Re: [cayugabirds-l] FLLT Bell Station Webpage

2021-09-10 Thread Marc Devokaitis
Here is another perspective on proposed the Bell Station auction in case
anyone feels like poking around: the auction website itself
https://www.ten-x.com/listing/bell-station-lansing-ny-14580/114888/

Several interesting tidbits including the description of Ithaca's financial
overview inder the "Market Information" tab.

Make good trouble!

Marc





On Thu, Sep 9, 2021 at 5:10 PM Suan Hsi Yong  wrote:

> The FLLT just put up this webpage about the Bell Station issue:
>
>   https://www.fllt.org/savebellstation
>
> If you haven't already, signing this change.org petition (
> https://chng.it/yQdP6g8PyT ) is something you can do quickly; there
> are plans for the NYS senator and assemblyperson to send the list of
> signatories to the governor's office:
>
> Suan
>
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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Red-headed Woodpecker

2021-05-22 Thread Marc Devokaitis
I didn't post about it ay thet time, but I had one in Trumansburg Village
on Thursday evening (5/20), near intersection off Congress St and Seneca
St. It was calling repeatedly, and doing some drumming on a metal pipe.

Marc Devokaitis

On Sat, May 22, 2021, 1:19 PM Christopher Sperry  wrote:

> I haven’t heard of any sittings on the list
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> On May 22, 2021, at 1:17 PM, Christopher Sperry 
> wrote:
>
>  So cool!!!
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> On May 22, 2021, at 10:27 AM, Laurie Rubin  wrote:
>
> 
> This message originated from outside the Ithaca College email system.
>
> In our backyard in Lodi. First time ever.
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Re: [cayugabirds-l] House Wren

2021-04-28 Thread Marc Devokaitis
I'd buy that. FOY House Wren was singing in our yard this morning as well.
Marc Devokaitis
Trumansburg Village

On Wed, Apr 28, 2021 at 10:12 AM Regi Teasley  wrote:

> I’m pretty sure I’m hearing a House Wren singing in our yard.  We’ve had
> one nesting here for several years.
> Regi
> West Hill (City)
>
> 
> *“The future of the world is nuts.”  Philip Rutter, founder of the
> American Chestnut Foundation*
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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Snow geese and bald Eagles

2021-03-17 Thread Marc Devokaitis
phenomenon ongoing. definitely hundreds of thousands, close in, starting at
lower lake rd, proceeding north. Absolutely astounding.

Marc Devokaitis

On Wed, Mar 17, 2021, 11:26 AM Johnson, Alyssa 
wrote:

> I’m saying over 200,000 now. THEY KEEP COMING!!! :)
>
> Get Outlook for iOS <https://aka.ms/o0ukef>
> --
> *From:* bounce-125468279-79436...@list.cornell.edu <
> bounce-125468279-79436...@list.cornell.edu> on behalf of Johnson, Alyssa <
> alyssa.john...@audubon.org>
> *Sent:* Wednesday, March 17, 2021 11:13:53 AM
> *To:* Cayugabirds-L@cornell.edu 
> *Subject:* [cayugabirds-l] Snow geese and bald Eagles
>
> 40+ bald eagles being seen along the Seneca river viewed from the Morgan
> Rd DEC office in Seneca Falls.
>
> 50,000 snow geese in a raft on Cayuga Lake viewed from the State Park boat
> launch.
>
> TONS of divers and tundra swans too
>
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Re: [cayugabirds-l] BirdNet App

2020-06-09 Thread Marc Devokaitis
Thanks Pete -

BirdNET has been successful for me with Eastern Towhee, Yellow Warbler,
Song Sparrow and Scarlet Tanager. It dipped on a still unidentified warbler
from last week--possibly a redstart, but the song seemed too long.

I've also tried to fool it into thinking I'm a White-throated Sparrow - it
has fallen for it once, and a few times it nailed the ID as a "human
whistle". Pretty fun to play around with.

One warning - if you record the song and submit it for analysis and the AI
DOESN'T come up with a confident ID, the recording *does not get saved*.
You can get around this by going into the app setting and turning storage
to "ON" your files will then be saved in a dedicated BirdNET folder.

For the recordings it does ID, it makes a handy list and allows easy access
to the recording snippet. Hope people will check it out. iOS version is in
the works.

Marc D

On Tue, Jun 9, 2020 at 8:31 AM Peter Saracino 
wrote:

> Hi fellow birders.
> I'm having fun playing around with the Cornell app "BirdNet" (currently
> for android only). It allows you to record a song and then tries to
> identify the bird making the sound. It then provides a Wikipedia page with
> info. about that bird. It's still in the developmental stage but I've been
> trying it out and so far it's been correct on a number of species including
> a rather distant warbling vireo! The only bird it got wrong so far was a
> wormeating warbler. I played its song using my Ibird pro app and BirdNet
> said it was a chipping sparrow (the songs are similar).
> Anyway, am wondering if anyone else out there has been using it and with
> what degree of success. So far it's been spot on for Oriole, cardinal,
> house wren, red-bellied woodpecker, indigo bunting, wood thrush, warbling
> vireo and robin (those are the only ones I've tried so far in real life).
> Thanks.
> Pete Sar
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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Phoebe and osprey nest-building

2020-04-05 Thread Marc Devokaitis
Also in southern Covert around dawn: copulating American Kestrels and a
singing Eastern Meadowlark in the fields on the west side of Congress St
Ext between Bates Rd. and Seneca Rd.

On Sat, Apr 4, 2020, 7:42 PM  wrote:

> Happiness is waking up to a foraging Eastern Phoebe in our silver maple
> tree, first of the season for us in Trumansburg, and then spending an hour
> watching the Osprey pair building their nest on the cell tower just south
> of the village of Covert.
> We had extended views of male repeatedly making trips close by us to pick
> up sticks and clumps of vegetation and then returning to the nest where the
> larger female sat on the edge of the nest, occasionally going to the nest
> under construction and moving things a bit while the male was out, but most
> of the arrangements were made by the male. A member of our group also
> reported that copulation occurred, while we were dispersing, cinching the
> male-female ID.
> Good birding
> Jared Dawson
> Trumansburg
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[cayugabirds-l] Seneca White Deer Festival Bird Walks - volunteer leader(s)?

2019-08-29 Thread Marc Devokaitis
Hi Folks,

I'm writing to let everyone know about the inaugural Seneca White Deer
Festival happening on *Saturday, October 5th* at the Seneca Army
Depot/Seneca White Deer HQ (5479 NY-96A
Romulus, NY US 14541)

I've been talking to the organizers, and HAD recently agreed to lead a pair
of hour-long bird walks at* 11:15 and 1:15*. I thought this would be
exciting to our local birding community as it means visiting a usually
inaccessible area with tons and tons of scrubby and open habitat during
prime sparrow migration season.

HOWEVER, a conflict has arisen on that weekend, and it looks like I will
have to back out. So I'm hoping that I can find one, two, or even a small
handful of people who might be willing to take this on in my stead.

The details were just hammered out this week, and the event has not  really
been promoted yet, but I would hate to see this opportunity for the local
birding community slip by.

*Please let me know* if you might be willing to jump in and lead one or
both of these walks. There would also be an (optional) opportunity to scout
the location on the mornings of October 1st or 2nd. I can put you in touch
with the organizer.

Thanks in advance for considering!
Marc

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Re: [cayugabirds-l] confirmation of RED-HEADED WOODPECKER breeding

2019-08-07 Thread Marc Devokaitis
That's so exciting Jared!
Incredibly/incredulously I have only had one local sighting this summer,
despite the fact that our yards are separated by no more than 500 feet, and
we keep filled suet feeders. It has not, to my knowledge, visited our yard.
I encountered it around the corner from you to the northwest, on Seneca Rd
between its intersections with Bradley St. and Rte 96 -- an adult was
working the groves of trees on either side of the road. This was about 10
days ago.
Hoping for the best for these neighborhood newcomers!

Marc

On Tue, Aug 6, 2019 at 6:51 PM Jared Dawson  wrote:

> Finally today 6 August I was able to confirm local breeding in the NW area
> of Trumansburg. From my house at 30 Bradley I first saw an adult back in
> the large mostly dead sugar maple where I first saw this species on 16 May.
> Then I heard the “chatter call” given by two birds, and saw two birds fly
> out of the maple to other nearby mature maples. Finally I got decent looks
> at a juvenile bird, with a dark gray head, and limited spots of white on
> the wing. In these trees there were at least three birds giving the chatter
> calls, and possibly four. I will try and get photos in the next few days if
> I can. The juvenile was on a suet feeder across Bradley to the west of my
> yard. I’ve only seen adult (s) at my suet feeder.
> Jared Dawson
> Trumansburg
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[cayugabirds-l] Black-backed Whistling Duck at Stewart Park

2019-06-17 Thread Marc Devokaitis
No details - but Carol Cedarholm, just posted a picture on Cayuga Bird Club
Facebook page.

Marc

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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Egyptian Goose?

2019-05-21 Thread Marc Devokaitis
Hi Candace,

Barbara Littlefair contacted the Lab to report  an Egyptian Goose in Salmon
Creek (Sunday) and up on the grass in Myers Park (Monday). She has some
images that confirm. Guessing others have seen this bird by now!

Marc



On Mon, May 20, 2019 at 11:34 AM Salt Point Osprey Camera 
wrote:

> I saw what looked like a pale Egyptian Goose in the company of two Canada
> geese on Salmon Creek mid-way between the RR bridge and the creek mouth at
> 10:30 through 11:10 this morning. It  walked along the banks of the creek
> on the Myer's Park side for quite a while.
>
> We've had Moscovy ducks there before. This is my first EGGO, if it is one.
>
> Candace
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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Peregrine on Seneca Street?

2019-04-05 Thread Marc Devokaitis
Hi Melanie,

It's certainly a possibility. I have seen a Merlin in the area around Six
Mile Creek downtown a couple of times in the past month, so consider that
too if you haven't.

Marc

On Fri, Apr 5, 2019, 9:58 AM Melanie Uhlir  wrote:

> Hi! I'm sorry for the late posting, but I was downtown for appointments
> yesterday and heard an unusual (to me), call and wondered if it's
> possible I hear a Peregrine? I found sound files on line and it seemed
> to match. I could not get a visual on the source of the sound. was
> midway between the intersection with Aurora and Quarry Street when I
> heard the vocalization. I was nearing the Cat Cafe.
>
>
>
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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Question

2019-02-01 Thread Marc Devokaitis
Hi Carol,

A guess would be that the fruits/seeds of the plant are "persistent",
meaning they last a long time on the plant, and while Alaskan Cedar  may
not be a familiar for the local birds, they are into them now for whatever
reason. Perhaps they're exploring novel food sources at this point in the
season as their usual choices become depleted.

Marc Devokaitis

On Fri, Feb 1, 2019 at 8:52 AM Carol Keeler  wrote:

> I’m wondering why my birds have suddenly found an Alaskan Cedar so
> interesting.  I noticed several birds, Cardinals, Tree Sparrows, Chickadees
> all sitting at the tips of a birch tree which is close to the Cedar.
> They’d fly over to the Cedar and go in.  More and more of my regular birds
> came and seemed to check out the tree.  At one time there was a Blue Jay, a
> couple of male Cardinals, two Titmice, a Chickadee, Tree Sparrows, and
> House Sparrows all sitting in the birch waiting to go in the Cedar.  What’s
> going on?  I know the Cedar has little seed cones.  I’ve never seen any
> birds in the Cedar before.  It was fascinating to watch.  I usually see the
> birds in the Norway spruces which are nearby, not the Cedar.  There are no
> feeders on that side of the house.  Any ideas of what’s going on?
>
> Sent from my iPad
>
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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Where are the birds?

2018-06-20 Thread Marc Devokaitis
One thing Dave didn't mention is the possibility of the (increasingly

) well-documented

songbird
declines following suit from a sharp decline in (and to also timing
mismatches with) the invertebrate prey that nearly all songbirds rely on to
some extent throughout their breeding cycle.

The latest of lots and lots of stories about this over the past couple of
years below. Europe seems to be more on top of studying and spreading the
word about this.
https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2018/jun/17/where-
have-insects-gone-climate-change-population-decline

“If all humankind were to disappear, the world would regenerate back to the
rich state of equilibrium that existed 10,000 years ago. If insects were to
vanish, the environment would collapse into chaos.” E.O.Wilson

Marc


On Wed, Jun 20, 2018 at 1:00 PM, David Nicosia 
wrote:

> I remember this conversation last year. If there is a marked rapid decline
> in song birds as reported, then something has occurred in the past couple
> years that is wiping our birds out. Habitat loss is a gradual slow process
> that would not be so readily noticed on a wide scale from year to year. The
> weather patterns, I don't believe were bad enough for massive mortality
> events (although I haven't looked into this in full depth). Wind farms keep
> popping up, but again its a gradual pressure that wouldn't manifest itself
> in 1-2 years for such reported rapid declines. The only thing I can think
> of is if there is a disease (west nile?) that is affecting songbirds and
> other species? This could explain two poor breeding seasons. Does anyone
> know if this is being reported in species of songbirds???
>
> Dave
>
>
>
> On Tue, Jun 19, 2018 at 2:10 PM  wrote:
>
>> The current "record" based on banded birds returned to the wild is 8
>> years 2 months. That said, Nancy may well have been enjoying the progeny of
>> that first pair as their site fidelity is high.
>>
>> John
>>
>>
>> ---
>> John and Sue Gregoire
>> Field Ornithologists
>> Kestrel Haven Migration Observatory
>> 5373 Fitzgerald Rd
>> 
>> Burdett, NY 14818
>> 
>> 42.443508000, -76.758202000
>>
>> On 2018-06-19 17:17, Asher Hockett wrote:
>>
>> Likely "your" pewee was at least two different birds, as their lifespan
>> is ~7 years.
>>
>> On Mon, Jun 18, 2018 at 7:57 PM, Nancy Cusumano <
>> nancycusuman...@gmail.com> wrote:
>>
>>> It really is an odd summer!  We also are missing "our" peewee, who has
>>> been here reliably for the 14 years I have lived in this house. Missing him!
>>> There are at least 2 pair of great crested flycatchers and on Friday an
>>> Indigo bunting showed up and is still around singing his head off from the
>>> tops of the black locust trees.
>>> There are sapsucker babies (that sound like they are humming in morse
>>> code from inside the tree) and bluebirds too.  So down one peewee, up a
>>> bunting? Guess I would call that OKbut I want my peewee back.
>>>
>>> thanks for everyone's comments on this thread.
>>>
>>> Nancy
>>>
>>> Cayuga Dog Rescue has saved more than 578! dogs since 2005!
>>> Learn more at cayugadogrescue.org
>>>
>>> On Mon, Jun 18, 2018 at 1:28 PM,  wrote:
>>>
 Hi!

 Over 30years of banding, migration and population study here and we
 experienced and ever increasing paucity of birds. About 15 years ago I
 wrote a report citing these losses. While many can be linked to loss of
 habitat mainly due to factory farming, that didn't account for the lack of
 song. We prognosticated at the time that populations within species were
 undergoing a drastic diminishment.That has since been shown to be even
 worse than we guessed ( based on American Bird Conservancy data sets).

 A result most noticeable was in song. With fewer competitors, birds in
 lesser numbers arrive on native land and , if they find it still existent,
 establish a territory. With little or no competition, the territorial song
 is short lived -after all, why expend energy needlessly? Defense of
 territory is seldom needed so in season song is greatly diminished.

 That doesn't mean it stops entirely but certainly far less than what we
 new 50, 40 or 30 years ago.

 Fast forward to the crazy migration we experienced this spring.
 Expected species have still not checked in and we guess they either
 overflew or were content to our south. We have the same experience with
 Veery here and Wood Thrush has been declining steadily. Least Flycatcher,
 Warbling Vireo are all missing and the fancy Thrushes once a stopover
 certainty haven't been seen for 

[cayugabirds-l] Magee Marsh bus trip with the Cornell Lab

2018-04-19 Thread Marc Devokaitis
Hi Cayuga Birders,

There is still space left on the bus to Magee Marsh with the Spring Field
Ornithology class. Magee is known as "the warbler capital of North America"
and we are likely to see 25-30 species of warblers, plus hordes of other
birds (and birders :))

The bus leaves the morning of Friday, May 11th, and returns on Sunday
evening, May 13th. This year, the schedule will allow 2 mornings on the
boardwalk, doubling the odds of a great migrant show.

See details here:
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/sfo/magee-marsh-trip

Email sfo_cl...@cornell.edu or call 607-254-2165 if you have questions.

Marc Devokaitis and Leo Sack
Cornell Lab of Ornithology

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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Song id

2018-04-04 Thread Marc Devokaitis
I'd guess Carolina Wren
https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Carolina_Wren/sounds

Marc

On Wed, Apr 4, 2018 at 8:01 AM, Mo Barger Rooster Hill Farm <
m...@roosterhillfarm.com> wrote:

> What early bird sounds similar to an lovebird (teacher teacher) but with a
> clear and loud voice? Calls in 3s. I have a bad recording I can share.
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[cayugabirds-l] Monday Night Seminar: Bird Sounds Decoded

2018-03-29 Thread Marc Devokaitis
Hello Everyone,



Next week’s Monday Night Seminar at the Cornell Lab features Nathan
Pieplow, author of Peterson's Field Guide to Bird Sounds of North America.



Join us in person or watch online at
http://dl.allaboutbirds.org/cornelllab-monday-night-seminars. Doors open at
7:00. Free, no registration required.



Hope to see you there!

Marc

--


Bird Sounds Decoded Monday, April 2, 2018 7:30pm



Nathan Pieplow, Author, Peterson's Field Guide to Bird Sounds of North
America


Identifying birds by sound is a crucial skill that can be difficult to
learn. Author Nathan Pieplow has devised a system that lets you identify
bird sounds without having to memorize them. The Peterson Field Guide to
Bird Sounds lets you look up sounds, the way you look up words in the
dictionary. The key is learning to visualize sounds. Nathan’s clear,
practical instructions for visualizing sounds will make you a better
listener. You will hear details in sound that you hadn’t noticed before,
and you will have the vocabulary to describe those details. Nathan will
help you identify birds by their sounds, but he will also help you
understand birds by their sounds. For the sounds of birds are a language,
carrying messages from one bird to another. To understand the language, and
decode the messages, all you need is the right dictionary.




Marc Devokaitis
Cornell Lab of Ornithology

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[cayugabirds-l] Spring Field Ornithology "Open House"

2018-03-28 Thread Marc Devokaitis
Hi All -

Tonight, all are welcome for the kick-off of SFO at the Cornell Lab. Come
see what it's all about!

6:30: Kevin McGowan: "Birding the Cayuga Basin"
7:30: Steve Kress: "Winter Resident Bird ID"
8:30: Steve Kress: "Seabird Restoration"

Cheers,
Marc

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[cayugabirds-l] Rosemary Grant at Cornell this Monday, 5:00pm in Call Auditorium

2018-03-08 Thread Marc Devokaitis
Hi Everyone,

Hopefully you have all gotten word about this exciting lecture coming up on
Monday. Rosemary Grant is a legend in the field of evolutionary biology and
ornithology, famous for her work on the Galapagos "finches" (actually in
the tanager family).

Hugh Powell interviewed Dr. Grant for All About Birds - you can read that
interview and more about the event at
http://news.cornell.edu/stories/2018/03/pioneering-evolutionary-biologist-rosemary-grant-speak-march-12

If you can't make it in person, CornellCast will be live-streaming the
event. You can watch through the usual Monday Night Seminar page,
bit.ly/BirdTalks

Hope to see you there!

Marc Devokaitis
Cornell Lab of Ornithology

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[cayugabirds-l] Monday Night Seminar: A Night at the Museum (of Vertebrates)

2018-02-01 Thread Marc Devokaitis
CayugaBirders:


Next week’s Monday Night Seminar features  Vanya Rohwer and Casey Dillman.
Together, Vanya and Casey curate the birds, mammals, fishes, amphibians,
and reptiles that make up the collections of the Cornell University Museum
of Vertebrates.  After a brief lecture in the auditorium, the audience will
be treated to some time with Vanya and Casey in the collections.



Join us in person or watch online at
http://dl.allaboutbirds.org/cornelllab-monday-night-seminars



Door open at 7:00. Free, no registration required.



Hope to see you there!

Marc

--



*Join Us for the Next Cornell Lab of Ornithology Monday Night Seminar*



*Monday, February 5th, 2018  7:30 PM to 9:00 PM*



*A Night at the Museum (of Vertebrates)*



*Vanya Rohwer and Casey Dil**l**man, Curators*



The best natural history collections are vibrant, dynamic places that
reveal new insights into the workings of the natural world. Join Vanya
Rohwer and Casey Dillman, curators of the Cornell University Museum of
Vertebrates (CUMV), to learn how natural history collections are used to
teach, conserve, and inspire new ideas. The lecture takes place in the
auditorium as usual, but Vanya and Casey will escort the audience into the
museum collections for a special behind-the-scenes peek at the specimens
and spaces of the CUMV.

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[cayugabirds-l] Spring Field Ornithology 2018

2018-01-29 Thread Marc Devokaitis
Dear Cayuga Birders,


I love that moment in late January when I notice just a smidge more
daylight remaining at the end of the workday. It sets me to thinking of the
all of the rotations and revolutions that we are a part of on this
fantastic planet. And more importantly, it makes me think about spring
birding!!



