Re: [cayugabirds-l] Butler's Pine warbler within Cayuga Basin?

2015-02-19 Thread John Cancalosi
I take a broader view of the Cayuga basin and harken back to the days of
Pangaea when I think that it is safe to say that the entire region shared a
common drainage.

Given the above interpretation, I am free to mention my experience this
weekend at Bombay hook NWR on Delaware bay. Frigid conditions made for
little open water. One small ice-free area had a pair of buffleheads
feeding which we stopped to watch. More buffleheads soon arrived followed
by several pairs of hooded mergansers. I wonder if the males of each
species were aware of what the other was wearing to the party, since the
bright white hood motif seemed to be the only fashion statement being made
by all the males on this occasion.

On Wed, Feb 18, 2015 at 12:29 PM, Geo Kloppel geoklop...@gmail.com wrote:

 Here's a link to the locality topo, if anyone wants to see it. The
 location of interest is along rte 89 in the NW corner of the map, just east
 of the 524' drumlin summit shown there.

 http://www.dec.ny.gov/data/dfwmr/bba/pdf/3577a.pdf

 -Geo
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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Icterid invasion, owl observation

2014-03-13 Thread John Cancalosi
Last night while all arctic hell was breaking loose, a brave mourning dove
was cooing outside my window. This irrepressible bird, like the rest of us,
must be yearning for Spring or was he mourning our eternal winter?



On Thu, Mar 13, 2014 at 12:13 PM, Dave Nutter nutter.d...@me.com wrote:

 At least 14 COMMON GRACKLES and 2 RED-WINGED BLACKBIRDS (one adult male,
 one immature male) has just invaded my neighbors' yard, taking over their
 feeders and drinking from a seep at the bottom of the hill. Earlier I heard
 and saw a NORTHERN FLICKER which looked a bit sad. Maybe it didn't visit
 the feeders.

 On Tuesday afternoon at 5pm I saw a flock of ~40 probable COMMON GRACKLES
 northbound over NYS-366 by the Vet School, but I wasn't able to pull over
 and get the binoculars on them in time to be 100% sure. Later that evening
 I went to Snyder Rd behind the airport and at about 7:20pm saw at least
 one, possibly 2, SHORT-EARED OWLS hunting. The longest view was of an
 initially distant bird which coursed north and south working its way east
 over the weedy grounds northeast of the runway, eventually pouncing in the
 field just outside the airport fence, not far from my vantage, but I could
 barely see its head above the grass. I listened unsuccessfully for American
 Woodcock until almost 8pm.

 --Dave Nutter

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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Injured/ill Snowy Owl Seneca Falls

2014-01-26 Thread John Cancalosi
Pelea just captured by rehabers. Apparently injured near its eye.

On Sunday, January 26, 2014, Dave K fishwatch...@hotmail.com wrote:

 Sunday 10:15AM Ridge Rd. 1/2 mile South of the intersection of
 Ridge/Hoster/Kuneytown Rds...just South of large silos on East side of
 Ridge.on snow very close to road.
 Alive but appears injured or sick.

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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Injured/ill Snowy Owl Seneca Falls

2014-01-26 Thread John Cancalosi
I have my phone set to spanish and when i typed snowy it changed it to
pelea of all things and i didnt catch it. So the owl is rescued in any case.

On Sunday, January 26, 2014, Dave K fishwatch...@hotmail.com wrote:

 Sunday 10:15AM Ridge Rd. 1/2 mile South of the intersection of
 Ridge/Hoster/Kuneytown Rds...just South of large silos on East side of
 Ridge.on snow very close to road.
 Alive but appears injured or sick.

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Re: [cayugabirds-l] FW: [BIRDBAND] Tracked Red-necked Phalarope from Scotland

2014-01-15 Thread John Cancalosi
I probably photographed these bird's ancestors on Fetlar some years ago.


On Wed, Jan 15, 2014 at 8:49 AM, Meena Madhav Haribal m...@cornell.eduwrote:

 A nice story about Red-necked Phalarope. Who knows from where our birds
 originate from!

