[cayugabirds-l] Exciting Adirondack Opportunities for Big Atlas Weekend

2021-06-19 Thread Matthew Medler
Hi All,

If you're interested in participating in the upcoming Big Atlas Weekend,
and you also like to travel to the Adirondacks each summer to enjoy that
region's specialty breeders, we have a couple of exciting trip ideas to
share!

The first-ever Big Atlas Weekend
 will be held
next weekend, June 25-27, and offers a variety of ways to participate and
be eligible to win exciting prizes from the Cornell Lab's Bird Academy.
Some of the goals of the Big Atlas Weekend are to: encourage visits to
priority blocks that are currently unvisited; increase coverage in priority
blocks with only a few hours of coverage; and highlight the importance of
nocturnal visits to priority blocks.

The Moose River Plains in Hamilton County offer outstanding boreal birding
opportunities for species like Boreal Chickadee, Canada Jay, Black-backed
Woodpecker, Swainson's Thrush, and more. The Moose River Plains are also
home to several priority atlas blocks that are completely unvisited or have
just a few hours of effort after Atlas Year 1. There are over 100 primitive
campsites in the area, so if you enjoy camping and birding, this is a great
place to go. Note that these campsites are all available on a first-come
first-served basis. There is also lodging available in nearby Inlet and Old
Forge.

The DEC website has detailed information about the Moose River Plains here:
https://www.dec.ny.gov/lands/53596.html

There are two unvisited priority blocks accessible from the main Limekiln
Lake-Cedar River Road (a.k.a. the Moose River Plains Road) that traverses
the area: Wakely Mountain CE 
 and Mount Tom CE . This road
also passes through the Snowy Mountain NW
 priority block, which is in
need of additional diurnal effort (and nocturnal effort).

The popular Ferd's Bog birding hotspot is located a short distance from the
Moose River Plains. Ferd's Bog is not located in a priority block, but if
you're spending the weekend in the area, it's always worth a visit!

The Nature Conservancy's Spring Pond Bog Preserve

is
one of the crown jewels of the Adirondacks. It is one of the last
strongholds of Spruce Grouse in New York State, and it also hosts other
special boreal breeding species like Boreal Chickadee, Black-backed
Woodpecker, Canada Jay, Yellow-bellied Flycatcher, and Palm Warbler.
Special permission is required to visit the preserve. To request a guest
pass, please email adironda...@tnc.org. Due to COVID-19 office closures,
TNC's response may be delayed, so be sure to contact them as far in advance
as possible.

A good portion of the Spring Pond Bog Preserve lies within the
unvisited Derrick
NW  priority block. If you plan
a trip to the preserve for atlasing and birding purposes, please be sure to
pay careful attention to block boundaries and strive to create either
stationary counts or short traveling checklists to make sure that all
observations from a checklist fall within a single atlas block.

Spring Pond Bog is located a bit north of the Village of Tupper Lake, which
offers restaurants and a few lodging options. The village is also located
in the Tupper Lake NW  priority
block, so if you spend any time there, be sure to submit some checklists
and keep an eye out for opportunities to confirm common species.

There are also two major DEC campgrounds in the Spring Pond Bog / Tupper
Lake area: Rollins Pond  and Fish
Creek Pond . These two
campgrounds both require reservations through the Reserve America website.
The Rollins Pond campground is located in the Derrick CE
 priority block, so a weekend of
camping at Rollins Pond and birding at Rollins Pond and Spring Pond Bog
could yield excellent birding and a great contribution to atlas efforts!

If you have any questions about Big Atlas Weekend, or if you make plans to
visit either of the areas that we've highlighted above, please email us at
nybba3.north...@gmail.com.

Good birding,
Matt Medler, Jeff Bolsinger, and Tom Wheeler
Atlas Regional Co-coordinators for Northern New York

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[cayugabirds-l] Atlas Year 2 Kick-off Event Tonight @ 6:30 pm

2021-04-07 Thread Matthew Medler
Hi All,

Just a quick reminder that the New York Breeding Bird Atlas Year 2 Kick-off 
Event is tonight (7 April 2021) at 6:30 pm. More information, including access 
to the meeting's Zoom link, can be found here:

https://ebird.org/atlasny/news/atlas-year-2-kick-off-april-7th-630-pm

Hope to see many of you there tonight!

Good birding,
Matt Medler
Northern Region Co-coordinator for NY BBA III


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[cayugabirds-l] New York Breeding Bird Atlas Year 2

2021-04-03 Thread Matthew Medler
Thank you for being a part of the New York birding community. Your checklists 
power research and conservation throughout the state and beyond, and 2021 
brings another great way to enjoy birds: the third New York Breeding Bird 
Atlas!

WHAT IS A BREEDING BIRD ATLAS?

Breeding Bird Atlases (or BBAs) are dedicated efforts to understand the 
populations of breeding birds in a specific region. The information collected 
is invaluable for guiding bird conservation. In New York, the atlas runs for 5 
years (2020-2024), and year 2 is beginning now!


HOW CAN YOU JOIN THE FUN?

All you have to do is go birding and report your sightings to eBird. The NY BBA 
III is fully integrated with eBird, so with a couple minor changes, you're 
essentially already atlasing!


There are three things to keep in mind to be a part of the atlas:

  1.  Follow the ‘block’ system. Atlas data are collected within 'atlas 
blocks'—squares that are ~3mi x 
3mi in size: if you reach the edge of a block, make sure to stop your checklist 
and start a new one.

  2.  Understanding breeding codes is key. The goal of the atlas is to document 
breeding behaviors using specific breeding 
codes.

  3.  Set your eBird portal to the NY BBA III. Once you understand breeding 
codes and the block boundaries, you just need to specifically tag your lists as 
a part of the atlas—this is very easy, and we have a walkthrough of the process 
here.


QUESTIONS?

If you have any more questions, please come join the Atlas Year 2 
Kick-off 
event on 7 April from 6:30-8:30pm! This event will talk about the atlas 
progress, goals, and what’s on tap for this year.


You can also check out atlas news, upcoming 
events, and stay informed by signing up 
for the atlas newsletter.


We can’t wait to have you join the team of the more than 1780 atlasers who have 
already contributed observations on over 200 breeding 
species. We’ll see you out there.


Happy birding,

Matt Medler

Northern New York Region Co-coordinator


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[cayugabirds-l] Glaucous Gull and Lesser Black-backed Gull

2021-02-07 Thread Matthew Medler
Hi All,

For those interested in Seneca Lake and Schuyler County birding, there is a 
nice flock of gulls at Clute Park in Watkins Glen that contains an adult 
Glaucous Gull and an adult Lesser Black-backed Gull. These two species are both 
infrequently reported here in Schuyler County.

Good birding,
Matt Medler

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[cayugabirds-l] Lesser Black-backed Gull and Bonaparte’s Gulls

2020-12-26 Thread Matthew Medler
As part of the Watkins Glen CBC today (26 Dec 2020) I just found a Lesser 
Black-backed Gull and five Bonaparte’s Gulls in the large gull flock off Clute 
Park. LBBG is fairly common in the Ithaca area, but much less so here in WG. 
Also two WWSC present.

Matt Medler

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[cayugabirds-l] Crossbills at Bear Swamp SF

2020-12-20 Thread Matthew Medler
I hit the finch jackpot while participating in the Cortland Christmas Bird 
Count yesterday (19 Dec 2020). While covering different sections of Bear Swamp 
State Forest, I came across flocks of both RED CROSSBILLS and WHITE-WINGED 
CROSSBILLS. I also had individual COMMON REDPOLL flyovers, as well as one 
PURPLE FINCH and one AMERICAN GOLDFINCH, making for a five-finch morning!

The first Red Crossbills were along the southern section of Bear Swamp Road, a 
bit north of the "Iowa Road parking lot" marked on Google Maps. Additional 
details can be found here: https://ebird.org/atlasny/checklist/S77689752

I then walked along Curtin Road a bit further north, focusing on the 1/4-mile 
stretch that contains conifers on both sides of the road. While there, I heard 
the flight calls of a flock of Red Crossbills, which eventually flew south 
across the road. https://ebird.org/atlasny/checklist/S77691187

Finally, just as I was about to wrap up for the morning, I heard and then saw a 
flock of 30 White-winged Crossbills near the west end of Hartnett Road: 
https://ebird.org/atlasny/checklist/S77695926

A few of the White-winged Crossbills offered nice views while perched, but 
otherwise, all of my finch encounters were of birds in flight, so if you go, 
keep an ear out for flight calls!

Good birding,
Matt Medler
Ithaca

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[cayugabirds-l] Montezuma area birding

2020-12-14 Thread Matthew Medler
To celebrate the start of the Christmas Bird Count season, I spent the day 
today (14 Dec 2020) birding at various spots in the Montezuma CBC circle. I was 
joined at different times by Tim Lenz, Jay McGowan, and Drew Weber for 
socially-distanced birding. In a testament to the incredible birding 
opportunities in the area, we collectively tallied just over 14,000 individuals 
of 67 species.

Tim and I started the morning at Cayuga Lake State Park 
(https://ebird.org/atlasny/checklist/S77470419), where we found 14 species of 
waterfowl. Tim also picked out 15 Bonaparte's Gulls, which were a nice 
surprise. From there, Tim headed to the NYS Chiropractic College, where he had 
650 Snow Geese, a Northern Mockingbird, and an American Kestrel. I drove up 
Lower Lake Road, where I came across a tight flock of 84 Ruddy Ducks.

After that, I headed up to the western side of Howland Island 
(https://ebird.org/atlasny/checklist/S77478312), where I spent a few hours 
walking around on the trails. It was a woodpecker wonderland there! I observed 
all six species of regular woodpeckers (including an uncommon-in-winter 
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker) with Hairy Woodpecker and Northern Flicker 
particularly vocal and conspicuous. At this point in the day, it felt almost 
balmy, so seeing five Yellow-rumped Warblers, two Belted Kingfishers, Great 
Blue Heron, and a Winter Wren fit in with the warmish weather.

>From there, I made my way to the Montezuma NWR Visitors Center 
>(https://ebird.org/checklist/S77481467), where I met up with Jay and Drew. The 
>highlights there were the large numbers of waterfowl visible on the Main Pool 
>(with the help of the scope), and the ~50 Sandhill Cranes in the pool right at 
>the Visitors Center.

At that point the weather started to get colder, and it started to really feel 
like winter. But we continued on to check several popular spots in the greater 
Montezuma area, including East Road/Knox-Marcellus (234 Sandhill Cranes, 145 
American Robins, and a late Savannah Sparrow), Armitage Road (Trumpeter Swans 
and a Rough-legged Hawk), Savannah Mucklands (another Rough-legged Hawk and an 
American Kestrel), and Van Dyne Spoor Road (more Trumpeter Swans and Sandhill 
Cranes).

We ended the day at Morgan Road, where we hoped to spot Short-eared Owls that 
have been seen between there and Carncross Road recently. Instead, we were met 
by a brief squall that made it hard to see much of anything. Eventually, 
though, it cleared up, but the Short-eared Owls never appeared. But, two Great 
Horned Owls made up for it by briefly duetting as it grew dark. All in all, it 
was a great day to be out birding!

This website contains a great tool for aggregating eBird checklists from a 
Christmas Bird Count or any other set of checklists that you might want to add 
up: http://iba.torontobirding.ca/ Our cumulative totals for the day are 
included at the end of this email.

Good birding,
Matt Medler
Ithaca

Common Name Total
Snow Goose  650
Canada Goose4080
Trumpeter Swan  16
Tundra Swan 569
Northern Shoveler   10
Gadwall 352
American Wigeon 407
Mallard 1640
American Black Duck 123
Northern Pintail39
Canvasback  38
Redhead 2450
Ring-necked Duck901
Greater Scaup   10
Lesser Scaup3
Bufflehead  15
Common Goldeneye1
Hooded Merganser16
Common Merganser86
Ruddy Duck  84
Wild Turkey 4
Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon)  61
American Coot   45
Sandhill Crane  348
Bonaparte's Gull15
Ring-billed Gull66
Herring Gull150
Great Black-backed Gull 8
Great Blue Heron2
Northern Harrier6
Cooper's Hawk   1
Bald Eagle  29
Red-tailed Hawk 9
Rough-legged Hawk   2
Great Horned Owl2
Belted Kingfisher   3
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker1
Red-bellied Woodpecker  14
Downy Woodpecker4
Hairy Woodpecker9
Pileated Woodpecker 1
Northern Flicker15
American Kestrel2
Blue Jay18
American Crow   829
Black-capped Chickadee  25
Tufted Titmouse 2
White-breasted Nuthatch 14
Brown Creeper   2
Winter Wren 2
Carolina Wren   3
European Starling   210
Northern Mockingbird1
Eastern Bluebird13
American Robin  476
House Sparrow   4
House Finch 1
American Goldfinch  46
American Tree Sparrow   21
Dark-eyed Junco 3
White-throated Sparrow  5
Savannah Sparrow1
Song Sparrow2
Swamp Sparrow   1
Brown-headed Cowbird30
Yellow-rumped Warbler   5
Northern Cardinal   7




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[cayugabirds-l] Atlas Town Hall Meeting Tonight at 6:30 pm

2020-07-08 Thread Matthew Medler
Hi All,

Just a quick reminder that Atlas coordinator Julie Hart will be leading another 
Atlas Town Hall meeting tonight, July 8, at 6:30 pm. Tonight's focus will be on 
answering data entry questions. Julie will also give a tutorial on how to use 
the Explore pages on the Atlas website so you know how to view all the results 
collected so far.

