finished cavity and probably deposit an egg.  I have seen them switch 
incubation or nest-security duties since incubation started.

Here is the entry I made to my eBird report yesterday afternoon:

At 1546, male flew to nest cavity. Female emerged, and pair flew just 5m to a 
branch where they copulated. Male flew to cavity and entered at 1549. Then at 
1553, he sat with head just sticking out of entrance. Female was off to west 
foraging in oaks. She returned to the nest at 1557, and replaced male in nest.

Here is the entry I made to my eBird report from this morning.

Male started count period in nest cavity with just head sticking out of 
entrance (at 0830). Female flew in from west at 0842 and switched places with 
male. At 0852, male approached from west and landed 10m away from nest where he 
issued several soft mew calls. He flew to the nest cavity at 0853 and looked 
inside. Female appeared at cavity entrance, looked from side to side (several 
time), and disappeared back inside. Male flew off again. He returned at 0858 
and sat preening at entrance to nest until end of count period.


I loved participating in the Global Big Day yesterday, and submitted 9 
checklists from various places, including my house, around the Lab of O, and 
down around Stewart Park.  I thoroughly enjoyed running into many friends and 
strangers alike who were out birding yesterday.  But, I find it hard to tear 
myself away from my local patch and its common birds when they have so much to 
teach me about their lives.

Enjoy the day
Jody

Jody W. Enck, PhD
Public Engagement in Science
Cornell Lab of Ornithology


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[cayugabirds-l] Yellow-bellied Sapsucker behavior around a nest

2016-05-10 Thread Jody W Enck
Hi All,

 Every once in a while I am fortunate enough to be able to conduct a 
30-minute stationary count during mid-day at a point in about the middle of the 
woods adjacent to my house.  Today was one of those days, and my count was the 
47th half-hour count at that site since the beginning of April.  I have seen a 
lot of that 23.5 hours of observation at the same place in the woods over the 
last five-plus week.  I want to pass along a bit of natural history I observed 
today.

 I’ve had the great fortune of watching a pair of Yellow-bellied Sapsuckers 
establish a territory that virtually centers on my point count location.  Over 
the course of about two weeks, I watched as they took turns excavating a new 
cavity on a Red Maple branch that already had eight woodpecker holes in it.  
Indeed, they chased away a pair of White-breasted Nuthatches that seemed to 
want to use one of the smaller holes on the back side of the branch.  The new 
Sapsucker cavity was constructed on the branch facing my count point and only 
about 20 yards away.

 As excavation neared completion, I almost laughed out loud watching the 
male appear from inside the cavity with mouthfuls of woodchips, spit them out 
in a shower, and disappear back inside for another mouthful.  In addition to 
watching nest excavation, I have witnessed neat interactions between the pair, 
including lots and lots of soft mews and other vocalizations I doubt I had ever 
heard.  Twice I witnessed the female visit the presumably completed nest, 
disappear inside for a couple of minutes and then depart again.  Once, she sat 
just outside the cavity and preened for over 10 minutes before going inside for 
a couple minutes, then emerging and flying away.  Perhaps she was laying an egg 
at those times.

 Today, I did my count from 1:45 to 2:15pm.  At 1:57, I saw the female 
emerge from the cavity (I did not know she was in there), and fly to a tree 
about 50 yards away.  She defecated almost on top of me as she flew over my 
head, suggesting to me that she might have been in the cavity for a while.  
When she landed, she issued on soft mew call that was returned from somewhere 
just out of site in another direction.  After two minutes, the male flew to the 
cavity, looked inside, then flew away out of view.  At 2:06, the female return 
and sat preening right outside the nest cavity.  Then at 2:10 she disappeared 
inside the nest.

 May there nest be successful.

Jody Enck
President of the Cayuga Bird Club


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[cayugabirds-l] Golden-winged Warbler at 1504 Hanshaw

2016-05-08 Thread Jody W Enck
In my apple tree as of 2:05pm.  Park in my driveway and come around back.  
Apple tree is the one to the right (outside) of the split rail fence – just 
beyond the pear tree.

Jody

Jody W. Enck, PhD
Public Engagement in Science
Cornell Lab of Ornithology


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[cayugabirds-l] FW: Waterfront Cleanup_Saturday, May 7 from 9 - 11am. 

2016-05-06 Thread Jody W Enck
Hello Birders, if you love Stewart Park as a place to go enjoy birds, please 
consider helping out on Saturday morning at the annual spring clean-up.  See 
the note below for more details.  Its fun, its easy, and it shows how much 
pride we have in our local birding haunts.

Jody Enck
President of Cayuga Bird Club




The Latest News from Stewart Park & the Waterfront Trail
[https://gallery.mailchimp.com/053e19caac1336caf0d731bc4/images/5465e73a-131b-4478-a0fd-bfa1aba76106.jpg]
Waterfront Cleanup_Saturday, May 7, 9 - 11am
Meet at Stewart Park Large Pavilion Parking Area
Join the Friends of Stewart Park and the Waterfront Trail for an hour or two of 
gardening and little pickup in Stewart Park and along the Waterfront Trail.  
Contact Rick for more information or specific 
assignments, or see you on Saturday morning.   Bring gloves, plastic bags and 
your favorite gardening tools.













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Friends of Stewart Park · 101 East State St. · #222 · Ithaca, NY 14850 · USA





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[cayugabirds-l] Saturday birding

2016-04-16 Thread Jody W Enck
A small group of interested birders, including a youngster less than 10 
years-old, joined me for a beginner bird walks this morning down at Stewart 
Park.  By good fortune, we ran into Chris Tessaglia-Hymes who joined us for the 
whole hour.  I really appreciated his extra eyes and ears.  Overall, bird 
diversity and abundance was generally lower compared to two weeks ago when I 
last led a group down there.  Still, it is always interesting when first an 
immature Bald Eagle cruises by and lands in a tree across Fall Creek only to be 
spotted by an adult eagle.  The adult chased the younger bird from the tree and 
both grappled a bit before the adult seemingly settled the matter.  Later as we 
were ending, three Osprey came by and tried to harass the now perched adult 
eagle, but to little avail.

Driving home I saw the intrepid Tom Schullenburg looking for migrants high and 
low in the sky from the end of his driveway along Hanshaw road.  I’ll let him 
post his highlights if he is so moved.

In early afternoon, I did a half-hour stationary count in the woods beside my 
house and spotted a first-of-the-year-for-me Blue-headed Vireo hawking for 
insects.

If you are sitting inside reading this, you really should get outside and enjoy 
the day!
Jody


Jody W. Enck, PhD
Public Engagement in Science
Cornell Lab of Ornithology


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[cayugabirds-l] Fw: [clo-l] Monday Night Seminar - Spotlight on Young Bird Researchers

2016-03-19 Thread Jody W Enck
Hi All, please take note of the next Monday night seminar hosted by the Lab of 
Ornithology.  Hope to see many of you there.
Jody

Jody W. Enck, PhD
Public Engagement in Science Program
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
607-254-2471

From: Lisa M Kopp<mailto:lk...@cornell.edu>
Sent: ?Thursday?, ?March? ?17?, ?2016 ?10?:?53? ?AM
To: CLO-L<mailto:cl...@list.cornell.edu>

Hello all,

The next Monday Night Seminar is on March 21st at 7:30pm, and features Conor 
Taff, Sahas Barve, and Taylor Heaton Crisologo. Hope to see many of you there, 
and please spread the word!
As always, the seminars are free and open to the public. The doors open at 
7:00.  This coming Monday, we will once again be streaming the seminar live. Be 
sure to bookmark http://dl.allaboutbirds.org/cornelllab-monday-night-seminars 
for quick access on Monday evening.

Spotlight on Young Bird Researchers

Speakers: Conor Taff, postdoctoral associate, Cornell Lab; Sahas Barve, Cornell 
Ph.D. candidate; Taylor Heaton Crisologo, Cornell undergraduate.

Join us for this special Monday Night Seminar showcasing three outstanding 
young researchers and ornithologists. Conor Taff, a postdoctoral associate at 
the Cornell Lab, will talk about the elaborate songs and plumage of male Common 
Yellowthroats and how these traits evolved over time. Ph.D. candidate Sahas 
Barve is an avid birder and exceptional ornithologist from India. He'll discuss 
his work on the coping mechanisms birds use to survive high in the Himalayas. 
Then, Cornell undergraduate Taylor Heaton Crisologo will spotlight the 
strategies used by Herring Gulls to defend their nests and protect their chicks.

--
See upcoming seminar speakers and topics at 
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/Page.aspx?pid=1579

-
Lisa Kopp
Visitor Experience Manager
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road
Ithaca, NY 14850
lk...@cornell.edu
T: 607-254-2174
F: 607-254-2111


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[cayugabirds-l] Cayuga Bird Club meeting tonight

2016-03-14 Thread Jody W Enck
Hi All,

A quick reminder that there is a Club meeting this evening at 7:30pm in the 
auditorium at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.  After a bit of business, we’ll 
hear from Dr. Anastasia Dalziell about her fascinating research on 
vocalizations of Superb Lyrebirds.

Since the Club’s last meeting, there has been a lot of communication between 
the Club and the City of Ithaca with respect to broad ideas for enhancing 
Stewart Park as a must-visit destination for birds and birders.  The meeting 
tonight will be the first official opportunity for me to share some of the 
things being discussed and to provide opportunities for Club members to get 
involved (see my President’s column in the March newsletter for heads-up 
opportunities).

For now, let me just say that the City is committed to making Stewart Park not 
only a fun destination for local residents, but a place that is particularly 
bird- and birder-friendly.  Rick Manning and others from the City will be 
speaking at our May meeting and will be seeking ideas at that time from the 
Club about a broad management planning effort focused on Stewart Park.

Please come to the Club meeting tonight for a bit more information.  Here are 
some highlights.


  *
Restoration of the stone overlook at the Fuertes Bird Sanctuary (“Swan Pen”).
  *
Focus on native plants and habitat restoration for birds and other wildlife, 
which may include removal of non-native, invasive species.
  *
Development of a schedule of regular public bird walks at the Park.
  *
Development of a plan for on-site nature-based educational opportunities.
  *
Development and implementation of a comprehensive goose-management plan for the 
southern end of Cayuga Lake, including opportunities for Club members to help 
with population estimates, nest searches, and other data gathering activities.

Finally,  check out this link, which will take you to an announcement for a 
fund-raiser to be held in April promoting the idea that Stewart Park is for the 
BIrds.
https://www.facebook.com/events/231796423836351/

I hope many of your on this listserv are able to attend tonight’s meeting of 
the Cayuga Bird Club.

Jody Enck
President, Cayuga Bird Club



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Re: [cayugabirds-l] working on response to City

2016-03-13 Thread Jody W Enck
Hi Dave,
Thanks for your thoughtful attention to this matter.  I was going to write 
sooner in response to your initial note, but have been dealing with an injury 
that has taken much of my attention.  I will write a more extensive note soon.  
But for now, let me just point out that the Club already has been heavily 
involved in working with the City on several issues related to Stewart Park, 
including the goose management plan.  I encourage you to please hold off on 
your efforts until you hear the complete story.  I’ll plan to spend some time 
on the topic at the meeting tomorrow.

