[cayugabirds-l] Cockatoos in Sydney learning from each other to bin-dive for food, study finds

2021-07-23 Thread Regi Teasley
Bird adaptation.

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2021/jul/23/cockatoos-in-sydney-learning-from-each-other-to-bin-dive-for-food-study-finds

Regi

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[cayugabirds-l] Refuge No More: Migratory Birds Face Drought, Disease and Death on the Pacific Flyway • The Revelator

2021-07-01 Thread Regi Teasley
You may want to sit down before you read this.

https://therevelator.org/refuge-birds-drought/

Regi

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[cayugabirds-l] Mystery illness strikes down birds across US south and midwest | Birds | The Guardian

2021-06-24 Thread Regi Teasley
FYI

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2021/jun/24/birds-mystery-illness-us-south-midwest

Regi

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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Recent storm damage at Stewart Park

2021-06-22 Thread Regi Teasley
Maybe this is an opportunity to plant some more appropriate native trees?
Regi


“If we surrendered to the earth’s intelligence, we could rise up rooted, like 
trees.” Rainer Maria Rilke


> On Jun 22, 2021, at 5:15 PM, Kevin C Packard  wrote:
> 
> 
> Dear birders,
> 
>  From what I saw on the Ithaca Times and in social media today, there appears 
> to be significant damage to the trees at Stewart Park from yesterday's 
> storms.  While I hope that it won't have a major impact on our local birds 
> that nest there, the park itself is closed until further notice while the 
> city clears the damaged trees.
> 
> https://www.ithaca.com/news/ithaca/stewart-park-newman-golf-course-cayuga-waterfront-trail-closed/article_6dc722ae-d36b-11eb-b6a4-679c175d0007.html
> 
>  Sincerely,
> 
>  Kevin
> 
> Kevin C Packard
> 
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[cayugabirds-l] Fwd: The Bobolink Project

2021-06-21 Thread Regi Teasley
Oops, make that Mass.  There is also a project in Vt.
Regi


“If we surrendered to the earth’s intelligence, we could rise up rooted, like 
trees.” Rainer Maria Rilke


Begin forwarded message:

> From: Regi Teasley 
> Date: June 21, 2021 at 9:14:09 AM EDT
> To: CAYUGABIRDS-L 
> Subject: The Bobolink Project
> 
> 
> Folks,
> I heard from a good person in Vt. about their program.  I think you will 
> find this useful.
> 
> https://www.bobolinkproject.com/
> 
> Regi
> 
> “If we surrendered to the earth’s intelligence, we could rise up rooted, like 
> trees.” Rainer Maria Rilke
> 

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[cayugabirds-l] The Bobolink Project

2021-06-21 Thread Regi Teasley
Folks,
I heard from a good person in Vt. about their program.  I think you will 
find this useful.

https://www.bobolinkproject.com/

Regi

“If we surrendered to the earth’s intelligence, we could rise up rooted, like 
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Fwd: [cayugabirds-l] Fields being mowed.

2021-06-16 Thread Regi Teasley



“If we surrendered to the earth’s intelligence, we could rise up rooted, like 
trees.” Rainer Maria Rilke


Begin forwarded message:

> From: Regi Teasley 
> Date: June 16, 2021 at 10:27:53 AM EDT
> To: "Kenneth V. Rosenberg" 
> Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Fields being mowed.
> 
> Thank you for this.  But, please don’t let the passion dissipate.  We must 
> begin to change our priorities and approach to the natural world while we can 
> still make a difference.  Activism matters in the switch from “business as 
> usual” to truly sustainable practices.
> Regi
> 
> 
> “If we surrendered to the earth’s intelligence, we could rise up rooted, like 
> trees.” Rainer Maria Rilke
> 
> 
>>> On Jun 15, 2021, at 11:33 PM, Kenneth V. Rosenberg  wrote:
>>> 
>> 
>> Hi everyone,
>>  
>> Having fueled some of the passion about hay-cutting and grassland bird 
>> conservation, I wanted to clarify a few points. Thanks to the many who 
>> provided resources and links to additional information. I am not an expert 
>> on farming or legal issues, but I can provide a bit more perspective on the 
>> grassland bird issues. What is happening today has happened for decades and 
>> is standard agricultural practice over most of the eastern U.S. The 
>> challenges are complex, both for the farmers and those interested in 
>> conservation.
>>  
>> Most importantly, it is not fair or correct to blame the local farmers, or 
>> even those at Cornell trying to manage the hayfields along Freese and 
>> Hanshaw Roads – these are indeed hayfields, grown for the horses at the 
>> Equine Research Lab, and the growers are under the same constraints 
>> regarding timing and nutritional value of the hay (the horses won’t eat it 
>> if it’s mowed too late). Individual farmers trying to eek out a living and 
>> keep their farms in production cannot be expected to sacrifice economically 
>> for the sake of birds or other wildlife – a common resource for us all. This 
>> is the fundamental problem.
>>  
>> The solutions, therefore, need to come at the societal and policy levels. If 
>> more of society puts greater value on birds and other nature, then this can 
>> become part of the economic structure that supports both agriculture and 
>> biodiversity conservation. Much easier said than done!  There is a 
>> complicated array of Farm Bill and other incentive programs that encourage 
>> farmers to create or set aside wildlife habitat, but these programs are 
>> obscure to most farmers – including the program managers at Cornell we met 
>> with last year. Here is a link to a guide that was just released about the 
>> latest Farm Bill programs:  
>> https://nabci-us.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/2018-2023-Farm-Bill-Guide-FINAL-LOW-RES-052621.pdf
>>  
>> As Geo and others point out, the bird part is pretty well known and several 
>> good resources exist – the timing of breeding, safe dates for mowing, field 
>> size requirements for each species, preferred grass types, etc.  The 
>> economic side is much more difficult, with pressures to produce on every 
>> acre and less and less room for nature in the agricultural matrix. And as 
>> Geo stated, without viable farming there would be no “grassland” or 
>> grassland birds in the Northeast. (the lost potential for managing 
>> state-owned lands for these disappearing species has also been noted).
>>  
>> As for our local situation with the Cornell University fields, I was not 
>> quite correct to say earlier that the managers of these particular fields 
>> were not interested in conservation options – but they did not have the 
>> option to make those decisions and could not afford to make short-term 
>> changes in their management. This is where our local bird community can help 
>> – both in terms of providing specific information on the birds and 
>> guidelines for mowing, etc., but more importantly, to let the university and 
>> town leaders know that we value the birds and the habitats on these lands. 
>> As a land-grant university, and with the lead by-line on the Science article 
>> documenting the loss of 3 billion birds, it is not unreasonable to ask 
>> Cornell to be part of the solution -- finding ways that ensure agricultural 
>> productivity while helping to stem the plummeting populations of grassland 
>> birds.  And it would be great for Cornell to model these solutions on its 
>> own extensive farmland.
>>  
>> I hope some of the passion expressed today will have a positive impact.
>>  
>> KEN
>>  
>>  
>>  

[cayugabirds-l] The Bobolink Project

2021-06-16 Thread Regi Teasley
Here’s one model we might consider.  This is an important issue and probably 
needs to be addressed from several angles.  We’re not alone in our concern.

https://www.bobolinkproject.com/

Regi

“If we surrendered to the earth’s intelligence, we could rise up rooted, like 
trees.” Rainer Maria Rilke


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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Fields being mowed.

2021-06-15 Thread Regi Teasley
Ken,
   This is useful information.  And thank you for your serious efforts.
I sometimes think that what we need to do is bring this to a wider public.  
Some photos of trashed nests would go a long way to making the point.  Of 
course Cornell wants to look good while doing little (consider their endless 
posturing and foot dragging on building efficiency).  So, what remains in-house 
may never change.
   This is part of a larger problem: talk green and continue with business as 
usual.  And, let’s face it, sometimes you have to stand between the machine and 
the victim—with cameras rolling.