This town hall will be a WebEx event, and the technical details can be found 
here:

https://meetny.webex.com/webappng/sites/meetny/meeting/info/165570217151310905?MTID=m06cd681bc4cf33701b2223c3b1e8a62f

Hope to see you there!

Matt Medler
Atlas co-coordinator for northern New York

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[cayugabirds-l] Atlas Insider Newsletter

2020-07-01 Thread Matthew Medler
Hi All,

The latest Atlas Insider newsletter is now out! It contains information on 
identifying confusing fledglings, searching for secretive marsh birds, and tips 
(from yours truly) about how to read maps to maximize your atlas efforts in the 
field. Here's a link:

https://mailchi.mp/109bf734881e/ny-breeding-bird-atlas-iii-atlas-insider-february-12522390?fbclid=IwAR00Si47_Rf-NxxhKT_1oJpb-46Cz36wMW65E-OXqNYoL3jjtp4LcZ5f4GE

Good atlasing,
Matt Medler
Ithaca

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[cayugabirds-l] Everybody is crazy about this

2019-02-24 Thread Matthew Medler
I couldn't expect more http://web.idlifeproducts.me 
<http://web.idlifeproducts.me/> 

 

 

Matthew Medler

 


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[cayugabirds-l] Ruff at Montezuma NWR yesterday

2017-07-20 Thread Matthew Medler
Hi All,

Last night, Tim Lenz, Bob McGuire, and I saw the RUFF that has been seen in the 
Montezuma area since Dave Nutter discovered it on Saturday, July 8. Like Dave, 
we saw the bird briefly at dusk at Eaton Marsh on the Montezuma NWR auto-loop. 
We had looked for the bird here and at Kips Island earlier in the evening, 
without success, but decided to return to Eaton Marsh at dusk in the hopes that 
it would join other roosting shorebirds there. Tim located the bird in amongst 
the many yellowlegs somewhere between 8:30 and 8:45, but shortly thereafter, 
the bird took flight with a few other shorebirds and left the area. Additional 
details, including a photo, can be found in Tim's eBird checklist:

https://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S38232573

It's worth noting here that the bird looks considerably different than it did 
when it was first found. The bird's black ruff is gone, and the bird has a 
striking white neck, throat, and upper breast. 

Good birding,
Matt Medler
Ithaca

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[cayugabirds-l] Ruff updates?

2017-07-16 Thread Matthew Medler
Has anybody seen (or looked for) the Montezuma Ruff today? Any updates, 
positive or negative, from today (Sunday, July 16) would be appreciated!

Thanks,
Matt Medler
Ithaca

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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Rose-breasted Grosbeak

2017-04-02 Thread Matthew Medler
Asher,
Is there any chance that the bird you saw this morning might have been a 
similar-looking female Purple Finch? Purple Finch is a classic early April 
migrant here in the Ithaca area, whereas Rose-breasted Grosbeaks typically 
arrive back here in late April or early May. This eBird map for Rose-breasted 
Grosbeak for Mar-Apr 2017 shows that the vast majority of records are from 
Central America:
http://ebird.org/ebird/map/robgro?neg=true=-141.8379045924362=8.949898346376457=-29.33790459243619=52.11981561533453=true=true=Z=3-5=3=5=cur=2017=2017

Here's the corresponding Purple Finch map:
http://ebird.org/ebird/map/purfin?neg=true=-141.8379045924362=8.949898346376457=-29.33790459243619=52.11981561533453=true=true=Z=3-5=3=5=cur=2017=2017

Good birding,Matt MedlerIthaca



  From: Asher Hockett 
 To: CAYUGABIRDS-L  
 Sent: Sunday, April 2, 2017 10:28 AM
 Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Rose-breasted Grosbeak
   
This morning at our feeders on South Danby Rd, a female Rose-breasted Grosbeak. 
Still not quite sure if in basin. Our drainage goes into Miller Creek, and i'm 
pretty sure into Cayuga Lake.

-- 
asher

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[cayugabirds-l] American White Pelican

2016-12-04 Thread Matthew Medler
The American White Pelican is still present in  Ithaca this morning (4 Dec 
2016). At 7:45 am, it was back on the red lighthouse jetty.

There is also a nice loon flight this morning, with 150+ Common Loons departing 
the south end of Cayuga Lake in high flight in about 30 minutes of observation.

Matt Medler
Ithaca

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[cayugabirds-l] American White Pelican

2016-12-03 Thread Matthew Medler
Tim Lenz found an American white pelican on the red lighthouse jetty about an 
hour ago. The bird was visible naked eye as a white blob from Stewart Park 
around 430, and after rushing to Hog Hole to try to see it from there in the 
fading light, I saw a large White thing swimming away from the red jetty 
towards the white jetty and Stewart Park. So, it seems possible that it will 
still be here in the morning.

Matt

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[cayugabirds-l] Brown pelican now

2015-06-06 Thread Matthew Medler
The brown pelican is soaring over the south end of Cayuga  Lake right now, 8:40 
AM. 

Matt M.  Mike Andersen

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[cayugabirds-l] Cayuga Lake Basin Spring Arrival Dates and First Records

2015-04-03 Thread Matthew Medler
Fritzie and All,

The Cayuga Bird Club site has a nice page with 2015 Cayuga Lake Basin first 
records, which Dave Nutter tirelessly updates, first records from previous 
years, and 10-year median arrival dates that I calculated based on the first 
records that I kept for 2000-2009. All of this information can be found at a 
slightly different URL than the one in Fritzie's message. Here it is:

http://www.cayugabirdclub.org/Resources/cayuga-lake-basin-first-records

Matt Medler
Ithaca

P.S. Thanks for the kind words, Fritzie. Thanks to Dave Nutter for continuing 
the first record tradition, and thanks also to Paul Anderson, who I believe 
created this nice web page to display all of this information.

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[cayugabirds-l] Red-throated Loon continues

2015-03-31 Thread Matthew Medler
Hi All,

For those who haven't had a chance to see it yet, the very cooperative 
RED-THROATED LOON was still present at Treman State Marine Park today (31 March 
2015) from about 5:15 to 7:15 pm. At first, the bird was in the small area of 
open water where the park's marina enters the Cayuga Inlet. It then ventured 
out into the inlet for a while, where it spent time diving under the many crew 
boats going back and forth up and down the inlet. The loon eventually returned 
to the marina towards the end of my stay. I spent most of my time focused on 
trying to film the loon, but I did also note an OSPREY flying up the inlet and 
also filmed a resplendent GREAT BLUE HERON along the ice edge.

Good birding,
Matt Medler
Ithaca

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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Purple Sandpiper continues

2014-10-23 Thread Matthew Medler
Hi All,
The PURPLE SANDPIPER was still present at 6:35 pm, in the same spot that Jay 
describes below. It was actively foraging in the wind and light rain as it got 
dark.
Good birding,Matt MedlerIthaca

  From: Jay McGowan jw...@cornell.edu
 To: Cayugabirds-L Cayugabirds-L@cornell.edu; oneidabi...@yahoogroups.com 
 Sent: Thursday, October 23, 2014 8:00 AM
 Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Purple Sandpiper continues
   
If you missed it yesterday, it looks like the PURPLE SANDPIPER will be putting 
on an encore performance today. It is currently foraging on the north side of 
the spit at Myers Point out near the tip.-- Cayugabirds-L List Info: Welcome 
and Basics Rules and Information Subscribe, Configuration and Leave Archives: 
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[cayugabirds-l] Avocets now at K-M Marsh

2014-10-05 Thread Matthew Medler
The two avocets are now (1:30) in Knox-Marsellus Marsh.

Matt Medler 

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[cayugabirds-l] Jaeger at Myers

2014-09-30 Thread Matthew Medler
This from the RBA text system just now:

Ken Rosenberg. Jaeger off Myers point now - probable Parasitic. On water now 
just south of lighthouse. Way out.

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[cayugabirds-l] Sunday Sabine's Gull?

2014-09-14 Thread Matthew Medler
Has anybody been to Stewart Park this morning to look for the Sabine's Gull? If 
so, could positive or negative reports be shared here?

Thanks,
Matt Medler


P.S. And yes, I will be getting on the Cayuga RBA soon.

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[cayugabirds-l] Least Bitterns at Catharine Creek Marsh

2014-07-19 Thread Matthew Medler
Hi All,

In the I can't believe I've never been there category, I visited Catharine 
Marsh in Watkins Glen for the first time today (19 July 2014). It's a beautiful 
marsh, and despite the late date and hour, my visit was quite productive. I 
birded from Rock Cabin Road, along the eastern edge of the marsh, stopping 
regularly along the road, and then spent a good 30 minutes at the small 
observation tower near the south end of the marsh. The undisputed highlight of 
the visit was seeing not one, but two LEAST BITTERNS from the observation tower 
(with the help of my scope). There was also a GREEN HERON and 12+ GREAT BLUE 
HERONS in this area, and a VIRGINIA RAIL called once fairly close to the tower. 
The sheer number of singing SWAMP SPARROWS was quite impressive for this date, 
and singing MARSH WRENS also put in a good showing, especially near the 
platform.

The only disappointment from my visit was the complete lack of any waterbirds 
visible on the open water in the marsh. I literally did not see a single duck, 
grebe, cormorant, gallinule, or even goose! With all of the reports of young 
waterbirds from Montezuma, I thoughts I would see some waterbirds at Catharine 
Marsh. Maybe next time...

My complete eBird checklist is below.

Good birding,
Matt Medler
Ithaca



Catharine Creek Marsh--Rock Cabin Rd., Schuyler, US-NY
Jul 19, 2014 10:30 AM - 12:27 PM
Protocol: Traveling
1.2 mile(s)
Comments: Overcast, calm, 70°F. Stops every 0.1 mi. All totals are best 
attempts at careful counts, except where noted. Scope used to scan marsh when 
possible.  br /Submitted from BirdLog NA for iOS, version 1.7.1
43 species

Least Bittern (Ixobrychus exilis)  2 First individual seen in flight in 
scope for 15+ seconds before it settled back into cattails. Second individual 
seen perched on edge of cattails for ~1 min. Both seen on far (west) side of 
marsh from platform.
Great Blue Heron (Ardea herodias)  25 12+ from observation tower.
Green Heron (Butorides virescens)  2 I saw one lone individual three 
different times; am confident of at least two different individuals.
Turkey Vulture (Cathartes aura)  5 Soaring distantly over ridge to west
Bald Eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus)  1 Adult perched on small shrubby 
vegetation just a few feet above water.
Virginia Rail (Rallus limicola)  1 One kiddick series after being on tower 
30+ minutes.
Mourning Dove (Zenaida macroura)  5
Ruby-throated Hummingbird (Archilochus colubris)  1
Belted Kingfisher (Megaceryle alcyon)  3
Red-bellied Woodpecker (Melanerpes carolinus)  2
Downy Woodpecker (Picoides pubescens)  2
Northern Flicker (Yellow-shafted) (Colaptes auratus auratus/luteus)  3
Pileated Woodpecker (Dryocopus pileatus)  1
Great Crested Flycatcher (Myiarchus crinitus)  1
Eastern Kingbird (Tyrannus tyrannus)  1
Warbling Vireo (Vireo gilvus)  1
Red-eyed Vireo (Vireo olivaceus)  5
Blue Jay (Cyanocitta cristata)  6
American Crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos)  3
Tree Swallow (Tachycineta bicolor)  1
Bank Swallow (Riparia riparia)  2
Black-capped Chickadee (Poecile atricapillus)  2
Tufted Titmouse (Baeolophus bicolor)  1
White-breasted Nuthatch (Sitta carolinensis)  1
Marsh Wren (Cistothorus palustris)  9 Carefully counted, one individual at 
a time. Most numerous (or easily detectable) from observation tower, where 4+ 
individuals singing.
Carolina Wren (Thryothorus ludovicianus)  1
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher (Polioptila caerulea)  2
Wood Thrush (Hylocichla mustelina)  2
American Robin (Turdus migratorius)  13
Gray Catbird (Dumetella carolinensis)  15
Cedar Waxwing (Bombycilla cedrorum)  5
Common Yellowthroat (Geothlypis trichas)  11
Yellow Warbler (Setophaga petechia)  6 Seen. One singing
Song Sparrow (Melospiza melodia)  6
Swamp Sparrow (Melospiza georgiana)  23
Scarlet Tanager (Piranga olivacea)  3
Northern Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis)  8
Indigo Bunting (Passerina cyanea)  3
Bobolink (Dolichonyx oryzivorus)  1 Flyover
Red-winged Blackbird (Agelaius phoeniceus)  30 Rough estimate
Common Grackle (Quiscalus quiscula)  10 Estimate
Baltimore Oriole (Icterus galbula)  2
American Goldfinch (Spinus tristis)  20 Estimate