With that, I want to remind everyone of (or in some cases, introduce you
to) the Cornell Lab’s Spring Field Ornithology course (SFO
), taking place from March 28th – May
20th.



SFO is an Ithaca-area tradition that has helped thousands of people learn
about birds and birding over the past four-plus decades. It is also a great
way to get to know the birding community and the birding hotspots around
the area. Designed for all skill levels, the course has two main sections
plus a pair of overnight trips.

· *Wednesday night lectures*, including a visit to the bird
collection of the Cornell Museum of Vertebrates and a nighttime 'owl
prowl.'

· *Saturday or Sunday field trips* to regional birding hotspots
such as Braddock Bay Bird Observatory, Derby Hill Hawk Watch, Montezuma,
Sapsucker Woods and Greensprings Natural Cemetery.

· *An overnight and a weekend trip* to birding meccas: Montezuma
National Wildlife Refuge and Magee Marsh, Ohio.

*Dr. Steve Kress, *VP for Bird Conservation for National Audubon Society,
returns to teach the course, joined by a host of guest lecturers from
around the Lab. A cadre of local birding experts lead the weekend trips.
Visit http://www.birds.cornell.edu/sfo  to watch a video about the course,
look at photos, review the course schedule and enroll, and learn about the
offerings.

*Early bird discounts apply through February 5th! *


Full schedule: http://www.birds.cornell.edu/sfo/Course_schedule
Online portal:
https://academy.allaboutbirds.org/courses/spring-field-ornithology-northeast/


*If you are interested in any of this, or have any questions, please let me
know by email or visit me up in the Adelson Library at the Cornell Lab.*


*And please help spread the word by forwarding this email to anyone you
think might be interested!*


Happy Birding!
Marc

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[cayugabirds-l] Monday Night Seminar - Primates and Snakes: 75 Years of Deadly Dialogue?

2017-11-30 Thread Marc Devokaitis
Hi Everyone:



The December Monday Night Seminar is coming up next week. For a change of
pace, the upcoming session will be *largely bird-free!* I’ve heard that
Harry Greene is a fantastic speaker; this should be a real treat.

For those who can’t attend in person, we will also be live streaming the
lecture at bit.ly/BirdTalks
<http://dl.allaboutbirds.org/cornelllab-monday-night-seminars>. Doors open
at 7:00. Free, no registration required.

Hope you can make it!

Marc



***



*Monday, *
*December 4, 2017   7:30 PM to 9:00 PM*


Primates and Snakes: 75 Million Years of Deadly Dialogue?



*Harry W. Greene, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Cornell
University*



Come hear the fascinating story of how snakes and primates have influenced
one another’s evolution for millions of years. Harry Greene from Cornell
University’s Department of Ecology and Evolution explores the theory that
snakes have influenced the evolution of primate neurobiology, vision, and
fear, beginning as long as 75 million years ago with constricting predators
and 50 million years ago with venomous adversaries. The origins of venomous
front-fangs radically changed encounters with snake predators, such that
birds and primates, with their sophisticated visual, acoustical, and
cognitive abilities, influenced the evolution of serpentine defensive
displays and mimicry. As weapon-wielders, primates in particular might have
affected snake evolution, including the origins of serpents’ long-distance
weaponry in Africa and Asia. These long-term, evolutionary relationships
among snakes and primates both challenge and inspire efforts to conserve
snakes.



Marc Devokaitis
The Cornell Lab of Ornithology

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[cayugabirds-l] Monday Night Seminar -- Arthur Singer, 50 Years of Wildlife Art

2017-11-02 Thread Marc Devokaitis
Hi Everyone:



The November Monday Night Seminar is coming up next week at the Lab of
Ornithology. For those who can’t attend in person, we will also be live
streaming the lecture at bit.ly/BirdTalks
. Doors open
at 7:00. Free, no registration required.



The new exhibit, which accompanies Monday’s lecture and book signing, is on
display in the auditorium as of today.  Please check it out!



Hope to see you there,

Marc



***



*Monday, November 6, 2017  *
* 7:30 PM to 9:00 PM*



*Arthur Singer: 50 Years of Wildlife Art*



*Paul and Alan Singer*

Authors of the new book Arthur Singer: The Wildlife Art of an American
Master



Join Paul and Alan Singer, sons of prolific wildlife artist Arthur Singer
for a special evening commemorating the talent and work of their father.
First, Paul Singer will provide a look at the wildlife art of Arthur Singer
from 1934 until his death in 1990. Then, Alan Singer, Arthur’s illustration
assistant on a variety of projects including revisions to the Field Guide
to Birds of North America (aka “The Golden Guide”) and the US Postal Stamp
commemoratives, will share his observations on Arthur's working methods and
approach to illustration and painting.



*The talk will be followed by a book signing and a companion exhibit of
Singer’s work will be on display in the auditorium through February 2018.*

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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Where are all my feeder birds

2017-10-25 Thread Marc Devokaitis
Hi All,

Re-opening this thread--I thought I'd share with the list a comment from
Donald Leopold, Chair of the Department of Environmental and Forest Biology
 at SUNY-ESF (I was asking him about something else, but this came up.)

"Not only are conifers producing an extraordinary abundance of cones but I
have never seen such an abundance of walnuts, hickories, oak acorns, sugar
maple and white ash samaras, and other tree fruits and seeds.
Interestingly, I’ve seen this above average production across the
Northeast."


Hopefully this goes a long way to explaining the increase in decreases this
year.


Marc Devokaitis




On Wed, Oct 18, 2017 at 12:46 PM, Barbara B. Eden <b...@cornell.edu> wrote:

> For the past 2 months the resident birds that I daily feed have dropped in
> population This is the first time this has happened and even those pesky
> squirrels have left I live in Cayuga Heights and my backyard is a bird
> friendly habitat
> Any thoughts would be appreciated
> Thanks
> Barbara Eden
>
> Sent using OWA for iPhone
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[cayugabirds-l] Monday Night Seminar: Noah Strycker

2017-09-27 Thread Marc Devokaitis
Hi Folks,
Join Us for the Next Cornell Lab of Ornithology Monday Night Seminar


Monday, October 2, 2017  7:30 PM to 9:00 PM


Birding Without Borders: An Epic World Big Year





*Noah Strycker, Associate Editor, Birding Magazine*




In 2015, bird nerd Noah Strycker of Oregon became the first human to see
more than half of the planet’s bird species in a single,year-long,
round-the-world birding trip. Anything could have happened, and a lot did.
He was scourged by blood-sucking leeches, suffered fevers and sleep
deprivation, survived airline snafus and car breakdowns and mudslides and
torrential floods, skirted war zones,and had the time of his life. Birding
on seven continents and carrying only a pack on his back, Strycker enlisted
the enthusiastic support of local birders to tick more than 6,000 species,
including Adelie Penguins in Antarctica, a Harpy Eagle in Brazil, a
Spoon-billed Sandpiper in Thailand, and a Green-breasted Pitta in Uganda.
He shared the adventure in real time on his daily blog (audubon.org/noah),
and now he reveals the inside story. This humorous and inspiring
presentation about Strycker’s epic World Big Year will leave you with a new
appreciation for the birds and birders of the world.



*Following the presentation, Noah will be available for a book signing. His
book "Birding Without Borders" will be available in the Wild Birds
Unlimited store before and after the talk. *



*You can watch many of our past live-streamed seminars via the free video
seminar archive <http://bit.ly/1fYRfuT> on our website.*


Marc Devokaitis

Cornell Lab of Ornithology

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[cayugabirds-l] Red-headed Woodpecker in Lansing

2017-06-29 Thread Marc Devokaitis
Be on the lookout:

I just talked to a woman who lives on Peruville Rd (nearest cross street:
Sheldon) who has been observing a Red-headed Woodpecker at her feeders for
several days. She has observed it flying across the street to the same
location many times, and suspects there may be a nest.  I have encouraged
her to post to eBird.

Marc

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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Lack of birds

2017-06-20 Thread Marc Devokaitis
Throwing my two cents into this vicissitudinous thread...I just wrapped up
a correspondence with a woman in Maryland who was distraught several weeks
ago because her usual 50-hummingbird station was only getting two birds.
Yesterday she wrote to say she now had 40+, but the arrival of the bulk of
them was nearly *one month* later than usual.

eBird line graphs bear out similar trends -- because so many people ask
about hummer numbers in particular, I've been following the frequency and
abundance figures for several states (NY, MA, NJ) and while numbers were
measurably lower then than the average of the previous four years early on
in the season, in the past few weeks that has shifted and the counts for
the mid-June weeks seem to be much more in line with previous years.

With hummers in particular, I think some people leave each season with the
memory of numbers and frequency based on the late summer, when the number
of birds tends to double or triple, then they get disappointed when the
pre-breeding numbers are not at that same level.

Marc



On Mon, Jun 19, 2017 at 8:45 AM, Richard Tkachuck 
wrote:

> We have 3 nest boxes in my yard with tree swallows.
> Richard Tkachuck
>
> On Jun 18, 2017 9:48 AM, "Glenn Wilson"  wrote:
>
> In Union Center (Endicott), do not have any Tree Swallows that I know of.
>
> BUT the Spring Street feeders are very active with Rose-Breasted
> Grosbeaks, Cardinals, Juncos with young, White and Red breasted Nuthatches,
> Mourning Doves, at least two Hummingbirds, one pair of nesting Bluebirds,
> two nests of Prairie Warblers, calling Ovenbirds and Towhees, and a very
> vocal Phoebe. Can't forget Purple Finches, nesting House Finches, and two
> active House Wren nests
>
> Other than Tree Swallows, I would say this location is pretty normal. No
> Great Blue or Green Herons after the goldfish yet but no doubt they will
> come.
>
> Glenn Wilson
> Endicott, NY
> www.WilsonsWarbler.com
>
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[cayugabirds-l] Monday Night Seminar - Birds Through the Lens: Using video technology to reveal the lives of birds

2017-06-02 Thread Marc Devokaitis
Hi Birders:

Please join us for the next Monday Night Seminar, on June 5th.at the
Cornell Lab of Ornithology.  As always, the seminars are held in the
auditorium at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, and are free and open to the
public. The doors open at 7:00pm, talk begins at 7:30.

For those who are further afield, we will be streaming this seminar live.
Bookmark http://dl.allaboutbirds.org/cornelllab-monday-night-seminars for
quick access on Monday evening.
Birds Through the Lens: Using video technology to reveal the lives of birds



*Speaker: **Ann Prum, Founder, Producer and Cinematographer, Coneflower
Productions*

As the Founder, Producer & Cinematographer of Coneflower Studios, Ann
Johnson Prum has spent the last two decades creating nonfiction programs
using a combination of beautiful imagery, fascinating science and great
storytelling. Garnering 10 Emmy nominations and an Emmy win for Best Nature
Documentary (An Original Duckumentary), Coneflower Productions pushes the
use of new technology, science and creative storytelling to bring the world
of wildlife to viewers. Hear from Ann about life in the field and
production studio and learn what it takes to create ground-breaking
multimedia.















Marc Devokaitis

Public Information Specialist



*Learn something new about birds every month! Sign up for our eNewsletter
at **birds.cornell.edu/enews*
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[cayugabirds-l] Monday Night Seminar + Lunchtime talk: Dr. Christine Sheppard, American Bird Conservancy

2017-04-28 Thread Marc Devokaitis
Good morning!



May 1st is the next Monday Night Seminar at the Cornell Lab. Our speaker,
Dr. Christine Sheppard from the American Bird Conservancy, will also be
giving a special lunchtime lecture earlier in the day. See below for
information on both events.  Hope you can join us!

We will be streaming the EVENING seminar live. Bookmark
http://dl.allaboutbirds.org/cornelllab-monday-night-seminars for quick
access on Monday evening.

-Marc



*May 1, Noon–1:00 p.m.*



Cornell Lab of Ornithology Visitor Center Auditorium



*Speaker:* Dr. Christine Sheppard, Bird Collisions Campaign Manager,
American Bird Conservancy


*The Science Behind Bird Collisions and Bird-Friendly Recommendations*


When Christine Sheppard first started started working with the American
Bird Conservancy in 2009 to raise awareness about bird mortality from
window collisions, she quickly discovered that there was virtually no
science or basis for most recommendations. A monitoring program she
coordinated for the Wildlife Conservation Society Center for Global
Conservation, designed to incorporate the latest bird-friendly
recommendations, was the first investigation to see whether those
recommendations actually worked. Many did not. Christine has been digging
into the problem ever since and will share her finding from many studies,
most not directly about collisions of any sort, that have important
applications for explaining what solutions work and why.







*May 1, 7:30pm – 9:00pm*



*Speaker: *Dr. Christine Sheppard, Bird Collisions Campaign Manager,
American Bird Conservancy



Cornell Lab of Ornithology Visitor Center Auditorium



*Bird Mortality From Collisions With Glass: What we’ve learned, what we
need to know, what you can do*



You probably think that you can see glass – but long ago, you learned a
concept – glass is an invisible barrier or reflective illusion – that birds
never understand. As many as a billion birds die each year in the U.S.,
nearly half of them on home windows. In the last decade, many scientists
have contributed pieces to the puzzle of how birds really see the world.
This has established a basis for developing new solutions for existing
glass, as well as materials and design strategies for creating new,
bird-friendly buildings. Most architects, urban planners – most people –
don’t understand why birds are important and how big the collisions problem
is. Virtually everyone has seen or heard a bird hit glass, but think of it
as a rare occurrence. Dr. Christine Sheppard will discuss the tools we have
to solve the problem and the big job ahead getting those solutions
implemented. However, this is one conservation issue where individuals can
take immediate action and see immediate results.




Marc Devokaitis

Public Information Specialist

Cornell Lab of Ornithology

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[cayugabirds-l] Monday Night Seminar: A World of Sound with Juan Pablo Culasso

2017-03-30 Thread Marc Devokaitis
Hi Everyone:

Please join us for the next Monday Night Seminar, on April 3rd. As always,
the seminars are held in the auditorium at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology,
and are free and open to the public. The doors open at 7:00,

We will be streaming this seminar live. Bookmark
http://dl.allaboutbirds.org/cornelllab-monday-night-seminars for quick
access on Monday evening.  Hope to see you there!

-Marc





*Monday, April 3*

*7:30pm*



*Juan Pablo Culasso*

*A World of Sound*



A blind birdwatcher from Uruguay proves you don’t need sight to see.
Through the sounds of nature he is able to envision the world that
surrounds him. Juan Pablo Culasso is one of the best birdwatchers in the
Americas by using his ears, not his eyes. He was born blind and as a child
learned to identify the feathered creatures by their voices. As an adult,
his career is recording the sounds of nature. Last year, he had the
opportunity, as a guest of the Uruguayan government, to travel to
Antarctica to learn the landscape of the world’s last wilderness through
its sounds. Join us to hear from Juan Pablo about his travels to this
remote place and what he discovered there.



*You can watch any of our past live-streamed seminars via the free video
seminar archive <http://bit.ly/1fYRfuT> on our website.*







Upcoming Monday Night Seminars:

-











May 1, 2017

Dr. Christine Sheppard, Bird Collisions Campaign Manager, American Bird
Conservancy



*Bird Mortality From Collisions With Glass: What we’ve learned, what we
need to know, what you can do*



You probably think that you can see glass – but long ago, you learned a
concept – glass is an invisible barrier or reflective illusion – that birds
never understand. As many as a billion birds die each year in the U.S.,
nearly half of them on home windows. In the last decade, many scientists
have contributed pieces to the puzzle of how birds really see the world.
This has established a basis for developing new solutions for existing
glass, as well as materials and design strategies for creating new,
bird-friendly buildings. Most architects, urban planners – most people –
don’t understand why birds are important and how big the collisions problem
is. Virtually everyone has seen or heard a bird hit glass, but think of it
as a rare occurrence. Dr. Christine Sheppard will discuss the tools we have
to solve the problem and the big job ahead getting those solutions
implemented. However, this is one conservation issue where individuals can
take immediate action and see immediate results.











Marc Devokaitis

Cornell Lab of Ornitology

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[cayugabirds-l] Black Vulture

2017-03-24 Thread Marc Devokaitis
One soaring with a TUVU over downtown Trumansburg around 5:00pm today.

Marc Devokaitis

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[cayugabirds-l] MONDAY NIGHT SEMINAR: Perspectives on Nocturnal Bird Migration: What We've Learned from BirdCast

2017-03-03 Thread Marc Devokaitis
Hi Everyone:

Please join us for the next Monday Night Seminar, featuring Andrew
Farnsworth <http://birdcast.info/person/farnsworth/> of Birdcast
<http://birdcast.info/?utm_source=Cornell+Lab+Staff+eNews_campaign=23bb415a34-Sapsucker_Woods_Events_Feb2017_medium=email_term=0_1c649f110c-23bb415a34->,
this coming Monday at 7:30pm. As always, the seminars are held in the
auditorium and free and open to the public. The doors open at 7:00.

We will be streaming this seminar live. Bookmark
http://dl.allaboutbirds.org/cornelllab-monday-night-seminars for quick
access on Monday evening.  Hope to see you there!
-Marc



March 6th, 7:30PM
Perspectives on Nocturnal Bird Migration: What We've Learned from BirdCast



*Speaker: *Dr. Andrew Farnsworth, Research Associate, Cornell Lab of
Ornithology



Bird migration is a spectacular phenomenon that has long captured the
attention of human observers. The Cornell Lab's BirdCast project
<http://birdcast.info/?utm_source=Cornell+Lab+Staff+eNews_campaign=23bb415a34-Sapsucker_Woods_Events_Feb2017_medium=email_term=0_1c649f110c-23bb415a34->
 uses state-of-the-art machine learning and computer science, along with
data from radar and acoustic monitoring, to uncover migration secrets.
Andrew Farnsworth will talk about some of the novel insights revealed by
this fascinating project.



*You can watch any of our past live-streamed seminars via the **free video
seminar archive* <http://bit.ly/1fYRfuT>* on our website.*







Upcoming Monday Night Seminars:

-





April 3, 2017

Juan Pablo Culasso



*A World of Sound*



A blind birdwatcher from Uruguay proves you don’t need sight to see.
Through the sounds of nature he is able to envision the world that
surrounds him. Juan Pablo Culasso is one of the best birdwatchers in the
Americas by using his ears, not his eyes. He was born blind and as a child
learned to identify the feathered creatures by their voices. As an adult,
his career is recording the sounds of nature. Last year, he had the
opportunity, as a guest of the Uruguayan government, to travel to
Antarctica to learn the landscape of the world’s last wilderness through
its sounds. Join us to hear from Juan Pablo about his travels to this
remote place and what he discovered there.





May 1, 2017

Dr. Christine Sheppard, Bird Collisions Campaign Manager, American Bird
Conservancy



*Bird Mortality From Collisions With Glass: What we’ve learned, what we
need to know, what you can do*



You probably think that you can see glass – but long ago, you learned a
concept – glass is an invisible barrier or reflective illusion – that birds
never understand. As many as a billion birds die each year in the U.S.,
nearly half of them on home windows. In the last decade, many scientists
have contributed pieces to the puzzle of how birds really see the world.
This has established a basis for developing new solutions for existing
glass, as well as materials and design strategies for creating new,
bird-friendly buildings. Most architects, urban planners – most people –
don’t understand why birds are important and how big the collisions problem
is. Virtually everyone has seen or heard a bird hit glass, but think of it
as a rare occurrence. Dr. Christine Sheppard will discuss the tools we have
to solve the problem and the big job ahead getting those solutions
implemented. However, this is one conservation issue where individuals can
take immediate action and see immediate results.











Marc Devokaitis

Public Information Specialist

Cornell Lab of Ornithology


*Learn something new about birds every month! Sign up for our eNewsletter
at **birds.cornell.edu/enews*
<https://secure3.birds.cornell.edu/SSLPage.aspx?pid=1065>



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not yet a member, please visit **birds.cornell.edu/join*
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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Robins

2017-02-06 Thread Marc Devokaitis
Hi Carol, all-


Over the past decade +, America Robins have been spotted in all states
except Hawaii in all months of the year.  Rather than a strict north/south
movement, Turdus migratorius lives up to its scientific name (migratorius =
wandering) and tends to winter where there is abundant fruit or soft soil.
See https://www.allaboutbirds.org/is-it-unusual-to-see-
american-robins-in-the-middle-of-winter/. and Birds of North America
online, American Robin > Distribution, Migration and Habitat (
https://birdsna.org/Species-Account/bna/species/amerob/distribution)

I used the Line Graph feature of eBird to plot winter occurrence of
American Robin in Tompkins County starting in 2013. Although the Feb. data
for 2017 is obviously incomplete, we can see a definite trend of increased
frequency of AMRO's occurring on checklists over the past few seasons.
 2015 is the exception; and you may recall that was the only recent winter
of extreme cold temps and above average snowfall. Note the spike in mid-Feb
occurrence in 2014 and 2016, another trend that seems poised to continue
this year.  But this is a very condensed slice of data; winters that are
warmer with less snowfall will mean we see more robins.

http://ebird.org/ebird/GuideMe?src=changeDate=amerob;
getLocations=counties=US-NY-109=US-NY=
species=on=12=02=2013=2017=
separateYears=16=1=Continue

Looking further back in eBird data, and/or looking at Tompkins County CBC
data could serve to illustrate more concrete trends for this region.