Thanks
Jody
Cayuga Bird Club President


From: Dave Nutter
Sent: ‎Sunday‎, ‎March‎ ‎13‎, ‎2016 ‎9‎:‎52‎ ‎PM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L

At the suggestion of some bird club members I am drafting a resolution to bring 
before the Cayuga Bird Club meeting tomorrow night asking the City of Ithaca  
to halt its plans to ban feeding waterfowl, to haze geese on City land and 
water, and to disrupt nesting. Reasons are several and may include:

The process was wrong. The recent “stakeholders” meeting did not include a 
particularly interested, knowledgeable, and passionate group, namely local bird 
enthusiasts such as the Cayuga Bird Club. The one time we were included it 
seemed that participants agreed to try habitat modification to make areas 
unattractive for geese which are prime areas for human use and where it is 
especially desirable not to have goose droppings. We believe this would be 
least expensive and most effective in the long run as well as least disruptive 
to the peaceful atmosphere of City Parks. However, this appears not to have 
been done and instead it appears that a Parks Commission subcommittee has since 
taken an entirely different course without the participation of this 
stakeholder group, and the Planning and Economic Development Committee of 
Common Council intends to rapidly push it through despite numerous and serious 
flaws.

Renwick Wildwood Sanctuary on the south side of Stewart Park was created as a 
bird sanctuary through the work of the Cayuga Bird Club. The Fuertes Sanctuary 
in the west end of Stewart Park was created as a waterfowl sanctuary in honor 
of renowned artist and beloved Cayuga Bird Club President Louis Agassiz 
Fuertes. The shallow south end of Cayuga Lake is an important area for 
waterfowl of many species during migrations and winter, while a few individuals 
may remain over the summer as well. A significant portion of the population of 
one species of duck, the Redhead, winters on Cayuga Lake, and it is common to 
see flocks of thousands of them from Stewart Park. Canada Geese are the most 
easily recognized waterfowl by the lay-public, but there are two 
similar-looking species of goose, as well as several different looking goose 
species. It is entirely inappropriate to harass waterfowl in the Steawrt Park 
area. We also believe it is wrong to promote or institute as an official policy 
the harassment of birds. Canada Geese are not dangerous like rabid raccoons; 
geese stick out their tongues and hiss when people threaten their young. Canada 
Geese don’t wreck cars, destroy food gardens or ornamental plants, or wipe out 
the understory of forests like deer do; geese just eat grass, perhaps even 
saving the City money on mowing.

Stewart Park is an especially wonderful place to view a great variety of 
waterfowl species from many parts of North America, sometimes at very close 
range and among Canada Geese on land or in the water. The habituation of the 
local waterfowl to people can bring other species closer. It is not unnatural 
that birds tolerate people when people are not mean to them; rather it is to be 
celebrated. This is a wonderful education opportunity which connects people to 
wildlife, emphasizes our ecological connectedness to other places, and promotes 
conservation. Harassment of geese will not only be unpleasant to people, it is 
apt to disrupt the activities of other species of birds as well, including 
Common Mergansers, Hooded Mergansers, Wood Ducks, and Mallards which also nest 
feed, display, and raise young locally.

We have no evidence that feeding waterfowl is a problem, that it happens often 
or in great quantity, that it contributes significantly to the birds’ diet or 
the amount of poop they create, or that it creates any health problem. However, 
what little feeding which occurs can be very educational and create a lasting 
positive feeling toward wildlife. Stopping feeding will not stop the geese from 
coming to the parks to eat the grass, which they do daily. While we support the 
City using the Ithaca Police Department to enforce its ban on shooting on City 
land and water and keeping guns out of Stewart Park, we do not support using 
police resources to ticket someone feeding birds in Stewart Park, such as a kid 
with a bag of popcorn or a family with a loaf of bread, which are harmless 

[cayugabirds-l] Red-winged Blackbirds

2016-02-21 Thread Jody W Enck
Hi All,

Just had 14 Red-winged Blackbirds (all males, but in various examples of 
transitional plumage) show up at my feeders at 1504 Hanshaw Road, Ithaca as of 
1pm.  I suspect the Lab’s feeders will be swamped with them soon if they are 
not already.  Has early March arrived in late February?

Good Birding

Jody W. Enck, PhD
Public Engagement in Science Program
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
607-254-2471


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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Ithaca count notes & questions

2016-01-02 Thread Jody W Enck
Hi All, just a follow-up to Dave's posts about the Christmas Bird Count.  I had 
the pleasure of having Nick Reynolds from the Ithaca Journal join me for over 
an hour of counting yesterday morning.  He posted the following article on the 
Journal's webpage.  A little too much focus on me for my taste, but I am glad 
to see the Club and the count getting some nice press.

Enjoy
Jody


 
http://www.ithacajournal.com/story/news/local/2016/01/01/yearly-outing-christmas-bird-count/78181962/

Jody W. Enck, PhD
Public Engagement in Science Program
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
607-254-2471

From: Dave Nutter<mailto:nutter.d...@mac.com>
Sent: ?Saturday?, ?January? ?2?, ?2016 ?8?:?55? ?AM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L<mailto:cayugabird...@list.cornell.edu>

Note that Tom Schulenberg heard a Fish Crow at his house on Hanshaw Rd, but I 
don't know if that should affect the total.
I neglected to mention that 1,185 Dark-eyed Juncos was a new high count.
About the species discovered by single parties, I'd like to make sure I get the 
names of all initial observers and an accurate description of the location, 
including the town where the birds were first found. I know I lack that some of 
this information. In particular:
Kevin, where did you first find the Long-tailed Ducks?
Who first found the Red-breasted Merganser and where? I first learned of it 
from Jay who was with Livia, but that was around 2pm, and Kevin may have found 
it earlier.
Kevin, where did you find the Red-throated Loon?
Scott Sutcliffe, where did you find the Pied-billed Grebe, and who else was 
with you?
Colleen, was the Short-eared Owl on the west side of Scofield Rd (Lansing) or 
the east side (Groton) or both?
Scott Haber, where was your Merlin observation?
Please let me know if any other info in the list below seems wrong or lacking.
Wow, what a bunch of OCD questions! Thanks for putting up with my efforts to 
get consistent data.
--Dave Nutter

* * * *

GRESCA 0101 Ken Rosenberg, Bill Howe Stewart Pk, Ithaca
LESSCA 0101 Ken Rosenberg, Bill Howe Stewart Pk, Ithaca
LOTDUC 0101 Kevin McGowan Cayuga L, Lansing?
REBMER 0101 Jay McGowan, Livia Santana East Shore Pk, Ithaca
RETLOO 0101 Kevin McGowan E Cayuga L, ?
PIBGRE 0101 Scott Sutcliffe Treman Marina, Ithaca?
HORGRE 0101 Ken Rosenberg, Bill Howe Stewart Pk, Ithaca
GTUHER 0101 Mark Witmer Ithaca Reservoir, Ithaca
ROLHAW 0101 Joe Wetmore, Karen Edelstein Lansing Ctr Trl, Lansing
SHEOWL 0101 Colleen Richards, Kathy Strickland N end Scofield Rd, 
Lansing/Groton
MERLIN 0101 Scott Haber Lansing Village Greenway?, Lansing
NORSHR 0101 Jill Vaughan Triphammer Terr & Hillcrest Rd, Lansing
FISCRO 0101 Kevin McGowan; Tom Schulenberg CU compost, Stevenson 
Rd, Dryden; Hanshaw Rd, Ithaca
WINWRE 0101 Ken Rosenberg, Bill Howe Jetty Woods, Ithaca
RUCKIN 0101 Kevin McGowan Portland Pt Rd, Lansing
HERTHR 0101 Connie O'Brien, Annette Finney Leonard Rd & Bald Hill 
Sch Rd, Caroline
YERWAR 0101 Kevin McGowan Portland Pt Rd, Lansing
FIESPA 0101 John Fitzpatrick Cascdilla Cr, Dryden
FOXSPA 0101 Tom Schulenberg Liddell Lab pond, Freese Rd, Dryden
COMGRA 0101 Lisa, Bill, & Sandy Podulka Caroline Depot Rd & 
Lackawanna Rd, Caroline

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RE: [cayugabirds-l] Red-headed Woodpecker at Fairhaven SP

2015-07-27 Thread Jody W Enck
Hello Marc,

One idea is to check out eBird.  Go to Explore a Region (choose a state or even 
a county within a state along your route), and you'll get a map with stick pins 
showing hotspots where people have been reporting checklists.  Alternatively, 
if you have some target birds you want to try to see, go to Find a Species, and 
type in the name of the bird.  You'll get a map with stickpins showing where 
that species has been reported.  You can narrow your search by date.  For 
example, just choose the current month, and the map will show sites where the 
species has been reported in just this calendar month for this year.

Hope that helps.
Jody

-Original Message-
From: bounce-119483214-3493...@list.cornell.edu 
[mailto:bounce-119483214-3493...@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Rustici, Marc
Sent: Monday, July 27, 2015 8:06 AM
To: mgul...@rochester.rr.com; CAYUGABIRDS-L cayugabird...@list.cornell.edu
Subject: RE: [cayugabirds-l] Red-headed Woodpecker at Fairhaven SP

Good Morning,

Sorry to attach to Michael's email but, I am new to the list.

I would greatly appreciate some help and advice.  I am planning a trip to 
Chicago in very early November.  I am considering driving so I can stop and do 
some birding.  Can someone advise as to what are the best places to bird along 
the way?  I have looked at the Indiana Audubon site but I was just able to 
obtain a list of sites not attached to a map (was not working).  Even with the 
map and site list I am hoping someone educated in the impact of migration on 
these sites.

Bottom line, where should I stop or is it too late in the migration?

Thanks so much.

Marc C. RusticiFHFMA, CPA
VP of Finance
Arnot Health Inc
(607) 737-4507

-Original Message-
From: bounce-119480938-62610...@list.cornell.edu 
[mailto:bounce-119480938-62610...@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of 
mgul...@rochester.rr.com
Sent: Sunday, July 26, 2015 2:16 AM
To: cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Red-headed Woodpecker at Fairhaven SP

 I observed a Red-headed Woodpecker at Fair Haven SP at 5:15pm 
yesterday(7-25-15). The bird was located at the eastern end of the beach area 
near the small field stone shed at the base of the hill. Other highlights 
included a Spotted Sandpiper and an Osprey.

Michael Gullo

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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Golden-cheeked Warbler

2015-07-10 Thread Jody W Enck
Sorry for the slow response folks.  I've been stuck in the Philly airport due 
to storm-cancelled flights.  Have to fly Philly to Chicago to Elmira and walk 
home from there because all flights from Philly to Ithaca are full today and 
tomorrow.

Bottom line re Golden-cheeked Warblers is that there are two competing 
estimates.  The low estimate is from a survey of public lands (Department of 
Defense -- Fort Hood, other federal lands and state lands).  Another estimate, 
although several years old at this point, surveyed private lands as well as 
public lands and estimated 10x the number of breeding pairs as the low 
estimate.  This information has been published in peer-reviewed scientific 
journals, and likely can be found using Google Scholar and searching on 
Golden-cheeked warbler population estimates.