Regi


“If we surrendered to the earth’s intelligence, we could rise up rooted, like 
trees.” Rainer Maria Rilke


> On Jun 15, 2021, at 4:07 PM, Kenneth V. Rosenberg  wrote:
> 
> 
> Linda, thanks for bringing this mowing to everyone’s attention. In a 
> nutshell, what is happening today in those fields, repeated over the entire 
> U.S., is the primary cause of continued steep declines in Bobolink and other 
> grassland bird populations.
>  
> Last year, because of the delays in mowing due to Covid, the fields along 
> Freeze and Hanshaw Roads were full of nesting birds, including many nesting 
> Bobolinks that were actively feeding young in the nests at the end of June. 
> In the first week of July, Cornell decided to mow all the fields. Jody Enck 
> and I wrote letters and met with several folks at Cornell in the various 
> departments in charge of managing those fields (Veterinary College, 
> University Farm Services) – although they listened politely to our concerns 
> for the birds, they went ahead and mowed that week as dozens of female 
> bobolinks and other birds hovered helplessly over the tractors with bills 
> filled food for their almost-fledged young.
>  
> The same just happened over the past couple of days this year, only at an 
> earlier stage in the nesting cycle – most birds probably have (had) recently 
> hatched young in the nest. While mowing is occurring across the entire region 
> as part of “normal” agricultural practices (with continued devastating 
> consequences for field-nesting birds), the question is whether Cornell 
> University needs to be contributing to this demise, while ostensibly 
> supporting biodiversity conservation through other unrelated programs. Jody 
> and I presented an alternative vision, where the considerable acres of fields 
> owned by the university across Tompkins County could serve as a model for 
> conserving populations of grassland birds, pollinators, and other 
> biodiversity, but the people in charge of this management were not very 
> interested in these options.
>  
> And there we have it, a microcosm of the continental demise of grassland 
> birds playing out in our own backyard, illustrating the extreme challenges of 
> modern Ag practices that are totally incompatible with healthy bird 
> populations. I urge CayugaBirders to make as much noise as possible, and 
> maybe someone will listen.
>  
> KEN
>  
> Ken Rosenberg (he/him/his)
> Applied Conservation Scientist
> Cornell Lab of Ornithology
> American Bird Conservancy
> Fellow, Atkinson Center for a Sustainable Future
> k...@cornell.edu
> Wk: 607-254-2412
> Cell: 607-342-4594
>  
>  
> From: bounce-125714085-3493...@list.cornell.edu 
>  on behalf of Linda Orkin 
> 
> Date: Tuesday, June 15, 2021 at 3:02 PM
> To: CAYUGABIRDS-L 
> Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Fields being mowed.
> 
> After a couple year hiatus in which the Freese Road fields across from the 
> gardens have been mowed late in the season allowing at least Bobolinks to be 
> done with their nesting and for grassland birds to be lured into a false 
> feeling of security so they have returned and I’ve counted three singing 
> meadowlarks for the first time in years,  Cornell has returned to early 
> mowing there as of today. And so the mayhem ensues. How many more multitudes 
> of birds will die before we believe our own eyes and ears. Mow the grass 
> while it’s still nutritious but are we paying attention to who is being fed. 
> Grass taken from the land to pass through animals and in that inefficient 
> process turning to food for humans. 
> 
> Linda Orkin
> Ithaca NY
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[cayugabirds-l] Non-bird: Lightening Bug

2021-05-22 Thread Regi Teasley
In know this isn’t a bird but it does fly.  Last night about 2:00 am I saw a 
Lightening Bug out back of our house in a brushy area.  We often see them in 
late June, but in May?

Regi
West Hill
Ithaca


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[cayugabirds-l] Common Yellowthroat

2021-05-02 Thread Regi Teasley
This morning I saw a Common Yellowthroat taking a bath in the garden bird bath.
In case you needed another reason to garden for birds.

Regi
West Hill/City


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[cayugabirds-l] House Wren

2021-04-28 Thread Regi Teasley
I’m pretty sure I’m hearing a House Wren singing in our yard.  We’ve had one 
nesting here for several years.
Regi
West Hill (City)


“The future of the world is nuts.”  Philip Rutter, founder of the American 
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[cayugabirds-l] Goodbye California: Reminisces of a climate refugee | The Cottonwood Post

2021-04-04 Thread Regi Teasley
Birders,
I think this will be of interest. 

https://thecottonwoodpost.net/2021/04/04/goodbye-california-reminisces-of-a-climate-refugee/

Regi 

“The future of the world is nuts.”  Philip Rutter, founder of the American 
Chestnut Foundation


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[cayugabirds-l] Body of Cooper’s hawk

2021-03-08 Thread Regi Teasley
Alas, this morning we saw the body of a first year Cooper’s hawk at Cass Park.  
It was on the east side of the tennis courts about 10 feet away.  We had dogs 
so we couldn’t pick up the body.  It may have been under the snow before that 
melted.
It has been a very rough winter for many creatures. 
Regi


“The future of the world is nuts.”  Philip Rutter, founder of the American 
Chestnut Foundation


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Re: [cayugabirds-l] gynandromorph cardinal

2021-02-25 Thread Regi Teasley
Atrazine affects frogs, might if affect birds as well?
Regi


“The future of the world is nuts.”  Philip Rutter, founder of the American 
Chestnut Foundation


> On Feb 25, 2021, at 10:13 AM, metet...@gmail.com wrote:
> 
> Non- birders have asked me about this and whether the bird could just be 
> half male/female just in pigment. I notice the article says “possible 
> Gynandromorph”. Does anyone know if there have been cases of just plumage 
> dimorphism? Mike Tetlow
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
> --
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[cayugabirds-l] Fwd: [sustainable_tompkins-l] Open Space Institute Launches $18M Appalachian Landscapes Protection Fund to Accelerate Land Conservation to Fight Climate Change

2021-02-24 Thread Regi Teasley
Birders,
 Here is information that will be of interest.
Regi 


“The future of the world is nuts.”  Philip Rutter, founder of the American 
Chestnut Foundation


Begin forwarded message:

> From: Maura Stephens 
> Date: February 24, 2021 at 10:23:43 AM EST
> To: CPNY General List 
> Subject: [sustainable_tompkins-l] Open Space Institute Launches $18M 
> Appalachian Landscapes Protection Fund to Accelerate Land Conservation to 
> Fight Climate Change
> Reply-To: Sustainability in Tompkins County 
> 
> 
> 
> Please share with organizations in our Appalachian region that might benefit 
> from this fund.
> PRESS RELEASE
> 
>  
> Open Space Institute Launches $18M Appalachian Landscapes Protection Fund to 
> Accelerate Land Conservation to Fight Climate Change
> 
> 
> NEW YORK, NY (Feb. 18, 2021)—Seeking to accelerate land conservation in the 
> eastern U.S. to counter climate change and its impacts, the Open Space 
> Institute (OSI) today announced the launch of its $18 million Appalachian 
> Landscapes Protection Fund (ALPF). This first-of-its-kind fund is aimed 
> specifically at protecting some of the nation’s most biologically rich and 
> climate-resilient landscapes. The initiative aligns with the Biden 
> administration’s recently announced plan to conserve 30 percent of U.S. land 
> and waters by the year 2030 to leverage natural climate solutions, protect 
> biodiversity, and slow extinction rates. 
> 
> Harnessing the carbon-capturing role of forests to combat climate change, the 
> ALPF’s goal is to conserve 50,000 acres along the spine of the Appalachian 
> Mountains, which contain the world’s largest broadleaf forest, are 
> responsible for a majority of US forest carbon sequestration, and provide 
> essential climate refuge for plants and animals (maps and photos available 
> here: https://openspaceinstitute.canto.com/b/SME5F). OSI has initially 
> identified three specific regions that are priorities for conservation based 
> on their intact habitat and ability to serve as corridors for migrating 
> wildlife, contiguous forests, and to protect and increase carbon storage in 
> vast forest resources that also provide clean water and recreational 
> opportunities for millions of people. The three large-scale forested target 
> areas, ranging in size from three to seven million acres, are: (1) the Cradle 
> of Southern Appalachia, (2) the Middle Atlantic, and (3) the Northern 
> Appalachians. 
> 
> To date, OSI has secured a $6 million grant from the Doris Duke Charitable 
> Foundation and $6 million from six other regional foundations toward its $18 
> million goal. Additional funding will allow for further investment in the 
> three target areas and/or the geographic expansion of the program. 
> 
> “Now more than ever, our future depends on forests. By putting climate change 
> front and center, the Appalachian Landscapes Protection Fund will help 
> protect the land that matters most as we take on the largest environmental 
> challenge of our time,” said Kim Elliman, president and CEO of OSI. “While a 
> changing climate can create overwhelming uncertainty, the conservation of 
> forests can go a long way toward helping wildlife and people adapt, while 
> reducing emissions through carbon storage and sequestration.” 
> 
> To achieve critical, climate-related conservation goals, OSI is providing 
> grants and loans for the acquisition of land and conservation easements that 
> will leverage an additional $66 million in matching public and private funds. 
> The Fund also advances efforts by states, local communities, Native American 
> tribes, and land trusts, to align their conservation goals around climate 
> priorities. The ALPF will ease funding requirements for organizations that 
> identify as Black, Indigenous, and People of Color-led that are at heightened 
> risk of being negatively impacted by the climate crisis. 
> 
> The ALPF is part of a growing national effort to increase use of strategic 
> land conservation to combat climate change. Forests, their trees, and soil 
> are critical to storing carbon; and, when managed correctly, forests can also 
> play a critical role in capturing the carbon emissions that are being 
> produced today.  
>  
> … 
>  
> Please see the full text of the release here: 
> https://www.openspaceinstitute.org/news/open-space-institute-launches-18-million-appalachian-landscapes-protection-fund-to-accelerate-land-conservation-to-fight-climate-change
>   