Marc Devokaitis
Trumansburg, NY


On Mon, Feb 6, 2017 at 8:01 AM, Carol Cedarholm <cceda...@gmail.com> wrote:

> Is this early or unusual?
>
> On Sun, Feb 5, 2017 at 6:09 PM Ann Mitchell <annmitchel...@gmail.com>
> wrote:
>
>> There was a large flock of Robins on Cliff Street south of Vinegar
>> Street. I saw them at 9:00 a.m.and at 4:30 p.m.
>> Ann Mitchell
>>
>> On Sun, Feb 5, 2017 at 5:07 PM, Gladys Birdsall <g...@outlook.com> wrote:
>>
>> Yesterday morning, Jan. 4th, I was out walking the dogs, up here on Mt.
>> Pleasant and there was a lot of activity with Robins.  Hard to count but
>> maybe 25-30, all around the house and out the driveway.  They were after
>> Hawthorn berries.  There are also wet areas in the woods.  I know there are
>> wild grapes around too.  It was 12 degrees F when I got up and about 10 AM
>> it was still only 14 degrees F.
>>
>> Today I see there are Robins around down the road, west of our driveway.
>> The past 3 days we have had a good amount of snowfall, dry fluffy snow, a
>> good ground covering, so it was a surprise, but fun to see the Robins.
>>
>> Gladys
>>
>> On 2/5/2017 12:31 PM, Donna Lee Scott wrote:
>>
>> Lotsa Robins this winter!
>>
>> I had 30 on Collins Road in Lansing , Count circle region 9, Jan. 1,
>> Cayuga Bird Club Christmas Bird count.
>>
>> Since then, see flock of them here on Lansing Station Road occasionally.
>>
>>
>>
>> Eating wild grapes, exploring open water areas of little streams and
>> ditches.
>>
>>
>>
>> Donna Scott
>>
>> Lansing Station Road
>>
>> Lansing, NY
>>
>> East Shore, Cayuga Lake
>>
>>
>>
>> *From:* bounce-121209964-15001...@list.cornell.edu [
>> mailto:bounce-121209964-15001...@list.cornell.edu
>> <bounce-121209964-15001...@list.cornell.edu>] *On Behalf Of *Carol
>> Cedarholm
>> *Sent:* Sunday, February 05, 2017 12:18 PM
>> *To:* CAYUGABIRDS-L <cayugabird...@list.cornell.edu>
>> <cayugabird...@list.cornell.edu>
>> *Subject:* [cayugabirds-l] Robins
>>
>>
>>
>> Has anyone been seeing robins? I live in downtown ithaca and a flock of
>> 30 robins visited my backyard today!
>>
>> Carol Cedarholm
>>
>> --
>>
>> *Cayugabirds-L List Info:*
>>
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>>
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>>
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>> <http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm>
>>
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>>
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>> <http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html>
>>
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>>
>> BirdingOnThe.Net <http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html>
>>
>> *Please submit your observations to eBird
>> <http://ebird.org/content/ebird/>!*
>>
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>> Welcome and Basics <http://www.northeastbirdi

[cayugabirds-l] Monday Night Seminar: David Bonter--Of Islands and Undergrads

2017-02-03 Thread Marc Devokaitis
Hi Everyone:

Please join us this coming Monday for the first Monday Night Seminar of the
new year, featuring the indomitable Dr. David Bonter. As always, the
seminars are held in the auditorium, and free and open to the public. The
doors open at 7:00.

We will be streaming this seminar live. Bookmark
http://dl.allaboutbirds.org/cornelllab-monday-night-seminars for quick
access on Monday evening.  Hope to see you there!

-Marc



Dr. David Bonter, Director, Citizen Science, Cornell Lab of Ornithology



*Of Islands and Undergrads: A decade of bird study in the Isles of Shoals*



The Isles of Shoals, a craggy archipelago in the Gulf of Maine, is an ideal
place to immerse students in learning and research focused on birds. For
the past decade, Dr. David Bonter has taught Field Ornithology and mentored
research of Cornell undergraduate students studying the eiders, swallows,
gulls and warblers that invade the islands during the breeding season. This
presentation will virtually transport you to Appledore Island where you’ll
learn about the students’ findings and experience their journey through the
trials and tribulations of ornithological field work.







Upcoming Monday Night Seminars:







March 6, 2017

Dr. Andrew Farnsworth, Research Associate, Cornell Lab of Ornithology



*Perspectives** on Nocturnal Bird Migration: What we've learned
from BirdCast*



Bird migration is a spectacular global phenomenon that has long captured
the attention of human observers. But it wasn’t until the turn of the 20th
century that ornithologists realized the magnitude of migration that
occurred at night. Now in the early 21st century, several technologies have
advanced sufficiently far to allow us to achieve new understandings of the
magnitude and characteristics of nocturnal bird migration across a broad
range of scales in new and different ways. The BirdCast project is a
collaborative effort between ornithologists and computer scientists to
further our understanding of the biology of bird migration by using state
of the art machine learning and computer science techniques in combination
with data collected with remote sensing methods, like radar and acoustic
monitoring, to achieve these understandings. Dr. Andrew Farnsworth will
speak about some of the novel insights gleaned and results produced so far
from this fascinating project.





April 3, 2017

Juan Pablo Culasso



*A World of Sound*



A blind birdwatcher from Uruguay proves you don’t need sight to see.
Through the sounds of nature he is able to envision the world that
surrounds him. Juan Pablo Culasso is one of the best birdwatchers in the
Americas by using his ears, not his eyes. He was born blind and as a child
learned to identify the feathered creatures by their voices. As an adult,
his career is recording the sounds of nature. Last year, he had the
opportunity, as a guest of the Uruguayan government, to travel to
Antarctica to learn the landscape of the world’s last wilderness through
its sounds. Join us to hear from Juan Pablo about his travels to this
remote place and what he discovered there.





May 1, 2017

Dr. Christine Sheppard, Bird Collisions Campaign Manager, American Bird
Conservancy



*Bird Mortality From Collisions With Glass: What we’ve learned, what we
need to know, what you can do*



You probably think that you can see glass – but long ago, you learned a
concept – glass is an invisible barrier or reflective illusion – that birds
never understand. As many as a billion birds die each year in the U.S.,
nearly half of them on home windows. In the last decade, many scientists
have contributed pieces to the puzzle of how birds really see the world.
This has established a basis for developing new solutions for existing
glass, as well as materials and design strategies for creating new,
bird-friendly buildings. Most architects, urban planners – most people –
don’t understand why birds are important and how big the collisions problem
is. Virtually everyone has seen or heard a bird hit glass, but think of it
as a rare occurrence. Dr. Christine Sheppard will discuss the tools we have
to solve the problem and the big job ahead getting those solutions
implemented. However, this is one conservation issue where individuals can
take immediate action and see immediate results.

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[cayugabirds-l] Spring Field Ornithology 2017

2017-01-26 Thread Marc Devokaitis
Hi Cayuga Birders:

Just a quick note to let you know that registration is now open for Spring
Field Ornithology at the Cornell Lab.  *Early bird discounts in effect
through Sunday, Feb. 5.*



As you may know, the course is an Ithaca-area tradition that has helped
several thousand people learn about birds and birding over the past four
decades. The course has two main sections plus a pair of overnight trips,
and is designed for all skill levels.

· *Wednesday night lectures*, including a visit to the bird
collection of the Cornell Museum of Vertebrates and a nighttime 'owl
prowl.'

· *Saturday or Sunday field trips* to regional birding hotspots
such as Braddock Bay Bird Observatory, Derby Hill Hawk Watch, Montezuma,
Sapsucker Woods and Dryden Lake.

· *Two overnight trips* to birding meccas: Montezuma National
Wildlife Refuge and Cape May, NJ

Visit http://www.birds.cornell.edu/sfo to watch a video about the course,
look at photos, review the course schedule and enroll.


Full schedule: http://www.birds.cornell.edu/sfo/Course_schedule


As last year, *in-person participants in the lectures section will also get
access to the online component*, which lecture recordings, quizzes, and
handouts. Online portal:
https://academy.allaboutbirds.org/courses/spring-field-ornithology-northeast/


If you have questions, contact me at sfocl...@cornell.edu,
<sfocl...@cornell.edu> or call 607-254-2165, or stop by the Adelson Library
at the Cornell Lab to chat during the week. *And please help spread the
word by forwarding this email to anyone you think might be interested.*


Thank you, and I hope to see many of you this spring!



Marc Devokaitis

Coordinator, Spring Field Ornithology <http://www.birds.cornell.edu/sfo>

607-254-2165

sfocl...@cornell.edu

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[cayugabirds-l] Birds of East Africa (Play)

2017-01-17 Thread Marc Devokaitis
Hi All,


The folks at the Kitchen Theater asked me to help spread the word about
this upcoming production.  John Fitzpatrick is giving a special pre-show
talk ahead of the February 8th performance, and looks like we bird-folk can
get a discount on tickets for any night.



--Marc







Kitchen Theatre Company begins 2017 with a world premiere of a new play
called *Birds of East Africa* by Wendy Dann. We are reaching out to
individuals and groups with interests in birding and ornithology about this
exciting production.  Ornithologists are not regularly the central
character in plays, and rarely do we get to hear about the synergy between
birds and humans in theatrical productions.  Playwright Wendy Dann has done
extensive research exploring the keen observational abilities of birders to
inform the character Marion's unique world view.



The play runs from January 29th to February 12, 2017 with six performances
each week.  There are scheduled talk backs throughout the run and a special
pre-show talk on Wednesday, February 8th by Lab of Ornithology Director Dr.
John W. Fitzpatrick, Ph.D*.**,* followed by a performance at 7:30pm



We are offering a special discount ticket for birders, ornithologists and
researchers to see the play. To purchase a ticket call 607 272-0570
<(607)%20272-0570> weekdays between 11am and 5pm or on-line *here*
 and use the code
*BIRDS25. *There is also a special group rate ticket for parties of 10 or
more.

We have added the press release below and for more information on the show
please visit our website here
*.*



To arrange for a group, or request an additional post-show talk back,
please contact me, Michelle Blau, Administration and Management Fellow.

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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Snowy Owls

2017-01-04 Thread Marc Devokaitis
In case you missed it on the local FB bird club pages, Pete Saracino posted
Laurie Drikx's excellent slideshow of said banding:
http://www.lauriedirkx.com/AllCreaturesGreat/Banding-a-Snowy-w-Tom-McDonald/i-3Wq5XLv/A

Marc



On Tue, Jan 3, 2017 at 8:44 PM, Ann Mitchell 
wrote:

> This morning Diane Morton and I went to the Finger lakes Regional Airport
> to see the reported Snowy Owls. We saw the two of them near the runway in
> the grass. We went in the terminal to ask permission to get close enough to
> photograph them. The man in charge and his family were there. He said an
> Ornithologist from Rochester had been there earlier who caught, banded, and
> weighed them. He also took blood samples to research their precise origin.
> He said one of them was a  5 1/2 month old female which was well nourished.
> I don't remember what he said about the other owl.
>
> After that, we drove down Seybolt Road. Just south of Canoga Road, there
> was a Northern Shrike sitting on a wire.
>
> We then went to Cayuga State Park where we saw a huge raft of ducks north
> of the boat launch which had all the likely Aythya species including Ruddy
> Ducks and American Wigeon. In the middle of the lake we saw two Mute Swans
> and 10 Tundra Swans.  The weather was deteriorating
>
> Sent from my iPhone
> --
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>
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>

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[cayugabirds-l] Snow Geese in tburg

2017-01-02 Thread Marc Devokaitis
1000+ (and some Canadas) in the field right behind ShurSave.

Marc

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[cayugabirds-l] Monday Night Seminar - Cat Wars: The Devastating Consequences of a Cuddly Killer

2016-12-01 Thread Marc Devokaitis
The next Monday Night Seminar at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology is December
5th, at 7:30 pm.  As always, the seminars are held in the auditorium, and
free and open to the public. The doors open at 7:00.

We will be streaming this seminar live. Bookmark
http://dl.allaboutbirds.org/cornelllab-monday-night-seminars for quick
access on Monday evening. Thanks for helping spread the word!


*Cat Wars: The Devastating Consequences of a Cuddly Killer*

Dr. Peter Marra, Head of the Smithsonian Migratory Bird Center


In 1894, lighthouse keepers arrived on Stephens Island off New Zealand with
a cat, supposedly named Tibbles. In just over a year, the Stephens Island
Wren, a rare bird endemic to the island, was rendered extinct. Mounting
scientific evidence confirms what many conservationists have suspected for
some time—that in the United States alone, free-ranging cats are killing
birds and other animals by the billions. Equally alarming are the
little-known but potentially devastating public health consequences of
rabies and parasitic *Toxoplasma* passing from cats to humans at rising
rates. *Cat Wars* tells the story of the threats free-ranging cats pose to
biodiversity and public health throughout the world, and sheds new light on
the controversies surrounding the management of the explosion of these cat
populations.

Marra will trace the historical and cultural ties between humans and cats
from early domestication to the current boom in pet ownership, along the
way accessibly explaining the science of extinction, population modeling,
and feline diseases. He will chart the developments that have led to our
present impasse—from Stan Temple’s breakthrough studies on cat predation in
Wisconsin to cat-eradication programs underway in Australia today.  Marra
will also describe how a small but vocal minority of cat advocates has
campaigned successfully for no action in much the same way that special
interest groups have stymied attempts to curtail smoking and climate
change. The outdoor cat issue* is a *complex global problem—*Cat Wars*
proposes solutions that foresee a time when wildlife and humans are no
longer vulnerable to the impacts of free-ranging cats.











Marc Devokaitis

Public Information Specialist

Cornell Lab of Ornithology

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[cayugabirds-l] Rusty Blackbirds

2016-11-22 Thread Marc Devokaitis
Andrina Serpiello reported 8 hanging out around the Cornell Lab feeder
garden this afternoon just before 4:00pm. A couple of Red-wings in the mix
as well.

Marc Devokaitis

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[cayugabirds-l] Monday Night Seminar: Sonic Sea

2016-11-03 Thread Marc Devokaitis
Hi All,


Next week’s Monday Night Seminar is NOT at the Lab of Ornithology, but will
be a showing of Sonic Sea at the Cornell Cinema
<http://cinema.cornell.edu/Fall2016/sonic_sea.html> at 7pm. Hope to see you
there!



*November 7*

*Screening: Sonic Sea, featuring a Q with Dr. Christopher Clark*

*(@Cornell Cinema)*



Come to the Cornell Cinema to watch “Sonic Sea” in this special free
screening hosted by the Cornell Lab of Ornithology. Oceans are a sonic
symphony. Sound is essential to the survival and prosperity of marine life,
but man-made ocean noise is threatening this fragile world. Sonic Sea is
about protecting life in our waters from the destructive effects of oceanic
noise pollution. After the screening, join a Q discussion with Dr.
Christopher Clark who is featured in the film.




Marc Devokaitis

Cornell Lab of Ornithology

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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Turkey Vultures

2016-10-24 Thread Marc Devokaitis
Hi Sara Jane,

For at least the past 3 years, there have been TUVU's roosting during the
fall behind the Varna Community Center, in some tall conifers. I get
neighbors calling me about it every year with a mixture of wonder and
frustration.

Marc Devokaitis
Lab of Ornithology






On Mon, Oct 24, 2016 at 4:24 PM, Sara Jane Hymes <s...@cornell.edu> wrote:

> I was just coming through Varna when I had to pull over and stop the car,
> because there were about 25-30 TV’s soaring overhead, just above the
> rooftops.  There were enough to be looking for a ‘road-kill’, but I imagine
> they were either settling down for night or trying to get an updraft.
> --
>
> Sara Jane Hymes
>
>
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[cayugabirds-l] SSW this morning

2016-10-18 Thread Marc Devokaitis
Fall Chorus on a short visit to the lookout south of the Sherwood Platform
around 8:30 this morning. Estimated 20 White-throated Sparrows "cheeping"
and uttering weak, rambling song fragments. Another dozen or so
juncos"chipping", and around 30 Cedar Waxwings wheezing. All were dining on
the abundant fruits in the wetland vegetation. Goldfinches and Red-winged
Blackbirds gathering as well and one surprise (late) Red-eyed Vireo.

Marc Devokaitis

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[cayugabirds-l] Bebee Lake Migrants this morning

2016-09-30 Thread Marc Devokaitis
I've been birding Bebee Lake on my bus layovers on many mornings over the
past several weeks, Today was the first day on which there was a bona fide
wave of migrants. Highlights were SWAINSON'S THRUSH, WARBLING VIREO,
TENNESSEE WARBLER, MAGNOLIA WARBLER, and BLACK-THROATED GREEN WARBLER.
Several birds that got away unidentified as well.

Complete checklist at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S31820891

Marc Devokaitis

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[cayugabirds-l] Monday Night Seminar - Amanda Rodewald: Coffee, Communities, and Conservation

2016-09-29 Thread Marc Devokaitis
Hello all,



The Fall 2016 series of Monday Night Seminars at the Cornell Lab of
Ornithology kicks off this coming Monday, October 3, at 7:30 pm, and
features the Cornell Lab’s Director of Conservation Science, Dr. Amanda
Rodewald <https://dnr.cals.cornell.edu/people/amanda-rodewald>.  As always,
the seminars are held in the auditorium, and free and open to the public.
The doors open at 7:00.

We will be streaming this seminar live. Bookmark
http://dl.allaboutbirds.org/cornelllab-monday-night-seminars for quick
access on Monday evening. Thanks for helping spread the word!



*Monday, October 3rd, 7:30pm*

*Coffee, Communities, and Conservation: How your cup can make a difference*

Amanda Rodewald, Garvin Professor of Ornithology and Director of
Conservation Science



Accelerating rates of land conversion for agriculture, development, and
resource extraction in much of Latin America have challenged us to identify
creative ways to sustain biodiversity, protect critical ecosystem services,
and support human health and well-being within “working landscapes.”
Shade-grown coffee farms are especially well-suited to simultaneously meet
a variety of economic, social, and ecological needs. When coffee is grown
under trees, the system can provide a variety of products (e.g., coffee,
fruits, firewood, lumber, and medicines), while at the same time maintain
forest cover, support biodiversity, and reduce erosion and chemical use
compared to other intensive agricultural systems. Perhaps no other group
better highlights the positive role that shade-coffee can play in
conservation than Neotropical Migratory birds, which heavily use
shade-coffee farms.  Unfortunately, traditional shade management has given
way to more intensive uses like “sun coffee” monocultures that promise
higher productivity but at greater environmental cost and potentially more
economic risk.  This shift in practice has prompted conservation
organizations to develop incentives for sound environmental stewardship
that also support livelihoods.  In this talk, I will discuss how
shade-coffee and other agroforestry practices can support bird
conservation, healthy ecosystems, and ultimately human communities in Latin
America.







*Upcoming MNS:*



*November 7 *

*Screening: Sonic Sea, featuring a Q with Dr. Christopher Clark*

*(@Cornell Cinema)*



Come to the Cornell Cinema to watch “Sonic Sea” in this special free
screening hosted by the Cornell Lab of Ornithology. Oceans are a sonic
symphony. Sound is essential to the survival and prosperity of marine life,
but man-made ocean noise is threatening this fragile world. Sonic Sea is
about protecting life in our waters from the destructive effects of oceanic
noise pollution. After the screening, join a Q discussion with Dr.
Christopher Clark who is featured in the film.





*December 5 *

*Cat Wars: The Devastating Consequences of a Cuddly Killer*

Peter Marra, Head, Smithsonian Migratory Bird Center


In 1894, lighthouse keepers arrived on Stephens Island off New Zealand with
a cat, supposedly named Tibbles. In just over a year, the Stephens Island
Wren, a rare bird endemic to the island, was rendered extinct. Mounting
scientific evidence confirms what many conservationists have suspected for
some time—that in the United States alone, free-ranging cats are killing
birds and other animals by the billions. Equally alarming are the
little-known but potentially devastating public health consequences of
rabies and parasitic *Toxoplasma* passing from cats to humans at rising
rates. *Cat Wars* tells the story of the threats free-ranging cats pose to
biodiversity and public health throughout the world, and sheds new light on
the controversies surrounding the management of the explosion of these cat
populations.

Marra will trace the historical and cultural ties between humans and cats
from early domestication to the current boom in pet ownership, along the
way accessibly explaining the science of extinction, population modeling,
and feline diseases. He will chart the developments that have led to our
present impasse—from Stan Temple’s breakthrough studies on cat predation in
Wisconsin to cat-eradication programs underway in Australia today.  Marra
will also describe how a small but vocal minority of cat advocates has
campaigned successfully for no action in much the same way that special
interest groups have stymied attempts to curtail smoking and climate
change. The outdoor cat issue* is a *complex global problem—*Cat Wars*
proposes solutions that foresee a time when wildlife and humans are no
longer vulnerable to the impacts of free-ranging cats.











Marc Devokaitis

Cornell Lab of Ornithology

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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Banded Canada Geese

2016-08-08 Thread Marc Devokaitis
Hi All,

I've been talking to Paul Curtis from Cornell Dept. of Natural Resources
about this and he has shared the following information--see below.

Information on reporting the geese (other than to the BBL via the link
provided by John, which is always good practice!) is also provided. Note
that the project leaders are most interested in hearing about geese found
OUTSIDE of Stewart Park.