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19149882

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)

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[cayugabirds-l] Cuckoo Sounds

2014-06-05 Thread Matthew Medler
Hi All,

The topic of cuckoo vocalizations, and how to identify them, came up recently, 
so I thought I would share a link to archived recordings of Black-billed Cuckoo 
and Yellow-billed Cuckoo at the Macaulay Library web site:

Black-billed:
http://macaulaylibrary.org/search?taxon=black%20billed%20cuckootaxon_rank_id=67taxon_id=11998247tab=audio-list

Yellow-billed:
http://macaulaylibrary.org/search?taxon=yellow%20billed%20cuckootaxon_rank_id=67taxon_id=11998245tab=audio-list

And, just for fun, here are recordings of Common Cuckoo, the famed voice of 
cuckoo clocks:
http://macaulaylibrary.org/search?taxon=common%20cuckootaxon_rank_id=67taxon_id=11999648tab=audio-list

Enjoy!
Matt Medler
Ithaca
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[cayugabirds-l] Kirtland's still present right now

2014-06-01 Thread Matthew Medler
7 pm, 1 June. Look for birders south of park entrance, south of both lanes of 
parkway.

Matt

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[cayugabirds-l] Kirtland's still present

2014-06-01 Thread Matthew Medler
7 pm, 1 June. Look for birders south of park entrance, south of both lanes of 
parkway.

Matt

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[cayugabirds-l] Kirtland's Warbler at Hamlin Beach

2014-06-01 Thread Matthew Medler
Hi All,

I wanted to provide a few details about where the Kirtland's Warbler was seen 
late in the day on Sunday, 1 June 2014. And, I wanted to thank Andy Guthrie for 
not only finding this bird, but also remaining at Hamlin Beach for nearly the 
entire day to help other birders (like myself) find the warbler.

The warbler was last seen at about 7:30 pm, on the guard rail(!) of the 
eastbound Lake Ontario Parkway where it crosses over the Hamlin Beach park 
access road: 
43.35510, -77.946832

(Fortunately, this section of the parkway was closed, so there was no danger of 
the bird being hit by a car.)

A bit earlier, at about 7 pm, we enjoyed nice looks of the bird in this cluster 
of trees: 
43.354743, -77.946193

Earlier in the day, Andy heard and/or saw the warbler in the patch of woods to 
the west of the park entrance booth, roughly between these two sets of 
coordinates: 
43.35986, -77.94560
43.35612, -77.94714
The entrance booth (where there was a $6 entrance fee on Sunday) is located 
here: 
43.35864, -77.94519

To the best of my knowledge, there was about a five-hour period of time, 
between about 1:30 and 6:30 pm, when the warbler was not detected at all. When 
a group of us observed the bird late in the day, the bird was largely silent, 
but it did sing softly a few times (and, I believe, also sing loudly once or 
twice).

I hope this information is helpful, and that more people can enjoy this 
wonderful bird on Monday. And thanks again to Andy for finding yet another 
first record for New York!

Matt Medler
Ithaca

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[cayugabirds-l] Winged Warbler songs

2014-05-18 Thread Matthew Medler
Hi All,

We are fortunate to have John Confer, one of the world's foremost experts on 
Blue-winged Warbler and Golden-winged Warbler, in our midst, so I'm hoping that 
he can provide a more insightful commentary on this topic than I can. But, I 
did want to point out that both the Blue-winged Warbler BNA account (which John 
co-authored) and the Golden-winged Warbler BNA account (which he authored and 
co-revised) make it clear that hybrids between the two species do not sing 
intermediate songs and are therefore not identifiable by song as a hybrid (let 
alone the type of hybrid):

From the Blue-winged Warbler BNA Account:
Songs of hybrids typical Blue-wing or Golden-wing; not intermediate or more 
variable in hybridizing populations, in contrast to plumage color.

And from the Golden-winged Warbler BNA Account:
Songs of hybrids match those of the parental species and are not intermediate 
in form (Ficken and Ficken 1967, Gill and Murray 1972b)Census techniques 
that use bird calls face severe difficulty with Golden-winged and Blue-winged 
warblers. Hybrids will be identified as one or the other species. The pre-dawn 
singing bouts of type II song are very similar for both species, and difficult 
to distinguish.

Going a step further, the song situation between Blue-winged Warbler and 
Golden-winged Warbler is very complicated, with Blue-winged Warblers capable of 
singing Golden-winged Warbler song and vice versa. Therefore, it is my 
understanding that no winged warbler can be safely identified to species (let 
alone hybrid type) with 100% confidence without visual confirmation.

For those interested in listening to the vocal variability in this group, here 
are the 164 Vermivora recordings archived at the Macaulay Library:

http://macaulaylibrary.org/search?taxon=vermivorataxon_rank_id=62taxon_id=12023487tab=audio-listorder=taxapage=1

(This includes four Bachman's Warbler recordings at the top, and 32 hybrid 
recordings on Page 2.)

And for those interested in more reading, both Birds of North America accounts 
contain extensive Sounds sections that discuss interspecies discrimination 
and related topics in the two species.

Good birding,
Matt Medler
Ithaca

P.S. John, I hope that I got this all right! I'm sure we'd all enjoy hearing 
additional comments from you.







 From: Wesley M. Hochachka w...@cornell.edu
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L cayugabird...@list.cornell.edu 
Sent: Saturday, May 17, 2014 8:52 PM
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] likely Golden-winged/Brewster's Warbler on Hammond 
Hill this morning
 


 
Hi everyone,
 
   Apologies for my late posting, but I only now had a chance to scan through a 
large number of recordings of singing warblers, and concluded that there was 
either a Golden-winged or Brewster’s Warbler on Hammond Hill this morning.  The 
bird was heard by me, Scott Haber, and Brad Walker on the trail labelled 
“Yellow 6”.  If you travel the trail across the road from the Hammond Hill Rd 
parking lot in the state forest, you will be on the “Yellow 1” trail.  At a 
point just above the old blow-down area that has both Mourning and Canada 
Warblers (putting on good performances this morning!), the trail comes to a 
T-intersection, and if you turn left at the T (onto the “Yellow 6” trail) and 
travel between 50 and 100m you will come to a more open area before the conifer 
forest, which looks like an old apple orchard that has been overgrown for many 
years.  We heard, but were not able to see, a bird that was singing 
persistently for at least 10
 minutes, giving a 2-note song that sounds like an abridged version of one of 
the typical Golden-winged Warbler songs: a longer buzz, followed by multiple 
shorter notes at a slightly lower pitch for the typical song.  The bird in 
question consistently sang only the first long buzz note and then a single 
shorter note.  I found a couple of examples on xeno-canto that display this 
variant:
 
http://www.xeno-canto.org/103587
http://www.xeno-canto.org/49544
 
However, after listening to every Golden-winged Warbler recording on 
xeno-canto, I think that anything that a pure Golden-winged Warbler can sing 
can also be sung by a Brewster’s Warbler (there were a few recordings of 
Brewster’s Warbler hybrids listed with the Golden-winged Warblers.  So, I think 
that there’s at least 50% of a Golden-winged Warbler (possibly less if you go 
by mitochondrial DNA) up on Hammond Hill.  If anyone is in the area, it might 
be useful to have a look and listen in the general area that I described.
 
Wesley Hochachka
 
 
 
 
 
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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Kittiwake not at Myers

2014-05-17 Thread Matthew Medler
The kittiwake is not here at Myers right now. It may have been scared off by 
the awful music is being played from the picnic area. I will post again if it 
returns.

Matt Medler

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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Clay-colored sparrow copulation with chipping

2014-05-15 Thread Matthew Medler
Although Clay-colored Sparrow is rare here in the Cayuga Lake Basin, there is a 
history of this species breeding with Chipping Sparrow in our area. From a 1960 
issue of The Kingbird:

The lthaca Clay-colored Sparrow (see July, 1960, Kingbird, p. 651) mated with a 
female Chipping Sparrow, fed her on the nest, and assisted in feeding the 
young. There were three eggs on Jun 13. Young and both parents were 
photographod on Jun. 22. On Jun 24 the young were taken by an unknown predator, 
probably a Blue Jay, during a short period when the nest was not under 
observation. This nesting record will be written up in detail and published 
later. 

http://www.nybirds.org/KBsearch/y1960v10n3/y1960v10n3rgn3.pdf#search=%22summer%201960%22

And, also of interest is this recording from Sapsucker Woods from 1959:

http://macaulaylibrary.org/audio/15418

Matt Medler
Ithaca





 From: France bird...@gmail.com
To: Graham Montgomery montgomery.gra...@gmail.com 
Cc: cayugabird...@list.cornell.edu 
Sent: Thursday, May 15, 2014 9:16 PM
Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Clay-colored sparrow copulation with chipping
 


If it actually breeds we should name it the Cascazilla Sparrow
France
On May 15, 2014 9:07 PM, Graham Montgomery montgomery.gra...@gmail.com 
wrote:

Hi all, 

Brian Magnier and myself went out and watched/photographed the Clay-colored 
sparrow on Cornell's campus this afternoon. He's still sticking around and 
singing/calling almost constantly. The most interesting thing we observed was 
copulation with a chipping sparrow at around 6:00 PM.

Photos here:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/72340495@N06/sets/72157644692290725/

Brian also got some excellent photos that hopefully he'll post at some point. 
Us + Andy Johnson also had a nice Blue-winged warbler in the flowering trees 
south of Goldwin Smith Hall.

Good birding,

Graham Montgomery
Cornell Entomology | Biology
Ithaca, NY

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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Sapsucker Woods, Fri 5/9 full summary (22+ warbler species incl Golden-winged)

2014-05-09 Thread Matthew Medler
Just a quick note to add that there was a cooperative LINCOLN'S SPARROW in the 
feeder garden at the Cornell Lab Visitor's Center at about 11:30 this morning. 
Great day here at Sapsucker Woods!

Best,
Matt Medler
Ithaca





 From: Mark Chao markc...@imt.org
To: 'Cayugabirds- L' Cayugabirds-L@cornell.edu 
Sent: Friday, May 9, 2014 11:35 AM
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Sapsucker Woods, Fri 5/9 full summary (22+ warbler 
species incl Golden-winged)
 


At about 9 AM on Friday, I returned to Sapsucker Woods and met up with Miyoko 
Chu, Pat Leonard, Gus Axelson, Greg Delisle, and Betsy Hutchings on the trail.  
The Wilson Trail had only a fraction of the activity that Anne and I witnessed 
earlier, but our late group did see a nice assortment of male warblers, 
including WILSON’S, MAGNOLIA, BLACK-THROATED GREEN, CHESTNUT-SIDED and 
BLACKBURNIAN, plus an adult male ORCHARD ORIOLE (in the flowering tree by the 
footbridge over the outlet stream – somehow the first adult of this species 
I’ve ever seen in Sapsucker Woods).  I also saw a SWAINSON’S THRUSH just north 
of the Sherwood Platform.
 
Toward the end of our circuit, Scott Haber arrived and told us that Kevin 
McGowan had found a female GOLDEN-WINGED WARBLER at the Podell Boardwalk, then 
saw it fly south.  I parted with Miyoko and the others, then went looking for 
this bird.  I didn’t find it.  (Jay McGowan also searched for a while in vain.) 
  My consolation prize was another fine mixed flock of warblers along the 
Woodleton Boardwalk, including a splendid male BAY-BREASTED WARBLER at eye 
level in a hemlock three meters away, at least four male BLACK-THROATED BLUE 
WARBLERS, and both male and female NORTHERN PARULA.
 