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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Robins

2021-02-10 Thread Regi Teasley
We had a large flock drop by yesterday afternoon to eat the “berries” on the 
Hawthorns.
Regi
West Hill in Ithaca


“The future of the world is nuts.”  Philip Rutter, founder of the American 
Chestnut Foundation


> On Feb 10, 2021, at 4:36 PM, Donna Lee Scott  wrote:
> 
>  Some robins stay here all winter. 
> I have had 2 diff flocks in my yard eating cedar berries. 
> 
> Donna Scott
> Lansing
> Sent from my iPhone
> 
>> On Feb 10, 2021, at 4:02 PM, Susan Evans-Pond  wrote:
>> 
>> Likewise, 10-15 robins in flying around and perching in the forest trees and 
>> bushes on the east side of Westhaven Road (West Hill) behind the houses.  
>> They were curious, sometimes perching quite close to where I was 
>> snow-shoeing.  Also lurking high in the trees were 3 Cedar Waxwings and the 
>> usual and very plentiful cardinals, chickadees, white-throated and house 
>> sparrows, chickadees, crows, juncos and starlings.
>> A beautiful morning.
>>  
>> From: bounce-125377575-86332...@list.cornell.edu 
>>  On Behalf Of marsha kardon
>> Sent: Wednesday, February 10, 2021 2:37 PM
>> To: cayugabirdlist 
>> Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Robins
>>  
>> I saw about 15 robins flying together and perching in the trees by the side 
>> of Bundy Road at about 1pm today.  I haven't seen any other robins since the 
>> fall.  Have they migrated back here already, or do some stay here all 
>> winter?  Marsha Kardon
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[cayugabirds-l] Conservation Biologist Murdered In Colombia Saved Two Species

2021-01-23 Thread Regi Teasley
Sad news.

https://www.forbes.com/sites/grrlscientist/2021/01/18/conservation-biologist-murdered-in-colombia-saved-two-species/

Regi

“The future of the world is nuts.”  Philip Rutter, founder of the American 
Chestnut Foundation


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[cayugabirds-l] Chipping Sparrow

2021-01-12 Thread Regi Teasley
The Chipping Sparrow was back for a visit this afternoon.  It appeared to enjoy 
having a Xmas tree under the feeder so it could feel safer while eating the 
Millet seeds.

Regi
West Hill above LACS



“The future of the world is nuts.”  Philip Rutter, founder of the American 
Chestnut Foundation


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[cayugabirds-l] Dryden Lake

2021-01-11 Thread Regi Teasley
Birders,
Dryden Lake is a designated Unique Natural Area in our county so the 
Environmental Management Council, advisory to the county legislature, will also 
be taking a look at this. I would encourage all other efforts to continue.

Regi Teasley, incoming EMC Chair


“The future of the world is nuts.”  Philip Rutter, founder of the American 
Chestnut Foundation


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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Future of Lott Farm & Basin Upland Sandpipers?

2021-01-09 Thread Regi Teasley
Might Finger Lakes Land Trust help with this?
Regi


“The future of the world is nuts.”  Philip Rutter, founder of the American 
Chestnut Foundation


> On Jan 9, 2021, at 8:51 PM, Deb Grantham  wrote:
> 
> 
> NRCS has incentives/subsidies for ag land placed in conservation easements, 
> including for wildlife habitat. I don’t know that it would be enough for 
> them, though.
>  
> Probably going through the Seneca County Soil & Water Conservation District 
> is the way to go. I can check around a bit.
>  
> Deb
>  
>  
> From: bounce-125276871-83565...@list.cornell.edu 
>  On Behalf Of Dave Nutter
> Sent: Saturday, January 9, 2021 8:17 PM
> To: CAYUGABIRDS-L 
> Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Future of Lott Farm & Basin Upland Sandpipers?
>  
> As many of you know, the private Lott Farm, located on the NE corner of 
> NYS-414 and Martin Rd on the south border of the Town of Seneca Falls, has 
> long been the site for the August farm equipment fair called Empire Farm 
> Days. Therefore it has fortuitously been managed as an extensive grassland. 
> It is the only remaining breeding site in the Cayuga Lake Basin for Upland 
> Sandpipers (They bred between Wood Rd & Caswell Rd in Dryden years ago, 
> before a few houses went in there.) as well as a great place for many other 
> breeding grassland birds, the occasional rare Dickcissel, plus fairly regular 
> Snowy Owls in winter. Furthermore, the owner has been gracious in granting 
> access, without charging any fee, to birders who simply request permission, 
> describe their vehicle, and agree to remain on the gravel roads. 
>  
> In talking to Reuben Stoltzfus this evening I learned that we cannot take for 
> granted the situation which had simply been the result of good luck and 
> generosity. This past year, the Empire State Farm Days event did not take 
> place due to the COVID-19 pandemic. But also the event is now under new 
> management who have chosen a different site for the future. This means that 
> whatever profit and benefit which the Lott Farm gained from that event is 
> gone. And they never got any benefit except good will from us birders.  
>  
> While Reuben has not talked to the farm owner and did not know of any plans 
> for this land which had been managed as grassland, I think it’s safe to 
> assume that there is a strong incentive for the owner to find some use which 
> will pay the taxes or turn a profit, and that grassland bird habitat may not 
> be in the picture unless action is taken quickly to encourage future 
> management to allow these birds to continue, before decisions are made  - if 
> they have not been finalized already - for the plowing or construction season 
> this spring. 
>  
> Is this something about which local bird clubs would want to work with the 
> owner of Lott farm? Are there DEC programs which can reimburse landowners for 
> maintaining such habitat? Would bird clubs want to help more directly? Would 
> birders be willing to pay a small fee for the privilege of birding there or 
> to become members of some organization for the pride of knowing they are 
> helping some regionally rare birds survive where we can sometimes see them?  
>  
> These are just some ideas based on very limited information. I know there are 
> people reading this who are far better than I am at organizing, networking, 
> researching, and promoting these things. Please think about it, discuss it, 
> and help ensure that come mid-April the Upland Sandpipers have a home to 
> return to. Thanks.
> 
> - - Dave Nutter
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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Dryden Conservation Board Resolution Recommending Preservation of Dryden Lake Dam

2021-01-09 Thread Regi Teasley
I would love to see birders, as birders, taking an active role in supporting 
local environmental protection.
Regi


“The future of the world is nuts.”  Philip Rutter, founder of the American 
Chestnut Foundation