Not trying to encourage or discourage anyone from signing the petition.  Just 
want folks to dig into the background to become more informed before deciding 
what to do.

Take care -- will be in airplanes rest of day and unable to respond any more.
Jody

Jody W. Enck, PhD
Public Engagement in Science Program
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
607-254-2471

From: Dave Nuttermailto:nutter.d...@me.com
Sent: ?Friday?, ?July? ?10?, ?2015 ?4?:?47? ?AM
To: jwe4@cornell. edumailto:j...@cornell.edu
Cc: oneidabi...@yahoogroups.commailto:oneidabi...@yahoogroups.com, 
CAYUGABIRDS-Lmailto:cayugabird...@list.cornell.edu, Judith 
Thurbermailto:jathur...@yahoo.com

So, Jody, what's the inside scoop on the population of Golden-cheeked Warblers? 
Does Travis Audubon have it right or wrong? Should they be removed from the 
Endangered Species list so that their habitat ceases to have protection and is 
open to development? Were they wrongly placed on the list? Has their situation 
greatly improved? Who hired your friend? What does he tell the media?

--Dave Nutter

On Jul 09, 2015, at 10:53 PM, Jody W Enck j...@cornell.edu wrote:

Hi all,
Just a word of caution:  petitions are easy to sign without knowing the whole 
back-story.  We've had this discussion several times before about looking into 
as much information as possible before signing something that may seem 
emotionally important without access to all the facts.  As it turns out, I had 
dinner last night in Baton Rouge, Louisiana with the biologist who did much of 
the population survey work on Golden-cheeked Warblers relatively recently.  He 
mentioned the moveon.orghttp://moveon.org petition and how his phone has been 
ringing off the hook from media inquiries.  Please get as much information as 
you can and become as informed as you can before just signing a petition.

Thanks,
Jody

Jody W. Enck, PhD
Public Engagement in Science Program
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
607-254-2471

From: Judith Thurbermailto:jathur...@yahoo.com
Sent: ?Thursday?, ?July? ?9?, ?2015 ?9?:?59? ?PM
To: oneidabi...@yahoogroups.commailto:oneidabi...@yahoogroups.com, 
CAYUGABIRDS-Lmailto:cayugabird...@list.cornell.edu


Do we promote this type of communication here?
Well, just in case:



https://www.change.org/p/united-states-fish-and-wildlife-service-reject-the-petition-submitted-june-29-2015-to-remove-the-golden-cheeked-warbler-from-the-list-of-endangered-species




Judy Thurber
Liverpool, NY
Sent from my iPad
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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Golden-cheeked Warbler

2015-07-09 Thread Jody W Enck
Hi all,
Just a word of caution:  petitions are easy to sign without knowing the whole 
back-story.  We've had this discussion several times before about looking into 
as much information as possible before signing something that may seem 
emotionally important without access to all the facts.  As it turns out, I had 
dinner last night in Baton Rouge, Louisiana with the biologist who did much of 
the population survey work on Golden-cheeked Warblers relatively recently.  He 
mentioned the moveon.org petition and how his phone has been ringing off the 
hook from media inquiries.  Please get as much information as you can and 
become as informed as you can before just signing a petition.

Thanks,
Jody

Jody W. Enck, PhD
Public Engagement in Science Program
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
607-254-2471

From: Judith Thurbermailto:jathur...@yahoo.com
Sent: ?Thursday?, ?July? ?9?, ?2015 ?9?:?59? ?PM
To: oneidabi...@yahoogroups.commailto:oneidabi...@yahoogroups.com, 
CAYUGABIRDS-Lmailto:cayugabird...@list.cornell.edu

Do we promote this type of communication here?
Well, just in case:



https://www.change.org/p/united-states-fish-and-wildlife-service-reject-the-petition-submitted-june-29-2015-to-remove-the-golden-cheeked-warbler-from-the-list-of-endangered-species



Judy Thurber
Liverpool, NY
Sent from my iPad
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[cayugabirds-l] Palm Wabler!

2015-04-17 Thread Jody W Enck
Hi all,

I walked out of work just before 4pm (front door of the Lab of Ornithology) and 
started walking on the Wilson trail south.  Just before entering the forest 
proper a flash of color caught my attention.  Imagine my pleasant surprise when 
it turned into a brightly colored Palm Warbler chasing insects.  I wasn’t 
expecting anything but maybe Yellow-rumped Warblers for a little while longer.  
A very nice way to start my weekend.

Jody

Jody W. Enck, PhD
Public Engagement in Science Program
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
607-254-2471


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Re: [cayugabirds-l] rare bird rant

2015-02-27 Thread Jody W Enck
Hello All,

  I was stimulated by Dave’s well-written email to offer an anti-rant 
.  (And, Dave, please keep your rants coming, because I do enjoy reading 
them!)  Maybe the fact that I don’t have a cell phone and rarely carry my 
little trac-fone with me says a lot about how I approach birding.  Encounters 
with birds, rare or common, are very personal for me.  I think it is great that 
others get so excited about chasing birds that others have reported, but that 
is not for me.  More importantly for me, I really don’t want to have a bunch of 
other birders (even my friends) show up and interfere with that very personal 
interaction.  If that is selfish, then I guess I’ll wear that label proudly.  I 
am a scientists (both ecological and social) and a conservationist, yet I am 
reluctant to submit my sightings to eBird because I don’t want my personal 
experiences to be treated as data by others.  I know I’m a bit weird about all 
this compared to most people.  I still have not chased the Tufted Duck, which 
I’ve never seen in my life.  There was a White-eyed Vireo on the other side of 
the Lab of O pond for three days a year or so ago and I never trekked the 150 
yards out to see it.  Please don’t think I am an anti-lister, either.  I 
recently was in CA for work and passed the 500 species in the US mark 
(Surfbird) pointed out to me by Brian Sullivan (along with my life Black-vented 
Shearwater, Common Murre,  Rhinoceros Auklet, and Pacific Loon -- see I do go 
birding with others sometimes!).  Soon after Brian left, I stumbled upon a bird 
I did not recognize other than to know it was some kind of sandpiper-ish bird.  
I sat for a half hour taking notes, drawing pictures, and taking a few 
pictures.  Then I had to go do work.  Later that night I was excited to find 
out that I had encountered a Wandering Tattler (#501 in the US for me; 
California Thrasher was my last new one at #502 and California Condor had been 
#489 ).  I did send Brian and a couple other CA birders a couple pictures for 
confirmation.  But, I was thrilled and felt a real sense of discovery because I 
encountered the bird on my own and had a half hour to really observe it by 
myself.  I know that is a very different experience than the ones desired by 
other birders.  And, I totally support Dave’s point of view and do encourage 
others to share their sightings if they want to.  Just please don’t expect me 
to want to !

Thanks Dave for stimulating this discussion.

Jody

Jody W. Enck, PhD
Public Engagement in Science Program
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
607-254-2471

From: Dave Nuttermailto:nutter.d...@me.com
Sent: ‎Friday‎, ‎February‎ ‎27‎, ‎2015 ‎4‎:‎59‎ ‎AM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-Lmailto:cayugabird...@list.cornell.edu


Hey, everybody!
I know seeing a rare bird is tremendously exciting, and I certainly wouldn't 
have wanted Mark to miss seeing the chase  interactions or getting those 
fantastic photos (plus congratulations on a fantastic life bird!). But please 
if at all possible before leaving a rare bird try to get word out on the text 
message rare bird alert system. If you are not on the text alert system, or 
don't want to take your eyes off the bird long enough to text about it, call 
someone else and have them put the word out. There were people in the field 
yesterday afternoon who also had been trying to find the Gyrfalcon and could've 
returned quickly. A Gyrfalcon was also seen two other times this winter with no 
text RBA sent out. But when Tim Lenz did get the word out after a few minutes 
of viewing at least 6 additional birders got to see it that morning.
Similarly the Tufted Duck has been quietly seen recently when there was a guy 
from out of town who was asking about it. I know it may seem like old news, but 
these are still rare birds that people would love to get a chance to see. 
Thanks.

--Dave Nutter
607-229-2158

On Feb 27, 2015, at 12:29 AM, M Miller mmiller...@hotmail.com wrote:

Just wanted to add that I first saw the gyrfalcon at 3 PM (thanks to the couple 
parked on Stahl Rd with a scope set up on it). It quickly flew south to land on 
the east side of Seybolt Rd (nabbing a duck dinner on it’s way) about 200 yards 
south of Stahl Rd. It stayed there for about 20 minutes, then flew back north a 
few hundred yards, and was still in the area when I left. Photos can be seen on 
the Eaton Birding Society facebook page.

Mark Miller


From: Scott Haber scotthab...@gmail.commailto:scotthab...@gmail.com
Date: February 26, 2015 at 4:41:52 PM EST
To: nysbird...@cornell.edumailto:nysbird...@cornell.edu 
nysbird...@cornell.edumailto:nysbird...@cornell.edu
Subject: Re: [nysbirds-l] Gyrfalcon
Reply-To: Scott Haber scotthab...@gmail.commailto:scotthab...@gmail.com

I neglected to mention that Mark got some awesome photos of the Gyr nabbing a 
Mallard in flight, and then fighting off two Red-tailed Hawks trying to claim 
the carcass on the ground. The photos can be viewed here:
https://www.facebook.com/photo.php

Re: [cayugabirds-l] Clarification about anti-rant

2015-02-27 Thread Jody W Enck
Hi All,

 I received a lot of emails today about my response to Dave Nutter’s great 
opening rant about folks who don’t report sightings of birds in a timely 
manner.  I sense that I did not articulate part of my anti-rant as clearly as I 
would have liked.  Some of you seem to have interpreted me as saying that I 
don’t particularly like eBird.  Just to set the record straight -- I 
wholeheartedly encourage everyone to consider reporting their sightings to 
eBird because of the tremendous scientific and conservation benefits associated 
with that data set and how it can be used for on-the-ground decision making.  
When I was in CA, I made about a dozen point counts in areas with few or no 
previous reports to help do a tiny part in filling in some of the geographic 
gaps in the data set.  As a conservationist, I can easily be an eBird 
cheerleader.  As a birder, well, that is another story.

 In my earlier post, I did mention how I was not a very consistent or 
enthusiastic poster to eBird as a birder.  I also mentioned that birding for me 
is a very personal experience.  And I have my very individualized way of both 
connecting with birds in the field, and, more to the point, keeping track of my 
sightings in ways that are meaningful to me.

 I certainly have heard how important it is for some people to be made 
aware of rare or unusual species so they can have a chance to see and enjoy 
them, and I understand the importance for many people to express their internal 
“sharing trait” by wanting to share their sightings with others and helping 
others get to see a bird they might otherwise ever have a chance to see.  For 
those people, the notion of sharing their sightings with others and to have 
sightings shared with them are indeed, identity-defining traits (along with 
others).  They need to do these things to feel like they are being a birder 
because that’s who they are as a birder.  I totally get that, and I love that 
others do these things and have these traits.