The total warbler species tally so far today for Sapsucker Woods is 22, to my 
knowledge.  Here is the list with some numbers and credits.
 
Tennessee (Laurie Ray, Jay, Brad, and Livia)
Nashville
Blue-winged (Laurie)
GOLDEN-WINGED (Kevin)
Chestnut-sided 7+
Northern Parula 6+
Yellow 
Palm (3+ for me, I believe many more for others)
Cape May (1 for me, several for others)
Magnolia 9+
Yellow-rumped 60+
Black-throated Green 11+
Blackburnian 11+ (about 10 males throughout, plus one female in the Woodleton 
flock)
Bay-breasted (1+ for me, I think a few for Jay, Brad, and Livia)
Black-throated Blue (5+, all males)
Black-and-white 5+ (3+ singing, plus two females)
American Redstart 6+
Northern Waterthrush 5+ (one apparent migrant near Sherwood Platform, others 
likely breeders along Woodleton)
Common Yellowthroat 3+
Ovenbird 4+
Wilson’s (1 for me and others; Dave LoParco saw two)
Canada (1+ singing at bend in Wilson Trail North, past second footbridge; seen 
briefly by me, but mostly uncooperative for viewing)
 
Jay, Brad, and Livia also saw a couple of PHILADELPHIA VIREOS, six male Scarlet 
Tanagers together near the ground plus one female who permitted Jay to approach 
within an arm’s length, and surely other amazing sights.
 
I suspect that most of these birds are still around in the sanctuary, but in 
the quiet heat of day, finding them will require luck and fast movement to 
maximize coverage.  I would advise that if it seems quiet, keep moving until 
you find a concentration of birds.  
 
Mark Chao
 
PS.  Sorry for the misplaced parentheses in my earlier message.  I was a little 
tired, rushed, and overstimulated. 


 
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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Willow Flycatcher and other migrants in Mundy

2014-05-03 Thread Matthew Medler
Hi Meena and All,


Since Empidonax flycatchers can be notoriously difficult to identify visually, 
I thought I would mention the possibility that the flycatcher at Mundy might 
have been a Least Flycatcher. Least also gives a whit call, and there have 
been multiple reports of Least in our area in the past few days. Willow and 
Alder Flycatcher are two of our latest arrivals in the area--when I tracked 
spring arrival dates from 2000 to 2009, I calculated the average Basin arrival 
dates for these two species as May 17 and May 16, respectively. (Least 
Flycatcher's average arrival date for 2000-2009 was April 29.) 


Here are the latest eBird maps for Least and Willow for May 2014:

Least:
http://ebird.org/ebird/map/leafly?neg=trueenv.minX=-115.45075808685442env.minY=25.872982715847318env.maxX=-59.20075808685442env.maxY=44.80438120556643zh=truegp=falseev=Zmr=onbmo=5emo=5yr=curbyr=2014eyr=2014

Willow:
http://ebird.org/ebird/map/wilfly?neg=trueenv.minX=-115.45075808685442env.minY=25.872982715847318env.maxX=-59.20075808685442env.maxY=44.80438120556646zh=truegp=trueev=Zmr=onbmo=5emo=5yr=curbyr=2014eyr=2014


And here is a table of the average arrival dates that I calculated for 2000 to 
2009:

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/pub?hl=en_UShl=en_USkey=0AlopXQo1irTWdDQ4XzcyeVR6LV9sX3ZKMjVJMzdzSEEoutput=html

Best,
Matt Medler
Ithaca





 From: Meena Madhav Haribal m...@cornell.edu
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L cayugabird...@list.cornell.edu 
Sent: Friday, May 2, 2014 1:51 PM
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Willow Flycatcher and other migrants in Mundy
 


 
Hi all, 
 
I took a late lunch walk today. There were a few migrants. First I saw and 
heard the House Wren, his bubbling song was exhilarating. Then I saw this 
flycatcher with olive green back and wing bars and clear eye-ring, I called it 
a Trail’s Flycatcher. But
later on the way back it was giving continuous ‘whit’ calls and confirmed that 
it was a  Willow Flycatcher.  I also watched it chase a moth for some time. The 
third migrant was also first heard and then I knew where exactly to look for it 
among the newly emerging
buds. It was a beautiful Yellow Warbler.  Lastly, I heard a Gray Catbird call, 
but did not get visuals on it.
 
So that was exciting!
 
Dr. Meena Haribal
Boyce Thompson Institute
Ithaca NY 14850
Ph: 607-3011167 
http://meenaharibal.blogspot.com/
http://haribal.org/
 
 
  
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[cayugabirds-l] Rusty Blackbirds at Sapsucker Woods

2014-04-02 Thread Matthew Medler
Hi All,

There were at least two Rusty Blackbirds singing near the boardwalk to the 
employee parking lot as I departed work today around 6 pm.

Good birding,
Matt Medler
Ithaca
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[cayugabirds-l] Red Knot still present

2013-07-28 Thread Matthew Medler
The Red Knot and six Sanderlings are still present at Myers at 4:45. The knot 
briefly moved to the beach, near the lighthouse, but it is now back at the very 
end of the spit. Beautiful bird in breeding plumage. Good luck!

Matt Medler
Ithaca

Sent from my iPhone
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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Hooded Warbler songs

2013-05-22 Thread Matthew Medler
For those interested in more about Hooded Warbler songs, the Birds of North 
America account describes two singing modes in Hooded Warbler: repeat mode 
and mixed mode:

Territorial males sing during the breeding season; males have several 
song types that differ in frequency range and number of notes (Godard 1991, 
Wiley et al. 1994). Males have 4–9 crystallized song patterns that can be 
divided into “repeat” versus “mixed” mode (see Fig. 3a). The repeat mode song 
consists of about 4–5 notes (rendered ta-wit ta-wit ta-wit tee-yo) and repeated 
at a rate of 5–6/min. Repeat mode songs end with either 1 
or 2 high notes followed by a lower chevron-shaped note. The other 3–8 
song patterns (Fig. 3b, c) are sung in an irregular sequence at a rate of 
10–12/min (“mixed” 
mode). Repeat mode is used more frequently prior to attracting a mate. 
About 5% of males sing an atypical song type in repeat mode, but most 
attract mates.
If you'd like to hear more recordings of Hooded Warbler, check out the Macaulay 
Library web site (www.macaulaylibrary.org), which has 76 recordings, including 
15 from New York. Particularly interesting is this long recording from Mike 
Andersen, which includes repeat mode singing, chip notes, and mixed mode 
singing. Pretty cool recording!

http://macaulaylibrary.org/audio/125208/setophaga-citrina-hooded-warbler-united-states-new-york-michael-andersen

Good listening,
Matt Medler
Ithaca





 From: Jay McGowan jw...@cornell.edu
To: Meena Madhav Haribal m...@cornell.edu 
Cc: CAYUGABIRDS-L cayugabird...@list.cornell.edu 
Sent: Wednesday, May 22, 2013 8:19 PM
Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] May 19 unidentified call
 


Sounds like the alternate song of a Hooded Warbler.



On Wed, May 22, 2013 at 8:16 PM, Meena Madhav Haribal m...@cornell.edu wrote:

Hi all, 
I posted last Sunday that I heard a call which I could not recognize. Here it 
is. It was in a pine and mixed hardwood woods. To me it sounded that the bird 
was feeding in the middle layers of the woods and moving. I did not spend time 
to track it down as my friend's kids wanted to see the Hairy Woodpeckers. 
There is also spectrogram of the sound on the Soundcloud if that is helpful. 
 
https://soundcloud.com/meena-haribal/130519-01tewtewwhichwhich
 
BTW, one of the kids is hooked to birds. My friend told me that early morning 
while brushing he was commenting that he is hearing an unfamiliar bird!
 
Any clues or suggestions are welcome. 
 
Cheers
Meena 
 
 
 
Meena Haribal
Ithaca NY 14850
http://haribal.org/
http://meenaharibal.blogspot.com/
 
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-- 
Jay McGowan
Macaulay Library
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
jw...@cornell.edu

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[cayugabirds-l] Sapsucker Woods Common Nighthawk

2013-05-22 Thread Matthew Medler
I took a quick walk along the Wilson Trail at Sapsucker Woods this evening (22 
May 2013). Things were relatively quiet bird-wise, but I did hear and then 
briefly see a migrating Common Nighthawk flying in a rather direct manner to 
the northwest. The other highlight was seeing Gary Kohlenberg and Alberto 
López, who had a nice male Magnolia Warbler in his sights.

Good birding,
Matt Medler
Ithaca

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[cayugabirds-l] Swan Pen Quiet

2013-05-04 Thread Matthew Medler
The Swan Pen is quiet this morning (4 May 2013). Only bird of note was a 
White-crowned Sparrow foraging on the trail, neat the lake.

Good birding,
Matt Medler
Ithaca

Sent from my iPhone
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[cayugabirds-l] Late morning birds at Sapsucker Woods

2013-04-28 Thread Matthew Medler
Nacho Areta, Mecky Holzmann, and I took a leisurely walk around Sapsucker Woods 
this morning (28 April 2013), from about 10:30 am to 12:30 pm. There was not a 
ton of activity, but it was a gorgeous morning and we had some nice birds. Here 
are a few highlights:

Palm Warbler--1 at Sherwood Platform
Baltimore Oriole--1 heard singing once, near Sherwood Platform

Black-throated Blue Warbler--1 heard singing from hemlocks near East Trail gate
Northern Waterthrush--3 heard singing from Woodleton Boardwalk (although one 
was probably on the other side of the road)
N. Rough-winged Swallow--one flying about the entrance to the Johnson Center
Trout Lilly--lots in bloom


Good birding,
Matt Medler
Ithaca

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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Yellow-throated Warbler song question

2012-05-16 Thread Matthew Medler
Hi Dave and All,

If you're interested in listening to more recordings of Yellow-throated Warbler 
to see how much variation there is, there are 40+ recordings available for 
listening on the Cornell Lab's Macaulay Library web site:

http://macaulaylibrary.org/search?location_id=location_type_id=location=recordist=recordist_id=catalogs=behavior=behavior_id=tab=audio-listtaxon_id=12000480taxon_rank_id=67taxon=yellow+throated+warbler

Enjoy,
Matt Medler
Ithaca




 From: Dave Nutter nutter.d...@me.com
To: Dave Nutter nutter.d...@me.com 
Cc: cayugabirds-L@cornell.edu 
Sent: Wednesday, May 16, 2012 10:41 PM
Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Yellow-throated Warbler song question
 

I listened to the YELLOW-THROATED WARBLER for awhile this morning singing from 
the Sycamore grove along Pier Road, and I saw it as well to confirm. It sounded 
a bit different than yesterday. I don't know if that was due to the environment 
or proximity or the bird's enthusiasm at different times of day or something 
about my own mental state. Anyway it sounded more like:

tu  tu  tu  TEE-TU  TEE-TU  TEE-TU  TEE-TU  TEE-Tu  tyu


The sound is not the rich slurred notes of a Baltimore Oriole, but instead 
higher and thinner and thus more obviously a warbler. It varied between 4 and 7 
of the TEE-TU pairs of notes. The quieter introductory and final notes were 
sometimes hard to hear among the many other singers in the area, but the TEE-TU 
notes cut through loud  clear.  The ending was also a bit variable, but I 
never heard it give a rising final note like the birds I've heard in New 
Jersey. 

--Dave Nutter

On May 15, 2012, at 10:53 PM, Dave Nutter nutter.d...@me.com wrote:


This afternoon (15 May) I went to Pier Road beside Newman Golf Course and also 
across Fall Creek in Renwick Wildwood. Among other things, I hoped to refind 
the YELLOW-THROATED WARBLER. I believe I eventually heard it, but I was not 
able to see it, in or near a large Sycamore in Renwick between the two paths 
well north of the concrete arch. While trying to find the bird I worked on 
memorizing the song. I wasn't perfect in that department either, but I notated 
it: 


tup tup tup TEE-DOE TEE-DOE TEE-DOE TEE-DOE TEE-DOE du du


I actually forgot to count how many of the louder TEE-DOE pairs of notes there 
were, but the last one or two of those pairs was slightly lower in pitch than 
the initial few, and they seemed similar to some recordings I've heard of 
Yellow-throated Warbler, but I haven't heard recordings with any such 
introductory notes nor with such a bland tag at the end. I wonder if this 
description matches what other observers have heard from the Yellow-throated 
Warbler which has been in this area during the past week, and also whether 
either this description or what you heard from this individual is similar to 
songs from this species others have heard elsewhere Thanks.