> On Jan 9, 2021, at 2:32 PM, Marie P. Read  wrote:
> 
> 
> ...or maybe I should have said “...help support financially.”
> 
> 
> Get Outlook for iOS
> From: bounce-125276647-5851...@list.cornell.edu 
>  on behalf of Marie P. Read 
> 
> Sent: Saturday, January 9, 2021 2:30:01 PM
> To: Bard Prentiss ; CAYUGABIRDS-L 
> ; NATURAL-HISTORY-L 
> 
> Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Dryden Conservation Board Resolution 
> Recommending Preservation of Dryden Lake Dam
>  
> Good news...losing Dryden Lake would be a tragedy for wildlife and humans 
> alike. If/when the expected grumbling about finding the needed funds and how 
> that would affect local taxes comes up, this should be a project that the 
> local birding community could support financially?
> 
> Marie
> 
> Get Outlook for iOS
> From: bounce-125276602-5851...@list.cornell.edu 
>  on behalf of Bard Prentiss 
> 
> Sent: Saturday, January 9, 2021 1:12:35 PM
> To: CAYUGABIRDS-L ; NATURAL-HISTORY-L 
> 
> Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Dryden Conservation Board Resolution Recommending 
> Preservation of Dryden Lake Dam
>  
>  v
> DRAFT 12/29/2020
> 
> Dryden Conservation Board Resolution Recommending Preservation of Dryden Lake 
> Dam
> 
> Whereas there has been a dam at Dryden Lake Dryden, NY since circa 1801; and
> 
> Whereas the body of water known as Dryden Lake, created by the building of 
> the dam, has provided numerous benefits to the citizens of the Town of Dryden 
> and surrounding areas for over two hundred years, with its benefits changing 
> and expanding over two plus centuries; and
> 
> Whereas the lake originally provided power for a sawmill and ice harvesting, 
> it created additional waterfowl and wildlife habitat that has made the lake 
> today a birding “hot spot” with 228 species observed, providing migratory 
> bird rest areas and nesting and foraging habitat (Canada geese, ducks, loons, 
> herons, Bald Eagles) as well as habitat for numerous mammals, amphibians, 
> turtles, etc; and
> 
> Whereas Dryden Lake and its surrounding areas provides many forms of year 
> round recreation for town and surrounding area residents, such as fishing, 
> ice fishing, hiking, jogging, dog walking, biking, cross country skiing, snow 
> shoeing (on the Jim Schug trail), kayaking, canoeing, ice skating, hunting, 
> trapping, bird watching, picnicking, etc; and
> 
> Whereas Dryden Lake and its surrounding natural areas are an important 
> educational resource, being used both for formal classes in ecology and 
> natural resources (Cornell University) and informal education of everyone 
> from young children to lifelong education participants; and
> 
> Whereas the Town of Dryden currently provides a community park at the Lake 
> under an agreement with the New York State Department of Environmental 
> Conservation; and
> 
> Whereas the Dryden Lake park is a popular location for many community events 
> with the lake being the center piece for those events; and
> 
> Whereas the lake has a rich historical and cultural value to the citizens of 
> the town; and
> 
> Whereas the NYS DEC is considering the removal of the dam and the elimination 
> of Dryden Lake in the form it has existed for over two hundred years; and
> 
> Whereas the Dryden Town Board has requested a recommendation from the 
> Conservation Board on the future of the Dryden Lake dam and ultimately Dryden 
> Lake itself.
> 
> Therefore, let it be resolved that the Town of Dryden Conservation Board 
> recommends to the Dryden Town Board that the latter take all necessary action 
> to ensure the preservation of a dam and the body of water known as Dryden 
> Lake, maintaining its current contribution to the recreational and ecological 
> benefits provided to the Dryden community. 
> 
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[cayugabirds-l] Fwd: [New post] Mojave Desert bird populations plummet due to climate change

2021-01-08 Thread Regi Teasley
Birders,
   I thought this would be of interest.
Regi


“The future of the world is nuts.”  Philip Rutter, founder of the American 
Chestnut Foundation


Begin forwarded message:

> From: The Cottonwood Post 
> Date: January 8, 2021 at 11:12:29 AM EST
> To: rltcay...@gmail.com
> Subject: [New post] Mojave Desert bird populations plummet due to climate 
> change
> Reply-To: The Cottonwood Post 
> 
> 
> 
> Respond to this post by replying above this line
> New post on The Cottonwood Post
> 
> 
> Mojave Desert bird populations plummet due to climate change
> by Stephen Carr Hampton
> Two recent papers concluded that many breeding bird species in southern 
> California and Nevada deserts have declined dramatically due to climate 
> change.
> 
> In their abstract, Iknayan and Beissinger (2018) summarized, "We evaluated 
> how desert birds have responded to climate and habitat change by resurveying 
> historic sites throughout the Mojave Desert that were originally surveyed for 
> avian diversity during the early 20th century by Joseph Grinnell and 
> colleagues. We found strong evidence of an avian community in collapse."
> 
> 
> They re-surveyed 61 sites originally surveyed by Grinnell teams in the early 
> 20th century (primarily between 1917 and 1947).
> Of 135 species assessed (which included some wintering and migrating species, 
> as well as breeding species), 39 had significantly declined; only one (Common 
> Raven) had increased. This was in stark contrast to similar assessments they 
> conducted of Sierra and Central Valley sites, where more species had 
> increased than decreased and there were no overall declines (not to say there 
> weren't winners, losers, and range shifts within those regions).
> 
> 
> Figure 1B from Iknayan and Beissinger (2018). Every study site had fewer 
> species than previously-- on average each site had lost 43% of their species.
> Detailed analyses suggested less rainfall and less access to water was the 
> primary driver. Habitat change only affected 15% of the study sites and was 
> of secondary importance. They found no evidence of expansion of species from 
> the hotter, drier Sonoran Desert (e.g. Phainopepla, Verdin, Black-throated 
> Sparrow) into the Mojave Desert.
> 
> Consistent with a community collapse, declines were greatest among species at 
> the top of food chain -- carnivores such as Prairie Falcon, American Kestrel, 
> and Turkey Vulture. Insectivores were the next most impacted, and herbivores 
> the least. But the declines affected both common and rare species, both 
> generalists and specialists.
> 
> 
> Figure 1B from Iknayan and Beissinger (2018), which I've augmented with 
> species labels from the database available in the supplementary materials. 
> Other significant losers (red dots), in order of degree of decline, included 
> Western Kingbird, Western Meadowlark, Black-chinned Sparrow, Lawrence's 
> Goldfinch, Bushtit, Ladder-backed Woodpecker, and Canyon Wren. The yellow 
> dots are newly invasive species: Chukar, Eurasian Collared-Dove, Eurasian 
> Starling, and Great-tailed Grackle.
> A follow-up study by Riddell et al (2020), also involving Iknayan and 
> Beissinger, focused on the thermoregulatory costs -- the water requirements 
> to keep cool -- for the declining species. They found that "species’ declines 
> were positively associated with climate-driven increases in water 
> requirements for evaporative cooling and exacerbated by large body size, 
> especially for species with animal-based diets." Larger species get much of 
> their water from the insects they eat. They estimated larger species would 
> have to double or triple their insect intake to meet their water needs, 
> though insect abundance is lowest July thru September.
> 
> 
> American Kestrels were among the biggest losers in the study, struggling to 
> meet their cooling needs.
> Intriguingly, they found that 22 species had actually declined in body size 
> over the last century, consistent with Bergmann's Rule, and had reduced their 
> cooling costs up to 14%. These species fared better. Current climate change, 
> however, is at least ten times more rapid than any previous warming event, 
> during which many species evolved. They estimated cooling costs have already 
> increased 19% and will reach 50% to 78% under most scenarios, far 
> outstripping any species' ability to evolve through the current rapid warming.
> 
> These results stand in stark contrast to the Pacific Northwest, where many of 
> the same bird species (e.g. Anna's Hummingbird, Turkey Vulture, Northern 
> Mockingbird) are increasing. This is consistent with projections which 
> generally show individual declines along species' southern edge and 
> expansions at the north edge of their range (see Audubon climate projection 
> maps for individual species).
> 
> Iknayan and Beissinger conclude, "Our results provide evidence that bird 
> communities in the Mojave Desert have collapsed to a new, 