 For me as a birder, the very same behaviors that I want to encourage as a 
conservationist (e.g., helping other people see birds they’ve never seen 
before, and reporting my sightings to eBird as data) take on very different 
meanings.  Those behaviors diminish my sense of personal discovery and the 
intimacy of my interaction with nature by reducing my experience to data (the 
eBird example) or by inhibiting the very connection to the bird that I have 
strived so hard to achieve.  In essence, these behaviors become 
identity-destroying for me as a birder.  Doing these behaviors is like asking 
me to drink poison or to become someone who I am not and who I do not want to 
become.

 As a conservationist, I will defend and support eBird to the death.  But, 
as a birder, I will submit to eBird sparingly so I can maintain my sense of 
identity, my feeling of being the kind of birder I want to be rather than the 
kind of birder that someone else might be.  And, I really like it that there 
are so many different kinds of birders around.  If we all were the same, I 
think birding would be really boring.

Take care everybody.
Jody

Jody W. Enck, PhD
Program Development and Evaluation
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
607-254-2471

From: Rob Blyemailto:rwb...@comcast.net
Sent: ‎Friday‎, ‎February‎ ‎27‎, ‎2015 ‎9‎:‎58‎ ‎AM
To: jwe4@cornell. edumailto:j...@cornell.edu
Cc: CAYUGABIRDS-Lmailto:cayugabird...@list.cornell.edu, Dave 
Nuttermailto:nutter.d...@me.com

Jody, Dave and others,

I have some of the same birding behaviors as Jody but one activity I do support 
whole-heartedly is the regular and frequent use of Ebird.  Ebird lets me keep 
track of my bird sightings almost effortlessly. Most importantly, it lets me 
contribute to our collective knowledge of bird distribution and populations, 
again with very little effort. I have been birding since about 5 years old and 
earned my living as a wildlife biologist. Since about 1969, I have filled out 
paper checklists that I have stored somewhere. I conducted multi-year bird 
populations studies that were entered  into corporate data bases with the 
assurance that the data would never by erased. But, I don't really know what 
birds I have seen and the data from those studies was dumped (without 
myknowedge) by a database administrator looking for space (I guess).

I am thrilled with Ebird and at least I know what I have seen and where since I 
started using Ebird regularly in 2013. I plan to use the paper records of my 
bird population studies and my birding checklists to enter historical data into 
Ebird for both personal, selfish reasons and to make the study data available 
to others.

Please use Ebird. You could even hide its output if that violates your sense of 
privacy.

Rob Blye
CALS 1972


From: Jody W Enck j...@cornell.edu
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L cayugabird...@list.cornell.edu, Dave Nutter 
nutter.d...@me.com
Sent: Friday, February 27, 2015 8:05:21

RE: [cayugabirds-l] Turkey Vulture

2015-02-25 Thread Jody W Enck
Hi Larry,

Great report on another cold day.  
I have seen Turkey Vultures (up to 15) almost every day this winter locally 
around Ithaca.  One recent day I was waiting for an early morning ride from 
Varna to the Lab of O and watched more than a dozen in trees across the road 
hanging out until some thermals started heating up (my supposition -- the 
vultures did not share this info with me).  As long as they have access to food 
(e.g., compost piles, road kills, game farm critters, etc) they seem to be fine 
with cold and snow.

Jody Enck

-Original Message-
From: bounce-118862556-3493...@list.cornell.edu 
[mailto:bounce-118862556-3493...@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of W. Larry Hymes
Sent: Wednesday, February 25, 2015 1:03 PM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Turkey Vulture

About 20 minutes ago I was very surprised to see a TURKEY VULTURE soaring about 
near East Hill Plaza.  Having heard no reports this 
winter, I'm assuming this is an early migrant.   I've often wondered why 
this bird, and the red-wing blackbirds

Considering the severe weather and heavy snow cover in our area, why would this 
bird, and the RED-WINGED BLACKBIRDS that Dave Nutter saw on the 22nd, not delay 
their northward migration until conditions improve considerably?  As they move 
north, aren't they taking into account the conditions they are encountering and 
deciding whether to proceed or wait it out?  Any thoughts!?!?

Larry

-- 


W. Larry Hymes
120 Vine Street, Ithaca, NY 14850
(H) 607-277-0759, w...@cornell.edu



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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Lapland Longspur/ Pheasant

2015-01-31 Thread Jody W Enck
Re the pheasant sighting...
DEC only releases male pheasants in that part of the state as natural 
reproduction of pheasants does occur here.  Hence, females are not legal game 
around central New York.
So, theoretically at least, any female in Cayuga County should be a naturally 
hatched bird.  Of course, individual who train dogs or who operate licensed 
shooting preserves could release hen pheasants.

Pheasants were really common on our farm in southcentral PA when I was growing 
up.  I love to see them.
Jody


Jody W. Enck, PhD
Program Development and Evaluation
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
607-254-2471

From: Donna Scottmailto:dls...@me.com
Sent: ?Saturday?, ?January? ?31?, ?2015 ?2?:?45? ?PM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-Lmailto:cayugabird...@list.cornell.edu


Also, RING NECKED PHEASANT male digging in snow in wheat stubble on Dixon Rd 
north of Ledyard Rd. near abandoned large old house way back from road.
 This is 2nd Pheasant i have seen in this area  the other (female) was also 
near an abandoned house, on Rafferty Rd.  Houses both w windows gone. Wonder if 
they go inside for shelter? They are probably pheasants that have been released 
for hunting

Sent from my iPhone
Donna Scott
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RE: [cayugabirds-l] 50+ red-wings

2015-01-22 Thread Jody W Enck
This was a neat observation as I usually think of my son's birthday on March 
3rd as when I should start to see Red-winged Blackbirds.  All this makes me 
wonder about migratory fits and starts.  If it snows too much for those birds 
to forage effectively, can they / will they move back south just far enough to 
find sufficiently OK foraging opportunities?  Of course, some of that would 
depend on how widespread a snow event was or maybe whether it came from the NW 
or up from the south (as in a 'noreaster).  I am sure they wouldn't just sit in 
the marsh and get buried under snow, but how far south would they be willing 
to go given that they'd be giving up whatever possible genetic advantage they 
might have gained by coming this far north this early.  I am sure there are 
migration aficionados who can answer that question easily, but I am not one of 
them!

Jody Enck

-Original Message-
From: bounce-118729425-3493...@list.cornell.edu 
[mailto:bounce-118729425-3493...@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of John Confer
Sent: Thursday, January 22, 2015 4:33 PM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] 50+ red-wings

So we do have global climate change and the photoperiod is getting longer.. 
Still, I wonder if the 50+ male red-wings, all of them quiet, at Montezuma last 
night are going to pass on any genes for arriving this early. Surely we'll get 
at least one big snow storm that would be potentially lethal.

Still, red-wings mean spring is thinking about coming our way.

Cheers,

John

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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Flocks of mallards

2014-09-10 Thread Jody W Enck
Hi Nancy,
Thanks for the post about flocks of mallards in farm fields.  It brought back 
fond memories of growing up on our farm in south-central PA.  Sometimes mixed 
flocks of dabbling ducks would land to feed in our harvested small grain fields 
(wheat, barley, oats) in late summer, but they seemed especially attracted 
later in the fall and early winter to the harvested corn fields.  They would 
come and go at different times of day, but I have wonderful memories of lots 
and lots of birds coming into those fields between sunset and dark.  Much fun!

Thanks for the memories.
Jody

Jody W. Enck, PhD
Program Development and Evaluation
Cornell Lab of Ornithology

From: Nancymailto:nancycusuman...@gmail.com
Sent: ?Wednesday?, ?September? ?10?, ?2014 ?8?:?58? ?AM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-Lmailto:cayugabird...@list.cornell.edu

There have been flocks of a couple hundred mallards in the ag fields around our 
house lately. Is it unusual to see them in such great numbers on land? They 
have been in the field at the corner of Perry City and Dubois rds, and also in 
the field next to our home at 5011 Dubois. Along with lots of geese...

Nancy Cusumano

Cayuga Dog Rescue has saved more than 475 dogs since 2005!
Learn more at cayugadogrescue.org


Sent from my iPad
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Re: [cayugabirds-l] List of breeding birds in North America

2014-05-21 Thread Jody W Enck
The American Ornithologists Union website has checklists for both North America 
and South America (second tab from left at top of page).  You'll need to check 
more closely than I did to see if they separate North from Middle America in 
the excel spreadsheet that you can download from that site.

Jody W. Enck, PhD
Program Development and Evaluation
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
607-254-2169

From: Richard Tkachuckmailto:rictkal...@gmail.com
Sent: ?Wednesday?, ?May? ?21?, ?2014 ?4?:?39? ?PM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-Lmailto:cayugabird...@list.cornell.edu

Is there an electronic list of birds that breed in North America (north of the 
Rio Grande)?
Richard Tkachuck
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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Thrushes at SSW

2014-05-10 Thread Jody W Enck
Hi Anne Marie,

  Way cool to hear this as I, too, saw a Gray-cheeked Thrush in my side 
yard this morning (I live very near the intersection of Sapsucker Woods Road 
and Hanshaw Road.  The bird I saw in the shadowy shrubby back of my yard was 
exactly as you described:  Gray olive above from head to tail, including wings. 
 Face essentially uncolored (certainly nothing close to buffy of Swainson's).  
Two-toned bill.  White chin edged with small spots on both sides.  Smallish 
spots on upper breast.  I have no idea why, but when I saw this bird, my brain 
immediately took me back to a trip to Mexico I took several years ago.  I saw 
many Clay-colored Robins in similar habitat (none of which actually looked 
clay-colored to me!).  But alas, I watched this bird for 5 minutes from about 
15 feet away and could not make it into a Clay-colored Robin no matter how hard 
I tried ?!.

  Lots of warblers, vireos, Baltimore Orioles, Scarlet Tanagers (a pair 
patiently looking for insects only six feet from me!), and other thrushes too.

fun morning.
Jody

Jody W. Enck, PhD
Program Development and Evaluation
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
607-254-2169

From: Anne Marie Johnsonmailto:annemariejohn...@frontiernet.net
Sent: ?Saturday?, ?May? ?10?, ?2014 ?11?:?20? ?AM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-Lmailto:cayugabird...@list.cornell.edu

At about 9:30 this morning there were at least 3 thrushes along the portion
of the East Trail that parallels Sapsucker Woods Road (on the east side of
the road heading south from the traihead). The first I got a good look at
was a SWAINSON'S THRUSH--clearly buffy eye ring, spectacle, and lower
cheek. The next one was a VEERY--essentially no spots, brown back. Then a
third thrush came in, and all the thrushes chased around. One thrush landed
on the path and foraged for quite awhile, giving me a chance to observe all
sides from 15 to 20 ft away. The back was evenly dark gray/olive, tail to
cap. The cheek was a lighter gray/olive under the eye but no contrast in
shade. There were no face markings. I believe this last thrush was a
GRAY-CHEEKED THRUSH.

The AMERICAN BITTERN was still near the Sherwood Platform, but while we
were there, it flew from the little area to the right of the  two benches
west of the boardwalk. It landed along the edge of the pond north of the
platform but still in full view from the two benches.

