Re: [cayugabirds-l] Geese on other lakes?

2021-03-13 Thread Kyle Gage
I live on Canandaigua Lake & we can get flocks of several thousand & in fact a 
sizable flock was around most of this winter. Seneca Lake can also have decent 
numbers but neither lake has the incredible numbers Cayuga Lake gets. I’m not 
sure of numbers on the other Finger Lakes but eBird records would give an idea. 

Sent from my iPhone

> On Mar 12, 2021, at 12:52 PM, Laura Stenzler  wrote:
> 
> Do the other Finger Lakes also attract large numbers of snow geese?
> 
> Laura
> 
> Laura Stenzler
> l...@cornell.edu
> 
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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Diving Mallard Video

2021-03-06 Thread Kyle Gage
I remember watching mallards diving at a park or water treatment plant in 
Cortland back in the 1980’s. Water was crystal clear & they would go to the 
bottom about 10’-15’ down. 

Sent from my iPhone

> On Mar 6, 2021, at 8:04 AM, Peter Saracino  wrote:
> 
> 
> Interesting Dave
> I wonder how deep the water IS there. Also do you have a sense from your 
> experience as to how long they can stay under?
> Pete Sar
> 
>> On Sat, Mar 6, 2021, 7:30 AM Dave K  wrote:
>> I've seen Mallards diving along the Cayuga Lake SP shore this season, maybe 
>> more than usual, maybe not.
>> Yesterday I had a chance to watch one diving at Oak Island in Waterloo.
>> The Mallard flock gathers around a Hen with a visible, bright speculum (top 
>> left of video) that is diving for food.
>> If diving is a learned behavior the 100 other Mallards aren't getting it and 
>> she's the only one eating.
>> The melee continues until the Domestics move in and break it up.
>> Video at
>> https://www.flickr.com/photos/105424358@N06/51008681556/in/datetaken/
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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Cowbirds

2020-04-11 Thread Kyle Gage

Some other species such as yellow warbler will reject cowbird eggs or build a 
new nest over one w/cowbird eggs in it. I have seen a 2 layered nest before ( 
after the young have fledged) presumably a yellow warblers. 

Also, from Cornell’s NestWatch program: “ Those species which accept cowbird 
eggs either do not notice the new eggs, or as new evidence suggests, accept 
them as a defense against total nest destruction. Cowbirds may “punish” 
egg-rejectors by destroying the entire nest, whereas it is possible for 
egg-acceptors to raise some of their own young in addition to the cowbird young”