[cayugabirds-l] Chipping Sparrow

2020-12-25 Thread Regi Teasley
Mid-day under our bird feeder we had a Chipping Sparrow along with out White 
Throated Sparrows.
West Hill, uphill from LACS
Regi


“The future of the world is nuts.”  Philip Rutter, founder of the American 
Chestnut Foundation


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[cayugabirds-l] Fwd: Plum Island is Off the Auction Block [Breaking News]

2020-12-22 Thread Regi Teasley
Plum Island is a great place for birding. 
Regi

“The future of the world is nuts.”  Philip Rutter, founder of the American 
Chestnut Foundation


Begin forwarded message:

> From: Audubon New York 
> Date: December 22, 2020 at 10:03:43 AM EST
> To: Regi Teasley 
> Subject: Plumb Island is Off the Auction Block [Breaking News]
> Reply-To: audubo...@audubon.org
> 
> 
> After years of YOUR advocacy, a tremendous victory… no auction for Plum 
> Island! Now the next steps can begin. Read more here.
>  
> 
> 
> Breaking News: Plum Island Saved from the Auction Block!
> Dear Regi,
> 
> Eight years have passed, and thousands of Audubon advocates across New York 
> have spoken up for birds. Today we are thrilled to share that a bill 
> preventing the unnecessary sale of Plum Island has finally passed through 
> Congress and is on its way to the President, who is expected to sign.
> 
> Located at the eastern end of Long Island Sound, Plum Island is a key 
> breeding and stopover site for thousands of birds, including at-risk and 
> priority species like the Roseate Tern and Piping Plover. Until now, this 
> ecological treasure was at risk of being lost to development.
> 
> Preventing the unnecessary sale of Plum Island has been a top priority for 
> Audubon and our members, and we are so grateful to end the year with this 
> historic victory.
> 
> This action will finally give the people of New York, and especially Long 
> Island, a say in Plum Island’s future. A path to permanent conservation is 
> finally within our sights!
> 
> We’ll continue to keep you updated, and invite you to read the full news 
> story here. Thank you again for being an incredible and impactful voice for 
> birds.
> 
> Sincerely,
> Your friends at Audubon New York
> Read More
> Piping Plover. Photo: Merri Lee Metzger/Audubon Photography Awards
> CONNECT WITH US
>   
> Audubon New York
> 2 Third Street, Suite #480, Troy, NY 12180
> (518) 869-9731 | ny.audubon.org
> 
> © 2020 National Audubon Society, Inc.
> 
> Update your email address or unsubscribe
> 
> 

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[cayugabirds-l] Brown-headed Cow Birds

2020-12-19 Thread Regi Teasley
Just now (10:30 am) we have three Brown-Headed Cow Birds on our tray feeder and 
on the ground.

Regi Teasley
West Hill in the city


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Chestnut Foundation


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[cayugabirds-l] Grackle

2020-12-03 Thread Regi Teasley
We had a Grackle just now, 3:50 pm, foraging in our back garden.  
West Hill in the city,
Regi

“The future of the world is nuts.”  Philip Rutter, founder of the American 
Chestnut Foundation


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[cayugabirds-l] [The Washington Post] Trump officials move to relax rules on killing birds

2020-12-03 Thread Regi Teasley
Fellow birders,
 Let’s assure that there will still be birds to watch.

Trump officials move to relax rules on killing birds
The Trump administration published an environmental analysis Friday finding 
that its proposal not to hold companies responsible for killing birds 
“incidentally” would not cause undue harm, clearly the way for it to finalize 
the rollback before the president’s term ends on Jan. 20.
By Juliet Eilperin and Sarah Kaplan

https://www.washingtonpost.com/climate-environment/2020/11/27/migratory-bird-treaty-act/

Download The Washington Post app.

Regi

“The future of the world is nuts.”  Philip Rutter, founder of the American 
Chestnut Foundation


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[cayugabirds-l] What to Do If You Find an Injured Animal | Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine

2020-10-13 Thread Regi Teasley
I’m posting this for the person who found the injured Raven.   Here you will 
find more information.

https://www.vet.cornell.edu/hospitals/janet-l-swanson-wildlife-hospital/what-do-if-you-find-injured-animal

Regi

“The future of the world is nuts.”  Philip Rutter, founder of the American 
Chestnut Foundation


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[cayugabirds-l] Catbird

2020-10-03 Thread Regi Teasley
At 1:40 we had a handsome Catbird taking a thorough bath in our backyard 
birdbath.
That made my day.
Regi
West Hill 
City of Ithaca


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[cayugabirds-l] Home on the Range: Grasshoppers and Insecticides on Western Rangelands | Xerces Society

2020-09-19 Thread Regi Teasley
Surely this must have an impact on birds.

https://xerces.org/blog/home-on-range-grasshoppers-and-insecticides-on-western-rangelands

Regi

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[cayugabirds-l] Birds are mysteriously dying in New Mexico in 'frightening' numbers

2020-09-13 Thread Regi Teasley
Birders,
A friend of mine in the West sent me this article about birds dying.

https://www.lcsun-news.com/story/news/2020/09/12/mass-deaths-migratory-birds-new-mexico-environment/5780282002/

Regi

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[cayugabirds-l] Shared from BBC News Birdwatching In Australia during lockdown

2020-08-07 Thread Regi Teasley
A silver lining in Australia’s Covid19 lockdown.

https://www.bbc.com/news/av/world-australia-53676061/how-lockdown-birdwatching-is-helping-australia-s-bushfire-recovery

Regi

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[cayugabirds-l] ‘Why I spent my life saving the Blakiston’s fish owl’

2020-08-04 Thread Regi Teasley
In case you missed this

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2020/aug/02/why-i-spent-my-life-saving-the-blakistons-fish-owl

Regi

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[cayugabirds-l] Downtown Boise Peregrine Encounter | Zealandia Blog

2020-07-15 Thread Regi Teasley
Folks,
   I thought this would be of interest.

https://www.zealandia.com/blog/2020/07/12/downtown-boise-peregrine-encounter/

Regi

Those who dwell among the beauties and mysteries of the earth are never alone 
or weary of life.  Rachel Carson.


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[cayugabirds-l] Fireworks and birds

2020-07-05 Thread Regi Teasley
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3199162/?referringSource=articleShare


Geez, you mean it’s not all about us?
Regi

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or weary of life.  Rachel Carson.


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[cayugabirds-l] Dover clifftops 'buzzing with wildlife' after National Trust takeover

2020-07-04 Thread Regi Teasley
Some good news.

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2020/jul/04/dover-clifftops-buzzing-with-wildlife-after-national-trust-takeover?CMP=share_btn_link

Regi

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[cayugabirds-l] ANS Testimony on Wildlife-Harming Noise | Audubon Naturalist Society

2020-06-14 Thread Regi Teasley
This concerns the use of gas-powered leaf blowers and their impact on birds.
Comments please.

https://anshome.org/2018/08/ans-testimony-on-wildlife-harming-noise/

Regi
Ithaca

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[cayugabirds-l] GCFlycatcher eating ants?

2020-05-26 Thread Regi Teasley
Our resident Great Crested Flycatcher just landed near our patio and, after 
checking out a spot by the humming bird feeder, hopped down and pecked around 
before leaving.
Do you think it was eating ants?  There are some in the vicinity.

Regi
West Hill in the city


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[cayugabirds-l] Common Yellowthroat in Ninebark

2020-05-18 Thread Regi Teasley
We were pleased to se a Common Yellowthroat working in the Ninebark bush in our 
yard.  Just one more reason to plant native plants for birds.

Regi
Cliff Park Rd, West Hill
Ithaca


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[cayugabirds-l] FOY Yellow Warbler

2020-05-01 Thread Regi Teasley
We have a female Yellow Warbler working away on the Ninebark bush in our yard.
Regi
West Hill in the City
near LACS


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[cayugabirds-l] FOY Catbird

2020-04-27 Thread Regi Teasley
Hurrah! Our favorite Catbird graced us with his presence in our yard.