I arrived at Sapsucker Woods late this morning and didn't see much in the
way of warblers. There was a PALM WARBLER near the Sherwood Platform, and
several BLACK-THROATED GREEN warblers along the southwest portion of the
Wilson Trail. Still lots of Yellow-rumps and Ruby-crowned Kinglets around.

Anne Marie Johnson


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Re: [cayugabirds-l] other osprey nest at Cass?

2014-05-06 Thread Jody W Enck
Yes, I have been watching progress for a couple days as my one son has played 
several baseball games down there recently.  One Osprey was carrying huge 
sticks to the nest on Saturday, including dropping a couple by accident beside 
the field where they kids were playing (wish they were wearing batting helmets 
while out in the outfield!!).  Osprey also observed copulating that day on the 
nest.  Last night (Monday) one bird was on nest while second brought in two 
different fish.  Once, as bird approached with a fish, a gull chased after the 
fish carrier and chased it all the way to West Hill (I say, all the way but 
that is only a couple hundred yards as the Osprey flies.



Jody W. Enck, PhD
Program Development and Evaluation
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
607-254-2169

From: Marc Devokaitismailto:mdevokai...@gmail.com
Sent: ?Tuesday?, ?May? ?6?, ?2014 ?4?:?08? ?PM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-Lmailto:cayugabird...@list.cornell.edu


Haven't seen this mentioned but maybe someone is aware--a second Osprey nest 
has been built (or is in final stages) at Cass Park on one of the lights in the 
middle of the softball fields--reported by phone to the Lab today by an 
(almost) non-birder.

Marc Devokaitis
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Re: [cayugabirds-l] One special hunting season and two management proposals -black bear and Mute Swan.

2014-01-30 Thread Jody W Enck
Hi all,

  I encourage folks on the listserv to consider this issue carefully 
and to provide comments to DEC during this period when the agency is seeking 
public comment.  A word of caution, though.  As I am sure all of you can 
appreciate, issues like this are rather complex -- they are not black and white 
with simple answers.  I certainly can appreciate and respect the opinions of 
folks who don’t want to see any animals killed if at all possible.  If that is 
how you feel, then the petition being circulated by goosewatchnyc is something 
you might really want to sign.  However, if you are interested in seeking more 
information about why Mute Swans are classified as invasive species, how the 
DEC arrived at a statewide invasive species plan, and scientific information 
about thine ecological and human impacts of Mute Swans, then I encourage you to 
look elsewhere to become informed.

  Although I am on the Conservation Committee for the Cayuga Bird Club, 
I am writing this post as just a private person because I really feel like 
folks should have the best available information so they can provide their 
informed opinion and input to DEC.  Statements on the website linked below 
about “bad science” being used reflect only a minute part of the data used in 
the decision by DEC, and they are largely taken out of context.  It is a little 
bit like someone dismissing the idea of climate just because they woke up to a 
really cold morning.  Further, the web link below describes how Mute Swans live 
by the thousands in the UK in harmony with other waterfowl.  I don’t have any 
problem with that, but the context for the proposed action is that because Mute 
Swans are not native to North America, they have ecological and social impacts 
here that differ from what happens in the UK.

  The group presenting the petition against removing Mute Swans is 
fairly clear in their desire not to have any animals killed if at all possible. 
 Like I said earlier, if that is consistent with your personal beliefs, then by 
all means, please consider signing the petition.  However, if you are 
considering signing the petition because the link below tells you to think DEC 
has used bad science or has not considered the right things in its decision, 
then I would encourage you not to sign the petition.  The information provided 
on the website relating to those issues is not factual.

  One of the things I really like about the birding community served by 
this listserv is that it is really passionate about birds and bird-related 
issues.  I am very glad to see folks bring to our attention things like the DEC 
plan and that there are groups both in support of, and against, the plan.  I 
also believe that an important service that some of us with experience in these 
matters can provide is assistance sorting through rhetoric.  Maybe the 
executive committee of the Cayuga Bird Club might want to develop an official 
position on the DEC proposal (I am not suggesting that the executive committee 
do that), but I don't think it is up to the Conservation Committee to 
necessarily come out in support or opposition to it.  I do think, though, that 
members of the committee and other informed folks should help the rest of us 
sort through the noise in the communication so we can make the best informed 
decision for ourselves.


Hope this has been useful for folks to think about.
Jody Enck


From: Linda Orkin
Sent: ‎Wednesday‎, ‎January‎ ‎29‎, ‎2014 ‎2‎:‎12‎ ‎PM
To: John and Sue Gregoire
Cc: CAYUGABIRDS-L, KHAMOLISTSERV

Just wanted to let everyone know that there are indeed two sides to the issue 
of killing all Mute Swans. Here is a link which I received.

http://www.goosewatchnyc.com/mute-swan-plan/

Perhaps there is no truths on this analysis, however...

Given the DEC's NYS management policies towards Coyotes, no daily bag limit, 
can be killed day and night and fair game for hunting contests,  I am very 
inclined to dislike their policies.

Linda Orkin
Ithaca, NY 14850


On Mon, Jan 20, 2014 at 7:26 AM, John and Sue Gregoire 
k...@empacc.netmailto:k...@empacc.net wrote:
Be aware of the special deer season throughout Tompkins County when you venture 
out
in January. The second and third item propose Black Bear and Mute Swan 
management
plans and are open for comment.
J.

01/15/2014
Hello,
The NYS Department of Environmental Conservation has issued the following press
release:

Special Deer Hunting Season in Central Tompkins County to Help Control Local 
Deer
Population

Deer Management Focus Area Open Until January 31, 2014

A special deer hunting season to help control the deer population in and around 
the
city of Ithaca, Tompkins County, will be open until January 31, 2014, State
Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) Regional Director Ken Lynch 
announced
today.

The Deer Management Focus Area (DMFA) program was initiated in 2012 in the 
Ithaca
area to expand the use of hunting to 

Re: [cayugabirds-l] Fwd: [GeneseeBirds-L] Duck Hunting Rules and enforcement

2013-12-30 Thread Jody W Enck
Hello all,

Please note that all of New York State west of route 81 and south of Lake 
Ontario is in the western zone for waterfowl hunting.  The zones listed in the 
DEC table are just for New York State.  I hope this reduces some of the 
confusion.

Jody Enck



From: Linda Orkin
Sent: ‎Monday‎, ‎December‎ ‎30‎, ‎2013 ‎9‎:‎36‎ ‎AM
To: Anne Clark
Cc: Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes, CAYUGABIRDS-L

Thanks Anne. This reminds me that I had also checked seasons a while back when 
thinking about this year's upcoming CBC. I saw the same and then just thought I 
had been wrong. What's the story anyone?

Linda.

Sent from my iPhone

On Dec 30, 2013, at 9:31 AM, Anne Clark 
anneb.cl...@gmail.commailto:anneb.cl...@gmail.com wrote:


Am I not reading tables correctly?  Doesn't the table show just snow goose and 
Canada goose hunting season now, with ducks having ended Dec 15?  If so, why 
are hunters all tucking in at the end of the Lake?  And why is it so 
concentrated right now, since Snow Geese have been legal since Oct 1?  This 
shows duck hunting as extending Oct-Dec15?

I am confused.


On Dec 30, 2013, at 9:19 AM, Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes wrote:

For those interested…a similar conversation was happening on GeneseeBirds-L.

Sincerely,
Chris T-H


Begin forwarded message:

From: Michael and Joann Tetlow 
mjtet...@frontiernet.netmailto:mjtet...@frontiernet.net
Subject: [GeneseeBirds-L] Duck Hunting Rules and enforcement
Date: December 29, 2013 8:54:23 PM EST
To: geneseebird...@geneseo.edumailto:geneseebird...@geneseo.edu
Cc: 'Joann Tetlow' tetlo...@gmail.commailto:tetlo...@gmail.com


 Here is a link to Migratory Bird hunting regulations. 
http://www.dec.ny.gov/regs/4047.html  Section Q addresses the illegality of not 
retrieving carcasses as follows: q) Wanton waste of migratory game birds. No 
person shall kill or cripple any migratory game bird pursuant to this section 
without making a reasonable effort to retrieve the bird, and retain it in his 
actual custody, at the place where taken or between that place and either:

(1) his automobile or principal means of land transportation;

(2) his personal abode or temporary or transient place of lodging;

(3) a migratory bird preservation facility;

(4) a post office; or

(5) a common carrier facility.
•   So seeing any hunter leaving dead birds warrants a call 
to the DEC environmental conservation officer at the following: TIPP DEC is a 
24-hour telephone hotline that is also referred to as Turn in Poachers and 
Polluters. It is answered by live dispatchers. The TIPP phone number 
is1-800-TIPP DEC (1-800-847-7332). Callers may request to file a complaint 
anonymously.
I have also called 911 and asked for the DEC officers but would rather leave 
that number for human emergencies.

Hope for good, safe hunters and keep your head down until January 13th.  Mike 
Tetlow

p.s. here is the link to the seasons and bag limits: 
http://www.dec.ny.gov/outdoor/2.html


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Field Applications Engineer
Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 607-254-1132
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp

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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Christmas Bird Count and Hunting Pressure

2013-12-30 Thread Jody W Enck



From: bob mcguire
Sent: ?Monday?, ?December? ?30?, ?2013 ?10?:?19? ?AM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L

In an effort to move the discussion towards some sort of resolution, I have 
have a couple of questions. Does anyone have answers?

1) Has the late waterfowl hunting season overlapped with the Ithaca CXBC for 
ever? If not, since when?
The DEC must work each year within guidelines established by the US Fish and 
Wildlife Service.  Those guidelines can change each year based on surveys of 
breeding pairs of ducks across a wide swath of Canada and the northern US and 
surveys of ponds in the prairie pothole region of the Great Plains.  Results of 
these surveys affect total season length, bag limits for ducks (including for 
specific species and even hens vs. drake ducks), and whether states can have a 
split season or just one set of inclusive dates for hunting ducks.  These 
guidelines differ for each of the four major flyways in North America (we are 
in the Atlantic Flyway; the others are the Mississippi, the Central, and the 
Pacific).  New York is the only state in the nation that is allowed by federal 
regulation to have five management zones for hunting waterfowl.  Most states 
are limited to no more than three.  NY's topography and habitat diversity are 
unique when it comes to waterfowl.  The five zones allow for a finer resolution 
on harvest management.

In years when duck populations are low (often corresponding to drought in the 
pothole region), seasons are short, bag limits are low, and usually split 
seasons don't occur.  Compared to historical trends, populations of many (not 
all) species of waterfowl are relatively high this year.  Thus, federal 
guidelines allow states to have the maximum number of days for hunting ducks 
(60 in NY), liberal bag limits, and a split season.   (NY has a split season 
this year in that the first split starts in October and goes for a 43 days this 
year in the western zone and then started again on December 28 for another 17 
days for a total of 60 days).

2) Who (office or person) in the DEC sets the season dates? Is it strictly a 
matter for the DEC, or is US Fish  Wildlife involved?