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>> On Apr 11, 2020, at 10:10 AM, Magnus Fiskesjo  
>> wrote:
> 
> Hi, I would love to know, and I sure wish I could find that article. I 
> definitely recall that it said the cowbird chicks that were studied left 
> their nest like 3am to go to the field ("party"), and then came back to the 
> nest before dawn, to continue to pretend to be their slave parent's child!  
> 
> Of course later they'll not sit in the nest any more, and wander around while 
> being fed, I've seen that. And yes I am sure you are right about most of the 
> other things you noted! I maybe should not have said "teenager", -- that was 
> my word choice, not that of the scholars whose research was reported in that 
> Living Bird magazine article.  I used "teenager" because the cowbird nightly 
> field party seemed to be a ... teenager's dance party. 
> 
> Maybe someone else knows the URL for the actual article. I can't find it, I 
> must have read it in print only.  
> 
> This rather memorable article also talked about other astounding discoveries 
> such as that the catbird is the only bird that can resist the cowbird's 
> trickery. Unlike other birds, it said, the catbird will expel every egg that 
> looks different from its first egg. So, the cowbirds can only outsmart it by 
> laying their egg in the catbirds' new nest before even mama catbird has laid 
> her first egg there. If it can, then the catbird will expel her own eggs, one 
> after the other. And if the cowbird scheme fails, it might rip up the nest 
> (as revenge). 
> 
> --yrs.,
> Magnus Fiskesjö
> n...@cornell.edu
> 
> From: AB Clark [anneb.cl...@gmail.com]
> Sent: Saturday, April 11, 2020 9:30 AM
> To: Magnus Fiskesjo
> Cc: Michael H. Goldstein; CAYUGABIRDS-L
> Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Cowbirds
> 
> I wonder if there has been some mis-intepretation either in the article or by 
> subsequent readers.  Cowbird young, like other passerines, leave the nest in 
> the care of parents (foster or otherwise) and live outside the nest from then 
> on.  (OK individuals may hop outside during the day and return at night for 
> the day or two over which they fledge.)  Care for cowbirds in the fledgling 
> stage lasts a similar time to their relatives, red-winged blackbirds and 
> other smallish icterids.  They should be fed and be following or calling to 
> parents over the next 12-14 days, not joining older cowbirds.  Teenagers 
> would be perhaps yearling cowbirds?  It is later, in summer and fall, when 
> young cowbirds are independent of parents, that they flock up with other 
> cowbirds and blackbirds.
> 
> I haven’t heard anything about 3 am gatherings from Meredith or her students. 
>  Seems pretty dark for any such passerine to be moving.  West and King 
> studied them in aviaries and it could be that researchers got up at 3 am to 
> set up and be there when singing started to happen.  But in any case, cowbird 
> song learning is a fascinating situation where the basic songs are clearly 
> not learned from parents during late nestling or early fledgling periods, 
> i.e. develop “innately”, but  are socially modified in a number of ways, 
> feedback from female cowbirds and from competing male cowbirds both.  West 
> and King published several really nice overviews in accessible papers, 
> Scientific American or American Scientist, I believe.
> 
> By the way, there is at least one video-documented report of a hatchling 
> cowbird behaving like cuckoos and butting host eggs out of the nest.
> 
> 
> Anne B Clark
> 147 Hile School Rd
> Freeville, NY 13068
> 607-222-0905
> anneb.cl...@gmail.com
> 
> 
> 
> On Apr 11, 2020, at 9:11 AM, Magnus Fiskesjo 
> mailto:magnus.fiske...@cornell.edu>> wrote:
> 
> This morning, a male cowbird singing, at Salt Point. Never heard that before. 
> A very low volume series of thin crispy notes. No clucking, as in some 
> recordings of its song.
> 
> The bird sat very close, on top of the little pine/fur tree at the lakeside 
> fork of the path to the Bluebird Path.
> 
> It refused to leave its perch and continued singing even as I stood right 
> under the tree.
> 
> Ps. the weirdest cowbird research for me was the Living Bird piece reporting 
> on how a cowbird knows it is a cowbird, and not a whatever other bird, 
> despite being raised by them as slave 

Re: [cayugabirds-l] 2019 Muckrake Report

2019-09-22 Thread Kyle Gage
To update Bob McGuire’s excellent report of this years Muckrace, we had a 
“wrap-up” Muckrace meeting last week & some final numbers include: 34 teams, 
155 participants, & 173 total species tallied. Top teams are as Bob said in his 
report. 

To date $9600 has been raised. There is still time to make a donation to help 
us reach our goal of $10,000! Just go to 
“friendsofmontezuma.org/projects-programs/muckrace” to make a donation directly 
to the Friends or your favorite team. Thank you!

Kyle Gage
Friends of the Montezuma Wetlands Complex

Sent from my iPhone

> On Sep 19, 2019, at 8:21 AM, bob mcguire  wrote:
> 
> The Cayuga Bird Club sponsored two teams in this year’s Montezuma Muckrace, 
> held over a week ago. The event is a fundraiser for the Friends of the 
> Montezuma Wetlands Complex. Over the past 23 years it has raised over 
> $145,000 for projects in the Complex. If you would like to donate you may do 
> so at https://friendsofmontezuma.org/projects-programs/muckrace/. 
> 
>  I have prepared a rather lengthy report for our team - the ARROGANT BUSTARDS 
> (Susan Danskin, Diane Morton, Deirdre Anderson, Dave Nutter, Ken Kemphues, 
> Gary Kohlenberg, and myself) - for the October CBC newsletter. Several people 
> have asked, “So, how did you do?”. Here is a brief summary. 
> 
> This year some 34 teams (more than 145 participants) over the course of 24 
> hours (7pm September 6 - 7pm on the 7th) tallied more than 150 species. The 
> winning competitive team was From rochester with 119. The winning 
> recreational team had 130. The high count for photographers was 70 (Suan Yong 
> and Mark Miller). Both of the CBC-sponsored teams came in with 91! 
> 
> Most of the participants agreed that it was an uncommonly slow day this year. 
> Shorebird habitat was in short supply and for some reason (perhaps the recent 
> passage of a cold front) forest birds, warblers in particular, were scarce. 
> The highlights for our team were the gorgeous female Baltimore Oriole 
> foraging below Tschache Tower, the elusive Mockingbird that Susan spotted as 
> we sped by, and a spontaneously-calling Barred Owl along Van Dyne Spoor Road 
> at the end of the day.
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