Regi 
West Hill in the city


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[cayugabirds-l] Brown Thrasher

2020-04-13 Thread Regi Teasley
This morning we saw a very handsome Brown Thrasher digging in the leaves in our 
back yard.  We’re on West Hill in the city.  In case you needed another reason 
to garden for birds

Regi
Cliff Park Rd.
Ithaca


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Re: "Juvenile cowbirds sneak out at night" - RE: [cayugabirds-l] Cowbirds

2020-04-12 Thread Regi Teasley
“Young Cowbirds won’t you come out tonight? Come out tonight? Come out 
tonight
And dance by the light of the moon.” 


Those who dwell among the beauties and mysteries of the earth are never alone 
or weary of life.  Rachel Carson.


> On Apr 12, 2020, at 4:47 PM, Magnus Fiskesjo  
> wrote:
> 
> 
> Thanks! Yes Indeed it seems that in the 2015 study, cowbird youngsters 
> (*fledglings*) were *spending the night away* from their slave parents and 
> then return *not* to the *nest* but to the foster parents' location -- for 
> more slave feeding. This scenario does make more sense, yes, so it may well 
> be I misremembered about the *nest* part. The *fledglings* going out on their 
> own would also resolve, perhaps, John Confer's points of doubt about body 
> temperature. 
> 
> But note, that we are not up to date, yet -- the 2015 publication was 
> apparently superseded by new research which expanded, to discover the 
> "teenager party" as reported in Living Bird, I believe some time in 2017-2019 
> -- that is, about young cowbirds *not* sitting in the dark (which makes 
> little or no sense, to me, at least! why would they do that?), but hanging 
> out with young cowbird peers which would enable them to build cowbirdness. To 
> me it looks like this additional discovery was not yet made in 2015 -- so in 
> that study they mistakenly concluded that the young cowbird was sitting alone 
> in the dark, instead of going to his peer party. 
> 
> If I do find it again, I'll forward it. 
> 
> --If anyone on this list has a digital copy already, please post a copy. 
> 
> Many thanks again, over and out for now, 
> Magnus
> --
> Magnus Fiskesjö, PhD
> Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, Cornell University
> McGraw Hall, Room 201. Ithaca, NY 14853, USA
> E-mail: magnus.fiske...@cornell.edu, or: n...@cornell.edu
> 
> From: AB Clark [anneb.cl...@gmail.com]
> Sent: Sunday, April 12, 2020 10:14 AM
> To: Magnus Fiskesjo
> Cc: John Confer; CAYUGABIRDS-L
> Subject: Re: "Juvenile cowbirds sneak out at night" - RE: [cayugabirds-l] 
> Cowbirds
> 
> At the risk of making this a longer-than-wanted discussion, I will briefly 
> answer—and then retreat!
> 
> I just read Magnus’  report on Louder et al’s study from U Illinois and 
> downloaded the actual paper and here is the story.  No one is leaving at 3 
> am!  Or flying out of a nest as a nestling.  Too much fine grained 
> terminology is leading to misunderstandings, but it is a fascinating paper.
> 
> SO—the question that the researchers were interested in was whether actual 
> biological mothers of young cowbirds were somehow leading their own 
> fledglings away from the Host-parents territory.  The answer is NO.  But the 
> FLEDGLINGS (juveniles that have left the nest and are flying, at about 10-20 
> days old) are often leaving on their own, at dusk, to ROOST (sit in the dark) 
> away from their foster-parents territories, but still returning to those 
> territories in daytime.
> 
> The confusions come in because they put the little radios on the cowbird 
> young on about the last day when they were still in their host-nests as 
> NESTLINGS, but the observations they report were all on FLEDGLINGS, young 
> that had left their nests, never to return.  In Icterids, nestlings do not 
> leave flighted, but they can flutter and can cling and climb with strong well 
> developed legs.  From what I remember, young cowbirds develop a little faster 
> than some.  So maybe they fly as early as 5-6 days after fledging—I have to 
> check.
> 
> But it is during the later FLEDGLING stage, out of the nests and mobile, that 
> they start to disappear off foster-territory in the evening.  Sunset isn’t 
> dark, so they can still move easily;  apparently motivated by whatever gets a 
> cowbird to become a cowbird, they often left to roost alone, during the next 
> 3 weeks of still being associated with foster-parents during the day.  And 
> their non-doting cowbird mothers don’t have anything to do with it, because 
> they were also being tracked by radios and triangulating receiver towers, and 
> mom-cowbirds were not present during these movements.
> 
> Did it bring juvenile cowbirds into contact with other cowbirds?  Apparently 
> not, at that stage.  But the “go away, young man/cowbird” urge was already 
> present.
> 
> 
> So thanks, Magnus, for bringing our attention to this really interesting 
> report!  (I can send it to anyone who wants to read it!)
> 
> Anne
> 
> Anne B Clark
> 147 Hile School Rd
> Freeville, NY 13068
> 607-222-0905
> anneb.cl...@gmail.com
> 
> 
> 
> On Apr 11, 2020, at 10:02 PM, Magnus Fiskesjo 
> mailto:magnus.fiske...@cornell.edu>> wrote:
> 
> 
> Thanks. Yes it's curious and hard-to-believe and I think that's why I 
> remember so clearly reading about this in the Lab of O's Living Bird member's 
> magazine, but as I said, can't find that article online--perhaps 

Re: [cayugabirds-l] Bald eagle, Dryden Lake

2020-04-08 Thread Regi Teasley
Eveline,
I shared your question with Hilary Lambert of the Cayuga Lake Watershed 
Network which has worked long and hard to identify HABs and inform the public.  
Birders and lake protectors certainly have common interests.
She is working on your question.
Regi


Those who dwell among the beauties and mysteries of the earth are never alone 
or weary of life.  Rachel Carson.


> On Apr 8, 2020, at 2:34 PM, Eveline V. Ferretti  wrote:
> 
> 
> Just awesome—to know these may be breeding here by the Lake.  But I did end 
> up with one question on that:  Would the toxic algae blooms that appear to be 
> happening in the Lake every summer pose a risk to young (or even not so 
> young)  fish-eating birds of prey?
>  
> From: Kevin J. McGowan  
> Sent: Wednesday, April 8, 2020 12:22 PM
> To: Eveline V. Ferretti ; CAYUGABIRDS-L 
> 
> Subject: RE: Bald eagle, Dryden Lake
>  
> There is an eagle sitting on a nest at the southeastern corner of the lake. 
> It’s mate caught a very small fish right in front of me this morning.
>  
> Kevin
>  
> From: bounce-124532185-3493...@list.cornell.edu 
>  On Behalf Of Eveline V. Ferretti
> Sent: Wednesday, April 8, 2020 10:53 AM
> To: CAYUGABIRDS-L 
> Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Bald eagle, Dryden Lake
>  
> I had the great good fortune of seeing a bald eagle swoop in to land on a 
> tree right by the Dryden Lake trail yesterday evening. It’s the closest view 
> I’ve ever gotten of this regal-looking bird. He (she? I’m going with “he” as 
> he was not so very large) remained perched there for a long time—still there 
> when I passed by again 20 minutes after first seeing him--taking in the 
> evening view of the lake, where the fish were, in fact, jumping.   And where 
> quite a few common mergansers were enjoying the evening quiet too (may not 
> have been aware who was watching them).
>  
> Eveline Ferretti
> Public Programs and Communication Administrator
> Albert R. Mann Library
> Cornell University
> 237 Mann Drive
> Ithaca, NY 14853
> (607) 254-4993
> e...@cornell.edu
>  
>  
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[cayugabirds-l] No bird alert

2020-01-30 Thread Regi Teasley
Well, it’s not exactly that, but you might want to check out Audubon’s website 
to see that the Migratory Bird Treaty is under attack by—guess who!
Don’t leave the current administration wondering how you feel about this.

Regi

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[cayugabirds-l] American Tree Sparrow

2019-12-05 Thread Regi Teasley
We are lucky to have an American Tree Sparrow beneath our feeder today.  I 
glimpsed it yesterday but couldn’t be sure.  

Regi 
West Hill in the city

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[cayugabirds-l] Song Sparrow

2019-12-02 Thread Regi Teasley
We had a Song Sparrow under our bird feeders today and our 2-3 White Throated 
Sparrows remain.   There are also dozens of Goldfinches, House Finches, our 
resident Juncos, a few Chicadees and a couple of Mourning Doves.
 A pair of Carolina Wrens enjoyed the suet and the lovely Cardinals ate the 
sunflower seeds.   I saw a Cardinal sampling the frozen berries on the 
Hackberry. Not much activity from Blue Jays or Woodpeckers yet.