Other things I found included a female COMMON MERGANSER entering a hole in a 
dead tree, and a pied EUROPEAN STARLING, which I've seen before, on the 
Stewart Park lawn north of the suspension bridge. It is mostly normal but with 
several small white splotches scattered over its body and a large white patch 
on its upper right breast.


--Dave Nutter
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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Renwick vs. Fuertes

2012-05-08 Thread Matthew Medler
Hi Dave and All,
I should have said this in my original message about Renwick vs. Fuertes, and 
that is that my message was not meant in any way to criticize you or anybody 
else for using the name Renwick for the area in question. I apologize if my 
message was taken as criticism of any sort--it was not intended in that way. 
And, I also should have thanked you for getting out the word about the 
Yellow-throated Warbler so quickly--it allowed me and several others to enjoy 
this nice bird.

I also agree with your decision to use the term Renwick in your text message 
to describe where the bird was originally found. This seems to be the term that 
many (or most?) local birders currently use to describe this area, so using 
this name was undoubtedly the most effective way to help people find the bird. 
I have used the name Fuertes Sanctuary for many years (and raised this whole 
issue prior to the publication of the new birdfinding guide), but from a 
communication standpoint, there is not much point in using this name if it is 
not recognized by other birders.

However, I am still puzzled as to why birders have not consistently used (let 
alone embraced) the name Fuertes Bird Sanctuary over the years. After all, we 
as a group seem quick to adopt new names (Fuller Wetlands), name changes (Park 
Preserve), and cumbersome names (Lindsay-Parsons Biodiversity Preserve) that 
lack a direct connection to our birding community. The name Fuertes Bird 
Sanctuary has existed for over 80 years, and yet, it appears to have been used 
sporadically at best. (It does appear in a few issues of The Kingbird from the 
1950s...and the 1980s.) Perhaps this is due to confusion over what the name 
refers to. But, the City of Ithaca unambiguously uses the name Fuertes Bird 
Sanctuary for the wooded area south of Stewart Park, as does the Cayuga 
Waterfront Trail. It would be particularly interesting to learn why the City 
has applied this term to this specific area...

Matt Medler
Ithaca



 




 From: Dave Nutter nutter.d...@me.com
To: Matthew Medler m...@cornell.edu 
Cc: cayugabirds-l cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu 
Sent: Tuesday, May 8, 2012 6:30 PM
Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Renwick vs. Fuertes
 

When Drew called me about the rare Yellow-throated Warbler, and I sent out the 
text message from my phone, I had to be concise but clear. Fuertes and 
Renwick are the same number of characters, but Renwick is, I think, a bit 
less ambiguous. Renwick refers to a couple streets in a neighborhood nearby, 
while I think there are several places named for Louis Agassiz Fuertes. Wasn't 
the pond- and feeder-viewing area inside the old Lab of O called the Fuertes 
Observatory? Isn't the auditorium at the current Lab which displays so many of 
his paintings also named for Fuertes? There are a couple of bronze plaques by 
the Swan Pond, one of which honors Fuertes, and the other talks about 
swans. Fuertes was a great artist, so I associate his name with his wonderful 
paintings and drawings more than with those woods. I see no disrespect in that. 
Official name or no, many people do and will call it the Renwick Sanctuary, 
including users of the new birding guide
 which the club just published (see p.21). 
--Dave Nutter

 
On May 08, 2012, at 08:26 AM, Matthew Medler m...@cornell.edu wrote:


Hi All,



The discovery of the Yellow-throated Warbler in the woods south of Stewart 
Park highlighted a question that I've wondered about for some time: why do 
most Ithaca birders refer to this area as Renwick Woods or Renwick Bird 
Sanctuary rather than Fuertes Bird Sanctuary? Based on the City of Ithaca's 
web site, it appears that the official name for this area is in fact Fuertes 
Bird Sanctuary:


http://www.ci.ithaca.ny.us/parks/stewartpark.cfm


Even putting this aside, it's always puzzled me that Ithaca birders would 
favor the name of an early Ithaca settler over Louis Agassiz Fuertes. Not only 
is Fuertes one of America's greatest bird artists, but he is also one of our 
most illustrious Ithaca birding ancestors, having been very active in the 
Cayuga Bird Club and the local birding community for many years. I would think 
that we would want to celebrate Fuertes's name and use it to refer to the bird 
sanctuary that was named in his memory after his untimely death.


I am truly interested in learning why it is that so many use the name Renwick 
to refer to the Fuertes Bird Sanctuary. But, in the absence of any compelling 
reason for favoring Renwick over Fuertes, I'd also encourage birders to use 
the sanctuary's official name and honor Fuertes's legacy in the process.



Matt Medler
Ithaca
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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Yellow-throated Warbler directions

2012-05-07 Thread Matthew Medler
Just in case anybody else was interested in looking for this bird but wasn't 
clear on where it was, here are the coordinates:

 42.455841, -76.502954

Google Maps is showing the road name as Pier Rd./Cayuga Waterfront Trail. The 
bird was singing from high up in a cluster of large sycamores, right by the tee 
box for the 3rd hole of the golf course. The fire department training building 
that Jay mentioned is the first building beyond the sycamores on Pier Rd.


Thanks, Drew! Good luck to others who go to look for it!

Matt Medler
Ithaca




 From: Kevin J. McGowan k...@cornell.edu
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L cayugabird...@list.cornell.edu 
Sent: Monday, May 7, 2012 1:31 PM
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Yellow-throated Warbler photo
 

 
http://picasaweb.google.com/KevinJ.McGowan/Spring2012Birds#5739845053573543074
 
 
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[cayugabirds-l] Sapsucker at Sapsucker Woods

2012-03-28 Thread Matthew Medler
There was a Yellow-bellied Sapsucker giving its wah call a few times as I 
walked into work here at Sapsucker Woods this morning (28 March 2012). The bird 
was calling from the patch of woods just south of the outer parking lot, on the 
east side of the road.

Also in the early arrivals category, there was a singing Winter Wren at 
Shindagin Hollow last Friday (23 March 2012).


Good birding,
Matt Medler
Ithaca

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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Western Grebe - Cayuga Co.

2012-02-08 Thread Matthew Medler
Can anybody go to Stewart Park right now to see if there might be three Western 
Grebes on the lake at the moment?

Great finds, guys!




 From: Tom Johnson t...@cornell.edu
To: Tom Johnson t...@cornell.edu 
Cc: cayugabirds cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu 
Sent: Wednesday, February 8, 2012 3:59 PM
Subject: Re:[cayugabirds-l] Western Grebe - Cayuga Co.
 

We were wrong.  There are actually TWO Western Grebes here.  

On Wednesday, February 8, 2012, Tom Johnson t...@cornell.edu wrote:
 Hi,
 Jay McGowan and I are looking at a Western Grebe at Twin Oaks Campground on 
 the east side of Cayuga Lake north of Union Springs.  The bird is with a big 
 Aythya raft.
 Cheers,
 Tom

 --
 Tom Johnson
 Hummelstown, PA
 t...@cornell.edu


-- 
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t...@cornell.edu

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[cayugabirds-l] Ovid Owls

2012-01-22 Thread Matthew Medler
Hi All,

There were at least three Short-eared Owls present yesterday evening (21 Jan 
2012) in the area in Ovid previously described by Marty Schlabach (thanks Marty 
and Mary Jean!). There was one owl perched on a post along Rock River Road, 
just north of the intersection of Wycoff, at 4:55 pm. This bird then took 
flight over the field east of Rock River and north of Wycoff (north of the farm 
at the intersection), and was soon joined by two others in flight. All three 
birds eventually moved eastward, and were likely better viewed from along 
Wycoff. But, one bird eventually came back closer to Rock River, caught some 
sort of gray rodent, and proceeded to eat it while perched on a short post 
right along Rock River Road. A great show! This was all between 4:55 and 5:20 
pm.

Matt Medler
Ithaca

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[cayugabirds-l] Red Phalarope today?

2011-10-10 Thread Matthew Medler
Hi All,

I'm wondering if anybody has looked for the Red Phalarope at Montezuma today 
(Monday, 10 October 2011). Any reports from today, either positive or negative, 
would be much appreciated!

Thanks,
Matt
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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Pine Siskins are like potato chips...except in Sapsucker Woods today

2011-10-06 Thread Matthew Medler
This is a great excuse to plug eBird's great new mapping interface:

http://ebird.org/ebird/map/pinsis?neg=trueenv.minX=env.minY=env.maxX=env.maxY=zh=falsegp=falsemr=onbmo=10emo=10yr=1900-2011byr=1900eyr=2011

A quick check of this map shows that it's not unusual for Pine Siskins reports 
in our area in early to mid October and it's also not unusual for single 
individuals to be reported.


What a great eBird tool--much better than digging through old Cayugabirds 
messages!

Matt Medler
Ithaca




From: Wesley M Hochachka w...@cornell.edu
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L cayugabird...@list.cornell.edu
Sent: Thursday, October 6, 2011 4:16 PM
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Pine Siskins are like potato chips...except in 
Sapsucker Woods today


Hi everyone,
 
   On my way in to work this morning, I was surprised to see a single PINE 
SISKIN sitting atop one of the snags on the west end of the main pond in 
Sapsucker Woods…surprised for two reasons:
(1)    It seemed rather early for siskins to appear, although there was a 
little burst of eBird records in mid-September with none between then and now, 
and 
(2)    In my experience “siskins” is almost invariably plural…like potato chips.
I was puzzled as to how a single Pine Siskin could end up so early and so 
alone…and apparently with no other reports in the immediate area and date 
range.  I think I know what happened now, thanks to Dave Bonter pointing out 
today’s blog entry from Braddock Bay: roughly 350 Pine Siskins hit the nets in 
Braddock Bay yesterday without any warning of a lead-up trickle over the 
previous days.  So, it appears that there was a big movement of siskins into 
this general region, and I presume that the lone bird that I saw was either 
navigationally or socially challenged and overshot the main movement.
 
Wesley Hochachka
 
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[cayugabirds-l] Connecticut Warbler at Park Preserve

2011-09-16 Thread Matthew Medler
Chris Wood just reported a Connecticut Warbler on the text message rare bird 
alert:

Connecticut Warbler at Roy Park Preserve. SE side along orange trail 35m past 
where other trail goes into woods/p

That's all I know. Good luck if you go!

Matt
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[cayugabirds-l] Thursday night south end birds

2011-09-08 Thread Matthew Medler

Hi All,

There was a lot of bird activity at the south end of Cayuga Lake 
tonight, as viewed by various observers from Hog Hole, Stewart Park, and 
East Shore Park. I only saw a subset of the birds, but thought I would 
post the collective highlights, since others have not done so yet.


LAUGHING GULL--seen out on an island of flotsam shortly before dark by 
Tim Lenz (and others, I believe)
BLACK TERN--Jay McGowan, Livia Santana, Nick Sly and I saw up to five 
individuals from Hog Hole; these birds were very distant, even with 
scopes; two birds later seen a bit closer from East Shore; Tim might 
have had more individuals (7?)

RUDDY TURNSTONE(S?)--on the flotsam island out on the lake
COMMON NIGHTHAWKS--a group of nine individuals seen over the south end 
of the lake around 6:30 or so; at least 2-3 other individuals at other 
places/times


There's probably more that I'm forgetting, but I thought I'd share these 
more notable birds.


Good birding,
Matt Medler
Ithaca

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[cayugabirds-l] Interesting bird education tools available

2011-08-13 Thread Matthew Medler
Hi All,

I am in possession of two interesting bird education tools that I would be 
happy to give to anybody who is interested in them. They are called Audubon 
Land Bird Guide Rapid Recognition Sheets, and they are basically 24 field 
guide plates printed on one large piece of paper (roughly 3' x 4') and then 
stitched to a framed piece of canvas that can be hung on a wall. They feature 
artwork by Don Eckelberry from the old Audubon Land Bird Guide: Eastern Land 
Birds.

While a bit old, these items are still in good shape, and the artwork is 
excellent. They don't quite match the decor of my apartment, but I think they 
would be perfect for a school, nature center, or Audubon center. If you're 
interested in them, let me know, and I'd be happy to share photos or make 
arrangements to give them away.

Matt Medler
Ithaca

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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Prothontaries -- Yes

2011-06-01 Thread Matthew Medler
There were two Prothonotary Warblers countersinging from opposite sides of 
Armitage Road at 4:30 pm on Monday afternoon (31 May 2011). These birds were 
just 10-20 yards west of the little gravel pull-off area on the west side of 
the one-lane green bridge. No sign of any Acadians at that time, but a singing 
Northern Waterthrush was a bit of a surprise. Not a surprise, but always nice 
to hear, were two Cerulean Warblers. Oh, and a distant Black-billed Cuckoo sang 
for about 30 seconds.