 -Original Message-
 From: Bird Bander's Forum [mailto:birdb...@listserv.ksu.edu] On Behalf Of
 Lyndon Kearsley


 Not seen any news on this amazing migration item on the list and since
 this bird used the eastern seaboard flyway presume of interest in the US.
 The bird breeds in N Scotland and was tracked using a rump mounted
 geolocator over the whole migrztion. Found to have wintered on the coast of
 Equador / Peru presumably at sea. Photo of webbed feet below.

 Pasted text below:

 Neat video and map here: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-25661650

 see also:

 http://www.rarebirdalert.co.uk/v2/Content/Tiny_tag_unlocks_secret_to_record-breaking_migration_of_Red-necked_Phalaropes.aspx?s_id=753701389

 and: http://www.birdwatch.co.uk/channel/newsitem.asp?cate=__15087

 Distribution:
 [image: Inline images 1]

 A tracking device, which weighs less than a paperclip, has helped
 scientists uncover one of the world's great bird migrations. It revealed
 that a Scottish Red-necked Phalarope migrated thousands of miles west
 across the Atlantic to the Pacific Ocean, a journey never recorded for any
 other European breeding bird. In 2012, the RSPB, working in collaboration
 with the Swiss Ornithological Institute and Dave Okill of the Shetland
 Ringing Group, fitted individual geolocators to ten phalaropes nesting on
 Fetlar (Shetland), in the hope of learning where they spend the winter.

 After successfully recapturing one of the tagged birds when it returned to
 Fetlar last spring, experts discovered it had made an epic 16,000-mile
 round trip during its annual migration?-?flying from Shetland across the
 Atlantic, south down the eastern seaboard of the US, across the Caribbean,
 and Mexico, ending up off the coast of Peru. After wintering in the
 Pacific, it returned to Fetlar, following a similar route.

 Before this, many experts had assumed that Scottish breeding phalaropes
 joined the Scandinavian population at their wintering grounds, thought to
 be in the Arabian Sea. Yet the destination of this bird was the Pacific
 Ocean. Red-necked Phalarope is one of the UK's rarest breeding birds. It is
 now only found in Shetland and the Western Isles, and numbers fluctuate
 between just 15 and 50 nesting males. Scotland marks the southern limit of
 its breeding range, with the species far more abundant further north where
 it occupies wetlands around the northern hemisphere.

 [image: Inline images 2]
 --
 Lyndon

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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Target SNOW and JFK collisions

2013-12-11 Thread John Cancalosi
After hearing this report and watching a snowy owl at the Syracuse airport
remain perched for hours while jets passed within meters makes me think
that these birds can be extremely tolerant of human presence to put it
mildly.

It reminds me of a situation in Lincolnshire, England where grey seals haul
up to have their young on an RAF bombing range! Meanwhile planes are
screaming by continuously. On non-bombing days visitors are allowed on the
beach near the seals. One would think that this would be the end of the
seals, but their population is expanding!


On Wed, Dec 11, 2013 at 10:55 AM, Kenneth V. Rosenberg k...@cornell.eduwrote:

  This bird, like virtually all Snowy Owls I've seen, was completely
 oblivious to our (or the many other people and cars) presence. At one point
 it flew down in a silent glide directly at Anne and me, almost grazing our
 shoulders as it dove into the ditch behind us (possibly after a Song
 Sparrow that was calling there); and then turned and flew right back to the
 same post. These owls are stressed, no doubt, by their forced dispersal in
 search of food, and many will unfortunately probably not make it, but an
 owl that takes up temporary residence in a Target parking lot during peak
 shopping hours is not going to feel harassed by a few birders peering up in
 awe at it.

  KEN


  Ken Rosenberg
 Conservation Science Program
 Cornell Lab of Ornithology
 607-254-2412
 607-342-4594 (cell)
 k...@cornell.edu

  On Dec 11, 2013, at 8:47 AM, Scott Haber scotthab...@gmail.com
  wrote:

  I think Kevin was suggesting that the owl sliding was a result of the
 bird attempting to perch on a steep, snow-covered incline, and not because
 it was terrified by a small group of birders standing at a respectful
 distance, but I guess he could be wrong.