-Marc Devokaitis

---



The City of Ithaca, New York State Department of Environmental Conservation,
and Cornell University, with support from the Friends of Stewart Park, are
working to reduce goose conflicts and associated issues in Stewart
Park, Ithaca,
NY.



Around 425 geese were tagged in Stewart Park late June, 2016


• All geese were marked with a US Fish & Wildlife Service aluminum leg
bands



• A sample of 200 adult geese are also wearing yellow neck collars with
numbers and letters



• 50 young (hatching-year) geese were banded with red leg bands with
white letters



• Collaring and banding the geese allows DEC and Cornell staff to
monitor their movements throughout the City, and aid the City's efforts to more
accurately estimate the population size.





 *Geese* *in Stewart Park*

Stewart Park, here in Ithaca, NY, is a great place for humans and wildlife
alike. With open playing fields and the historic Renwick Woods surrounded by
water, it is no wonder that so many people and animals are attracted here.
Canada geese are abundant and easily seen around the park.

The City of Ithaca, the New York Department of Environmental Conservation,
and Cornell University are working together to manage the geese and feces in
Stewart Park.

*Why* *this project?*

These efforts are in response to multiple complaints from residents largely
due to the excessive amount of feces from the current population. The large
amount of goose poop has prevented people from being able to use park space,
the City golf course, and playing fields.





*What’s** next?*

• Cornell staff will be counting geese & testing a novel method to deter
the geese away from Stewart Park & the City golf course.

• Our trained scientist will use a novel aircraft in a very specific,
controlled manner in order to mitigate any impacts to non-target species.

• These activities will mostly occur during early morning and late
evening to minimize disturbance to park users.

• Transects will help determine if this non-lethal management reduces
the goose feces and associated problems.

• Results will be used by the City and  DEC to continue developing an
effective and responsible management plan.


Can I help?

• If you see one a yellow-collared, or red leg-banded geese in *areas
other than Stewart Park and the City Golf Course *and can read the numbers
and letters accurately (typically with binoculars), email:
*ithacage...@gmail.com* <ithacage...@gmail.com> with the subject heading
“Goose observation” and the numbers, date, time and location of the bird.




On Mon, Aug 8, 2016 at 7:51 AM, John and Sue Gregoire <k...@empacc.net>
wrote:

> Suan,
>
> All banded birds can be reported at the site below. Although you don't
> have the band
> from your CAGO observations, I believe you can also report the color and
> markings of
> the neck bands using that form.
>
> https://www.pwrc.usgs.gov/BBL/bblretrv/
>
> John
> --
> John and Sue Gregoire
> Field Ornithologists
> Kestrel Haven Avian Migration Observatory
> 5373 Fitzgerald Road
> Burdett,NY 14818-9626
> N 42 26.611' W 76 45.492'
>  Website: http://www.empacc.net/~kestrelhaven/
> "Conserve and Create Habitat"
>
> On Sun, August 7, 2016 14:11, Suan Yong wrote:
> > FYI, Canada geese with yellow neck bands NY06, NY12, and NY17 are
> currently loafing
> > in a flock of ~30 CANGs in Salmon Creek between Myers and Salt Point.
> Not sure who's
> > keeping track and what's the best avenue for reporting these; I know
> there's some
> > local interest, presumably even in tracking "boring" baseline reports,
> but I'm
> > guessing we don't want this list to turn into a flood of daily "it's
> still there"
> > reports (which are still valuable scientifically).
> >
> > Suan
> > _
> > http://suan-yong.com
> > --
> >
> > Cayugabirds-L List Info:
> > http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
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> ionLeave.htm
> >
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> > 3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html
> >
> > Pl

Re: [cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard: May 10, 2016

2016-05-10 Thread Marc Devokaitis
Cool observation of the White-crowned Sparrows.

Below is the BNA excerpt describing something similar. Since these birds
aren't on their breeding grounds, this must be practice? Maybe the two
males you saw are actually good buddies travelling together and its kind of
like a sparring match at the gym...

Agonistic Behavior

Territorial male flies toward conspecific intruder, erects crown feathers,
puffs chest, and sings loudly. Aggressor may then adopt a threatening
posture, sleeking its body feathers, orienting its body to the horizontal,
and pointing its open bill toward the intruder. This may be accompanied by
a Wing-flutter Display in which male crouches, lowers and flutters its
wings, and raises its head and tail slightly (Moore 1984
<http://bna.birds.cornell.edu/bna/species/183/articles/species/183/biblio/bib107>
, Baptista 1989
<http://bna.birds.cornell.edu/bna/species/183/articles/species/183/biblio/bib017>),
reminiscent of female’s Copulation-solicitation Display. Fighting is most
common early in territory establishment. Birds in a territorial dispute fly
at each other with feet pointed toward opponent. In prolonged combat, they
fall to the ground, grappling with their feet (Baptista 1989
<http://bna.birds.cornell.edu/bna/species/183/articles/species/183/biblio/bib017>
).


Thanks for sharing,

Marc





Marc Devokaitis

Public Information Specialist
Cornell Lab of Ornithology



On Tue, May 10, 2016 at 10:12 AM, Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes <
c...@cornell.edu> wrote:

> This morning, it was significantly colder than yesterday morning at the
> same time. Fewer birds in general (except for White-throated Sparrows) and
> fewer warbler species. A single Blue-winged Warbler was singing incessantly
> from near the middle of the Hawthorn Orchard throughout much of my time
> there.
>
> Highlight was the huge flock of about 62 White-throated Sparrows which are
> frequenting the hedgerow near the softball field. I got a fairly accurate
> count of that flock as they passed me from the East to the West along the
> hedgerow. They were headed to the grassy field beyond the softball field to
> feed on dandelion seeds. There was at least one White-crowned Sparrow here
> as well.
>
> On my way back to the truck, I encountered another three White-crowned
> Sparrows – two apparent males and an apparent female. They were just inside
> the fencing on the green of the outside tennis courts. The two males were
> in an apparent singing and displaying duel – something I’ve never observed
> before. The two males took turns singing. As one male sang upright, the
> other male would crouch down with back in horizontal and bill down with cap
> pointed at the singing male, subtly jerking its head back and forth and
> gently hopping side to side. Then, they would switch, with the previously
> singing male now taking a horizontal pose with bright black-and-white
> striped cap facing the now upright and singing opponent. They repeated this
> for at least a couple of minutes, each bird singing one song before getting
> into the horizontal pose again; this all happening while the non-vocal,
> apparent female, was hopping around nearby, watching from the sidelines.
> This was almost rapid-fire, like a tennis ball being hit back-and-forth
> across the net during a match.
>
> I think we need a few good days of warm weather to bring out the hawthorn
> flowers…
>
> Good birding!
>
> Sincerely,
> Chris T-H
>
>
> Hawthorn Orchard
> May 10, 2016
> 06:30
> Traveling
> 1.00 miles
> 149 Minutes
> All birds reported? Yes
> Comments: Cold start to the morning. ~ 30°
> Submitted from eBird for iOS, version 1.2.0 Build 62
>
> 9 Canada Goose
> 1 Great Blue Heron
> 2 Killdeer
> 2 Ring-billed Gull
> 3 Mourning Dove
> 2 Red-bellied Woodpecker
> 2 Downy Woodpecker
> 1 Hairy Woodpecker
> 2 Least Flycatcher
> 1 Eastern Phoebe
> 23 Blue Jay
> 2 American Crow
> 11 Tree Swallow
> 1 Barn Swallow
> 7 Black-capped Chickadee
> 2 Tufted Titmouse
> 1 White-breasted Nuthatch
> 2 House Wren
> 6 Ruby-crowned Kinglet
> 3 Wood Thrush
> 14 American Robin
> 12 Gray Catbird
> 1 Brown Thrasher
> 8 European Starling
> 2 Cedar Waxwing
> 1 Ovenbird
> 2 Blue-winged Warbler
> 1 Black-and-white Warbler
> 9 Nashville Warbler
> 2 Common Yellowthroat
> 2 American Redstart
> 4 Magnolia Warbler
> 1 Yellow Warbler
> 1 Black-throated Blue Warbler
> 6 Yellow-rumped Warbler
> 1 Chipping Sparrow
> 4 White-crowned Sparrow
> 78 White-throated Sparrow
> 3 Song Sparrow
> 1 Scarlet Tanager
> 11 Northern Cardinal
> 1 Rose-breasted Grosbeak
> 8 Red-winged Blackbird
> 1 Eastern Meadowlark
> 6 Common Grackle
> 5 Brown-headed Cowbird
> 4 Baltimore Oriole
> 1 Purple Finch
> 1 Pine Sisk

[cayugabirds-l] Monday Night Seminar: The Pioneering Women Biologists of New York’s Raptor Recovery Programs

2016-04-22 Thread Marc Devokaitis
Hello everyone,


Please join us for the last Monday Night Seminar of the fall semester on
coming up this* Monday, April 25th *at 7:30pm at the Cornell Lab.  As usual
the event is free and open to the public.  Seating is limited—first come,
first served.  Hope to see you there!

This coming Monday, we will once again be streaming the seminar live.
Bookmark http://dl.allaboutbirds.org/cornelllab-monday-night-seminars for
quick access on Monday evening.



*Alone in this* *Remote Place: The Pioneering Women Biologists of New
York’s Raptor Recovery Programs*

Darryl McGrath, Author



Forty years ago, four women biologists in New York played key roles in the
projects that kept the peregrine falcon and bald eagle from going extinct.
All four became the first scientists to achieve several critical
accomplishments in this work. Their research often unfolded in the
wilderness, under difficult, isolated and even dangerous conditions. Author
Darryl McGrath captured their stories in her book, “Flight Paths: A Field
Journal of Hope, Heartbreak, and Miracles with New York’s Bird People,”
which documents the raptor recovery programs and also pays tribute to the
determination of these early women biologists. There will be a book signing
with the author after the presentation









Marc Devokaitis

Cornell Lab of Ornithology

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[cayugabirds-l] owls

2016-04-11 Thread Marc Devokaitis
Hi All,

Asking for about 70 friends...anyone have a line on a dependable owl (You
know, one that works hard, doesn't call in sick, goes to the kids' ball
games on the weekend...) that a group or two might try to encounter
tomorrow evening on the SFO owl prowl?

I know Suan saw a screech in Lansing this weekend, and Chris heard a *Strix
humana* at Sapsucker today :)

Anyone else willing to share any wisdom?


Thanks,
Marc

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[cayugabirds-l] Cornell Lab at FLEFF -- this Sunday, 4/3

2016-03-28 Thread Marc Devokaitis
*Cornell Lab of Ornithology and the Macaulay Library Video Showcase*

*(7 short films from the Lab's Macaulay Library)*


*Sunday April 3rd 4:30pm at Cinemapolis*


The Macaulay Library at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology is the world’s
largest archive of wildlife sounds and videos. Their mission is to collect,
preserve, and facilitate the use of wildlife recordings for science,
education, conservation and the arts. In this series of short films
highlighting the work of the Macaulay Library: listen to the sounds of
Ruffed Grouse drumming, hear a mystery bird from the jungles of Borneo,
travel with scientists and photographers to the Cape York region of
Australia and the Canadian Arctic to record and photograph some of the most
beautiful and elusive birds in the world.



With guests: Ornithologists Dr. David Winkler and Dr. Edwin Scholes, audio
archivist Martha Fischer, audio engineer Bill McQuay, and student
scientists Teresa Pagan and Eric Gulson



http://www.ithaca.edu/fleff/filmsevents2016/?item=10150

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[cayugabirds-l] Event at Mann Library next week

2016-03-15 Thread Marc Devokaitis
Hi All:


Passing this to the list on behalf of Mann Library.


*Bird Families of the World: A Guide to the Spectacular Diversity of Birds*

*Chats in the Stacks book talk by David W. Winkler*

*Wednesday, March 23, at 4:00 pm *

*Room 160, Stern Seminar Room, Mann Library*



Many Many  people are captivated by the amazing variety of birds they
see and hear, and observing birds can be a life-enriching pursuit.



To explore avian diversity requires a mental map, a framework that helps us
organize our experiences and observations, and fortunately, the scientific
classification of birds provides exactly what we need. Whether you are an
experienced ornithologist or you have just discovered birding, David
Winkler’s new book serves as an excellent reference guide and learning tool
for understanding both the evolutionary diversity of the world’s birds and
their great variation in appearance, ecology, and behavior.



Join us for a *Chats in the Stacks* book talk with Professor David W.
Winkler, the faculty curator of birds in the Department of Ecology and
Evolutionary Biology, director of the Cornell University Museum of
Vertebrates, and member of Cornell’s Laboratory of Ornithology. *Bird
Families of the World*, published by Lynx Edicions and the Cornell Lab of
Ornithology (December 2015), has been designed to serve both as a text for
ornithology courses and as a resource for bird enthusiasts of all levels.
The work contains hundreds of beautiful color illustrations and photographs
from bird enthusiasts around the globe, as well as paintings of one species
from each of the genera in each family. The book is coauthored by Irby J.
Lovette, Fuller Professor of Ornithology at the Cornell Laboratory of
Ornithology.



Refreshments served and books available for purchase. This event is hosted
by Mann Library.



For more information visit http://mannlib.cornell.edu/events-exhibits.











*Lynn M Bertoia*
Program Coordinator

Library Administration
234 Olin Library
Cornell University
Ithaca, NY 14853
(607) 255-4813
lm...@cornell.edu

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Re: [cayugabirds-l] help determining the time to mow fields

2016-03-14 Thread Marc Devokaitis
Hi Michael,

This should be helpful if you haven't come across it yet.
http://www.dec.ny.gov/pubs/86582.html

Marc



On Mon, Mar 14, 2016 at 2:23 PM, Michael O. Engle  wrote:

> Hi,
>
>
>
> I had a chat with a local livestock raiser at Winter Market this weekend.
> He hays a number of fields and would like some guidance on the best time to
> do the haying to protect birds that nest in the fields he cuts. Please
> respond to me off list, and I will pass his contact information along.
>
>
>
> Thanks,
>
>
>
> Michael
>
>
>
> +
>
> Michael Engle,
>
> Reference and Instruction Librarian
>
> Selector, Olin/Uris Reference and Anglo-American News
>
> 106 Olin Library, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853
>
> Email: m...@cornell.edu; Telephone: (607) 255-1884
>
>
> --
> *Cayugabirds-L List Info:*
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> Rules and Information 
> Subscribe, Configuration and Leave
> 
> *Archives:*
> The Mail Archive
> 
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[cayugabirds-l] snipe or woodcock at Sapsucker

2016-03-08 Thread Marc Devokaitis
Standing on the Sherwood platform @ 2:00pm, the bird flew directly over my
head, heading southwest and into the woods -- didn't see it take off or
land. Couldn't get any distinctive plumage marks. Flew straight and
relatively quickly at a height of about 20 ft off the ground. Based on that
I'm leaning toward snipe.

Marc Devokaitis

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[cayugabirds-l] Special Film Event - Audubon: The Film

2016-03-08 Thread Marc Devokaitis
Hi Cayuga Birders;

Hope you all can join Fitz next Thursday for this special event at
Cinemopolis!


*Audubon**: The Film*
<http://cornell.us2.list-manage.com/track/click?u=b35ddb671faf4a16c0ce32406=a81ae1c811=8fc49d2825>

*Thursday, March 17, 7:00 p.m.*
Cinemapolis
<http://cornell.us2.list-manage2.com/track/click?u=b35ddb671faf4a16c0ce32406=625ee5d1b8=8fc49d2825>
(Advance
tickets required)
120 E Green St, Ithaca, NY

This new film focuses on the achievements of iconic artist, ornithologist,
and explorer John James Audubon. Learn about his adventurous life and
enduring legacy as the godfather of today’s conservation movement. Cornell
Lab director John W. Fitzpatrick provides commentary in the film and will
be available after the screening for a Q session.


*Watch the trailer:*


*http://www.audubonthefilm.com <http://www.audubonthefilm.com>/*


*Advance tickets required:*


*https://www.tugg.com/events/92425 <https://www.tugg.com/events/92425>*




-Marc Devokaitis

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[cayugabirds-l] Fwd: Monday Night Seminar at the Cornell Cinema!

2016-02-26 Thread Marc Devokaitis
r book, “Flight Paths: A Field
Journal of Hope, Heartbreak, and Miracles with New York’s Bird People,”
which documents the raptor recovery programs and also pays tribute to the
determination of these early women biologists.









Marc Devokaitis

Public Information Specialist



*Learn something new about birds every month! Sign up for our eNewsletter
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[cayugabirds-l] Monday Night Seminar at the Cornell Cinema!

2016-02-26 Thread Marc Devokaitis
racles with New York’s Bird People,”
which documents the raptor recovery programs and also pays tribute to the
determination of these early women biologists.









Marc Devokaitis

Public Information Specialist



*Learn something new about birds every month! Sign up for our eNewsletter
at birds.cornell.edu/enews
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[cayugabirds-l] Possible injured/dead hawk along E Shore Dr.

2016-02-17 Thread Marc Devokaitis
Just received a call from someone who hit a hawk with his car on E. Shore
Drive, somewhere between Stewart Park and Rogue's Tavern (didn't get exact
location).

No indication from person if bird was injured or killed, and he did not
stay in the location with the bird.  If anyone is heading along that way,
keep your eyes peeled,

Marc Devokaitis

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[cayugabirds-l] SFO 2016 - Celebrating 40 years!

2016-02-05 Thread Marc Devokaitis
Hello Cayuga Birders present and past,


Incredibly, 2016 marks the *40th year* for Spring Field Ornithology at the
Cornell Lab of Ornithology! This years course begins *Wednesday, March 23rd
*and runs through* May 15th.  *


The course is designed for everyone from the complete beginner to the most
avid birder and includes lectures, half-day and full-day trips, plus two
overnights. Mix and match the sections to fit your schedule. The class
consists of:

· *Wednesday night lectures*, including two visits to the bird
collection of the Cornell Museum of Vertebrates and a nighttime 'owl
prowl.'

·*Saturday or Sunday field trips* to regional birding hotspots such
as Braddock Bay Bird Observatory, Derby Hill Hawk Watch, Montezuma,
Sapsucker Woods and Dryden Lake.

· *Two overnight trips* to birding meccas: Montezuma National
Wildlife Refuge and Magee Marsh in Ohio.

We invite you to *register by February 7* for a special gift: Free access
to two of our Be a Better Birder
<https://academy.allaboutbirds.org/courses/be-a-better-birder-size-and-shape/>
online
tutorials. A $58 value!

This year, we celebrate our ruby (-throated hummingbird?) anniversary by
offering the* lecture portion of the course “online” as well*
<https://academy.allaboutbirds.org/courses/spring-field-ornithology-northeast-2016/>
*.* This means anyone, anywhere can share in the wonder this
year. In-person participants in the lectures section will *automatically*
get access to the online component, which includes the lecture recordings,
quizzes, and handouts.

*Dr. Steve Kress, *VP for Bird Conservation for National Audubon Society,
returns to teach the course, and he will be joined by guest lecturers from
the Cornell Lab of Ornithology. Weekend trips will be led by a cadre of
local birding experts.

The weekly field trips tailored to the interests and abilities of each
group. A sense of community builds throughout the course, and many people
enjoy the trips so much that they return year after year with their friends.


Visit http://www.birds.cornell.edu/sfo  to watch a video about the course,
look at photos, review the course schedule and enroll, and learn about the
offerings.

Full schedule: http://www.birds.cornell.edu/sfo/Course_schedule

NEW online portal:
https://academy.allaboutbirds.org/courses/spring-field-ornithology-northeast-2016/


If you have questions, contact me at sfocl...@cornell.edu,
<sfocl...@cornell.edu> or call 607-254-2165. *Please help spread the word
by forwarding this email to anyone you think might be interested!*


Thank you, and I hope to see many of you this spring!
Marc



Marc Devokaitis

Coordinator, Spring Field Ornithology <http://www.birds.cornell.edu/sfo>

607-254-2165

sfocl...@cornell.edu

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[cayugabirds-l] Rusty Blackbird

2016-01-28 Thread Marc Devokaitis
Currently sitting in trees to the left of boardwalk right outside main
entrance at Lab of Ornithology.

Marc Devokaitis

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[cayugabirds-l] Monday Night Seminar - The Living Bird: 100 Years of Listening to Nature

2015-10-29 Thread Marc Devokaitis
The next Monday Night Seminar at the Cornell Lab is on *November 2nd, at
7:30pm.*  As always, the seminars are free and open to the public. The
doors open at 7:00.  Thanks for helping spread the word, and hope to see
you there.

This coming Monday, we will once again be streaming the seminar live. Be
sure to bookmark
http://dl.allaboutbirds.org/cornelllab-monday-night-seminars for quick
access on Monday evening.

*The Living Bird: 100 Years of Listening to Nature*

*Book signing and presentation by Gerrit Vyn, Multimedia Producer, Cornell
Lab of Ornithology*


Photographer, cinematographer, and sound recordist Gerrit Vyn travels
around the world to document the lives of birds for the Cornell Lab of
Ornithology. A new book created for the Lab’s 100-year anniversary, "The
Living Bird: 100 Years of Listening to Nature," explores our joyful and
complex relationship with birds. Gerrit’s images, along with thoughtful and
inspiring essays by writers that include Barbara Kingsolver, Jared Diamond,
and Lab Director John Fitzpatrick, take readers on a visual and
experiential journey revealing the life-changing role that birds can play
in our understanding of the natural world. In his talk, Gerrit will
illustrate the major themes covered in the book and share many of his
powerful images and video recordings from the field.