Matt Medler
Ithaca




From: bob mcguire bmcgu...@clarityconnect.com
To: cayugabirdlist cayugabirds-L@cornell.edu
Sent: Wednesday, June 1, 2011 8:47 AM
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Prothontary - no

John Confer and I drove up to the north end of the lake yesterday  
evening to look for some of the recently-sighted birds. From the tower  
at Tschache Pool we scoped the vast mud flats and found - 3 BLACK- 
BELLIED PLOVERS and two distant shorebirds that flew in and  
disappeared behind logs and stumps. No other shorebirds. 3 Red-winged  
Blackbirds. One of the plovers had a markedly darker cap, making it  
worth a closer look. However the throat and belly were black while the  
vent was white, and the bill was relatively short and stubby. So we  
left it as Black-bellied Plover.

From there we drove out Armitage Road, parked just past the green  
bridge, and spent about a half hour walking up and down the road to  
the west. We heard several Yellow Warblers, 2 American Redstarts, also  
Common Yellowthroats, Swamp Sparrows and, surprisingly, 3 ACADIAN  
FLYCATCHERS. Two of them were on the north side, close to the road.  
The third was on the south side. Unfortunately for us, no Prothonotary  
Warblers. We left at sunset.

Bob McGuire



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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Prothontary Warbler Spot

2011-06-01 Thread Matthew Medler
Yes, the two Prothonotary Warblers that I heard yesterday are in the same 
general area that Geo describes below. However, they were not singing from 
right along the canal, as they did back in the 1990s. Instead, they were a bit 
west of that, away from the canal. Looking at Google Earth, the coordinates for 
the gravel parking spot are 43.020880, -76.800188, and the birds were singing 
25+ yards west of that (a bit farther west than I estimated below).

Matt  




From: Geo Kloppel geoklop...@gmail.com
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L Birding cayugabird...@list.cornell.edu
Sent: Wednesday, June 1, 2011 4:37 PM
Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Prothontaries -- Yes

When I plugged-in the provided coordinates the other day, Google Earth landed 
me out in the open, hundreds of yards to the east. But Matt Medler's 
description of the one-lane green bridge made it clear that these birds are 
in just about the same spot where Prothonotary Warblers were found in the late 
1990s - i.e. the west end of the high steel bridge over the modern barge canal.

-Geo


On Jun 1, 2011, at 4:10 PM, Kenneth Victor Rosenberg wrote:

 This is a strange series of events. Having been a little confused by the 
 bridges on Armitage Rd myself on Sunday, I wonder if there is the possibility 
 of these being two separate spots? 3 calling Acadian FCs would seem to be 
 hard to miss by all the other Prothonotary seekers, and vice versa  Just 
 a thought.
 
 KEN
 
 
 Ken Rosenberg
 Director of Conservation Science
 Cornell Lab of Ornithology
 607-254-2412
 607-342-4594 (cell)
 k...@cornell.edu
 
 On Jun 1, 2011, at 11:46 AM, J. Gary Kohlenberg wrote:
 
 Yesterday at 6:30 pm I was able to hear and then see both Prothonotary 
 warblers. I recorded video of one to have the singing. They are LOUD at 
 close range.
 This area is amazingly birdie.
 
 Gary
 
 
 
 
 On Jun 1, 2011, at 9:58 AM, Matthew Medler m...@cornell.edu wrote:
 
 There were two Prothonotary Warblers countersinging from opposite sides of 
 Armitage Road at 4:30 pm on Monday afternoon (31 May 2011). These birds 
 were just 10-20 yards west of the little gravel pull-off area on the west 
 side of the one-lane green bridge. No sign of any Acadians at that time, 
 but a singing Northern Waterthrush was a bit of a surprise. Not a surprise, 
 but always nice to hear, were two Cerulean Warblers. Oh, and a distant 
 Black-billed Cuckoo sang for about 30 seconds.
 
 Matt Medler
 Ithaca
 
 From: bob mcguire bmcgu...@clarityconnect.com
 To: cayugabirdlist cayugabirds-L@cornell.edu
 Sent: Wednesday, June 1, 2011 8:47 AM
 Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Prothontary - no
 
 John Confer and I drove up to the north end of the lake yesterday
 evening to look for some of the recently-sighted birds. From the tower
 at Tschache Pool we scoped the vast mud flats and found - 3 BLACK-
 BELLIED PLOVERS and two distant shorebirds that flew in and
 disappeared behind logs and stumps. No other shorebirds. 3 Red-winged
 Blackbirds. One of the plovers had a markedly darker cap, making it
 worth a closer look. However the throat and belly were black while the
 vent was white, and the bill was relatively short and stubby. So we
 left it as Black-bellied Plover.
 
 From there we drove out Armitage Road, parked just past the green
 bridge, and spent about a half hour walking up and down the road to
 the west. We heard several Yellow Warblers, 2 American Redstarts, also
 Common Yellowthroats, Swamp Sparrows and, surprisingly, 3 ACADIAN
 FLYCATCHERS. Two of them were on the north side, close to the road.
 The third was on the south side. Unfortunately for us, no Prothonotary
 Warblers. We left at sunset.
 
 Bob McGuire
 
 
 
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 Please submit your observations to eBird:
 http://ebird.org/content/ebird/
 
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Geo Kloppel
Bowmaker  Restorer
227 Tupper Road
Spencer NY 14883

607 564 7026
g...@cornell.edu
geoklop...@gmail.com




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[cayugabirds-l] Singing Black-billed Cuckoo?

2011-05-23 Thread Matthew Medler
Hi All,

I am wondering if anybody on the listserve is consistently hearing a singing 
(cu-cu-cu) Black-billed Cuckoo in our area. I would like to try to get a 
high-quality recording of this vocalization from this species to add to the 
Macaulay Library collection. If you happen to hear this sound with some 
regularity in a relatively quiet area, and would be willing to provide me with 
details, I would be greatly appreciative. All recordings I make are available 
for listening on the Macaulay Library web site, where one can listen to more 
than 100,000 total recordings:

http://macaulaylibrary.org

Thanks,
Matt Medler
Ithaca

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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Sapsucker Woods, Wed 5/11

2011-05-11 Thread Matthew Medler
I spent a bit of time out on the Wilson Trail North this morning, and will add 
a singing TENNESSEE WARBLER to the day's warbler list at Sapsucker Woods. I'll 
also note that this species, like most of our North American Vermivoras, is 
now actually in the genus Oreothlypis. (Sorry, Chris.)

Matt Medler
Ithaca





From: Mark Chao markc...@imt.org
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L@cornell.edu
Sent: Wednesday, May 11, 2011 10:58 AM
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Sapsucker Woods, Wed 5/11


As expected at this peak time, many birders were out in Sapsucker Woods today, 
each finding a slightly different mix of species.  The cumulative warbler tally 
for the day is 18+ species, several of which I missed.
 
YELLOW WARBLER
MAGNOLIA WARBLER (1 by lone bench south of Sherwood Platform)
BLACK-THROATED BLUE WARBLER (several throughout, including one female)
CHESTNUT-SIDED WARBLER (one on Wilson North, one south of Podell Boardwalk)
CAPE MAY WARBLER (two at bend in Wilson Trail North after second footbridge, 
found by Chris Wood, Tom Schulenberg, Steve Kelling, and a fourth gentleman)
BLACKBURNIAN WARBLER (3+ all around Wilson Trail)
YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLER
PALM WARBLER (1 south of feeder garden, seen by Mary Winston)
BAY-BREASTED WARBLER (as Kevin Ripka reported)
BLACK-AND-WHITE WARBLER (also found by Kevin)
AMERICAN REDSTART
NASHVILLE WARBLER (1 by lone bench)
NORTHERN PARULA (4+ all around Wilson Trail)
OVENBIRD (several throughout)
NORTHERN WATERTHRUSH (1+ migrant by green pool west of Wilson Trail near 
Sherwood, plus birds on territory along Woodleton Boardwalk)
WILSON’S WARBLER (lone feeder and also lone bench along Wilson Trail)
CANADA WARBLER (between Sherwood Platform and lone bench)
COMMON YELLOWTHROAT
 
YELLOW-THROATED VIREO and RUSTY BLACKBIRD both continue to sing at intersection 
of Wilson and West Trails.  It is also an unusually good day to watch EASTERN 
KINGBIRDS (7+), which put on quite a show brawling with each other in the 
treetops.
 
Mark Chao
 
 
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[cayugabirds-l] Sapsucker Woods American Woodcock

2011-03-24 Thread Matthew Medler
Two nights ago (22 March 2011), as I departed the Lab of Ornithology around 
7:45 
pm, I heard peenting and then displaying from an American Woodcock. I believe 
that the bird was peenting from the grassy hill immediately north of the 
building, and then was displaying in the general area of the Fuller Wetlands. 
Although I have seen woodcock at Sapsucker Woods before, I think this is the 
first time that I've heard one skydancing here.

Good birding,
Matt Medler
Ithaca

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[cayugabirds-l] King Eider

2010-12-03 Thread Matthew Medler

Hi All,

Just a quick message to note that Shawn Billerman, Andy Johnson, Matt 
Young, and I saw the King Eider from the marina at Myers late on Friday 
afternoon (3 Dec 2010).  We observed it for about 10 minutes around 3:45 
pm, and then watched it fly south in the company of 4-5 female Common 
Mergansers until we lost sight of it.  We thought that it might have 
flown all the way to Stewart Park, but a quick check there around 4:15 
did not yield the eider.


Before the eider flew south from Myers, it was essentially by itself out 
on the water, although it did cross paths with a Red-necked Grebe 
briefly.  It was considerably farther from shore than the flock of 
waterbirds (Mallards, Hooded Mergansers, Bufflehead, American Coots, 
etc.) that was just a short distance off-shore on the south side of the 
marina.


Good luck for those looking for this handsome bird on Saturday!

Matt Medler
Ithaca

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[cayugabirds-l] American Coots and AVM

2010-11-26 Thread Matthew Medler
Hi All,

I wanted to make people aware of a mysterious neurological disease that has 
afflicted American Coots, and, by extension, Bald Eagles and other higher-level 
predators, at artificial lakes in the southeastern U.S. for over 15 years.  
This 
disease is know as avian vacuolar myelinopathy (AVM), and can be read about 
here 
(and on other web sites):

http://wildlifedisease.nbii.gov/diseasehome.jsp?disease=Avian%20Vacuolar%20Myelinopathy%20%28AVM%29pagemode=submit


I hesitate to mention AVM in the context of the recent dead coots at Stewart 
Park, because it seems unlikely to me that AVM is involved.  I say this 
because, 
based on my limited knowledge of AVM, I think it is entirely confined to 
artificial lakes and reservoirs in the Southeast.  In addition, my 
understanding 
is that dying coots afflicted by AVM are usually very conspicuous due to their 
abnormal behavior, and while local observers have mentioned dead coots, nobody 
has said anything about seeing live coots acting in strange ways (having 
trouble 
swimming, flying, or walking).  


Matt Medler
Ithaca  

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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Gray Kingbird reported at Montezuma

2010-09-27 Thread Matthew Medler

Hi All,

Here is an e-mail from Jeff Doyle, who asked that I share this with the
group.

Matt


From Jeff:

No, I had no camera with me, so no photograph.

My wife and I hadn't been to Montezuma in a year or more. We had stopped at
the visitor's center and learned that the best birding was May's Point and
further north. We'd stopped at the observation tower opposite Tsache Pool,
then spent some time at the May's Point Pool before heading further north.
We'd never been to the Monument area before, and missed our turn the first
time before coming back and turning onto North May's Point Road. We stopped
at the intersection with East Road around 3:30, and I spotted a bird perched
on the telephone wire a few poles up East Road from the intersection.

My first thought was kingfisher--it seemed to have a disproportionately
large beak and head. But even a quick glance through binoculars dispelled
that thought, as it didn't have a crest. Next thought we had was kingbird,
because the overall aspect was reminiscent--flycatcher posture, for example.
But no Eastern kingbird fieldmarks--uniform gray, no band on tail (though at
first I didn't get a good look at the tail, particularly), and, I thought,
larger size--more the size of a Great Crested, but not the coloration. We
drove up the road slowly, stopped and looked, but didn't get out, not
knowing the road and there not being an obvious place to pull off and park.
The bird stayed on the wire and we got good looks with our binoculars. My
next passing thought was shrike--overall gray, and perhaps I saw the dark
streak through the eye (though I don't remember noting it at the time), but
the overall shape was wrong and there wasn't the contrasting coloration of a
shrike or mockingbird. We drove a little closer and the bird was disturbed,
flew up (flycatcher like), and lighted again. At that time I distinctly
noticed the deeply notched tail, which was quite distinctive.