NY has a waterfowl management team made up of biologists from across the state. 
 They set the start-end dates for hunting in the different management zones 
based on a host of data, including average freeze-up dates (e.g., beaver ponds 
in the northern part of the state freeze over by early November causing ducks 
to move out of that part of the state), timing of waterfowl migration, when 
waterfowl hunting have time available for hunting (which is why the season 
dates try to maximize weekends and holidays), and other factors.  Having done a 
lot of research on waterfowl hunters and waterfowl hunting for DEC to use in 
season setting over the last 25 years, I can say that I am aware of no 
mechanism through which DEC could change season timing or other regulations 
within a small area of one of the five major management zones in the state.

3) I know we have a TRADITION of counting on New Year's Day. (And I love to 
start the new year this way.) But would counting on a different day change the 
value of the data we collect? And in a significant manner?

I know others can speak to this more knowledgeably that I can.  I recall in 
previous years so good discussion of the pros and cons of changing the timing 
of counts, etc.

Hope this helps
Jody Enck


Chris T-H: If this discussion gets too far off topic for the listserve, let us 
know!

Bob McGuire

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[cayugabirds-l] Saturday birding highlights (sort of long)

2013-11-17 Thread Jody W Enck
Hello All,

  I am really not trying to compete with Ken Rosenberg for reporting 
neat birds (sorry, Ken, I couldn’t resist), but it just takes me a while to sit 
down at my computer to let other folks know about my experiences.  Anyway... 
perhaps the coolest birds I saw Saturday were a GOLDEN EAGLE and a NELSON’S 
SPARROW.

  I was birding an area that overlaps substantially (or even entirely) 
with Tom Schulenberg’s home patch.  If you put a dot at the intersection of 
Freese and Hanshaw Roads northeast of Ithaca, and draw a circle of about a mile 
radius around it, you get the picture of where I was birding.  Besides 
encompassing my own residence, I like this circle because it includes patches 
of woods (some rather contiguous with others allowing for some substantial 
amount of forested habitat from early successional stages up to woods that 
might be have at least 60-70 years worth of growth).  It also has agricultural 
fields (corn and soybean in particular) that have recently been harvested and 
are attracting lots of waterfowl and loafing gulls.  It includes the Freese 
Road garden plots and similar grassy and old field habitats.  It also includes 
a section of Fall Creek, the little pond at Liddel Bee Lab and the wetlands at 
the Lab of Ornithology.

  I set out Saturday about 9am with the express purpose of trying to 
see if the NELSON’S SPARROW was still hanging around the little pond by the bee 
lab on Freese Road.  It had been reported just the day before, so I thought 
there was a good chance that I might run into it if I was careful and 
persistent.  I have to admit that I did look for this bird with my sons the day 
that Tom first reported it (it is only a half mile from my house).  I thought 
my fledgling birder boys might enjoy trying to see a bird that they had never 
encountered before.  I am fairly certain that I got two glimpses of the bird 
with enough diagnostic field marks to say that I saw the bird that day, but the 
only looks my boys got were of a small brownish bird, twice jumping up out of 
the tall dead grass, flying about ten feet, and diving back into cover.

  So, yesterday I headed straight to the pond area.  It is becoming 
fairly easy to see where others are looking for the bird because of the human 
foot prints in the mud and the little paths that are now meandering through the 
tall, dead grass.  I really didn’t want to put on a one-man drive through the 
grass in an attempt to flush the bird for a quick view.  So, I surveyed the 
area from a little distance and decided to walk in to the bank of the pond and 
sit against one of the bluebird/tree swallow boxes to see if I could hear or 
see this sparrow without flushing it.

  Of course I ended up flushing birds just getting to the bluebird/tree 
swallow box.  One of these was a largish sparrow with a longish, more or less 
rounded tail, that seemed relatively dark on the top side (do you like my 
scientific descriptions?).  Perhaps a lingering SONG SPARROW.  Another bird was 
smaller, plumper, but not fat, and not interested in flushing nearly as far as 
the first bird (which went well over 40 yards before diving back into cover).  
This second bird only would go about five to eight feet before hiding again.  
This bird decidedly was not the Nelson’s sparrow, however, as I did see it well 
enough to know it had a very clean, unmarked throat and breast, and a mostly 
unmarked face, with a couple, broad brownish stripes on its head, and a 
light-colored bill.  The rational birder in me was saying to pay attention to 
the fact that it is mid November, and that this must be a juvenile 
White-crowned sparrow.  But the guy looking at the bird through 10x binoculars 
at about 12 feet, kept saying that this bird is way too small and simply not 
the right proportions.  Plus, the face, including the entire area around the 
eyes and auriculars was unmarked in my view of the bird.  This birder in me 
kept asking the question, why can’t this be a really late Field Sparrow?  
American Tree Sparrow also jumped into the rational side of my brain, and the 
shape and size of this bird was much more similar to that than a White-crowned 
for sure.  Still, the bill was all one shade of light (not two-toned like the 
rational birder in me would expect with a Tree Sparrow), and I did have a 
decent, straight-on (albeit brief) view of the breast, and saw nothing that 
looked remotely like a breast spot.  The inquisitive trait in me certainly was 
piqued with this bird, but certainly was not ”peaked” in that I never felt like 
I was satisfied with figuring out what that bird really was.  A second sparrow 
spp. in my notebook.

I flushed a third sparrow just getting to the place I wanted to sit 
down to watch.  This little lighter brownish job (LLBJ) also only went about 10 
feet at grass-top level before diving back into cover.  I couldn’t really 
notice anything else about this bird at 

Re: [cayugabirds-l] Rufous Hummingbird Seneca Falls

2013-10-14 Thread Jody W Enck
Hi Dave,

Really cool bird.  I have very limited experience with juveniles of western 
hummingbirds, but I did learn this summer that many of the western species 
(including for example, broad-tailed and calliope) can show rufous flanks.  In 
your pictures I do see hints of rufous on the rump, which I think would clinch 
it as a Rufous Hummingbird.  Maybe you or others could let the rest of us less 
experienced folks know what aspects from your photos help to eliminate similar 
species and narrow the identification to Rufous.  This kind of learning 
experience is cheaper for me than hopping a flight out west!

Thanks for posting you find.
Jody



Jody W. Enck, PhD
Human Dimensions of Natural Resource Conservation
Cornell Lab of Ornithology

From: Dave K
Sent: ‎Monday‎, ‎October‎ ‎14‎, ‎2013 ‎3‎:‎34‎ ‎PM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L


Have a Rufous Hummingbird visiting my feeders in Seneca Falls.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/105424358@N06/10276043945/http://www.flickr.com/photos/105424358%40N06/10276043945/

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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Marbled Godwit, Knox-Marsellus

2013-08-02 Thread Jody W Enck
Anybody interested in carpooling up tomorrow morning from Ithaca to look for 
this bird?

Jody Enck



From: Jay McGowan
Sent: ‎Friday‎, ‎August‎ ‎2‎, ‎2013 ‎6‎:‎45‎ ‎PM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L, oneidabi...@yahoogroups.com, geneseebirds-l, NYSBIRDS-L


A beautiful bright MARBLED GODWIT is currently foraging out in the deep water 
of Knox-Marsellus Marsh at Montezuma NWR, viewed from East Road. The American 
White Pelican is also present.

Jay McGowan

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RE: [cayugabirds-l] Black-billed cuckoo heard?

2013-03-28 Thread Jody W Enck
Hi all,
In terms of what species it could have been -- wild turkey comes to my mind.  
They are making lots of vocalizations right now, including yelps and clucks 
that could definitely sound cuckoo-esque in a wooded environment.  I have no 
doubt there are other winter resident birds that might be making these 
confusing sounds.  I hope you hear it again!

Jody Enck


From: Kevin James McGowan
Sent: ‎March‎ ‎28‎, ‎2013 ‎10‎:‎50‎ ‎AM
  To: Donna Lee Scott, Marla Coppolino, CAYUGABIRDS-L
Subject: RE: [cayugabirds-l] Black-billed cuckoo heard?

Black-billed Cuckoo spends the winter in South America (see the map at 
http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/black-billed_cuckoo/id), and those 
long-distance migrants are amazingly strict in their migratory schedules, 
usually not making it back to New York until May.

I just tried making a few species maps in at http://ebird.org/ebird/map/, and 
it would appear that there are no records for Black-billed Cuckoo in the United 
States in March, ever.

Best,

Kevin



From: bounce-77254620-3493...@list.cornell.edu 
[mailto:bounce-77254620-3493...@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Donna Scott
Sent: Thursday, March 28, 2013 10:39 AM
To: Marla Coppolino; CAYUGABIRDS-L
Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Black-billed cuckoo heard?

According to the Average Spring Arrival Dates for Cay. L. Basin 2000-2009, 
that they gave us in the Spring ornithology course, Black Billed Cuckoos' date 
of arrival should be more around May 9 !

their data is from this list and in later years from eBird.
Donna Scott
- Original Message -
From: Marla Coppolinomailto:marlacoppol...@gmail.com
To: Cayugabirds-L@cornell.edumailto:Cayugabirds-L@cornell.edu
Sent: Thursday, March 28, 2013 9:43 AM
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Black-billed cuckoo heard?

I think I that I was hearing a black-billed cuckoo yesterday evening, in the 
woods behind my property (Pleasant Valley Rd. in Groton).  Is that possible? 
Would they be back in our area at this time?

Marla
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RE: [cayugabirds-l] Crows mobbing Great Horned Owl on nest

2013-02-16 Thread Jody W Enck
Don’t know if owls and crows really think like this, but it would be a shame if 
they didn’t!!  Dave, you should write a book.

Jody Enck


From: nutter.d...@me.com
Sent: ‎February‎ ‎16‎, ‎2013 ‎12‎:‎21‎ ‎PM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L
Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Crows mobbing Great Horned Owl on nest

I think this is the sort of crap that Great Horned Owls have to put up with, 
and they get used to it. I suspect that what you saw is probably the pattern. 
Every day some crow discovers the owl, still in the same place on its nest, 
and raises the alarm, just as it would for an owl roosting in a new spot every 
day. All the other crows join in for awhile, so the whole crow community is 
aware of its presence, and the younger crows learn, We don't like these guys. 
When they're satisfied and bored with lack of reaction from the owl on the 
nest, they move on. The owl sighs, reminds itself to eat some of those bastards 
come nightfall, and continues incubating, brooding, or guarding its young.

--Dave Nutter

On Feb 15, 2013, at 06:29 PM, Mona Bearor conservebi...@gmail.com wrote:

Yesterday morning I observed about 50 crows mobbing a Great Horned Owl on a 
nest.  It made me wonder if the crows could make the owl abandon the nest with 
repeated harassment, or if they would just give up after a while.  I had an 
appointment so I couldn't stick around too long, but did watch this behavior 
for over 20 minutes non-stop.  The owl was still on the nest today.

Any thoughts on this?
Mona Bearor So. Glens Falls, NY

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RE: [cayugabirds-l] Stewart Park: decoys on ice, gunners' boat adjacen...