*You can watch any of our past live-streamed seminars via the **free video
seminar archive* <http://bit.ly/1fYRfuT>* on our website.*



--

See upcoming seminar speakers and topics at
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Marc Devokaitis

Public Information Specialist

Cornell Lab of Ornithology


*Learn something new about birds every month! Sign up for our eNewsletter
at **birds.cornell.edu/enews*
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[cayugabirds-l] Monday Night Seminar--BirdReturns: How Big Data and Farmers Are Protecting the Pacific Flyway in California

2015-10-15 Thread Marc Devokaitis
Hello all,



The next Monday Night Seminar at the Lab of Ornithology is on *October 19th
*at* 7:30pm, *and features eBird lead program lead Brian Sullivan along
with visiting fellow Mark Reynolds from the California chapter of The
Nature Conservancy. Hope to see many of you there--please spread the word!

As always, the seminars are free and open to the public. The doors open at
7:00.  This coming Monday, we will once again be streaming the seminar
live. Be sure to bookmark
http://dl.allaboutbirds.org/cornelllab-monday-night-seminars for quick
access on Monday evening.



BirdReturns: How Big Data and Farmers Are Protecting the Pacific Flyway in
California

*Brian Sullivan, eBird Program Leader; and Mark Reynolds, Lead Scientist,
California Migratory Bird Program, The Nature Conservancy*

Bird migration is one of the greatest challenges for conservation in a
changing world. Ancient flyways extend thousands of miles, some across
entire hemispheres. How can we protect a moving target? The challenge is
made greater by poor information about movements of species and habitat
availability, a lack of efficient and adaptable conservation tools, and the
high cost of implementation at meaningful scales. Speakers Brian Sullivan
from the Cornell Lab of Ornithology and Mark Reynolds from The Nature
Conservancy will explain how the recent availability of large-scale data,
from citizen science to remote sensing, is improving our ability to develop
effective conservation strategies for bird migrations. Find out how the
Cornell Lab’s eBird program worked in partnership with The Nature
Conservancy to develop precision science tools to create temporary bird
habitat on farmland in California when and where birds need it most. The
project has partnered with more than 200 farmers, creating more than 30,000
acres of high-quality bird habitat, demonstrating a cost-effective way for
farmers to help protect the Pacific Flyway.



--

See upcoming seminar speakers and topics at
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/Page.aspx?pid=1579











Marc Devokaitis

Public Information Specialist



*Learn something new about birds every month! Sign up for our eNewsletter
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[cayugabirds-l] Monday Night Seminar: The Jungle Sarus

2015-09-17 Thread Marc Devokaitis
Cayuga Birders,

The next Monday Night Seminar is September 21 at 7:30 at the Cornell Lab of
Ornithology. <http://www.birds.cornell.edu/Page.aspx?pid=1573>  Thanks for
helping spread the word!

As always, the seminars are free and open to the public. The doors open at
7:00.   See upcoming seminar speakers and topics at the Cornell Lab Events
page
<http://www.birds.cornell.edu/Page.aspx?pid=1579=cornell.lab.of.ornithol...@gmail.com>



Thanks,
Marc



*The Jungle Sarus: Eastern Sarus Crane and its Habitats in the Mekong River
Basin*

*Tran Triet, director of the Southeast Asia Program for the International
Crane Foundation*

* The breeding Eastern Sarus Crane can only be found in small wetlands
located deep in the deciduous forests of Northern Cambodia. With population
of fewer than 1,000 birds, a selective habitat requirement, and sensitivity
to human disturbance, the Eastern Sarus Crane faces a very real threat of
extinction.*



--













Marc Devokaitis

Public Information Specialist

 Cornell Lab of Ornithology


*Learn something new about birds every month! Sign up for our eNewsletter
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<https://secure3.birds.cornell.edu/SSLPage.aspx?pid=1065>*

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[cayugabirds-l] Fwd: CLC School event/new birding locale?

2015-08-26 Thread Marc Devokaitis
Cayuga Birders,

This school sits on about 90 acres of undeveloped land north of Rte 13
between Etna and Dryden. Carol was at the Lab last week trying to get ideas
for how to proceed in trail-building and preservation.  See below regarding
an event in October at the site.

Could be an exciting new place to find birds in the area...please reach out
to Carol if you have interest in visiting the site or other ideas that
might be helpful.

Marc Devokaitis




*From:* Carol Becker [mailto:cbec...@clcschool.org]
*Sent:* Thursday, August 20, 2015 10:37 AM
*To:* Cornell Lab of Ornithology cornellbi...@cornell.edu
*Subject:* Re: CLC School event



Dear Marc,




We are hosting a family friendly fall event on October 31, 2015 from 10am
to 4pm on our school property. Covenant Love Community School is located at
1768 Dryden Road, just outside of Ithaca on State Route 13 near Dryden, NY.
As part of the larger event that will include activities such as: bounce
house, petting zoo, hay rides, games, a holiday book sale, soup cafe and
bake sale, etc. we would also like to offer some kid/family friendly
educational programming from resources in our community.

This year our school is focusing on studying birds and ecology, as we learn
to care for the natural wetland that is located on our property.  We are
working to develop relationships with the resources right here in our
community that can enable us to better understand and conserve this
treasure.



Would you consider joining us for part or all of the event? What types of
educational programming for children related can/do you provide? We are
very open to involving you in whatever ways you feel are most appropriate.



The contact person for this event is:

Ms. Kyle Hamilton

Administrative Support  Development

Covenant Love Community School

1768 Dryden Road, Freeville, NY 13068

w: 607 347-4413

c: 607 342-8237



Thank you again for your help in spreading the word about this community
event.



Sincerely,

Carol Becker

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[cayugabirds-l] Live Stream of Jane Kim and John Fitzpatrick at 4:00pm today

2015-08-12 Thread Marc Devokaitis
Hi Cayuga Birders:


Curious to know more about the incredible mural being realized on the
Johnson Visitor Center wall?


This afternoon we will be broadcasting Jane Kim (artist)  and John
Fitzpatrick up on the hydraulic lift, discussing the origin of the mural,
taking us on a “tour of the world”, demonstrating art techniques, and
answering questions from the public.


Tune in to watch live at
http://dl.allaboutbirds.org/cornelllab-monday-night-seminars.  The
broadcast will run from approximately 4:00 -  5:00pm, and will be archived
for viewing afterwards.


Hope you can check it out!


Marc Devokaitis
Cornell Lab of Ornithology

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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Brown pelican off Poplar Beach

2015-06-05 Thread Marc Devokaitis
I just received a call about this as well (message on answering machine
from 2:30PM) -- spotted off of Elm Beach Rd.

Marc Devokaitis

On Fri, Jun 5, 2015 at 2:25 PM, mduttwei...@twcny.rr.com wrote:

 No, I wasn't at the Brewgarden. There was a brown pelican off Poplar Beach
 cruising and doing the classic drop to the water.  I have a passable photo
 and three witnesses. At one point it was being harassed by gulls after
 which it took off toward the south.  Mike Duttweiler

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[cayugabirds-l] Monday Night Seminar - Into the Nest: Intimate Views of the Courting, Parenting, and Family Lives of Familiar Birds

2015-04-30 Thread Marc Devokaitis
Hello Lab,



Please join us on *Monday, May 4* at *7:30pm *for the next Monday Night
Seminar.  As always, these seminars are free and open to the public. The
doors open at 7:00.  This coming Monday, we will once again be streaming
the seminar live. Be sure to bookmark
http://dl.allaboutbirds.org/cornelllab-monday-night-seminars for quick
access on Monday evening.  And if you missed them, you can also watch
the archived
versions http://www.birds.cornell.edu/Page.aspx?pid=1579 of most of the
previous live-streamed lectures.  Hope to see you there!





*Seminar and book signing*

*Laura Erickson, author; and Marie Read, author and wildlife photographer*

*Into the Nest: Intimate Views of the Courting, Parenting, and Family Lives
of Familiar Birds *

This new book from author Laura Erickson and wildlife photographer Marie
Read documents every stage in the family lives of birds. The authors will
talk about these rare glimpses into the lives of the birds we thought we
knew—everything from dramatic courtship to nest construction, egg-laying,
and first attempts at flight by the young. Copies of the book will
available for signing after the presentation.







Upcoming Monday Night Seminars:





*May 11*
*Cayuga Bird Club Meeting  Presentation*

*Dr. Ron Rohrbaugh, Assistant Director, Conservation Science, Cornell Lab
of Ornithology*

*Two Dimes and a Nickel: Tales of the Golden-winged Warbler *Ron will
discuss how the imperiled Golden-winged Warbler has shaped contemporary
avian science and conservation by fueling innovation and technology,
driving state and national land management policy, and forging
international partnerships.





Marc Devokaitis

Public Information Specialist





 The Cornell Lab of Ornithology

159 Sapsucker Woods Rd

Ithaca, NY 14850

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[cayugabirds-l] sisk-invasion

2015-04-21 Thread Marc Devokaitis
Last week  we had 7 PINE SISKINS show up at our bird feeders in Trumansburg
Village.  On Sunday we counted around 2 dozen. This morning I made a
careful count of 70!

Marc Devokaitis
Trumansburg, NY

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[cayugabirds-l] Hermit Thrush

2015-04-13 Thread Marc Devokaitis
Reported (and photographed) by visitors this morning on the West Trail at
Sapsucker Woods.

Marc Devokaitis
Ithaca, NY

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[cayugabirds-l] Monday Night Seminar - Project Puffin: The Improbable Quest to Bring a Beloved Seabird Back to Egg Rock

2015-04-03 Thread Marc Devokaitis
Hello Cayuga Birders:

Please join us on *Monday, April 6* at *7:30pm *for the next Monday Night
Seminar of the spring semester at the Lab of Ornithology
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/Page.aspx?pid=1573. As always, these
seminars are free and open to the public. The doors open at 7:00.  This
coming Monday, we will once again be streaming the seminar live. Be sure to
bookmark http://dl.allaboutbirds.org/cornelllab-monday-night-seminars for
quick access on Monday evening.  And if you missed them, you can also watch
the archived versions http://www.birds.cornell.edu/Page.aspx?pid=1579 of
the previous live-streamed lectures.



*Seminar and book signing*

*Dr. Stephen W. Kress, **Director, Audubon Seabird Restoration Program*

*Project Puffin: **The Improbable Quest to Bring a Beloved Seabird Back to
Egg Rock*

Host: Miyoko Chu

After 42 years, Project Puffin has achieved international acclaim for
pioneering methods that are helping endangered seabirds worldwide. But
there is much to this story that has never been told. Join us as project
founder Dr. Stephen Kress recounts how his childhood experiences in
landlocked Columbus, Ohio, ignited his lifelong passion for puffins on the
Maine coast. Hear about the challenges of working on remote islands, and
how persistence helped him succeed when a nemesis almost halted the project
in its infancy. Join us for the first public debut of Kress’s new
autographical book, which will be available for signing after the
presentation.





Upcoming Monday Night Seminars:



*April 13*

*Cayuga Bird Club Meeting*

*Greg Budney, Macaulay Library, Cornell Lab*

*Their World of Sound: An Exploration of Bird Sounds*

Birds make some of the most compelling sounds heard in nature--from the
stunningly beautiful to the bizarre, from drumming to mimicry, from the
Common Nightingale to the Musician Wren. During this presentation you'll
hear sounds that birds use to communicate and learn what these sounds
reveal about their complex lives, via sound recordings from the Cornell
Lab’s Macaulay Library, the world's largest archive of bird sounds.



*May 4*

*Seminar and book signing*

*Laura Erickson, author; and Marie Read, author and wildlife photographer*

*Into the Nest: Intimate Views of the Courting, Parenting, and Family Lives
of Familiar Birds *

This new book from author Laura Erickson and wildlife photographer Marie
Read documents every stage in the family lives of birds. The authors will
talk about these rare glimpses into the lives of the birds we thought we
knew—everything from dramatic courtship to nest construction, egg-laying,
and first attempts at flight by the young. Copies of the book will
available for signing after the presentation.



*May 11*

Cayuga Bird Club Meeting
Dr. Ron Rohrbaugh, Assistant Director, Conservation Science, Cornell Lab

Program TBA









Marc Devokaitis

Public Information Specialist





The Cornell Lab of Ornithology

159 Sapsucker Woods Rd

Ithaca, NY 14850



Marc Devokaitiscay

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[cayugabirds-l] question of the day

2015-03-12 Thread Marc Devokaitis
OK folks-- hoping to crowd-source the answer to this question.  Of course i
will include the requisite warning against birding WHILE driving...  But
maybe someone has an answer they are passionate about. I'm thinking a
hybrid hybrid would have great appeal.  Or a self-driving Google car!


*Dear Cornell Lab,*

*What is the best vehicle by which to bird in your opinion? What vehicle is
considered to be best to enjoy birding? Convenience, space, space to put
stuff and yet be handy, price, and of course view from all locations in
vehicle!*


Thanks for any thoughts!

Marc Devokaitis
Cornell Lab of Ornithology

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Re:[cayugabirds-l] question of the day

2015-03-12 Thread Marc Devokaitis
Thanks to all who replied.

Marc



On Thu, Mar 12, 2015 at 10:29 AM, Marc Devokaitis mdevokai...@gmail.com
wrote:

 OK folks-- hoping to crowd-source the answer to this question.  Of course
 i will include the requisite warning against birding WHILE driving...  But
 maybe someone has an answer they are passionate about. I'm thinking a
 hybrid hybrid would have great appeal.  Or a self-driving Google car!


 *Dear Cornell Lab,*

 *What is the best vehicle by which to bird in your opinion? What vehicle
 is considered to be best to enjoy birding? Convenience, space, space to put
 stuff and yet be handy, price, and of course view from all locations in
 vehicle!*


 Thanks for any thoughts!

 Marc Devokaitis
 Cornell Lab of Ornithology



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[cayugabirds-l] waterfowl mortality in our area?

2015-03-04 Thread Marc Devokaitis
Hi all,

Beth Bunting from the Cornell Vet School sent me this message  today:

*...we have been seeing a number of dead/starving ducks, grebes and raptors
from around the Great lakes and now this week we are hearing about seaduck
deaths in East Hampton. This is presumably from the extensive ice cover. We
are trying to assist rehabilitators with moving ducks and grebes to open
water. Do you have any info about duck populations on either Seneca or
Cayuga Lake? Are the birds out there? Is anyone talking about unusual
mortalities in the area?*



*Elizabeth Bunting, VMD*

*Wildlife Health Program*

*Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine*

*Animal Health Diagnostic Laboratory*

*Ithaca, NY 14850*

*607 253 3900*

*em...@cornell.edu em...@cornell.edu*


I let her know that there were birds out there, and that I hadn't heard of
any mortality events on Seneca or Cayuga this year...putting the word out
in case anyone has heard or seen anything that might be of interest to her
and her team  Feel free to contact her directly.


Thanks,


Marc Devokaitis

Cornell Lab of Ornithology

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[cayugabirds-l] Monday Night Seminar--The Talented Superb Lyrebird

2015-02-27 Thread Marc Devokaitis
 of the birds we thought we
knew—everything from dramatic courtship to nest construction, egg-laying,
and first attempts at flight by the young. Copies of the book will
available for signing after the presentation.



*May 11*

Cayuga Bird Club Meeting
Dr. Ron Rohrbaugh, Assistant Director, Conservation Science, Cornell Lab

Program TBA



Marc Devokaitis

Cornell Lab of Ornithology

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[cayugabirds-l] Bald Eagle?

2015-02-26 Thread Marc Devokaitis
7:50am.  Perched prominently over the inlet in the west end of Ithaca, near
the top of a tall tree approximately behind Kelly's Dock-Side.
Not-yet-mature.  Easily visible from 89 and the Octopus when crossing the
inlet. A question mark b/c it was from a moving vehicle, no bins.

Marc Devokaitis
Ithaca

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[cayugabirds-l] Spring Field Ornithology

2015-01-23 Thread Marc Devokaitis
Dear Cayuga Birders:


OK.  So there are male Red-winged Blackbirds at Montezuma in mid January.
That means we should be seeing phoebes by February, and a big wave of
warbler migration by late March, right?  Should be a an interesting year...


And what better way to bear witness to the the wild wonder of spring bird
migration in central New York than by joining this year’s Spring Field
Ornithology (SFO) course at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology?!  Whether you
are just getting into birds, or just want to reconnect with that
long-dormant birder inside of you that wishes it was better at getting up
early during April and May, this course is for you!


The course begins *Wednesday, March 25th *and runs through* May 17th *and
is designed for everyone from the complete beginner to the most avid birder.


SFO consists of:


*8 Wednesday night lectures*, including two visits to the bird collection
of the Cornell Museum of Vertebrates and a nighttime 'owl prowl.'

· *8 Saturday or Sunday field trips* to regional birding hotspots
such as Braddock Bay Bird Observatory, Derby Hill Hawk Watch, Montezuma,
Sapsucker Woods and Dryden Lake

*  2  2 overnight trips* to birding meccas: Montezuma National Wildlife
Refuge and Cape May, NJ.


You can take any part of the course, or the whole thing.  Visit
http://birds.cornell.edu/sfo  to see the schedule, watch a video about the
course, look at photos, and read testimonials. Register online at
http://store.birds.cornell.edu/category_s/49.htm

Steve Kress,
http://www.audubon.org/dr-steve-kress-vp-bird-conservation-director-seabird-restoration-program
VP for Bird Conservation for National Audubon Society, is the instructor.
The course also features guest lecturers from the Cornell Lab. Weekend
trips will be led by a cadre of local birding experts. The field trips are
tailored to the interests and abilities of each group. A sense of community
builds throughout the course, and many people enjoy the trips so much that
they return year after year with their friends!



Email, call or stop by the Adelson Library at the Lab if you have
questions.


Hope to see you there!

Marc



MarcDevokaitis

Course Coordinator

607-254-2165

sfocl...@cornell.edu

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[cayugabirds-l] 2 Bald Eagles

2014-11-18 Thread Marc Devokaitis
Circling pretty low over Sage Hall and heading northeast.

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[cayugabirds-l] Monday Night Seminar: Birds of the Mono Lake Basin

2014-11-13 Thread Marc Devokaitis
Hello all,


Please join us at *7:30 on November 17th* for the next Monday Night
Seminar--featuring Cayuga Bird Club  member and wildlife
photographer extraordinaire Marie Read.  As always, these seminars are free
and open to the public. The doors open at 7:00.



This coming Monday, we will be streaming the seminar live. Be sure to
bookmark http://dl.allaboutbirds.org/cornelllab-monday-night-seminars for
quick access on Monday evening.  And if you missed them, you can also watch
the archived versions
http://blog.allaboutbirds.org/2014/02/28/our-free-viewable-archive-of-livestreamed-seminars/
of the previous live-streamed lectures.



Hope to see you there,

Marc





*Sierra Wings: Birds of the Mono Lake Basin (seminar and book signing)*

*Speaker: Marie Read, photographer*

*Host: Miyoko Chu*



Nationally known bird photographer Marie Read takes us on a journey
exploring the birdlife of Mono Lake and its surrounding basin, located in
California¹s Eastern Sierra. Marie’s stunning photography, now featured in
her newly released book Sierra Wings: Birds of the Mono Lake Basin,
reveals the fascinating lives of the birds that breed or migrate through
this spectacular birding hotspot, famous for bizarre tufa towers and highly
saline and alkaline water. Enjoy Read's stories from the field and learn
how she obtained some of the behavior and action shots in the book. Books
will be available for purchase and signing.





 *UPCOMING MONDAY NIGHT SEMINARS:*





*December 08*

*Enchanting Bolivia  Lake Titicaca*

*Cayuga Bird Club Meeting*

*Speaker: Meena Haribal, naturalist*



Cayuga Bird Club members Kathy Strickland and Meena Haribal traveled to
Bolivia in December 2013 to visit Lake Titicaca and other locations such as
the Amazonas, Andes and Zongo regions, in search of birds, butterflies, and
plants. Meena will talk about their trip, using slides and sounds to show
the creatures they found. Meena photographed more than 100 species of
butterflies and several species of birds and recorded hours of sound. She
will share the best of this material to whet your appetite for travel to
Bolivia.

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[cayugabirds-l] Monday Night Seminar: Birds in Flight: the Art and Science of How Birds Fly

2014-10-06 Thread Marc Devokaitis
Hello All,



Please join us at *7:30 this evening* for the next Monday Night Seminar at
the Lab of Ornithology http://www.birds.cornell.edu/page.aspx?pid=1572.
As always, these seminars are free and open to the public. The doors open
at 7:00. Hope to see you there!





*Birds in Flight: the Art and Science of How Birds Fly (seminar and book
signing)*

*Speaker: Carrol Henderson, wildlife biologist, photographer, and author*

*Host: Robyn Bailey*



Carrol Henderson has long been captivated by the phenomenon of birds in
flight. During this seminar, he will take you through the stages of an
“Avian Flight School 101.” Learn about the physics-based miracles of flight
ranging from “Bernoulli’s effect” to the “secret of the alula,” the
venetian blind effect, dynamic soaring by albatrosses, and the amazing
process by which hummingbirds hover—all illustrated with photos taken by
Henderson in the course of his international travels.