We hadn't brought our field guide, so I couldn't look it up there. We'd seen
what we could see of the bird, so we continued on to the Monument, and soon
headed back south, as we hadn't had anything to eat since breakfast. The
bird wasn't on the wire when we got back to the intersection.

When we got home, I looked it up in my Peterson's, and there just isn't
anything else that it could be, though of course I'm highly skeptical of
having seen a S. Florida/W. Indies species that is at best casual to Long
Island and Nova Scotia and is coastal even in Florida on a wire in upstate
NY!

We have no internet at home, and I couldn't find Mena Haribel (sp.?) in the
phone book, so the best I could do was walk over to Sapsucker yesterday
morning.

That's what I know!

--Jeff


On 9/26/10 2:20 PM, charles eldermire wrote:

Hello- Jeff Doyle stopped by the Lab to report a Gray King bird he
saw on Saturday at 330pm at the junction of East Rd and Mays Point rd
on a telephone wire. If you have questions contact Jeff at
j...@cornell.edu

charles. --

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[cayugabirds-l] Connecticut Warbler Report from this morning

2010-09-26 Thread Matthew Medler

Hi All,

I thought I'd pass along this report that appeared on the eBird/Google 
Notable eBird Sightings gadget:


1 Connecticut Warbler was observed at Ithaca--Freese Road on 26 Sep, 
2010 by Nathan Senner. This sighting has not yet been reviewed by an 
eBird reviewer.


I don't know anything about this sighting, but thought I'd share for 
those who aren't signed up for this gadget.


Matt Medler
Ithaca

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[cayugabirds-l] Muckrace Results?

2010-09-13 Thread Matthew Medler
Does anybody have results from this year's Muckrace?  It would be great to read 
details...


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[cayugabirds-l] Red Knot and Ruff Sighting Info

2010-09-12 Thread Matthew Medler
For those still interested in trying to see the Red Knot and Ruff at 
Montezuma, I thought I'd share a few details of the sightings that Shawn 
Billerman, Andy Johnson, Jay McGowan and I had yesterday (11 September 
2010).  We spent from roughly 3 pm to 6 pm scanning the shorebirds from 
Towpath Road.  During that time, we had a very distant views of the RED 
KNOT in Knox-Marsellus Marsh (the wetland area on the left/west side of 
the dike).  By very distant views, I mean very distant views with 
Swarovski spotting scopes at 60X.  It would have been impossible to 
identify the knot (or any other shorebirds) with just binoculars or 
perhaps even with a low-powered scope.


As we were about to depart the Towpath Road area, we traveled a bit 
further down the road (to the east) to view shorebirds in what is 
apparently called Puddlers Marsh (the wetland area on the right/east 
side of the dike, as viewed from Towpath Road).  During the brief time 
we were there, a group of shorebirds (mostly Semipalmated Plovers) 
occasionally landed close enough to us so that we could not only see and 
identify them, but actually enjoy the beauty of their intricate 
plumages.  However, this group was very flighty and kept flying around 
the area.  During one of their brief touchdowns, though, the Red Knot 
was in their midst, offering nice (but brief) views.


We then heard from Kevin McGowan that the Ruff was present in 
Knox-Marsellus Marsh as viewed from East Road.  So, we headed up there, 
and Jay quickly relocated the Ruff.  Again, this bird was extremely 
distant, and it required high-powered scopes just to see it and identify 
it.  It was much too distant to really enjoy or appreciate any of the 
subtle details of its appearance.  While we were watching it, the Ruff 
was in the vicinity of some of the many Lesser Yellowlegs present.  To 
my eye, the body of the Ruff was about the same size as the Lesser 
Yellowlegs.  However, its legs were much shorter, giving a more compact 
look overall (compared to the yellowlegs).  For those who haven't seen 
the Ruff, it is a juvenile bird, meaning that it does not have any of 
the flashy ruffs that make adult males so flashy.  Instead, the most 
striking thing about the bird is the buffy coloration on the head and 
breast.  The general pattern of the bird is somewhat similar to Pectoral 
Sandpiper (and there are many Pectorals present), but the Ruff is 
buffier, and, importantly, much larger.


I hope this is helpful for those still hoping to see one or both of 
these birds.  It is quite challenging (and frustrating) to find and 
identify these birds (and all of the shorebirds present at 
Knox-Marsellus), but with a good scope and maybe a little luck, it can 
be done.


Good birding,
Matt Medler
Ithaca

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[cayugabirds-l] Merlin

2010-08-29 Thread Matthew Medler
Evan Barrientos, Andy Johnson, Jay McGowan, and I made a brief visit to 
the Montezuma area yesterday afternoon (28 August 2010), searching in 
vain for the Buff-breasted Sandpipers.  On the way back to Ithaca, Evan, 
Andy, and I enjoyed great looks at a female-type MERLIN perched in a 
tree by the farm just south of the Triangle Diner intersection (Jump 
Corners in my DeLorme Atlast).  This bird could have been a migrant 
that just stopped for a rest and maybe some fine fare at the Triangle, 
but it seems to me like Merlins have been seen in this same spot in 
previous years.  I can't remember if these sightings have all been 
during migration, or if they have come from different seasons.  If they 
are from different seasons, I wonder if this species is breeding in this 
specific area.  There is certainly a nice food source available in the 
form of House Sparrows.


Good birding,
Matt Medler
Ithaca

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[cayugabirds-l] East Hill Nighthawks

2010-08-29 Thread Matthew Medler
There were two COMMON NIGHTHAWKS flying around over East Hill about 15 
minutes ago (7:35 pm, 29 August 2010).  I observed them from near the 
Cornell Vet School parking lots, and while I was watching them, they 
seemed to be foraging in the area above the Maple Ave. power substation 
(or whatever that is).  It didn't seem like they were actively 
migrating, but I eventually lost sight of them, so they might have moved 
southward.  Always a nice sight to see on a beautiful late summer evening!


Good birding,
Matt Medler
Ithaca

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[cayugabirds-l] Montezuma Phalaropes

2010-08-27 Thread Matthew Medler
Matt Williams, Matt Young, and I spent several hours birding the Knox-Marcellus 
Marsh at Montezuma yesterday (26 August 2010).  We spent most of our time 
viewing from along Towpath Road, where we bumped into a migrant Alan Belford.  
I 
don't have time to post complete details now, but did want to let people know 
that there were three RED-NECKED PHALAROPES and a single WILSON'S PHALAROPE 
present along with more common shorebirds.  I believe that all four of these 
birds were juveniles.  Although they did split up at times, the four phalaropes 
were often in close proximity to each other (especially the three Red-neckeds). 
 
The Red-neckeds spent most of the time sitting on some of the deeper water in 
the area, often actively spinning around as phalaropes do.  


We viewed these birds from a rather expansive opening/vantage point along 
Towpath Road, a little ways before the impoundment wall (coming from East 
Road).  Although I think Young first picked out the Red-necked Phalaropes with 
his binoculars, a spotting scope is really necessary to enjoy these and other 
shorebirds present.

Good birding,
Matt Medler
Ithaca


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[cayugabirds-l] Shorebirds still moving

2010-06-03 Thread Matthew Medler

Hi All,

I just wanted to mention that although it is now early June, there are 
still northbound shorebirds migrating through our area.  A group of 
birders had several species fly past Myers this morning, and there is 
also a report from Oneidabirds and the Google eBird Gadget of three 
Hudsonian Godwits at the Montezuma Visitor's Center today.  This godwit 
report is especially interesting, as this species is not seen in the 
Basin every year, and is typically a fall only migrant in eastern 
North America.  In fact, I don't think I know of a single spring Basin 
record of Hudsonian Godwit (although there are at least two of Marbled 
Godwit, which is much rarer overall in the Basin).


So, it's not too late to be checking Myers and other spots for things 
like Sanderling, Ruddy Turnstone, and other shorebirds.


Good birding,
Matt Medler
Ithaca

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[cayugabirds-l] Sedge Wren report from Van Dyne Spoor Rd.

2010-05-19 Thread Matthew Medler
For those who don't use the Google eBird Gadget for notable New York 
sightings, I thought I'd pass this alone:


1 Sedge Wren was observed at Van Dyne Spoor Rd.--open area on 19 May, 
2010 by IBA Monitoring. This sighting has not yet been reviewed by an 
eBird reviewer.


I don't know anything about this report, but thought I'd share.  For 
more information on the Google eBird Gadget:


http://ebird.org/content/ebird/news/Google_Gadget.html

Good birding,
Matt Medler
Ithaca

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[cayugabirds-l] Shindagin Hollow area Clay-colored Sparrow

2010-05-16 Thread Matthew Medler

Hi All,

I had a great morning of sound recording and birding in the Shindagin 
Hollow area this morning (16 May 2010).  After the wind started to pick 
up around 9:30, I decided to explore a bit, and eventually stopped at a 
fairly large shrubland area along Braley Hill Road.  As soon as I got 
out of the car, I noticed a sound that I did not immediately 
recognize--a fast-paced series of even buzzy notes.  Unfortunately, the 
bird went quiet before I could record it at all or track it down.  But, 
I did hear it long enough to realize what it was, based on the quality 
of the song--a singing CLAY-COLORED SPARROW.  I have very little field 
experience with this species, but am used to hearing recordings of it in 
which the bird sings rather slow, two-noted songs like this:


http://macaulaylibrary.org/audio/42229

The bird I heard, though, was giving faster, 4 or 5 noted songs like this:

http://macaulaylibrary.org/audio/42235

This bird was clearly in the Susquehanna River drainage, rather than in 
the Cayuga Lake Basin, but I thought that some might be interested in 
trying to take a look for it.  I can't figure out the exact coordinates 
of the spot, but it was a large shrubland area on the west side of 
Braley Hill Road, about two miles north of the junction with Pleasant 
Valley Road.


I spent most of my morning along Bald Hill School Road, which was very 
birdy.  And the overall diversity of warblers that I encountered in my 
wanderings was fairly impressive:


Tennessee
Northern Parula
Chestnut-sided
Black-throated Blue
Yellow-rumped
Black-throated Green
Blackburnian
Pine
Prairie
American Redstart
Ovenbird
Louisiana Waterthrush (Leonard Rd.)
Mourning Warbler (2)
Common Yellowthroat
Hooded Warbler (several)
Canada Warbler (1)

With the exception of the first two, I believe that all of the others 
breed in the area, along with a few additional species.


Other birds of interest to me were my first singing EASTERN WOOD-PEWEE 
of the year, many VEERY, SCARLET TANAGERS and ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAKS, 
and a briefly singing BLACK-BILLED CUCKOO.


Good birding,
Matt Medler
Ithaca

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[cayugabirds-l] Sapsucker Woods, 8 May 2010

2010-05-08 Thread Matthew Medler
I spent a bit of time late this morning (8 May 2010) walking around the pond at 
Sapsucker Woods.  Things generally seemed quite birdy, but in looking at my 
notes, I guess I didn't really see that many birds that would be deemed 
migrants.  I saw/heard a total of ten species of warblers, with MAGNOLIA 
WARBLER (1), CHESTNUT-SIDED WARBLER (1), BLACK-AND-WHITE WARBLER (2), and 
BLACKBURNIAN WARBLER (2 heard only) being the highlights for me.  I also 
enjoyed hearing my first WOOD THRUSH, RED-EYED VIREO (5, singing on territory), 
and GREAT CRESTED FLYCATCHER of the season.  The only other things that stood 
out to me were a single NORTHERN ROUGH-WINGED SWALLOW foraging over the pond, 
and a single WILD TURKEY that followed me along the trail for a while.

Is everybody else still out birding today?

Matt Medler
Ithaca  


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[cayugabirds-l] Spring Arrival Date List

2010-04-30 Thread Matthew Medler
Hi All,

I've finally put together a new list of average spring arrivals dates for the 
Cayuga Lake Basin, based on spring arrivals from 2000-2009.  The list can be 
found directly at:

http://www.birds.cornell.edu/cayugabirdclub/aughtsarrivals.htm

or via the Cayuga Bird Club First Records and Arrivals page:

http://www.birds.cornell.edu/cayugabirdclub/firstrecords.htm

I'll also add that a great way to get a fuller understanding of the status and 
distribution of migrants and non-migrants alike in the Basin is to go to 
eBird.org and do the following:

Select View and Explore Data
Then select bar charts
Select New York, then the Counties in New York button, then Continue
And then select the Basin counties of Cayuga, Schuyler, Seneca, Tompkins, and 
Wayne.