2013-01-11 Thread Jody W Enck
Hi Dave, Kevin, et al.,

 I thought it might be worth pointing out that the issue of hunters hunting 
“in the water” is based on substantial case law and even a U.S. Supreme Court 
ruling.  I am not saying anybody should like the behavior of hunters doing 
this, but it is clearly legal.  Actually, the law specifically states that they 
can hunt below the high-water line.  Given that Cayuga Lake is drawn down in 
winter to prevent spring flooding along the Canal system, hunters can legally 
hunt from dry land.  State law then allows hunters “on the water” to hunt 
within the statutorily defined safety zone (50 feet from homes and other 
occupied buildings) as long as they do not shoot toward those buildings.  
Hence, you have people shooting near homes while moored at the end of a dock, 
for example.  There actually are well thought-out reasons for this.  Waterfowl 
do not use the lake randomly or certainly not evenly.  There are certain places 
where the waterfowl want to be.  The effective shooting range of shotguns is up 
to about 50 yards.  That means that hunters literally have to be in the 
particular locations where the birds want to be.  Zoning hunters into parts of 
the lake not used by the waterfowl on a regular basis would essentially 
eliminate the opportunity to hunt.

Now, having said all that, nobody should hunt in a given location just because 
it is legal to do so (in my opinion).  I think it is egregiously unethical to 
hunt from a boat right off of somebody else’s dock without first getting their 
permission.  Similarly, the kind of “in your face” attitude expressed by people 
who hunt right off shore adjacent to Steward Park, in my opinion, is 
despicable.  The Hog Hole situation is a lot more gray in my opinion.  But 
please keep in mind, that my opinion only matters to me!  Same goes for my 
sense of ethics.  In my warped view of the world, I think it was also 
egregiously unethical for Stewart Park to have been filled.  I’d personally 
love to see a restored marsh (think Catherine Marsh at s. end of Seneca Lake).  
Of course that might ultimately mean loss of Renwick Woods if a hydrological 
regime was re-established at the s. end of Cayuga Lake.  Anyway, restoration of 
at least some marsh area at the end of Cayuga Lake could be something that both 
birders and hunters could get excited about.  I am not saying that is feasible 
or could ever get enough traction locally to see the light of day, but it sure 
would be exciting to think about.

For those of you who can’t wait until waterfowl season is over, the last day to 
hunt ducks in this part of the state is January 13th.

Jody

Jody W. Enck, PhD
Human Dimensions of Natural Resources
Cornell Lab of Ornithology

From: 6072292...@vtext.com
Sent: ‎January‎ ‎11‎, ‎2013 ‎7‎:‎48‎ ‎AM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Stewart Park: decoys on ice, gunners' boat adjacen...

Stewart Park: decoys on ice, gunners' boat adjacent, dying bird retrieved on 
foot, most birds in southeast corner.
--Dave Nutter

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[cayugabirds-l] Bird Conservation -- REALLY!

2013-01-07 Thread Jody W Enck
Hi all,

 When I think about the topic of bird conservation, I think about all the 
great work that gets done at the local level.  In particular, I think about 
conservation actions that increase bird habitat (e.g., habitat restoration and 
management) as well as actions that slow down the loss of bird habitat (e.g., 
conservation easements and set-asides).  There also are important actions aimed 
more at birds than at bird habitat per se.  For example, I think of the issues 
of used fishing line receptacles, putting up next boxes or other structures 
(osprey platforms), etc.  I personally am thrilled that the Cayuga Bird Club 
has recently started up a conservation committee to take a more active role in 
bird conservation locally.

 All of this has gotten me thinking about how somebody knows that bird 
conservation is occurring.  What kinds of things do we count as successes?  I 
think there probably are lots of different possible answers.  I ask this mostly 
because if we all want to (1) achieve more bird conservation on the ground 
locally, and (2) attract more people to accomplish that conservation, I think 
it would be particularly useful to understand and communicate about what kinds 
of conservation “outcomes” we’d like to see happen.  I think it’s hard to get 
my friends and neighbors interested in bird conservation if they don’t really 
know what that means.

 I hope this stimulates some fruitful discussion.

Thanks.
Jody

Jody W. Enck, PhD
Human Dimensions of Natural Resources
Cornell Lab of Ornithology


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RE: [cayugabirds-l] (Long comment) Exempt part of Cayuga Lake from hunting diving ducks

2013-01-06 Thread Jody W Enck
Hello all,

 There are several of us in the local birding community who are working on 
issues like this -- interactions between birders and hunters.  Indeed, several 
of us have been involved at various scales (local, state, national) for many 
years.  These are complicated issues, and good reasons (for birders, and for 
waterfowl conservation) actually exist to maintain waterfowl hunting on Cayuga 
Lake.  I think it makes wonderful sense to have these conversations locally, 
and the Cayuga Bird Club is a great platform.  The discussions likely will 
require quite a bit of discussion in small to medium-sized groups (rather than 
on a listserve), although some kind of mechanism probably will need to be 
identified to allow input from folks who are not Bird Club members or who do 
not live close enough to meet regularly but want to participate in the 
discussion.  Like I said, something like this may seem like a worthy cause on 
the surface, but greater benefit for people and bird conservation might come 
out of some kind of effort at birders and hunters working together rather than 
as antagonizers.

 Thanks for listening.
Jody

Jody W. Enck, PhD
Human Dimensions of Natural Resources
Cornell Lab of Ornithology

From: Sandy Podulka
Sent: ‎January‎ ‎5‎, ‎2013 ‎8‎:‎51‎ ‎AM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L
Subject: Re:[cayugabirds-l] (Long comment) Exempt part of Cayuga Lake from 
hunting diving ducks

This would be a great project for the CBC and John has made thoughtful, 
thorough points.  It will be a tough sell to DEC, though, as in my experience, 
many people at DEC (but hopefully not all) view wildlife only as stuff to 
hunt.

--Sandy Podulka

At 09:29 AM 1/5/2013, Linda Orkin wrote:
Hello All,

Yes, I think this could be a project of the bird club with this input and 
support from people like John and Bill and their  extensive knowledge and 
experience with authorities.  Let us pursue this worthy goal.  What would be 
a good next step? Should those of us interested get together?

John's points are so well presented and thought out it seems to be the perfect 
starting place.

Linda Orkin

On Sat, Jan 5, 2013 at 9:02 AM, Meena Haribal 
m...@cornell.edumailto:m...@cornell.edu wrote:

Hi all,



I think this would be great conservation project for CBC to take up, with 
inputs from Bill and John and anyone else to be part of it.



Cheers

Meena


Meena Haribal
Ithaca NY 14850
http://haribal.org/
http://meenaharibal.blogspot.com/


From: 
bounce-72558715-3493...@list.cornell.edumailto:bounce-72558715-3493...@list.cornell.edu
 [ 
bounce-72558715-3493...@list.cornell.edumailto:bounce-72558715-3493...@list.cornell.edu]
 on behalf of Bill Evans [ 
wrev...@clarityconnect.commailto:wrev...@clarityconnect.com]
Sent: Saturday, January 05, 2013 8:52 AM
To: John Confer; CAYUGABIRDS-L
Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] (Long comment) Exempt part of Cayuga Lake from 
hunting diving ducks

This would be a nice accomplishment that is long overdue. I’ve thought that the 
“few individuals...greatly reducing the pleasure of many” angle should be 
enough to produce such an exemption, but your approach of population analysis 
and presenting a scientific case for the exemption might help facilitate the 
change for DEC.  Certainly the issue of hunting in such close proximity to a 
population center seems like it could be a driver – besides the safety issue, 
the sound of gunshots can be quite unnerving for some in our society.

From the birding and environmental education perspective, it would be wonderful 
to enjoy viewing large rafts of Aythya ducks and their cohorts on a more 
consistent basis.

Nearly 20 years ago Common Council voted to ban hunting in Allan Treman Marine 
Park – apparently the City of Ithaca had allowed hunting there after it was 
purchased by the state in 1976. Hunting currently occurs in the water offshore, 
and I’m not clear on jurisdiction involved.

Bill E

From: John Confermailto:con...@ithaca.edu
Sent: Thursday, January 03, 2013 2:55 PM
To: Cayuga Bird Listmailto:Cayugabirds-L@cornell.edu ; Confer, 
Karenmailto:confergoldw...@aol.com ; j...@cornell.edumailto:j...@cornell.edu
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] (Long comment) Exempt part of Cayuga Lake from hunting 
diving ducks

Hi Folks,

CBC are always fun for many reasons. It tickles the grey cells to think 
about population trends and regulatory factors. I shared a fun discussion about 
the impact of hunting on waterfowl on the south end and the rest of Cayuga Lake 
and we discussed if there were objective data on population abundance to 
justify preventing such hunting. This got me thinking.
  The Fish and Wildlife spends an immense amount of effort to census waterfowl 
every year: extensive aerial surveys that criss-cross the prairie potholes and 
elsewhere and Hudson Bay coast, really extensive banding efforts, and hundreds 
of hours of ground surveys, etc. All of this provides an estimate of pop 
abundance for each species

RE: [cayugabirds-l] Swan count for CBC

2013-01-04 Thread Jody W Enck
This discussion has been interesting to “watch” as it has unfolded.  I 
certainly understand the desire folks have to make the counts as accurate as 
possible.  Still, I wonder how all this adjusting of the numbers after-the-fact 
for just one species, and for just one year, influences the utility of the data 
for comparative purposes from year to year.  Given the year-to-year variability 
of the weather and its uncertain influence on both long-distance migration 
(e.g., of swans) and local movements (from and to feeders), I wonder if it 
simply makes the most sense to keep doing things the way they always have been 
done -- recognizing and even accepting that various species will be more or 
less likely to be affected in any given year with respect to whether they are 
double or triple counted, or undercounted.

If the purpose of the count (at least one of the major purposes) is to be able 
to examine long-term trends, then it seems that consistency of methodology from 
year-to-year should trump our noble attempts to improve within-year accuracy.

How far do Chickadees and other feeder birds move around on cold, blustery days 
like we had on January 1st?  The 6 feeder watchers in my neighborhood probably 
all had the same individual birds visit their feeders.  Seems rather endless to 
try to figure out how to deal with all the uncertainty in the data collection.  
I know the inquisitive scientist within me loves the challenge of trying to 
reduce that uncertainty, but a reduction in this kind of uncertainty probably 
will not enhance the utility of the data for its intended purpose.  Besides, 
the discoverer within me loves being out in horrible conditions just seeing 
what I can find, recognize, and learn.  I suppose it’s probably the same - to a 
lesser or greater degree- for everyone who looked for birds on the First.

Have fun,
Jody

Jody W. Enck, PhD
Human Dimensions of Natural Resources
Cornell Lab of Ornithology

From: Bill Evans
Sent: ‎January‎ ‎4‎, ‎2013 ‎10‎:‎05‎ ‎AM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L
Subject: Re:[cayugabirds-l] Swan count for CBC

Last night I made of a Google map of the swan flock information reported to the 
listserv. I updated the trajectories and markers this morning adding some 
deductive/speculative text.
Cayuga Bird Club 2013 CBC Swan flock 
maphttp://maps.google.com/maps/ms?ie=UTFmsa=0msid=208086491899212349523.0004d26dc6966e4c7c382
 (click markers to read text – if you have a Google acct and log in you can add 
information to the map)

The evidence suggests some flocks were double and even triple counted, but as 
Ken pointed out there are still some things that don’t add up. Two pieces of 
information that would help complete the picture would be more description on 
the location and trajectory of the flock of 21 (@ ~2:45pm) seen by Marty’s 
group. I don’t have that flock on the map and it doesn’t seem like it could 
have been the same flock of 19 I had at 2:15 or Ken had at 2PM, which were 
plausibly the same flock. Also, any swan flock information from section V 
(Sandy’s section) would be useful in determining whether the 40 seen there were 
unique flocks or flocks that had already been counted.