*UPCOMING  MONDAY NIGHT SEMINARS:*



*October 13*

*CAYUGA BIRD CLUB MEETING*

*The Bluebird Effect: Uncommon Bonds with Common Birds  *

*Speaker: Julie Zickefoose, writer/artist*

*Host: Laura Stenzler*



Doors open at 7:00 p.m., Cayuga Bird Club meeting begins at 7:30 p.m.;
seminar begins after the meeting at approximately 8:00 p.m.



Join writer/artist Julie Zickefoose for an evening exploring the
intersection of birds and spirituality in our lives. Can a bird become a
demigod to some? Can certain species achieve the level of a totem or spirit
guide? Are there phenomena that occur between human and nature that cannot
be explained by conventional means? These are concepts that have surfaced
over a lifetime of helping broken birds and mothering those who are
orphaned, and in so doing coming to know birds from the inside out. A
scientist at heart, Julie has lately found herself wondering more than
knowing. This talk will help you keep your spirit “open to the thrust of
grace,” thinking about the unexplainables in your own life. Zickefoose's
book, The Bluebird Effect, will be available for purchase and signing.



*October 20*

*Science and Nature in the Galapagos Islands*

*Speakers: Irby Lovette, director, Fuller Evolutionary Biology Program,
Cornell Lab Ornithology; Fausto Rodriguez, Galapagos Park Naturalist and
founder of Galapagos Best*

*Host: Miyoko Chu*



The Galapagos Archipelago has long been celebrated as an icon of evolution
and wondrous natural history. The Galapagos remains an otherworldly setting
where the wildlife from boobies to finches to fur seals, penguins to giant
tortoises to frigate birds shows no fear of humans, and where the
remoteness of the archipelago has fostered the evolution of wonderful
organisms and spectacular adaptations found nowhere else in the world.
Lovette and Rodriguez have many years of experience in Galapagos, and they
will recount some the wonders they have witnessed on their trips through
the archipelago, present new research findings from their own projects and
those of their colleagues, and discuss some of the challenging conservation
issues that may change the Galapagos forever.



*November 03*

*Fighting Crime with...Feathers: The Casebook of a Forensic Ornithologist*

*Speaker: Pepper Trail, Senior Forensic Scientist/Ornithologist, National
Fish and Wildlife Forensics Laboratory*

*Host: Miyoko Chu*



When a crime is committed against a bird, a forensic ornithologist
identifies the victim. Pepper Trail is likely the world’s only full-time
ornithological crime-fighter. Trail works at the National Fish and Wildlife
Forensics Laboratory in Ashland, Oregon, where he identifies all bird
evidence submitted by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service enforcement officers.
This evidence ranges from oil-soaked seabirds to the plumes of
birds-of-paradise, from carved hornbill skulls to live South American
parrots. Join us for a look behind the scenes at one of the world’s most
fascinating crime labs, and learn how feathers are powerful weapons in the
fight to protect the world’s birds.



*November 17*

*Sierra Wings: Birds of the Mono Lake Basin (seminar and book signing)*

*Speaker: Marie Read, photographer*

*Host: Miyoko Chu*



Nationally known bird photographer Marie Read takes us on a journey
exploring the birdlife of Mono Lake and its surrounding basin, located in
California¹s Eastern Sierra. Marie’s stunning photography, now featured in
her newly released book Sierra Wings: Birds of the Mono Lake Basin,
reveals the fascinating lives of the birds that breed or migrate through
this spectacular birding hotspot, famous for bizarre tufa towers and highly
saline and alkaline water. Enjoy Read's stories from the field and learn
how she obtained some of the behavior and action shots in the book. Books
will be available for purchase and signing.





Marc Devokaitis

Cornell Lab of Ornithology

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[cayugabirds-l] Cornell Lab Monday Night Seminars--Fall 2014

2014-09-12 Thread Marc Devokaitis
,” thinking about the unexplainables in your own life. Zickefoose's
book, The Bluebird Effect, will be available for purchase and signing.



*October 20*

*Science and Nature in the Galapagos Islands*

*Speakers: Irby Lovette, director, Fuller Evolutionary Biology Program,
Cornell Lab Ornithology; Fausto Rodriguez, Galapagos Park Naturalist and
founder of Galapagos Best*



 The Galapagos Archipelago has long been celebrated as an icon of evolution
and wondrous natural history. The Galapagos remains an otherworldly setting
where the wildlife from boobies to finches to fur seals, penguins to giant
tortoises to frigate birds shows no fear of humans, and where the
remoteness of the archipelago has fostered the evolution of wonderful
organisms and spectacular adaptations found nowhere else in the world.
Lovette and Rodriguez have many years of experience in Galapagos, and they
will recount some the wonders they have witnessed on their trips through
the archipelago, present new research findings from their own projects and
those of their colleagues, and discuss some of the challenging conservation
issues that may change the Galapagos forever.



*November 03*

*Fighting Crime with...Feathers: The Casebook of a Forensic Ornithologist*

*Speaker: Pepper Trail, Senior Forensic Scientist/Ornithologist, National
Fish and Wildlife Forensics Laboratory*

When a crime is committed against a bird, a forensic ornithologist
identifies the victim. Pepper Trail is likely the world’s only full-time
ornithological crime-fighter. Trail works at the National Fish and Wildlife
Forensics Laboratory in Ashland, Oregon, where he identifies all bird
evidence submitted by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service enforcement officers.
This evidence ranges from oil-soaked seabirds to the plumes of
birds-of-paradise, from carved hornbill skulls to live South American
parrots. Join us for a look behind the scenes at one of the world’s most
fascinating crime labs, and learn how feathers are powerful weapons in the
fight to protect the world’s birds.



*November 17*

*Sierra Wings: Birds of the Mono Lake Basin (seminar and book signing)*

*Speaker: Marie Read, photographer*




Nationally known bird photographer Marie Read takes us on a journey
exploring the birdlife of Mono Lake and its surrounding basin, located in
California¹s Eastern Sierra. Marie’s stunning photography, now featured in
her newly released book Sierra Wings: Birds of the Mono Lake Basin,
reveals the fascinating lives of the birds that breed or migrate through
this spectacular birding hotspot, famous for bizarre tufa towers and highly
saline and alkaline water. Enjoy Read's stories from the field and learn
how she obtained some of the behavior and action shots in the book. Books
will be available for purchase and signing.


--

Marc Devokaitis
Cornell Lab of Ornithology

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[cayugabirds-l] East Hill Killdeer

2014-05-15 Thread Marc Devokaitis
From Ilene Miller who also reported them last year:

The East Hill Office Building Killdeer is back for another year.  She laid
an egg yesterday.  She has picked the same parking lot island and tree as
last year.  I think she actually waited for them to put fresh mulch around
the tree.


Marc Devokaitis

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[cayugabirds-l] Big Day news

2014-05-08 Thread Marc Devokaitis
Hello All--


Although this news is off-topic, it is posted with permission of the eList
owner since it involves quite a few birders who are active within the
Cayugabirds community—and because it helps bird conservation!



Starting at midnight tomorrow, the Cornell student team, The Redheads,
will compete in the World Series of Birding in three categories: New Jersey
statewide (Hope Batcheller, Ben Barkley, Benjamin Van Doren, Brendan
Fogarty, Andy Johnson, Luke Seitz), county (Eric Gulson, Graham Montgomery,
David Weber, Tim Healy, Teresa Pegan), and Big Stay (Drew Dreelin, Eric
Sibbald, Mary Margaret Ferraro, Nathaniel Hernandez). The goal of this
24-hour event is to raise funds for conservation.



A donor will match all gifts up to $25,000 to support undergraduate
research and conservation projects. The students are trying to raise $7,500
toward this overall goal through a crowdfunding campaign. They are 45% of
the way there. Here is a link to a video about the students and a page
where you can make a donation if you'd like to help them meet their goal:
https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/cornell-lab-redhead-student-fund%20https:/www.indiegogo.com/projects/cornell-lab-redhead-student-fund



Also, the Lab's Team Sapsucker (Jessie Barrie, Andrew Farnsworth, Marshall
Iliff, Tim Lenz, Brian Sullivan, Chris Wood) found 275 species on their Big
Day in California and Arizona on May 3. It is the highest Big Day score
ever reported from the region and in North America it is second only to the
record the Sapsuckers set in Texas last year. So far they have raised
$360,000 toward their $400,000 goal for bird conservation. Here is a blog
post describing their adventure:
http://blog.allaboutbirds.org/2014/05/06/big-day-birding-275-species-california-arizona
/



Thanks to all of you who have supported bird conservation by making a Big
Day pledge or gift for the Lab's staff and student teams!





Marc Devokaitis

on behalf of the Cornell Lab of Ornithology

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[cayugabirds-l] Monday Night Seminar--To Know the Crow: Insights and stories from a quarter century of crow study

2014-04-18 Thread Marc Devokaitis
Hello,



Please join us at *7:30 on April 21* for the next Monday Night Seminar at
the Lab of Ornithology http://www.birds.cornell.edu/Page.aspx?pid=1573.
As always, these seminars are free and open to the public. The doors open
at 7:00.



This coming Monday, we will be streaming the seminar live. Be sure to
bookmark http://dl.allaboutbirds.org/cornelllab-monday-night-seminars for
quick access on Monday evening.  And if you missed them, you can also watch
the archived versions http://www.birds.cornell.edu/Page.aspx?pid=1579 of
the previous live-streamed lectures.





*Anne B. Clark, Binghamton University; Kevin McGowan, Cornell Lab of
Ornithology; To Know the Crow: Insights and stories from a quarter century
of crow study Host: Nancy Trautmann*


 American crows have followed us into our suburban and urban neighborhoods,
making them one of our most familiar birds. But they have socially
intricate lives, with more complex goals than converging at your local
dumpster—in fact, socially, they are probably more like us than any
primate. Ithaca is home to the longest running study of marked American
crows anywhere: it is now 26 years since Kevin first began banding them.
Kevin and Anne will tell some of their stories, including tales of family
values and treachery, stay-at-homes and travelers, dynasties and disease.

Thanks for spreading the word--hope to see you there!
Marc



*UPCOMING MONDAY NIGHT SEMINARS*




*April 28 Alfonso Aguirre Muñoz, Director, Grupo de Ecología y Conservación
de Islas Restoration of Mexican Islands and Conservation of Birds Host:
Eduardo Iñigo-Elias*
The Mexican islands are among the most valuable natural ecosystems. While
well preserved, invasive mammals have been a big threat to its
biodiversity, even causing the extinction of some island species. In
response, Mexico has eradicated 56 populations of invasive mammals from 36
islands, protecting 147 endemic species of mammals, reptiles, birds and
plants. In addition, 227 colonies of seabirds have been protected. The
eradication of invasive mammals from the approximately 40 remaining islands
is a strategic goal achievable by 2025, thanks to the collaboration of
local communities, federal government agencies, academic institutions, and
NGOs, as well as national and international donors and funds.





* May 12 Cayuga Bird Club Meeting Mia Boynton PhD, granddaughter of Louis
Fuertes and independent writer Fuertes Revisited: A Bird Artist in His
Setting *Mia Boynton, a granddaughter of Louis Fuertes and an independent
writer, will talk about the research she has done for her recently
completed biography of Louis Agassiz Fuertes, *Fuertes Revisited: A Bird
Artist in his Setting*. Topics covered will include business realities of
being a bird artist in the early 20th century, sources of inspiration for
Fuertes, sources of difficulty, and the ways in which he survived. Copies
of the book will be available for purchase. This seminar is one event in a
series of events commemorating and celebrating the Cayuga Bird Club's 100
year anniversary





*May 19 Humpback Whales--Composers of the Sea Katy Payne and Ann Warde,
Cornell Lab Bioacoustics Research Program*

*Host: Chris Clark*

Humpback whales are the maestros of the marine world. Their songs actually
 develop and change over time--an example of cultural evolution in a
non-human species! Katy Payne and Ann Warde of the Cornell Lab of
Ornithology's Bioacoustics Research Program have teamed up for this
audio-visual presentation during which they will introduce the audience to
whales, the sounds they make, and the concept of deep listening.




*Seminars are held at 7:30* *p.m. in the Cornell Lab of Ornithology's
Visitor Center auditorium except on night indicated as Cayuga Bird Club
meetings, with club business at 7:30 p.m., followed by the seminar. Doors
open at 7:00 and close when the auditorium is filled. Seminars are free and
open to the public. *

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Please submit your observations to eBird:
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[cayugabirds-l] owls--SFO trip scouting

2014-04-14 Thread Marc Devokaitis
Hi Folks,

I fully realize the quixotic nature of owl-location--magnified, perhaps, in
one's asking for such information from others...nevertheless

Seen or heard any good (nocturnal) owls lately?  Especially interested in
places within 10-15 minute drive from the Lab.  Individual birds that enjoy
30 degree weather and high winds and sleet are preferred.

Thanks,
Marc

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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Merlin @ Giles St

2014-04-10 Thread Marc Devokaitis
I have not seen the two Merlins together since the day I observed the
mating, but I have seen one from my porch almost every day. The favorite
perch seems to be in an oak tree in a backyard bordered by Prospect,
Pleasant and Hudson--have seen it there on at least half a dozen separate
occasions in the past week.
Marc


On Thu, Apr 10, 2014 at 9:27 AM, Suan Yong suan.y...@gmail.com wrote:

 Sitting high on a tree behind 140 Giles, just off Hudson.

 Suan
 _
 http://suan-yong.com
 _
 http://suan-yong.com

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[cayugabirds-l] Monday Night Seminar--Clark's Nutcrackers: Pivotal Players in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem

2014-04-07 Thread Marc Devokaitis
Hello,



Please join us TONIGHT at *7:30 *for the next Monday Night Seminar at the Lab
of Ornithology http://www.birds.cornell.edu/Page.aspx?pid=1573. As
always, these seminars are free and open to the public. The doors open at
7:00.




*Taza Schaming, PhD candidate; Cornell Lab of Ornithology Clark's
Nutcrackers: Pivotal Players in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem Host:
 Janis Dickinson*

Whitebark pine and Clark's Nutcrackers have a fascinating relationship. The
trees provide the birds with rich, fatty seeds that have more calories per
pound than chocolate. In return, the nutcrackers plant the seeds that
grow whitebark pines as well as 10 other conifer species--trees needed to
provide food for wildlife and to helping retain snow (and thus drinking
water) on the upper slopes of the Rockies. Schaming will also provide
insights into the social behavior of the Clark's Nutcracker.


Thanks for helping to spread the word--hope to see you there!

Marc



*UPCOMING MONDAY NIGHT SEMINARS*




*April 14 Cayuga Bird Club Meeting Dr. John L. Confer, Biology Department,
Ithaca College Saw-whet Owls: The Cute Factor Aids Science: 206,000 Birds
Banded by Insomniac Banders Reveal Migration Patterns and Regional
Reproductive Success*

The Northern Saw-whet Owl is widely distributed and an intensive banding
effort provides a data trove for this tiny raptor. Banding records combined
with GIS analyses reveal exceptional detail about migration patterns in
eastern and central North America which allows us to analyze
temporal/spatial patterns of reproductive success for breeding populations
in different portions of North America.




* April 21 Anne B. Clark, Binghamton University; Kevin McGowan, Cornell Lab
of Ornithology; To Know the Crow: Insights and stories from a quarter
century of crow study Host: TBA*
American crows have followed us into our suburban and urban neighborhoods,
making them one of our most familiar birds. But they have socially
intricate lives, with more complex goals than converging at your local
dumpster--in fact, socially, they are probably more like us than any
primate. Ithaca is home to the longest running study of marked American
crows anywhere: it is now 26 years since Kevin first began banding them.
Kevin and Anne will tell some of their stories, including tales of family
values and treachery, stay-at-homes and travelers, dynasties and disease.




* April 28 Alfonso Aguirre Muñoz, Director, Grupo de Ecología y
Conservación de Islas Restoration of Mexican Islands and Conservation of
Birds Host: Eduardo Iñigo-Elias*
The Mexican islands are among the most valuable natural ecosystems. While
well preserved, invasive mammals have been a big threat to its
biodiversity, even causing the extinction of some island species. In
response, Mexico has eradicated 56 populations of invasive mammals from 36
islands, protecting 147 endemic species of mammals, reptiles, birds and
plants. In addition, 227 colonies of seabirds have been protected. The
eradication of invasive mammals from the approximately 40 remaining islands
is a strategic goal achievable by 2025, thanks to the collaboration of
local communities, federal government agencies, academic institutions, and
NGOs, as well as national and international donors and funds.





* May 12 Cayuga Bird Club Meeting Mia Boynton PhD, granddaughter of Louis
Fuertes and independent writer Fuertes Revisited: A Bird Artist in His
Setting *Mia Boynton, a granddaughter of Louis Fuertes and an independent
writer, will talk about the research she has done for her recently
completed biography of Louis Agassiz Fuertes, *Fuertes Revisited: A Bird
Artist in his Setting*. Topics covered will include business realities of
being a bird artist in the early 20th century, sources of inspiration for
Fuertes, sources of difficulty, and the ways in which he survived. Copies
of the book will be available for purchase. This seminar is one event in a
series of events commemorating and celebrating the Cayuga Bird Club's 100
year anniversary





*Seminars are held at 7:30* *p.m. in the Cornell Lab of Ornithology's
Visitor Center auditorium except on night indicated as Cayuga Bird Club
meetings, with club business at 7:30 p.m., followed by the seminar. Doors
open at 7:00 and close when the auditorium is filled. Seminars are free and
open to the public. *

--

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1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
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--

[cayugabirds-l] Merlins Mating Downtown Ithaca

2014-04-02 Thread Marc Devokaitis
This was yesterday evening between 5:15-5:30pm, from the front porch of our
apartment.  We were observing the birds across our street, in the backyards
of houses bordered by Hudson, Pleasant, and Prospect St.

We heard a very fast,high pitched Ki-ki-ki-ki-ki-ki-  (thought woodpecker
at first). Scanned to see the two birds in an oak tree for one attempt.
The female flew off into a near by spruce about 30-40 yards away
immediately after.

After about 5 more minutes, we saw the male fly in the direction of the
female with very fast, fluttering wing beats, calling, and hooking up with
the female for a second time, then he returned to the oak tree, at which
point the observation window had to close.

Marc Devokaitis

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[cayugabirds-l] Monday Night Seminar: Unraveling the Mysteries of Songbird Mating Systems

2014-03-20 Thread Marc Devokaitis
Hello All,


Please join us at *7:30 on March 24* for the next Monday Night Seminar at
the Lab of Ornithology http://www.birds.cornell.edu/Page.aspx?pid=1573.
As always, these seminars are free and open to the public. The doors open
at 7:00.



*Sara Kaiser, Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
Unraveling the Mysteries of Songbird Mating Systems*

*Host: Mike Webster *Sara Kaiser is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the
Cornell Lab of Ornithology and the Smithsonian Migratory Bird Center.
She'll discuss how habitat quality affects where and how often the
seemingly monogamous Black-throated Blue Warbler mates outside its pair
bond. Most male Black-throated Blue Warblers are socially monogamous,
meaning they are mated to a single female. However, all is not as it
appears: up to 50% of Black-throated Blue Warbler nests have young sired by
a male that is not the territory holder. Sara has been studying the mating
system of these warblers in the hardwood forests of New Hampshire.


Thanks for helping to spread the word--hope to see you there!

Marc



*UPCOMING MONDAY NIGHT SEMINARS*





*March 31 Margaret Barker, Elissa Wolfson, Chris Willett Building, Placing,
and Maintaining Great Homes for Great Birds Host: Robyn Bailey *Join
authors Margaret Barker and Elissa Wolfson, along with woodworker Chris
Willett as they share what they learned--and built--while writing and
researching the Audubon Birdhouse Book (Voyageur Press, 2013). Find out how
to build for birds that take up residence within birdhouses--including Wood
Ducks, kestrels, and of course, bluebirds--as well as those such as Great
Blue Herons, Ospreys, and loons that nest outside the box. We'll explore
the reasons behind birdhouse building, especially where natural habitat is
scarce, the latest design innovations, and how people everywhere are
helping birds by providing them with safe homes.





*April 7 Taza Schaming, PhD candidate; Cornell Lab of Ornithology Clark's
Nutcrackers: Pivotal Players in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem Host: TBA*
Whitebark pine and Clark's Nutcrackers have a fascinating relationship. The
trees provide the birds with rich, fatty seeds that have more calories per
pound than chocolate. In return, the nutcrackers plant the seeds that
grow whitebark pines as well as 10 other conifer species--trees needed to
provide food for wildlife and to helping retain snow (and thus drinking
water) on the upper slopes of the Rockies. Schaming will also provide
insights into the social behavior of the Clark's Nutcracker.




*April 14 Cayuga Bird Club Meeting Dr. John L. Confer, Biology Department,
Ithaca College Saw-whet Owls: The Cute Factor Aids Science: 206,000 Birds
Banded by Insomniac Banders Reveal Migration Patterns and Regional
Reproductive Success*
The Northern Saw-whet Owl is widely distributed and an intensive banding
effort provides a data trove for this tiny raptor. Banding records combined
with GIS analyses reveal exceptional detail about migration patterns in
eastern and central North America which allows us to analyze
temporal/spatial patterns of reproductive success for breeding populations
in different portions of North America.