Regi

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[cayugabirds-l] Yellow Shafter Flicker

2019-11-21 Thread Regi Teasley
Well, it may not be rare, but the Yellow Shafted Flicker that just graced my 
back yard sure is handsome.

Regi
West Hill in the city

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Fwd: [cayugabirds-l] Wounded Mourning Dove

2019-11-09 Thread Regi Teasley
Thanks to Betsy and Donna for directing me to the Wildlife Clinic.
I’ve called them.

Thanks again,
Regi


What good is a house if you don’t have a tolerable planet to put it in?  Henry 
David Thoreau

Begin forwarded message:

> From: darlingtonbets 
> Date: November 9, 2019 at 9:59:11 AM EST
> To: Regi Teasley 
> Subject: Re:  [cayugabirds-l] Wounded Mourning Dove
> 
> 
> You could call Cornell's wildlife clinic, at 253-3060, or take it there. It's 
> on Hungerford Rd. This is a left turn off Snyder Hill Rd., quite near the 
> western end of Snyder Hill. 
> On Hungerford Rd., I think it's the first right-hand driveway. 
> Good luck!
> Betsy 
> 
> 
> 
> Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
> 
> ---- Original message 
> From: Regi Teasley 
> Date: 11/9/19 9:51 AM (GMT-05:00)
> To: cayugabirds-l 
> Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Wounded Mourning Dove
> 
> Yesterday, I pulled my dog off a Mourning Dove he was trotting around with.  
> Since he’s not much of a hunter, I suspect the bird had a close encounter 
> with a hawk.  The bird had no tail and one wing was badly hurt but otherwise 
> the bird seemed okay. 
>I didn’t want it to get eaten by the local cats so I put it in an open top 
> box in the pantry and gave it seed and water.
>   It seems to be okay this morning having eaten the seed.
> Now what do I do with it?  I doubt it will fly again but it is otherwise 
> fairly active.
> 
> I welcome suggestions.
> 
> Regi
> 
> 
> What good is a house if you don’t have a tolerable planet to put it in?  
> Henry David Thoreau
> --
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[cayugabirds-l] Wounded Mourning Dove

2019-11-09 Thread Regi Teasley
Yesterday, I pulled my dog off a Mourning Dove he was trotting around with.  
Since he’s not much of a hunter, I suspect the bird had a close encounter with 
a hawk.  The bird had no tail and one wing was badly hurt but otherwise the 
bird seemed okay. 
   I didn’t want it to get eaten by the local cats so I put it in an open top 
box in the pantry and gave it seed and water.
  It seems to be okay this morning having eaten the seed.
Now what do I do with it?  I doubt it will fly again but it is otherwise fairly 
active.

I welcome suggestions.

Regi


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David Thoreau
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Re: [cayugabirds-l] White-crowned Sparrows

2019-11-01 Thread Regi Teasley
We’ve had them here on West Hill in Ithaca as well.  What handsome birds.  One 
even started a song.

Regi


What good is a house if you don’t have a tolerable planet to put it in?  Henry 
David Thoreau

> On Nov 1, 2019, at 9:56 AM, Roadrunner  wrote:
> 
> Hi All, 
> We had two White-crowned Sparrows in our yard in Skaneateles this morning.
> 
> Diana Whiting
> 
> dianawhitingphotography.com
> 
> 
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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Angry birds (Am robins!)

2019-10-26 Thread Regi Teasley
Thank you for this information.  

Regi


What good is a house if you don’t have a tolerable planet to put it in?  Henry 
David Thoreau

> On Oct 26, 2019, at 12:53 PM, darlingtonbets  wrote:
> 
> 
> A number of years ago, I asked poisonous plant expert, John Kingsbury, about 
> pokeweed. He's a retired professor of botany from Cornell and was lecturer in 
> phytotoxicology at Cornell's Vet. College. And author of "Deadly Harvest," an 
> excellent book on poisonous plants. 
> 
> He told me that a group of medical researchers who were studying pokeweed, 
> and handling the plant, all developed leukemia-like symptoms. (I don't know 
> what happened after that. Did they recover, once they stopped handling it?)  
> 
> He recommended wearing gloves, if handling the plant. I think he said that 
> the berries were the least toxic part of the plant. 
> 
> Just because a plant is toxic to humans, of course, doesn't mean it should be 
> destroyed, just that people should be cautious in using, handling or eating 
> it.  And many plants that are toxic to humans are fine for birds and other 
> animals.  Pokeweed is a beautiful, interesting plant. Just don't eat it or 
> handle it without gloves.
> Betsy
> 
> 
> 
> 
> Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
> 
>  Original message 
> From: Maryfaith Miller 
> Date: 10/26/19 12:08 PM (GMT-05:00)
> To: anneb.cl...@gmail.com
> Cc: Regi Teasley , bluewing-gr...@googlegroups.com, 
> CAYUGABIRDS-L 
> Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Angry birds (Am robins!)
> 
> I have used pokeweed berries in my forest kindergarten class to dye wool an 
> intensely beautiful shade of purple. 5-6-7 year olds, harvested, crushed, 
> boiled over a campfire and stirred the pot full of wool roving and pokeweed 
> berries. My students love knowing which plants are deadly poisonous. I have 
> taught them a lot about mushrooms, and all of them can identify a destroying 
> angel, jack o'lanterns, etc. Knowledge is power, and children love having 
> this knowledge. They know where all the pokeweed plants are at Lime Hollow 
> and love to inform people about them.
> 
>  But this is a bird list, and the question is about bird behavior...I'd love 
> to hear about the OP's question re American Robin aggression if anyone knows 
> more about that.
> Maryfaith Decker Miller
> 
> On Sat, Oct 26, 2019 at 11:38 AM  wrote:
>> And I am living proof that eating young pokeweed is not deadly. We didn’t 
>> use 3 waters either, although drained it. 
>> But I am NOT suggesting everyone try it. Young spinach causes less panic. Or 
>> try lambs quarters. 
>> Anne 
>> Sent from my iPhone
>> 
>> On Oct 26, 2019, at 9:56 AM, Regi Teasley  wrote:
>> 
>>> I understand Pokeweed is poisonous to humans.  Your thoughts on keeping 
>>> these plants?
>>> 
>>> Regi
>>> 
>>> 
>>> What good is a house if you don’t have a tolerable planet to put it in?  
>>> Henry David Thoreau
>>> 
>>>> On Oct 26, 2019, at 9:01 AM, anneb.cl...@gmail.com wrote:
>>>> 
>>>> 
>>>> This morning I have a large number of robins all age/sexes foraging on my 
>>>> productive pokeweed berries and scratching leaves AND chasing each other 
>>>> hard and long.  More athletic long chases than I am used to associating 
>>>> with robins. 
>>>> 
>>>> They are not just chasing around the berries although I watched some head 
>>>> lowered face offs ( before a chase) on the fence near pokeweed. 
>>>> 
>>>> Anne 
>>>> Sent from my iPhone
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>> 
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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Angry birds (Am robins!)

2019-10-26 Thread Regi Teasley
I understand Pokeweed is poisonous to humans.  Your thoughts on keeping these 
plants?

Regi


What good is a house if you don’t have a tolerable planet to put it in?  Henry 
David Thoreau

> On Oct 26, 2019, at 9:01 AM, anneb.cl...@gmail.com wrote:
> 
> 
> This morning I have a large number of robins all age/sexes foraging on my 
> productive pokeweed berries and scratching leaves AND chasing each other hard 
> and long.  More athletic long chases than I am used to associating with 
> robins. 
> 
> They are not just chasing around the berries although I watched some head 
> lowered face offs ( before a chase) on the fence near pokeweed. 
> 
> Anne 
> Sent from my iPhone
> --
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[cayugabirds-l] Waxwings

2019-10-19 Thread Regi Teasley
We just had a flock of Waxwings dining on the fruit of the Washington Hawthorns 
in our yard.  These small trees are native and thus very easy to grow.  And 
“tree top” is about 20 feet so you can see the birds with no effort.  Do you 
have room for a hawthorn in your yard?