Anyone else who saw swan flocks on January 1st, please have a look at the map 
and see if your information matches or suggests additional unique flocks.

As of now there is a fairly solid case for a minimum of 163 southbound swans on 
count day. This presumes that swan flocks that exited the city of Ithaca in 
southbound flight didn’t return.

Bill E
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RE: [cayugabirds-l] Use of GPS Coordinates

2011-12-18 Thread Jody W Enck
Hi Bob,
Great question as I know different folks relate differently to numbers. 
 My personal preference is the decimal degrees for lat-long.  That is what I 
have my hand-held GPS unit set to.  

Jody  

Jody W. Enck, PhD.
Research Associate, Human Dimensions Research Unit
Department of Natural Resources
Cornell University
phone 607-255-8192
web  www.dnr.cornell.edu/hdru/

-Original Message-
From: bounce-39013239-3493...@list.cornell.edu 
[mailto:bounce-39013239-3493...@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of bob mcguire
Sent: Sunday, December 18, 2011 8:24 AM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Use of GPS Coordinates

The Cayuga Bird Club is in the process of finalizing the text of the  
new Basin Birding Guide. At the last minute we have decided to include  
GPS coordinates with the directions/maps for each of the 76 sites. I  
would like help and feedback with the following question: which format  
for coordinates to incorporate? I expect that folks will use GPS  
coordinates either at home (on their computers - Google Earth of  
Maps), or on car GPS units, or on smart phones.

The simplest format seems to be so-called decimal degrees
Latitude:   ##.°
Longitude:  -##.°

An alternative format is degrees minutes seconds
Latitude:   N##°##' ##
Longitude:  W##°##' ##

(I  know there are still other formats as well.)

I would prefer to go with what seems to be the most straight forward:  
decimal degrees. Is there a good argument for any other format? Can  
I provoke a good Sunday discussion here?!!

Bob McGuire






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[cayugabirds-l] Saturday birds

2011-03-13 Thread Jody W Enck
Hi all,
My two sons (ages 8 and 11) and I went around Cayuga Lake Saturday, starting 
after a mid morning music lesson.

Highlights were:

Excellent scope views of the Great Horned owls in Renwick Woods (Stewart Park, 
Ithaca), a domestic-Canada goose hybrid and a domestic?-mallard mixed female 
(the really light brown one reported from Stewart previously).

A Merlin flying and perching in the top of a spruce tree just north of Myers 
Point.

Screechie at the Factory St. pond in Union Springs.

Snow geese as reported by others in the north parts of the Montezuma complex.  
Throughout the day, my kids were trying to estimate and keep track of the 
number of birds seen by species.  With respect to the Snow Geese, my 8 year-old 
said, I don't know how many birds there were.  My eyes know, but they can't 
talk so I can't ask them.

On Center Rd. Ovid, among the hundreds of Canada Geese in a field right next to 
the road was one of the coolest birds I have ever seen.  It clearly was a 
Canada-Snow goose hybrid.  Seen from 20 yards with binoculars.  Slightly 
smaller than surrounding Canadas.  Base plumage similar to Canada (i.e., black 
head and neck with white chin strap, body more or less brownish gray [sort 
of]).  Bill shaped like a Snow Goose, complete with a grinning patch.  I have 
never seen one of those on a Canada before.  Black of head and neck was flaked 
with white feathers making it really stand out from the crowd.  Body had 
substantial number of white feathers mixed in with the typical brownish-gray 
Canada-type feathers.  When it flew a short distance with the rest of the flock 
(they all picked up, flew in a really tight circle and landed back in the same 
spot next to the road), its flight feathers looked like a typical Canada Goose. 
 All gray-brown.  No noticeable white feathers or black ends to primaries.  
Some day I'll actually buy a camera.  I could have gotten a decent picture with 
a cell phone.  But I don't have one of those either.  Did I mention that we 
drive a horse and buggy (just kidding on that one).

Last highlight was that my 8 year-old really wanted to see a Loon as he had 
never knowingly seen one.  We got a decent scope view of one just north of 
Sheldrake Point.  Another cool bird in transitional plumage.  Pretty far out, 
but easily seen in the scope.  At that distance, and with the transitional 
plumage, the best thing I had to go on was bill structure to call it a Common 
Loon (I have personally never seen the Pacific Loon in that area -- too 
difficult to get up there often by horse and buggy :))

At the end of the day, both kids said that the day was even more fun than they 
thought it would be.  Not a bad way to spend my birthday.

Jody Enck

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[cayugabirds-l] peregrine falcon at Cornell

2010-10-28 Thread Jody W Enck
Hi folks,
I watched a silhouette of a peregrine first fly by, then land, 
on Bradfield Hall on the Cornell campus around 7:30 this morning.  The local 
pigeons should be scared...very scared.
Also, right after sunset last evening I heard a Carolina Wren 
tea-kettling away in my yard in Ellis Hollow while I was trying to rake some 
leaves.

Jody Enck

Jody W. Enck, PhD.
Research Associate, Human Dimensions Research Unit
Department of Natural Resources
Cornell University
phone 607-255-8192
web  www.dnr.cornell.edu/hdru/


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RE: [cayugabirds-l] Red Knot and Ruff Sighting Info

2010-09-13 Thread Jody W Enck
Hi folks,
Any chance that an effort could be made to have some folks with 
higher-power optics and knowledge of shorebird ID meet us less-fortunate folks 
up at Towpath sometime soon to try to view these special birds.  I've used my 
45-power Vortex from both East Rd and Towpath, and it's a challenge to ID much 
beyond the closest parts of the mudflats.

Just a thought.
Thanks.
Jody Enck

__
Jody W. Enck, PhD
Human Dimensions Research Unit
Department of Natural Resources
119 Fernow Hall, Cornell University
Ithaca, NY  14853          607-255-8192
www.dnr.cornell.edu/hdru/

-Original Message-
From: bounce-6287225-3493...@list.cornell.edu 
[mailto:bounce-6287225-3493...@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Matthew Medler
Sent: Sunday, September 12, 2010 11:49 AM
To: Cayugabirds-L
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Red Knot and Ruff Sighting Info

For those still interested in trying to see the Red Knot and Ruff at 
Montezuma, I thought I'd share a few details of the sightings that Shawn 
Billerman, Andy Johnson, Jay McGowan and I had yesterday (11 September 
2010).  We spent from roughly 3 pm to 6 pm scanning the shorebirds from 
Towpath Road.  During that time, we had a very distant views of the RED 
KNOT in Knox-Marsellus Marsh (the wetland area on the left/west side of 
the dike).  By very distant views, I mean very distant views with 
Swarovski spotting scopes at 60X.  It would have been impossible to 
identify the knot (or any other shorebirds) with just binoculars or 
perhaps even with a low-powered scope.

As we were about to depart the Towpath Road area, we traveled a bit 
further down the road (to the east) to view shorebirds in what is 
apparently called Puddlers Marsh (the wetland area on the right/east 
side of the dike, as viewed from Towpath Road).  During the brief time 
we were there, a group of shorebirds (mostly Semipalmated Plovers) 
occasionally landed close enough to us so that we could not only see and 
identify them, but actually enjoy the beauty of their intricate 
plumages.  However, this group was very flighty and kept flying around 
the area.  During one of their brief touchdowns, though, the Red Knot 
was in their midst, offering nice (but brief) views.

We then heard from Kevin McGowan that the Ruff was present in 
Knox-Marsellus Marsh as viewed from East Road.  So, we headed up there, 
and Jay quickly relocated the Ruff.  Again, this bird was extremely 
distant, and it required high-powered scopes just to see it and identify 
it.  It was much too distant to really enjoy or appreciate any of the 
subtle details of its appearance.  While we were watching it, the Ruff 
was in the vicinity of some of the many Lesser Yellowlegs present.  To 
my eye, the body of the Ruff was about the same size as the Lesser 
Yellowlegs.  However, its legs were much shorter, giving a more compact 
look overall (compared to the yellowlegs).  For those who haven't seen 
the Ruff, it is a juvenile bird, meaning that it does not have any of 
the flashy ruffs that make adult males so flashy.  Instead, the most 
striking thing about the bird is the buffy coloration on the head and 
breast.  The general pattern of the bird is somewhat similar to Pectoral 
Sandpiper (and there are many Pectorals present), but the Ruff is 
buffier, and, importantly, much larger.

I hope this is helpful for those still hoping to see one or both of 
these birds.  It is quite challenging (and frustrating) to find and 
identify these birds (and all of the shorebirds present at 
Knox-Marsellus), but with a good scope and maybe a little luck, it can 
be done.

Good birding,
Matt Medler
Ithaca

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[cayugabirds-l] focus group about bird habitat on private lands

2010-07-09 Thread Jody W Enck
Dear Cayugabirders,
I am posting this announcement with permission of the list owner.  Ashley is a 
graduate student in the Department of Natural Resources here at Cornell, and 
she also wears some other hats with the federal Partners in Flight program.

Jody Enck
Department of Natural Resources
Cornell University



Are you a woodland owner with an interest in wildlife?  If so, please join 
other woodland owners in an informal discussion about woodlands and wildlife.

Cornell University Ph.D. student Ashley Dayer is studying wildlife habitat on 
New York State private lands to inform resources and programs provided for 
private landowners.  As part of her research, she is interested in speaking 
with landowners who meet the following criteria:


1)  Own at least 10 acres of woodland [Woodland is defined as land with at 
least ten well-spaced trees per acre or where trees were removed but will grow 
again (not converted to another use, such as cropland, pasture land, or 
residential). Woodland does not include Christmas tree farms, orchards, 
nurseries or unmowed old fields].



2)  Own this woodland within one of the southern tier counties of New York 
State (Chautauqua, Cattaraugus, Allegany, Steuben, Schuyler, Tompkins, 
Cortland, Tioga, Broome, Chenango, Otsego, Delaware).



3)  Do not currently manage for early successional forest habitat on your 
land. (For the purposes of this research, early successional forest habitat is 
defined as areas with grasses, trees, shrubs, and up to small trees).

If you are interested and meet the above criteria, please join Ashley at a 
landowner discussion in Cortland, New York on Thursday, July 22 from 
7:00-8:30pm.  Pizza and beverages will be provided.  Additionally, participants 
will take home wildlife habitat resource information.

Contact Ashley Dayer at aa...@cornell.edumailto:aa...@cornell.edu if you are 
willing to contribute.



Ashley Dayer
PhD Student
Department of Natural Resources
Cornell University
cell (541) 324-0281
aa...@cornell.edumailto:aa...@cornell.edu





__
Jody W. Enck, PhD
Human Dimensions Research Unit
Department of Natural Resources
119 Fernow Hall, Cornell University
Ithaca, NY  14853  607-255-8192
www.dnr.cornell.edu/hdru/http://www.dnr.cornell.edu/hdru/


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