* April 21 Anne B. Clark, Binghamton University; Kevin McGowan, Cornell Lab
of Ornithology; To Know the Crow: Insights and stories from a quarter
century of crow study Host: TBA*
American crows have followed us into our suburban and urban neighborhoods,
making them one of our most familiar birds. But they have socially
intricate lives, with more complex goals than converging at your local
dumpster--in fact, socially, they are probably more like us than any
primate. Ithaca is home to the longest running study of marked American
crows anywhere: it is now 26 years since Kevin first began banding them.
Kevin and Anne will tell some of their stories, including tales of family
values and treachery, stay-at-homes and travelers, dynasties and disease.




* April 28 Alfonso Aguirre Muñoz, Director, Grupo de Ecología y
Conservación de Islas Restoration of Mexican Islands and Conservation of
Birds Host: Eduardo Iñigo-Elias*
The Mexican islands are among the most valuable natural ecosystems. While
well preserved, invasive mammals have been a big threat to its
biodiversity, even causing the extinction of some island species. In
response, Mexico has eradicated 56 populations of invasive mammals from 36
islands, protecting 147 endemic species of mammals, reptiles, birds and
plants. In addition, 227 colonies of seabirds have been protected. The
eradication of invasive mammals from the approximately 40 remaining islands
is a strategic goal achievable by 2025, thanks to the collaboration of
local communities, federal government agencies, academic institutions, and
NGOs, as well as national and international donors and funds.





* May 12 Cayuga Bird Club Meeting Mia Boynton PhD, granddaughter of Louis
Fuertes and independent writer Fuertes Revisited: A Bird Artist in His
Setting *Mia 

[cayugabirds-l] Monday Night Seminar--The Warbler Guide: The Overlooked ID Points that Make Identifying Warblers Easy

2014-03-13 Thread Marc Devokaitis
Hello Cayuga Birders


Please join us at *7:30 on March 17* for the next Monday Night Seminar at
the Lab of Ornithology http://www.birds.cornell.edu/Page.aspx?pid=1573.
As always, these seminars are free and open to the public. The doors open
at 7:00.



This coming Monday, we will be streaming the seminar live. Be sure to
bookmark http://dl.allaboutbirds.org/cornelllab-monday-night-seminars for
quick access on Monday evening.  And if you missed them, you can also watch
the archived versions http://www.birds.cornell.edu/Page.aspx?pid=1579 of
the previous live-streamed lectures.  Thanks for spreading the word--hope
to see you there!


Marc Devokaitis
Cornell Lab of Ornithology




*Tom Stephenson, author; Scott Whittle, photographer The Warbler Guide: The
Overlooked ID Points that Make Identifying Warblers Easy Host: Mike Webster*

Birder and author Tom Stephenson and photographer Scott Whittle  will
describe important but often overlooked ID clues for colorful and sometimes
elusive warblers: overall contrast, subtle facial features, color
impressions, feather edging, rump contrast, as well as foraging style,
location, and behavior. Even viewing a warbler from below can reveal
identity clues for many species. Stephenson and Whittle will also address
some of the most challenging species to identify, compare them to similar
species, and illustrate how even partial views can be used to identify
warbler species.

*Stephenson's and Whittle's book, The Warbler Guide, published by Princeton
University Press, will be available for purchase and signing. *



*UPCOMING MONDAY NIGHT SEMINARS*



*March 24 Sara Kaiser, Cornell Lab Unraveling the Mysteries of Songbird
Mating Systems*

*Host: TBA *Sara Kaiser is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Cornell
Lab of Ornithology and the Smithsonian Migratory Bird Center. She'll
discuss how habitat quality affects where and how often the seemingly
monogamous Black-throated Blue Warbler mates outside its pair bond. Most
male Black-throated Blue Warblers are socially monogamous, meaning they
are mated to a single female. However, all is not as it appears: up to 50%
of Black-throated Blue Warbler nests have young sired by a male that is not
the territory holder. Sara has been studying the mating system of these
warblers in the hardwood forests of New Hampshire.





*March 31 Margaret Barker, Elissa Wolfson, Chris Willett Building, Placing,
and Maintaining Great Homes for Great Birds Host: Robyn Bailey *Join
authors Margaret Barker and Elissa Wolfson, along with woodworker Chris
Willett as they share what they learned--and built--while writing and
researching the Audubon Birdhouse Book (Voyageur Press, 2013). Find out how
to build for birds that take up residence within birdhouses--including Wood
Ducks, kestrels, and of course, bluebirds--as well as those such as Great
Blue Herons, Ospreys, and loons that nest outside the box. We'll explore
the reasons behind birdhouse building, especially where natural habitat is
scarce, the latest design innovations, and how people everywhere are
helping birds by providing them with safe homes.




*April 7 Taza Schaming, PhD candidate; Cornell Lab of Ornithology Clark's
Nutcrackers: Pivotal Players in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem Host: TBA*
Whitebark pine and Clark's Nutcrackers have a fascinating relationship. The
trees provide the birds with rich, fatty seeds that have more calories per
pound than chocolate. In return, the nutcrackers plant the seeds that
grow whitebark pines as well as 10 other conifer species--trees needed to
provide food for wildlife and to helping retain snow (and thus drinking
water) on the upper slopes of the Rockies. Schaming will also provide
insights into the social behavior of the Clark's Nutcracker.




*April 14 Cayuga Bird Club Meeting Dr. John L. Confer, Biology Department,
Ithaca College Saw-whet Owls: The Cute Factor Aids Science: 206,000 Birds
Banded by Insomniac Banders Reveal Migration Patterns and Regional
Reproductive Success*

The Northern Saw-whet Owl is widely distributed and an intensive banding
effort provides a data trove for this tiny raptor. Banding records combined
with GIS analyses reveal exceptional detail about migration patterns in
eastern and central North America which allows us to analyze
temporal/spatial patterns of reproductive success for breeding populations
in different portions of North America.




* April 21 Anne B. Clark, Binghamton University; Kevin McGowan, Cornell Lab
of Ornithology; To Know the Crow: Insights and stories from a quarter
century of crow study Host: TBA*
American crows have followed us into our suburban and urban neighborhoods,
making them one of our most familiar birds. But they have socially
intricate lives, with more complex goals than converging at your local
dumpster--in fact, socially, they are probably more like us than any
primate. Ithaca is home to the longest running study of marked American
crows anywhere: it is now 26 years since Kevin first

[cayugabirds-l] Monday Night Seminar: Confessions of a Travel Writer Who Birds to Travel and Travels to Bird (LiveStream)

2014-02-28 Thread Marc Devokaitis
 into the social behavior of the Clark's Nutcracker.




*April 14 Cayuga Bird Club Meeting Dr. John L. Confer, Biology Department,
Ithaca College Saw-whet Owls: The Cute Factor Aids Science: 206,000 Birds
Banded by Insomniac Banders Reveal Migration Patterns and Regional
Reproductive Success*

The Northern Saw-whet Owl is widely distributed and an intensive banding
effort provides a data trove for this tiny raptor. Banding records combined
with GIS analyses reveal exceptional detail about migration patterns in
eastern and central North America which allows us to analyze
temporal/spatial patterns of reproductive success for breeding populations
in different portions of North America.




* April 21 Anne B. Clark, Binghamton University; Kevin McGowan, Cornell Lab
of Ornithology; To Know the Crow: Insights and stories from a quarter
century of crow study Host: TBA*
American crows have followed us into our suburban and urban neighborhoods,
making them one of our most familiar birds. But they have socially
intricate lives, with more complex goals than converging at your local
dumpster--in fact, socially, they are probably more like us than any
primate. Ithaca is home to the longest running study of marked American
crows anywhere: it is now 26 years since Kevin first began banding them.
Kevin and Anne will tell some of their stories, including tales of family
values and treachery, stay-at-homes and travelers, dynasties and disease.




* April 28 Alfonso Aguirre Muñoz, Director, Grupo de Ecología y
Conservación de Islas Restoration of Mexican Islands and Conservation of
Birds Host: Eduardo Iñigo-Elias*
The Mexican islands are among the most valuable natural ecosystems. While
well preserved, invasive mammals have been a big threat to its
biodiversity, even causing the extinction of some island species. In
response, Mexico has eradicated 56 populations of invasive mammals from 36
islands, protecting 147 endemic species of mammals, reptiles, birds and
plants. In addition, 227 colonies of seabirds have been protected. The
eradication of invasive mammals from the approximately 40 remaining islands
is a strategic goal achievable by 2025, thanks to the collaboration of
local communities, federal government agencies, academic institutions, and
NGOs, as well as national and international donors and funds.





* May 12 Cayuga Bird Club Meeting Mia Boynton PhD, granddaughter of Louis
Fuertes and independent writer Fuertes Revisited: A Bird Artist in His
Setting *Mia Boynton, a granddaughter of Louis Fuertes and an independent
writer, will talk about the research she has done for her recently
completed biography of Louis Agassiz Fuertes, *Fuertes Revisited: A Bird
Artist in his Setting*. Topics covered will include business realities of
being a bird artist in the early 20th century, sources of inspiration for
Fuertes, sources of difficulty, and the ways in which he survived. Copies
of the book will be available for purchase. This seminar is one event in a
series of events commemorating and celebrating the Cayuga Bird Club's 100
year anniversary

*Seminars are held at 7:30* *p.m. in the Cornell Lab of Ornithology's
Visitor Center auditorium except on night indicated as Cayuga Bird Club
meetings, with club business at 7:30 p.m., followed by the seminar. Doors
open at 7:00 and close when the auditorium is filled. Seminars are free and
open to the public. *







Marc Devokaitis

Public Information Specialist


Cornell Lab of Ornithology

159 Sapsucker Woods Rd

Ithaca, NY 14850

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
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ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

[cayugabirds-l] Monday Night Seminar--Art Opening: Afterlifes of Natural History

2014-02-21 Thread Marc Devokaitis
 in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem Host: TBA*
Whitebark pine and Clark's Nutcrackers have a fascinating relationship. The
trees provide the birds with rich, fatty seeds that have more calories per
pound than chocolate. In return, the nutcrackers plant the seeds that
grow whitebark pines as well as 10 other conifer species--trees needed to
provide food for wildlife and to helping retain snow (and thus drinking
water) on the upper slopes of the Rockies. Schaming will also provide
insights into the social behavior of the Clark's Nutcracker.




*April 14 Cayuga Bird Club Meeting Dr. John L. Confer, Biology Department,
Ithaca College Saw-whet Owls: The Cute Factor Aids Science: 206,000 Birds
Banded by Insomniac Banders Reveal Migration Patterns and Regional
Reproductive Success*

The Northern Saw-whet Owl is widely distributed and an intensive banding
effort provides a data trove for this tiny raptor. Banding records combined
with GIS analyses reveal exceptional detail about migration patterns in
eastern and central North America which allows us to analyze
temporal/spatial patterns of reproductive success for breeding populations
in different portions of North America.




* April 21 Anne B. Clark, Binghamton University; Kevin McGowan, Cornell Lab
of Ornithology; To Know the Crow: Insights and stories from a quarter
century of crow study Host: TBA*
American crows have followed us into our suburban and urban neighborhoods,
making them one of our most familiar birds. But they have socially
intricate lives, with more complex goals than converging at your local
dumpster--in fact, socially, they are probably more like us than any
primate. Ithaca is home to the longest running study of marked American
crows anywhere: it is now 26 years since Kevin first began banding them.
Kevin and Anne will tell some of their stories, including tales of family
values and treachery, stay-at-homes and travelers, dynasties and disease.




* April 28 Alfonso Aguirre Muñoz, Director, Grupo de Ecología y
Conservación de Islas Restoration of Mexican Islands and Conservation of
Birds Host: Eduardo Iñigo-Elias*
The Mexican islands are among the most valuable natural ecosystems. While
well preserved, invasive mammals have been a big threat to its
biodiversity, even causing the extinction of some island species. In
response, Mexico has eradicated 56 populations of invasive mammals from 36
islands, protecting 147 endemic species of mammals, reptiles, birds and
plants. In addition, 227 colonies of seabirds have been protected. The
eradication of invasive mammals from the approximately 40 remaining islands
is a strategic goal achievable by 2025, thanks to the collaboration of
local communities, federal government agencies, academic institutions, and
NGOs, as well as national and international donors and funds.





* May 12 Cayuga Bird Club Meeting Mia Boynton PhD, granddaughter of Louis
Fuertes and independent writer Fuertes Revisited: A Bird Artist in His
Setting *Mia Boynton, a granddaughter of Louis Fuertes and an independent
writer, will talk about the research she has done for her recently
completed biography of Louis Agassiz Fuertes, *Fuertes Revisited: A Bird
Artist in his Setting*. Topics covered will include business realities of
being a bird artist in the early 20th century, sources of inspiration for
Fuertes, sources of difficulty, and the ways in which he survived. Copies
of the book will be available for purchase. This seminar is one event in a
series of events commemorating and celebrating the Cayuga Bird Club's 100
year anniversary

*Seminars are held at 7:30* *p.m. in the Cornell Lab of Ornithology's
Visitor Center auditorium except on night indicated as Cayuga Bird Club
meetings, with club business at 7:30 p.m., followed by the seminar. Doors
open at 7:00 and close when the auditorium is filled. Seminars are free and
open to the public. *







Marc Devokaitis

Public Information Specialist


Cornell Lab of Ornithology

159 Sapsucker Woods Rd

Ithaca, NY 14850

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

[cayugabirds-l] THURSDAY Night Seminar--Species Interactions in Birds: From Microevolution to Macroecology

2014-02-18 Thread Marc Devokaitis
Please join us at 7:30 on *February 20th* for the a special Monday *THURSDAY
*Night Seminar. As always, these seminars are free and open to the public.
The doors open at 7:00.



This coming Thursday, we will be streaming the seminar live. Be sure to
bookmark http://dl.allaboutbirds.org/cornelllab-monday-night-seminars for
quick access on Monday evening.

-- 


*Joseph Tobias, Oxford University Species Interactions in Birds: From
Microevolution to Macroecology*

*Host: Mike Webster*


Dr. Joseph Tobias of Oxford University will discuss interactions among
species competing for the same food resources and how that competition may
drive evolution in two directions. Competition could foster small genetic
changes resulting in new subspecies or large changes that may result in new
groups of birds. Drawing from work on birds and birdsong, Dr. Tobias will
show that tracing evolutionary development in species over time challenges
common assumptions about the consequence of species interactions, and sheds
new light on broad-scale patterns in evolution.
--



Hope to see you there!

Marc Devokaitis



*UPCOMING MONDAY NIGHT SEMINARS*





*February 24: Art Opening Denis Defibaugh, artist Afterlifes of Natural
History Host: Diane Tessaglia-Hymes *Natural History Museums are
depositories of what was once alive.  Artist and RIT Professor Denis
Defibaugh is interested in the aesthetics and taxonomy of these specimens
and feels they combine aspects of both art and science. Defibaugh uses film
that is obsolete, allowing it to oxidize and eventually become a black
sheet of film. His photographs of specimens are made during the
deterioration process, creating moving images of preservation and
decay--what he calls a fading memory.



*March 3 Rachel Dickinson, author Have Notebook and Camera Will Travel:
Confessions of a Travel Writer Who Birds to Travel and Travels to Bird.*
*Host: Miyoko Chu*
Freelance author and travel writer Rachel Dickinson has spent the past
couple of decades roaming the globe in search of stories. Armed with a
notebook and a little camera, she's written about far-flung places such as
Siberia and the Falklands, and places closer to home including the Erie
Canal and her hometown of Freeville. Her work has been published in a
number of publications including *Audubon, The Atlantic*, and
smithsonian.com. She is a regular contributor to *The Huffington Post*
and *Men's
Journal* online.

*Dickinson's book, Falconer on the Edge: a man, his bird, and the vanishing
landscape of the American West (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt)*





*March 10 Cayuga Bird Club Meeting Kevin McGowan, Cornell Lab of
Ornithology Waterfowl ID: The Most Important Things *Do you deem distant
ducks disturbingly difficult? Do you find figuring out female fowl
frustrating and fraught with failure? This evening is engineered to
enlighten, engage, and entertain, while welcoming everyone into the
wonderful world of waterfowl. It will introduce the top two tips for
telling tricky ID troubles apart:  shape and color pattern.  Kevin McGowan
works in the Education section of the Cornell Lab, and has been creating
distance learning courses about bird behavior and identification. He will
share highlights from his Waterfowl ID webinar series.




*March 17 Tom Stephenson, author; Scott Whittle, photographer The Warbler
Guide: The Overlooked ID Points that Make Identifying Warblers Easy Host:
Mike Webster*
Birder and author Tom Stephenson and photographer Scott Whittle  will
describe important but often overlooked ID clues for colorful and sometimes
elusive warblers: overall contrast, subtle facial features, color
impressions, feather edging, rump contrast, as well as foraging style,
location, and behavior. Even viewing a warbler from below can reveal
identity clues for many species. Stephenson and Whittle will also address
some of the most challenging species to identify, compare them to similar
species, and illustrate how even partial views can be used to identify
warbler species.

*Stephenson's and Whittle's book, The Warbler Guide, published by Princeton
University Press, will be available for purchase and signing. *



*March 24 Sara Kaiser, Cornell Lab Unraveling the Mysteries of Songbird
Mating Systems*

*Host: TBA *Sara Kaiser is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Cornell
Lab of Ornithology and the Smithsonian Migratory Bird Center. She'll
discuss how habitat quality affects where and how often the seemingly
monogamous Black-throated Blue Warbler mates outside its pair bond. Most
male Black-throated Blue Warblers are socially monogamous, meaning they
are mated to a single female. However, all is not as it appears: up to 50%
of Black-throated Blue Warbler nests have young sired by a male that is not
the territory holder. Sara has been studying the mating system of these
warblers in the hardwood forests of New Hampshire.





*March 31 Margaret Barker, Elissa Wolfson, Chris Willett Building, Placing,
and Maintaining Great Homes for Great

[cayugabirds-l] Live Smithsonian webcast on forensic ornithology featuring Carla Dove

2014-02-11 Thread Marc Devokaitis
Hello all,



We were just informed of a webcast happening tomorrow that may be of
interest to some.   See below. I've been told by several people that Carla
Dove is *the* feather expert.



Marc

-



The National Museum of Natural History will be doing two *live webcasts
about forensic ornithology* on Wednesday, February 12, featuring Carla
Dove. The free 25-minute programs will be broadcast at 11AM and 2PM and can
be viewed on any computer or smartphone.



The webcasts are geared toward middle- and high-school students, but they
will be of interest to adults as well.  We will also be archiving the
videos. More information is available here:
https://qrius.si.edu/forensic-ornithology-bird-detective-featuring-carla-dove


Karen Fitzgerald

Office of Education and Outreach

National Museum of Natural History

Smithsonian Institution



202.633.0814 phone

202.786.2778 fax

P Please consider the environment before printing this e-mail. Thank you.

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[cayugabirds-l] Monday Night Seminar: Birds, Butterflies, and More: Ten Secrets to Never Having a Slow Day in the Field

2014-01-30 Thread Marc Devokaitis
 remaining islands
is a strategic goal achievable by 2025, thanks to the collaboration of
local communities, federal government agencies, academic institutions, and
NGOs, as well as national and international donors and funds.





* May 12 Cayuga Bird Club Meeting Mia Boynton PhD, granddaughter of Louis
Fuertes and independent writer Fuertes Revisited: A Bird Artist in His
Setting *Mia Boynton, a granddaughter of Louis Fuertes and an independent
writer, will talk about the research she has done for her recently
completed biography of Louis Agassiz Fuertes, *Fuertes Revisited: A Bird
Artist in his Setting*. Topics covered will include business realities of
being a bird artist in the early 20th century, sources of inspiration for
Fuertes, sources of difficulty, and the ways in which he survived. Copies
of the book will be available for purchase. This seminar is one event in a
series of events commemorating and celebrating the Cayuga Bird Club's 100
year anniversary





*Seminars are held at 7:30*
*p.m. in the Cornell Lab of Ornithology's Visitor Center auditorium except
on night indicated as Cayuga Bird Club meetings, with club business at 7:30
p.m., followed by the seminar. Doors open at 7:00 and close when the
auditorium is filled. Seminars are free and open to the public. *



Marc Devokaitis

Public Information Specialist



Cornell Lab of Ornithology

159 Sapsucker Woods Rd

Ithaca, NY 14850

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[cayugabirds-l] crows and a chickadee

2014-01-10 Thread Marc Devokaitis
This morning at 7:20, i counted 100+ crows flying southeast over Hudson St.
on South Hill--  oriented toward Six Mile Creek.  Five minutes later there
was another group of about 150 that was flying more or less due east above
the intersection of State St and Mitchell St (lower Collegetown).  I was
hoping for one more five minutes later (flying northeast) to continue the
pattern, but it didn't materialize.

On N.Quarry there was a chickadee singing Cheeseburger, which struck me
(figuratively).

Marc Devokaitis
Ithaca

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Please submit your observations to eBird:
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[cayugabirds-l] Monday Night Seminar: TONIGHT--Climate Change, Food Caching, and Winter Breeding: The Story of a Declining Gray Jay Population

2013-12-02 Thread Marc Devokaitis
Hello All,



A late notice for this week’s Monday Night Seminar at 7:30 p.m.TONIGHT at
the Lab of Ornithology http://www.birds.cornell.edu/Page.aspx?pid=1573.
 As always, these seminars are free and open to the public. The doors open
at 7:00.