This will give a bar chart for all species seen in these counties, with all 
data entered between 1900 and 2010.  To focus on more recent data, click 
Change Date and change the start year from 1900 to 2000.  

Thanks to the tireless efforts of the many Basin eBirders, these bar charts are 
really excellent.  They really show much more about spring migration than just 
a list of arrival dates.  Be sure to add your sightings from eBird to make the 
bar charts even better!

Good birding,
Matt Medler
Ithaca

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[cayugabirds-l] Listening to (and looking at) bird sounds

2010-04-27 Thread Matthew Medler

Hi All,

Bob McGuire and Mark Chao shared some interesting comments last week 
about individual variation in the songs of the two species of 
waterthrushes.  For those who are interested in this sort of thing, I 
wanted to share some resources at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology's 
Macaulay Library (ML) web site that allow users to explore bird sound in 
more detail.


The Macaulay Library (ML) is home to over 100,000 digitized sound 
recordings, with bird recordings from all over the world, as well as 
thousands of mammal, insect, and amphibian recordings.  These recordings 
can be played at the ML web site:  macaulaylibrary.org


If you're interested in analyzing bird sounds in a bit more detail, the 
ML web site also features a great tool called RavenViewer that allows 
you to see real-time spectrograms for every recording.  The instructions 
for downloading RavenViewer can be found at the lower right corner of 
the ML home page, and it only takes a few minutes to complete the download.


Once you've downloaded RavenViewer and restarted your web browser, 
return to the ML web site, and type in a species (such as Northern 
Waterthrush) that you're interested in exploring.  The Search Results 
page will show a list of recordings of that species, and next to each 
catalog number, there will be two similar play buttons--a blue one with 
a white triangle, and a blue one (again with a white triangle) 
surrounded by yellow.  Click the blue, white, and yellow button to 
listen to the recording while also viewing it in RavenViewer.


A separate RavenViewer window will then open, showing three separate 
display panels.  The top one is a waveform, which shows the relative 
loudness of sounds in a recording.  The middle one is a spectrogram, 
which shows the frequency of a bird sound against time.  The bottom 
panel is a power spectrum, and to be honest, I'm not quite sure what 
that shows.  (I believe it is used mostly for bat recordings.)


When I use RavenViewer, I tend to hide the waveform and power spectrum 
panels, and show just the spectrogram.  (To hide a panel, select the 
relevant tab near the bottom of the browser window, and then select 
Hide.)  This makes the spectrogram panel larger, allowing for more 
detail.  I then select the spectrogram tab, and adjust the Timeline Zoom 
and Upper Frequency Limit settings to view individual songs in even more 
detail.  If I wanted to look at a single Northern Waterthrush song, for 
example, I would change the Upper Frequency Limit to 10,000 Hz and set 
the Timeline Zoom to something in the 65 to 75 range.  (I am no expert 
on sound analysis, though, so there might be better settings to use.)


RavenViewer also includes a Speed function that allows you to either 
slow down or speed up a recording.  If you think a Winter Wren song is 
amazing at normal speed, try slowing it down to half speed!


Good listening,
Matt Medler

Audio Archivist
Macaulay Library
Cornell Lab of Ornithology


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Re: [cayugabirds-l] West side of Cayuga Lake, plus Montezuma area

2010-04-17 Thread Matthew Medler
I knew I'd forget something:  a singing House Wren heard several times 
in the Sheldrake area.


Matthew Medler wrote:
I spent the day today (17 April 2010) birding with Tim Lenz, Alberto 
López, and Chris Wiley.  We started at Stewart Park, then headed up the 
west side of Cayuga Lake, and hit a few spots in the Montezuma area. 
Despite the cold, windy conditions, and the occasional rain and sleet, 
we had a nice day of birding.  Here are some of the highlights:


1 Field Sparrow on the Swan Pen trail

Hundreds of migrant swallows flying north along the west side of the 
lake; mostly Tree Swallows, but also a few Barn Swallows, N. 
Rough-winged Swallows, and Purple Martins


3+ singing Pine Warblers in the Sheldrake area, singing from white pines 
in two different yards; there were also 5+ Yellow-rumped Warblers in the 
same area.


2 stunning Long-tailed Ducks and an adult Lesser Black-backed Gull at 
Dean's Cove


1 Red-necked Grebe, ~25 Common Loons (on the water), and a few 
Bonaparte's Gulls in Varick


4 Upland Sandpipers at the the Empire Days Fairgrounds in Seneca Falls

1 (early) Solitary Sandpiper at the entrance to Montezuma NWR

13 Lapland Longspurs, 15+ Horned Larks, and 1 Vesper Sparrow, Savannah 
Mucklands


3 continuing American Golden-Plovers, 15 Greater Yellowlegs, 2 Lesser 
Yellowlegs, 1 Dunlin (mostly in breeding plumage), and 60 Wilson's Snipe 
at the end of Van Dyne Spoor Road.  (The railroad crossing is open again.)


Good birding,
Matt Medler
Ithaca

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[cayugabirds-l] Bonaparte's Gull leg color

2010-04-03 Thread Matthew Medler

Hi All,

I've spent many hours looking at hundreds to thousands of Bonaparte's 
Gulls on Lake Champlain in summer and early fall.  When these birds 
first appear on the lake in late July and early August, most of them are 
still in full breeding plumage, and the *typical* leg color on these 
birds is red (or reddish orange).  I associate pink leg color with 
juvenile or non-breeding Bonaparte's Gulls.


From looking at Stuart's photos, there is nothing about this bird that 
makes me think it is anything but a Bonaparte's Gull.  Perhaps I am 
missing something that was better seen in the field, but the leg color, 
head pattern, bill size and color, and wingtip pattern are all good for 
Bonaparte's Gull.


Matt


Stuart Krasnoff wrote:
I posted some frame captures of digivids I took of the black-headed gull 
(all lower case) that Dave Nicosia found at Armitage Rd. Saturday 
afternoon (2 April).  Please forgive the quality...I picked frames to 
try to show variation in appearance of the leg color (which I would 
describe as Freshly Nitrited Nova Lox ) as well as the bill-shape and 
proportion, and the extent of black and sides of the head (this bird 
certainly did not show the fingers of black descending from crown to eye 
and ear that Sibley figures.   Find photos at:


http://picasaweb.google.com/booleanquery/BirdsForID# 
http://picasaweb.google.com/booleanquery/BirdsForID


The ID consensus there on the dike looking north northwest at about 
1700h was Bonaparte's based on maximum likelihood, but ...the gull gave 
a bulkier, chestier appearance than Bonaparte's to me (Bill Evan's saw 
the videos and voiced that impression as well).  One of the frames has a 
Ring-billed Gull in it which is closer, but may give a sense of size.  
Also the bill appeared somewhat longish for a Bonaparte's.  For 
comparison to a Bonaparte's with red legs see:


http://jrscience.wcp.muohio.edu/birds/ohio_birds/Bonaparte_Gull_Red_Legs.html

I would appreciate opinions from laridoligists far and wide on range of 
color in the legs of these gulls (which Sibley describes as 
'pink').Other observations from the Montezuma area that might be 
relevant to vistors this weekend:


 After several Greater Yellowlegs and a furtive Wilson's Snipe at 
Larue's I think I had 2 Lesser Yellowlegs in Benning Marsh, but am still 
mulling over photos.  I will post some shots of them for interested 
dichomtomizers.


I ran into two DEC guys (Jim and another who's name I didn't get) at the 
new shore bird spot (1 Killdeer and many Green-winged Teal among other 
ducks) who said that there were 17 Pectoral Sandpipers and a Dunlin at 
Van Dyne Spoor in the morning.  The presumption was they were the same 
bunch seeni n previous days at Armitage.  I spent an hour (ca. 2-3 PM) 
-at Van Dyne Spoor and din't see any shorebirds (lots of Pintail, GW 
Teal etc., 1 Sandhill Crane, 2 Trumpeter Swans, 6-7 probable Tundra 
Swans, a circling Rough-legged Hawk, the expected No. Harrier).   At 
Armitage I looked for the Pectorals for awhile and finally found 8-9 
about 125 yards east of the dike on the western edge of the fields to 
the north of the road.  The Dunlin was there with them.


 


Good birding...Stuart

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



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[cayugabirds-l] Two warbler day!

2010-04-03 Thread Matthew Medler
Shawn Billerman and I did a bit of birding this morning (3 April 2010) 
to enjoy the warm weather.  We started at Myers, where the highlight was 
seeing Tom Johnson and his Spring Field Ornithology group.  We then hit 
Stewart Park, where highlights were a YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLER by the Swan 
Pen, a very vocal FISH CROW, and a nestling GREAT HORNED OWL in the 
Fuertes Sanctuary.  Finally, we headed up to Comstock Knoll, where we 
had nice looks at a singing male PINE WARBLER as well as a female Pine 
Warbler in the same area.


Good birding,
Matt Medler
Ithaca

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[cayugabirds-l] Aurora Raven

2010-03-21 Thread Matthew Medler
Shawn Billerman, Chris Wiley, and I spent the day out birding yesterday 
(20 March 2010), and saw most of the same birds that others have 
reported (as we spent at least some time with many of the others who 
have reported).  As crazy as it is to say this on a day when we saw 
Western Grebe, Eurasian Wigeon, and Sandhill Crane, I think the bird 
that most interested me yesterday was a COMMON RAVEN that we heard while 
scanning Aurora Bay from the Wells College Boathouse.  This bird was 
quite close--probably just upslope a bit in the vicinity of the Wells 
campus.  I believe that this is the first time that I have ever seen or 
heard a raven that was essentially at the shore of Cayuga Lake, and only 
the second Basin raven that I have noted away from higher elevation 
areas south or east of Ithaca.  Have others noted any ravens down by the 
lake?


Matt Medler
Ithaca

P.S.  We stopped in Aurora to look for Eared Grebe on the mirror-like 
lake.  No luck with Eared Grebe, but there were a few Horned Grebes. 
Overall, we had a four-grebe day!


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[cayugabirds-l] Rusty Blackbird at the Lab

2010-03-18 Thread Matthew Medler
There was a single singing RUSTY BLACKBIRD at Sapsucker Woods this morning (18 
March 2010) as I came into work.  For the person who asked on the listserve 
some time recently about good places to see this species, I'd say that 
Sapsucker Woods is probably one of the better places in the area.  With their 
preference for wet wooded areas, Rusty Blackbirds can be seen fairly reliably 
here during late March and early April.

Good birding,
Matt Medler
Ithaca

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[cayugabirds-l] Western Grebe at Chimney Bluffs State Park, Lake Ontario

2010-03-14 Thread Matthew Medler

Hi All,

I just received a message from Chris Wiley to say that he and some other
Ithaca birders are currently (10:30 am, 14 March 2010) watching a
WESTERN GREBE at Chimney Bluffs State Park, located on Lake Ontario in
Wayne County.  The bird is just off-shore from the parking lot area.
There are also about 30 Red-necked Grebes present, but the Western Grebe
is apparently staying to itself.

This bird appears to have swum under the radar for the past few days.
   It was reported to eBird on 11 March 2010, and because of its rarity
in the state, triggered a report on the eBird Notable Birds Google
Gadget (http://ebird.org/content/ebird/news/Google_Gadget.html) for New
York.  However, I have not seen any mention of it on any local listserves.

Good luck if you go!

Matt Medler
Ithaca


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[cayugabirds-l] Monday Night Seminar--Bret Whitney

2010-02-25 Thread Matthew Medler
Hi All,

I wanted to let people know that the next Monday Night Seminar at the Lab of 
Ornithology, on Monday, March 1st, should be a great one.  Renowned Neotropical 
ornithologist and tour leader Bret Whitney will be presenting the following 
talk:

Brazil: New birds in old places

The vast Amazon basin harbors the highest diversity of birds on
Earth, and it appears that the age of discovery is far from over! 
Learn how ornithologist and tour guide Bret Whitney combines his
knowledge of bird sounds and the lay of the land with NASA technology
to sleuth out ancient avian hideaways in Amazonian Brazil and
Peru.

Bret has discovered and described several new bird species during his career, 
and is a highly skilled sound recordist and videographer.  This talk promises 
to be one of the highlights of the spring seminar series.

Hope to see you there!
Matt Medler
Ithaca


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