  -Scott


 On Wed, Dec 11, 2013 at 8:00 AM, John and Sue Gregoire k...@empacc.netwrote:

 All,

 1.Aren't we as a group harassing that TARGET Snowy? Seems every report
 has it
 quickly flying off, relocating, sliding, or some such. Just my two cents.

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[cayugabirds-l] Syracuse airport owls

2013-12-08 Thread John Cancalosi
I had a nice afternoon watching, and dare I say photographing, snowy owls
at the Syracuse airport. I called the airport police prior to my arrival
and gave them my vehicle details. They told me not to block gates and
observe all signs. They seemed pretty familiar with the owl situation and
quite friendly. A friendly security guard pointed out an owl perched right
beside a runway where he said it had been for nearly three hours. All the
while it was around 50 meters from many commercial jets which were coming
and going pretty much continuously. Another owl perched atop a spotlight
near the road and I watched it dive onto the field below, presumably
hunting. It returned empty-handed and continued to preen and survey the
area for the two hours that I watched.

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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Montezuma Ibis flew west

2013-10-19 Thread John Cancalosi
As a photographer that has followed this list for sometime, I am grateful
that the inappropriate actions of my fraternity are regularly highlighted
by certain members of the birdwatching community. Although I wasn't the
photographer mentioned in the post, I always welcome these opportunities to
be reminded of the shaky moral ground upon which I and all photographers
stand. The present entry leaves me realizing the ever-present need to reset
my moral compass in order to meet the exacting standards of those who are
the true shining beacons of propriety as far as conduct in the outdoors
goes. I would however point out that the present commentator seems to
exhibit a certain degree of equipment envy, which may have influenced his
judgement.  Submitted with all due respects and abundant humility.


On Fri, Oct 18, 2013 at 8:05 PM, Gary Kohlenberg jg...@cornell.edu wrote:

 As I was studying the two Ibis at Benning Marsh around 6:15pm a
 photographer arrived, wiggled his bulk up through the sunroof of the van,
 slapped down a sandbag , hauled up his giant lens and managed to spook the
 Ibis away to the west. I didn't see them again , but maybe they will be
 back in the morning after an evening cruise. I hope.

 Gary



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[cayugabirds-l] Flying the coop

2013-06-17 Thread John Cancalosi
I witnessed a hairy woodpecker leave the nest for the first time last
Thursday. It was at the nest that Meena discovered on the Cornell campus.
In any case, it just popped out rather unceremoniously at 11:22 and fell
out of sight never to be seen again. The parents continued to feed other
young at least through the following day

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[cayugabirds-l] Lone snow goose

2013-05-10 Thread John Cancalosi
I saw a lone snow goose flying north in the Wilseyville area yesterday
afternoon. As they are not exactly solitary birds, I wonder what was going
on. John

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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Mob of crow (or is it called death of crow?)

2012-06-01 Thread John Cancalosi
I know this isn't Cayuga basin however: Yesterday, while in a Louisiana
swamp, I watched a couple of blackbirds harassing a black vulture. One of
the harassers actually alighted on the vulture's back and vulture surfed
for about 200 meters. Couldn't tell the species for sure from a distance
but lots of red-winged blackbirds and starlings around.  Thought someone
might be interested.

On Fri, Jun 1, 2012 at 10:43 AM, Meena Haribal m...@cornell.edu wrote:

  I just watched a mob of crow, may be some forty + individuals.
 Initially, I thought they were chasing someone, but I could not see any
 targets. I checked if there was an owl, raven or a red-tail among them. But
 it did not seem like there were any.  They just seemed like bunch of rowdy
 bullies going door to door to get someone. There seemed to be no leader
 either. They all flew randomly.  Finally, they went behind the new Vet
 School diagnostic center and probably continued on to the plantations.
 Wonder what they were up to.

 Meena

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