*Climate Change, Food Caching, and Winter Breeding: The Story of a
Declining Gray Jay Population*

*Speaker: Ryan Norris, Department of Integrative Biology, University of
Guelph.*

* Host: Irby Lovette*

A bird of the Canadian boreal forests, Gray Jays breed in late winter
andrely on cached food to survive. But at the southern edge of the
bird’s
range in Algonquin Park, Ontario, the jays have been declining for the past
20 years. One hypothesis is that increasingly warmer fall temperatures are
spoiling cached food. Using data from a banded population that spans more
than 50 years as well as a series of novel experiments, Norris presents
results that test both the assumptions and predictions of the “hoard-rot
hypothesis.”









*More Upcoming Seminars:*







*December 9 Cayuga Bird Club Meeting and Seminar*

*The Way West: Birding with a Microphone*

*Speaker: Bob McGuire, sound recordist, former CBC president, and editor of
Birding the Cayuga Lake Basin. Host: Laura Stenzler*

McGuire says recording bird song is his excuse for getting outdoors and for
traveling. He’ll describe a trip to record birds in Texas, Arizona,
California, and Oregon. The talk will include photos of the birds, their
habitats, and a selection of recordings. Cayuga Bird Club meeting and
speaker, starting at 7:15 with cookies and conversation. Bird club business
begins at 7:30 followed by the speaker presentation. All are invited and
welcome.



*Seminars are held at 7:30* *p.m. in the Cornell Lab of Ornithology's
Visitor Center auditorium except on night indicated as Cayuga Bird Club
meetings, with club business at 7:30 p.m., followed by the seminar. Doors
open at 7:00 and close when the auditorium is filled. Seminars are free and
open to the public. *





Marc Devokaitis

Cornell Lab of Ornithology

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Please submit your observations to eBird:
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[cayugabirds-l] Monday Night Seminar: November 18--Behind the Scenes With Bird Cams--Live Stream

2013-11-14 Thread Marc Devokaitis
Hello All,



Please join us at 7:30 p.m. on November 18th for the next Monday Night
Seminar.  As always, these seminars are free and open to the public. The
doors open at 7:00.


Once more, and for the final time this semester, we will be streaming the
presentation live—Bookmark this
pagehttp://dl.allaboutbirds.org/cornelllab-monday-night-seminars?__hstc=132624273.2323bdcc7ef7bed16dcec999613d549e.1366034604572.1384441996414.1384448327124.194__hssc=132624273.1.1384448327124__hsfp=2279697681for
easy access on Monday evening. And
if you missed the last two live-streamed seminars, you can check them out
herehttp://www.birds.cornell.edu/page.aspx?pid=1579calendar=cornell.lab.of.ornithol...@gmail.com
.



Hope you can make it!





*Behind the Scenes With Bird Cams*

*Speaker: Charles Eldermire, Bird Cams Project Leader, Cornell Lab of
Ornithology. Host: Miyoko Chu*

There's a lot more to Bird Cams than providing live, streaming video of
cute nestlings. Eldermire will take listeners behind the scenes of this
hugely popular Cornell Lab project. He'll discuss some of the unexpected
pleasures and problems that arise when unscripted natural history plays out
before the eyes of millions of deeply engaged fans.


This seminar will be streamed live. Copy the following web address into
your browser to see and hear the presentation:
http://dl.allaboutbirds.org/cornelllab-monday-night-seminars







*More Upcoming Seminars:*





*December 2*

*Climate Change, Food Caching, and Winter Breeding: The Story of a
Declining Gray Jay Population*

*Speaker: Ryan Norris, Department of Integrative Biology, University of
Guelph. Host: Irby Lovette*

A bird of the Canadian boreal forests, Gray Jays breed in late winter
andrely on cached food to survive. But at the southern edge of the
bird’s
range in Algonquin Park, Ontario, the jays have been declining for the past
20 years. One hypothesis is that increasingly warmer fall temperatures are
spoiling cached food. Using data from a banded population that spans more
than 50 years as well as a series of novel experiments, Norris presents
results that test both the assumptions and predictions of the “hoard-rot
hypothesis.”



*December 9 Cayuga Bird Club Meeting and Seminar*

*The Way West: Birding with a Microphone*

*Speaker: Bob McGuire, sound recordist, former CBC president, and editor of
Birding the Cayuga Lake Basin. Host: Laura Stenzler*

McGuire says recording bird song is his excuse for getting outdoors and for
traveling. He’ll describe a trip to record birds in Texas, Arizona,
California, and Oregon. The talk will include photos of the birds, their
habitats, and a selection of recordings. Cayuga Bird Club meeting and
speaker, starting at 7:15 with cookies and conversation. Bird club business
begins at 7:30 followed by the speaker presentation. All are invited and
welcome.



*Seminars are held at 7:30* *p.m. in the Cornell Lab of Ornithology's
Visitor Center auditorium except on night indicated as Cayuga Bird Club
meetings, with club business at 7:30 p.m., followed by the seminar. Doors
open at 7:00 and close when the auditorium is filled. Seminars are free and
open to the public. *





Marc Devokaitis

Lab of Ornithology

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[cayugabirds-l] Monday Night Seminar and Book Signing: Natural History, Aesthetics, and Conservation

2013-10-31 Thread Marc Devokaitis
Hello All,



Please join us at 7:30 on November 4th for the next Monday Night Seminar
(and Book Signing) at the Lab of
Ornithologyhttp://www.birds.cornell.edu/Page.aspx?pid=1573.
 As always, these seminars are free and open to the public. The doors open
at 7:00.



This coming Monday, we will once again be streaming the event live!  Be
sure to bookmark
http://dl.allaboutbirds.org/cornelllab-monday-night-seminars for quick
access on Monday evening.  And if you missed it, you can also watch
the archived
versionhttp://blog.allaboutbirds.org/2013/10/04/saving-antarcticas-pristine-ross-sea-public-seminar/?__hstc=132624273.2323bdcc7ef7bed16dcec999613d549e.1366034604572.1383052964405.1383232543563.181__hssc=132624273.1.1383232543563__hsfp=153550319of
the September 30
th seminar.



***Natural History, Aesthetics, and Conservation---Seminar and Book Signing*

*Speaker: Harry Greene, Professor and Faculty Curator of Herpetology,
Cornell University. Host: Miyoko Chu*

Greene will describe how natural history enhances our appreciation for
organisms and environments, thereby influencing value judgments that
ultimately underlie conservation. He will explain how an 18th Century
philosopher’s distinction between “beauty” and “sublime” can be used in the
context of Darwin’s notion of “descent with modification,” then illustrate
this approach with frogs, rattlesnakes, African megafauna, longhorn cattle,
and California Condors. Greene’s new book “Tracks and Shadows” will be
available for signing.





Hope to see you there!



*More Upcoming Seminars:*





*November 11 Cayuga Bird Club Meeting and Seminar*

*Songbirds Rise Above the Din*

*Speaker: Elizabeth Derryberry, Assistant Professor of Ecology and
Evolutionary Biology, Tulane University. Host: Laura Stenzler*

Noise, whether from a crowded city or nature itself, may be enough of a
nuisance to convince birds to change their tune. Derryberry will talk about
her studies on current and historical songs of White-crowned Sparrows in
San Francisco and Marin County, California. She compares songs from urban
and rural locations to see how these songs have evolved in each
location. Cayuga
Bird Club meeting and speaker, starting at 7:15 with cookies and
conversation. Bird club business begins at 7:30 followed by the speaker
presentation. All are invited and welcome.



*November 18*

*Behind the Scenes With Bird Cams*

*Speaker: Charles Eldermire, Bird Cams Project Leader, Cornell Lab of
Ornithology. Host: Miyoko Chu*

There's a lot more to Bird Cams than providing live, streaming video of
cute nestlings. Eldermire will take listeners behind the scenes of this
hugely popular Cornell Lab project. He'll discuss some of the unexpected
pleasures and problems that arise when unscripted natural history plays out
before the eyes of millions of deeply engaged fans.



*December 2*

*Climate Change, Food Caching, and Winter Breeding: The Story of a
Declining Gray Jay Population*

*Speaker: Ryan Norris, Department of Integrative Biology, University of
Guelph. Host: Irby Lovette*

A bird of the Canadian boreal forests, Gray Jays breed in late winter
andrely on cached food to survive. But at the southern edge of the
bird’s
range in Algonquin Park, Ontario, the jays have been declining for the past
20 years. One hypothesis is that increasingly warmer fall temperatures are
spoiling cached food. Using data from a banded population that spans more
than 50 years as well as a series of novel experiments, Norris presents
results that test both the assumptions and predictions of the “hoard-rot
hypothesis.”



*December 9 Cayuga Bird Club Meeting and Seminar*

*The Way West: Birding with a Microphone*

*Speaker: Bob McGuire, sound recordist, former CBC president, and editor of
Birding the Cayuga Lake Basin. Host: Laura Stenzler*

McGuire says recording bird song is his excuse for getting outdoors and for
traveling. He’ll describe a trip to record birds in Texas, Arizona,
California, and Oregon. The talk will include photos of the birds, their
habitats, and a selection of recordings. Cayuga Bird Club meeting and
speaker, starting at 7:15 with cookies and conversation. Bird club business
begins at 7:30 followed by the speaker presentation. All are invited and
welcome.



*Seminars are held at 7:30** **p.m. in the Cornell Lab of Ornithology's
Visitor Center auditorium except on night indicated as Cayuga Bird Club
meetings, with club business at 7:30 p.m., followed by the seminar. Doors
open at 7:00 and close when the auditorium is filled. Seminars are free and
open to the public. *





Marc Devokaitis
Cornell Lab of Ornithology

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[cayugabirds-l] Monday Night Seminar: Warbler Plumage Patterns that Make Capturing Insects Easier

2013-10-17 Thread Marc Devokaitis
Hello All,



Please join us at 7:30 on October 21 for the next Monday Night Seminar.  As
always, these seminars are free and open to the public. Doors open at 7:00.



*Warbler Plumage Patterns that Make Capturing Insects Easier*

*Speaker: Ron Mumme, Professor of Biology, Allegheny College. Host: Walt
Koenig*



The striking plumage ornaments so characteristic of birds are usually
thought to serve as social and sexual signals. In the parulid warblers
however, conspicuous plumage patterns can serve an entirely different
function: startling potential insect prey and enhancing foraging
performance. Professor Mumme will examine the role of plumage pattern in
the foraging behavior of the Slate-throated Redstart of Central and South
America and the Hooded Warbler of eastern North America.







*More Upcoming Seminars*



*November 4**--**Seminar and Book Signing*

*Natural History, Aesthetics, and Conservation*

*Speaker: Harry Greene, Professor and Faculty Curator of Herpetology,
Cornell University. Host: Miyoko Chu*

Greene will describe how natural history enhances our appreciation for
organisms and environments, thereby influencing value judgments that
ultimately underlie conservation. He will explain how an 18th Century
philosopher’s distinction between “beauty” and “sublime” can be used in the
context of Darwin’s notion of “descent with modification,” then illustrate
this approach with frogs, rattlesnakes, African megafauna, longhorn cattle,
and California Condors. Greene’s new book “Tracks and Shadows” will be
available for signing.



*November 11 Cayuga Bird Club Meeting and Seminar*

*Songbirds Rise Above the Din*

*Speaker: Elizabeth Derryberry, Assistant Professor of Ecology and
Evolutionary Biology, Tulane University. Host: Laura Stenzler*

Noise, whether from a crowded city or nature itself, may be enough of a
nuisance to convince birds to change their tune. Derryberry will talk about
her studies on current and historical songs of White-crowned Sparrows in
San Francisco and Marin County, California. She compares songs from urban
and rural locations to see how these songs have evolved in each
location. Cayuga
Bird Club meeting and speaker, starting at 7:15 with cookies and
conversation. Bird club business begins at 7:30 followed by the speaker
presentation. All are invited and welcome.



*November 18*

*Behind the Scenes With Bird Cams*

*Speaker: Charles Eldermire, Bird Cams Project Leader, Cornell Lab of
Ornithology. Host: Miyoko Chu*

There's a lot more to Bird Cams than providing live, streaming video of
cute nestlings. Eldermire will take listeners behind the scenes of this
hugely popular Cornell Lab project. He'll discuss some of the unexpected
pleasures and problems that arise when unscripted natural history plays out
before the eyes of millions of deeply engaged fans.



*December 2*

*Climate Change, Food Caching, and Winter Breeding: The Story of a
Declining Gray Jay Population*

*Speaker: Ryan Norris, Department of Integrative Biology, University of
Guelph. Host: Irby Lovette*

A bird of the Canadian boreal forests, Gray Jays breed in late winter
andrely on cached food to survive. But at the southern edge of the
bird’s
range in Algonquin Park, Ontario, the jays have been declining for the past
20 years. One hypothesis is that increasingly warmer fall temperatures are
spoiling cached food. Using data from a banded population that spans more
than 50 years as well as a series of novel experiments, Norris presents
results that test both the assumptions and predictions of the “hoard-rot
hypothesis.”



*December 9 Cayuga Bird Club Meeting and Seminar*

*The Way West: Birding with a Microphone*

*Speaker: Bob McGuire, sound recordist, former CBC president, and editor of
Birding the Cayuga Lake Basin. Host: Laura Stenzler*

McGuire says recording bird song is his excuse for getting outdoors and for
traveling. He’ll describe a trip to record birds in Texas, Arizona,
California, and Oregon. The talk will include photos of the birds, their
habitats, and a selection of recordings. Cayuga Bird Club meeting and
speaker, starting at 7:15 with cookies and conversation. Bird club business
begins at 7:30 followed by the speaker presentation. All are invited and
welcome.



*Seminars are held at 7:30** **p.m. in the Cornell Lab of Ornithology's
Visitor Center auditorium except on night indicated as Cayuga Bird Club
meetings, with club business at 7:30 p.m., followed by the seminar. Doors
open at 7:00 and close when the auditorium is filled. Seminars are free and
open to the public. *





Marc Devokaitis

Public Information Specialist

Cornaell Lab of Ornithology

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[cayugabirds-l] Monday Night Seminar: An Environmental Success Story

2013-10-10 Thread Marc Devokaitis
Hello all,

Please join us at 7:30 p.m. on October 14 for the next Monday Night Seminar
at the Lab of Ornithology.  Or come at 7:15 for conversation and cookies
with the Cayuga Bird Club.

If you have never visited the
preservehttp://www.nature.org/ourinitiatives/regions/northamerica/unitedstates/newyork/placesweprotect/centralwesternnewyork/wherewework/central-od-von-engeln-preserve-at-malloryville.xml#thingsToDothat
is the subject of this talk, it’s a true gem. A beautiful weekend is
on the way for exploring new places! Hope to see you Monday evening.

Marc



* *

*Cayuga Bird Club Meeting, Seminar, and Book Signing***

*An Environmental Success Story: Saving an Ecological Treasure through
Resolute Teamwork**

Speaker: Bob Beck, Author, Naturalist, Educator, Environmentalist.
Host: Laura Stenzler*



Bob Beck will share his experiences in organizing and leading an 11-year
fight against proposed gravel mines next to diverse, pristine wetlands. The
battle culminated in the establishment of The Nature Conservancy's O.D. von
Engeln Preserve at Malloryville, in the Fall Creek area of Tompkins County.
Beck’s new book The Journey at Malloryville Bog: Commitment, Teamwork and
Tenacity in Defense of Land and Nature will also be available for
signing. Cayuga
Bird Club meeting and speaker, starting at 7:15 with cookies and
conversation. Bird club business begins at 7:30 followed by the
presentation. All are invited and welcome.







*More Upcoming Seminars*



*October 21*

*Warbler Plumage Patterns that Make Capturing Insects Easier*

*Speaker: Ron Mumme, Professor of Biology, Allegheny College. Host: Walt
Koenig*

The striking plumage ornaments so characteristic of birds are usually
thought to serve as social and sexual signals. In the parulid warblers
however, conspicuous plumage patterns can serve an entirely different
function: startling potential insect prey and enhancing foraging
performance. Mumme will examine the role of plumage pattern in the foraging
behavior of the Slate-throated Redstart of Central and South America and
the Hooded Warbler of eastern North America.



*November 4**--**Seminar and Book Signing*

*Natural History, Aesthetics, and Conservation*

*Speaker: Harry Greene, Professor and Faculty Curator of Herpetology,
Cornell University. Host: Miyoko Chu*

Greene will describe how natural history enhances our appreciation for
organisms and environments, thereby influencing value judgments that
ultimately underlie conservation. He will explain how an 18th Century
philosopher’s distinction between “beauty” and “sublime” can be used in the
context of Darwin’s notion of “descent with modification,” then illustrate
this approach with frogs, rattlesnakes, African megafauna, longhorn cattle,
and California Condors. Greene’s new book “Tracks and Shadows” will be
available for signing.



*November 11 Cayuga Bird Club Meeting and Seminar*

*Songbirds Rise Above the Din*

*Speaker: Elizabeth Derryberry, Assistant Professor of Ecology and
Evolutionary Biology, Tulane University. Host: Laura Stenzler*

Noise, whether from a crowded city or nature itself, may be enough of a
nuisance to convince birds to change their tune. Derryberry will talk about
her studies on current and historical songs of White-crowned Sparrows in
San Francisco and Marin County, California. She compares songs from urban
and rural locations to see how these songs have evolved in each
location. Cayuga
Bird Club meeting and speaker, starting at 7:15 with cookies and
conversation. Bird club business begins at 7:30 followed by the speaker
presentation. All are invited and welcome.



*November 18*

*Behind the Scenes With Bird Cams*

*Speaker: Charles Eldermire, Bird Cams Project Leader, Cornell Lab of
Ornithology. Host: Miyoko Chu*

There's a lot more to Bird Cams than providing live, streaming video of
cute nestlings. Eldermire will take listeners behind the scenes of this
hugely popular Cornell Lab project. He'll discuss some of the unexpected
pleasures and problems that arise when unscripted natural history plays out
before the eyes of millions of deeply engaged fans.



*December 2*

*Climate Change, Food Caching, and Winter Breeding: The Story of a
Declining Gray Jay Population*

*Speaker: Ryan Norris, Department of Integrative Biology, University of
Guelph. Host: Irby Lovette*

A bird of the Canadian boreal forests, Gray Jays breed in late winter
andrely on cached food to survive. But at the southern edge of the
bird’s
range in Algonquin Park, Ontario, the jays have been declining for the past
20 years. One hypothesis is that increasingly warmer fall temperatures are
spoiling cached food. Using data from a banded population that spans more
than 50 years as well as a series of novel experiments, Norris presents
results that test both the assumptions and predictions of the “hoard-rot
hypothesis.”



*December 9 Cayuga Bird Club Meeting and Seminar*

*The Way West: Birding with a Microphone*

*Speaker: Bob McGuire, sound 

[cayugabirds-l] Monday Night Seminar: When Urban Winners Become Losers

2013-10-03 Thread Marc Devokaitis
 from a banded population that spans more
than 50 years as well as a series of novel experiments, Norris presents
results that test both the assumptions and predictions of the “hoard-rot
hypothesis.”



*December 9 Cayuga Bird Club Meeting and Seminar*

*The Way West: Birding with a Microphone*

*Speaker: Bob McGuire, sound recordist, former CBC president, and editor of
Birding the Cayuga Lake Basin. Host: Laura Stenzler*

McGuire says recording bird song is his excuse for getting outdoors and for
traveling. He’ll describe a trip to record birds in Texas, Arizona,
California, and Oregon. The talk will include photos of the birds, their
habitats, and a selection of recordings. Cayuga Bird Club meeting and
speaker, starting at 7:15 with cookies and conversation. Bird club business
begins at 7:30 followed by the speaker presentation. All are invited and
welcome.



*Seminars are held at 7:30** **p.m. in the Cornell Lab of Ornithology's
Visitor Center auditorium except on night indicated as Cayuga Bird Club
meetings, with club business at 7:30 p.m., followed by the seminar. Doors
open at 7:00 and close when the auditorium is filled. Seminars are free and
open to the public. *





Marc Devokaitis

Public Information Specialist



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[cayugabirds-l] Fwd: FW: Cornell Lab of Ornithology Website: University of Alberta Birds and Windows Project

2013-09-27 Thread Marc Devokaitis
Hi All,

Wanted to share this email about a new citizen science monitoring project
out of U. of Alberta.

Marc Devokaitis


-Original Message-
From: Justine [mailto:birdsandwind...@ualberta.ca]
Sent: Wednesday, September 25, 2013 5:14 PM
To: Cornell Lab of Ornithology
Subject: Cornell Lab of Ornithology Website: University of Alberta Birds
and Windows Project

Hello,

The University of Alberta has developed the Birds and Windows Project to
study bird window collisions at your home. We encourage everyone to take a
look at our website and participate in the study.

What is the issue?
It has been estimated up to 1 billion birds are killed in North America
each year as a result of bird window collisions! This is one of the largest
threats to bird populations, with residential homes representing the
majority of building-related mortality.

Get involved!
To better understand what can be done to reduce bird window collisions, the
University of Alberta has developed this project to actively involve YOU in
data collection. We are asking you to think about bird window collisions
you have observed in the past and would like you to regularly search around
your residence for evidence of bird window collisions in the future. By
collecting this data we hope to identify the factors that make some windows
more risky for birds than others.
As a citizen scientist you can help!

Visit the website for more information:
http://birdswindows.biology.ualberta.ca/

Thank you for helping us make our homes a healthy habitat for us and all
our neighbors! Please forward this email to any one else you think would be
interested.

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

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