Regi


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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Niger seed

2019-10-01 Thread Regi Teasley
It’s true in my experience.  It can become moldy in rainy weather.

Regi
What good is a house if you don’t have a tolerable planet to put it in?  Henry 
David Thoreau

> On Oct 1, 2019, at 8:59 AM, Randolph Scott Little  wrote:
> 
> Goldfinch feeding preferences just might have something to do with the state 
> of niger thistle seed.
>  
> I have been informed that niger seed has very short shelf life, that it 
> should only be purchased in small quantities, and that feeders should be 
> refilled from the bottom so old seed does not accumulate.
>  
> Can anyone substantiate this?
>  
> Good birding,
> Randy
> Randolph Scott Little
> 111 Berkeley Circle
> Basking Ridge, NJ 07920
> Phone: (908)221-9173
> r...@att.net or rs...@cornell.edu
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[cayugabirds-l] 'Alarming' extinction threat to Europe's trees - BBC News

2019-09-27 Thread Regi Teasley
I thought this would be of interest.

https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-49838650


Regi
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David Thoreau
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Re: [cayugabirds-l] US population trends; time frame for bird study

2019-09-26 Thread Regi Teasley
Alicia,
   Thank you for this.  Taking the longer view is important.
Also, when I taught Environmental Sociology, we had a shorthand for 
   POPULATION IMPACT:  

**Size of country’s population x Average Resource Use= Impact on 
Environment.**

Of course you could refine this further by economic class or region of the 
country.
But the important point is that  *the extraordinary resource use (and waste) by 
the people of the wealthy nations is WAY out of proportion to our numbers*.

Regi

What good is a house if you don’t have a tolerable planet to put it in?  Henry 
David Thoreau

> On Sep 26, 2019, at 1:54 PM, Alicia  wrote:
> 
> Decrease in children per family: In the 1970's, there were an average of 2.12 
> children per family, while from 2009-2018, the number had decreased to an 
> average of 1.88 and is holding steady there - a decrease of over 11% . (For 
> more info, check here.)  The percentage of single child families doubled from 
> 11% of all families in 1975 to 22% in 2016.  At this point, the birth rate 
> alone is considerably less than replacement rate and even with the increase 
> in longevity, the only reason the US population size is increasing is 
> immigration.  (That is a factual, not a political, statement - for the 
> record, I am not against immigration!)
> 
> When did the decline in bird population begin? The effect of human population 
> size and, particularly, habitat destruction and the changing chemistry of our 
> soil, air, and water, surely have taken a huge toll on birds.  But in at 
> least aspect of the new bird population study is misleading.  Its baseline is 
> 1970, about 50 years ago, but speaking as someone who was in high school then 
> and who learned from birders who were alive at the beginning of the 20th 
> century, it is clear that at least spring migration already was had suffered 
> a significant decline by 1970.  One very reliable birder I got to know was 
> born in 1905, and he assured me that by 1980, spring migration was a shadow 
> of what it had been in the 1920s & 30s in Tompkins County.  He wondered if 
> migratory routes had changed but said for whatever reason, there were only a 
> fraction of the warblers, vireos, orioles, and tanagers moving through the 
> area in the spring that there were 50 yrs before.  (This was a man who spent 
> pretty much every waking hour of his 93 years being outdoors birding, 
> fishing, or when he was younger hunting.)  Other people who had been around 
> birding in the 1930s before told me much the same.  
> 
> If you check accounts in Birds By Bent you'll find supporting evidence for 
> this in reports made at the time.  For example, a few years ago I had 25 Palm 
> Warblers in one group.  eBird was skeptical, but later when I checked Birds 
> by Bent, there were   several accounts of palm warbler flocks, including 
> one from Wm Brewster (co-founder of the American Ornithologists' Union), 
> writing from Massachusetts in 1906, who noted casually that in spring "one 
> may often meet up with fifteen or twenty in a single flock or forty or fifty 
> in the course of a morning walk."  I don't think any of us thinks of a walk 
> that yields 50 Palm Warbler as a migration event that 'often' happens now.
> 
> So as we think about this, we need to be careful not to assume that 1970 was 
> the beginning of the end, just because few of us around today remember even 
> more plentiful birds before that.  There is plenty of evidence that this 
> started much, much earlier, and as we look for causes and solutions, that 
> needs to be kept in mind.
> 
> Alicia
> 
> 
> 
>> On 9/26/2019 11:55 AM, Deb Grantham wrote:
>> You’re right about population – nobody wants to talk about that anymore.
>>  
>> I do the same with composting but also compost ALL of my food waste. I know 
>> the crows and raccoons and possums and so on help with that, but that’s ok 
>> with me.
>>  
>> Deb
>>  
>>  
>> From: Donna Lee Scott  
>> Sent: Thursday, September 26, 2019 11:54 AM
>> To: Deb Grantham ; CAYUGABIRDS-L 
>> 
>> Subject: RE: [cayugabirds-l] How to help birds
>>  
>> Compost all you can; I save out most used paper towels and tissues and mix 
>> with my big compost pile leaves, grass, veg garbage etc.
>> Having a few small woodsy plots here, I also make “wildlife hut” piles with 
>> most my downed branches and tree/bush trimmings, rather than send it to the 
>> dump.
>> Town of Lansing on their ONE brush pickup service per year at least makes 
>> mulch out of all they pick up.
>>  
>> But the Other Big Elephant in the room is HUMAN OVERPOPULATION, which 
>> obviously is helping to cause a lot of climate change , habitat loss, rain 
>> forest destruction, etc.
>> A very complex issue for which probably only massive education world-wide 
>> will help. Look at results of China’s previous efforts at “one child per 
>> couple”…
>> Back in the 1970s there was the Zero Population Growth book and publicity. 
>> Haven’t heard much 

Re: [cayugabirds-l] How to help birds

2019-09-26 Thread Regi Teasley
One organization that DOES talk about population is the Center for Biodiversity 
in AZ.
  I am a fan.  They do good work.

Regi


What good is a house if you don’t have a tolerable planet to put it in?  Henry 
David Thoreau

> On Sep 26, 2019, at 11:53 AM, Donna Lee Scott  wrote:
> 
> Compost all you can; I save out most used paper towels and tissues and mix 
> with my big compost pile leaves, grass, veg garbage etc.
> Having a few small woodsy plots here, I also make “wildlife hut” piles with 
> most my downed branches and tree/bush trimmings, rather than send it to the 
> dump.
> Town of Lansing on their ONE brush pickup service per year at least makes 
> mulch out of all they pick up.
>  
> But the Other Big Elephant in the room is HUMAN OVERPOPULATION, which 
> obviously is helping to cause a lot of climate change , habitat loss, rain 
> forest destruction, etc.
> A very complex issue for which probably only massive education world-wide 
> will help. Look at results of China’s previous efforts at “one child per 
> couple”…
> Back in the 1970s there was the Zero Population Growth book and publicity. 
> Haven’t heard much about this lately.
>  
> Donna Scott
> Lansing
>  
> From: bounce-123960446-15001...@list.cornell.edu 
> [mailto:bounce-123960446-15001...@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Deb Grantham
> Sent: Thursday, September 26, 2019 11:42 AM
> To: CAYUGABIRDS-L 
> Subject: RE: [cayugabirds-l] How to help birds
>  
> For reducing impacts of ag, don’t waste food. A very high percentage of food 
> in the US is wasted – spoils or people won’t eat the produce with spots, etc.
>  
> Deb
>  
>  
> From: bounce-123958613-83565...@list.cornell.edu 
>  On Behalf Of Dave Nutter
> Sent: Wednesday, September 25, 2019 10:36 PM
> To: CAYUGABIRDS-L 
> Subject: [cayugabirds-l] How to help birds
>  
> The Lab of O recently released a report saying the world’s wild bird 
> population has dropped an alarming 29% in the last five decades. I also 
> received a list from the Lab of O about how we as individuals can help reduce 
> the harm to birds. Suggestions include preventing window strikes, stopping 
> cat predation, stopping pesticide use, planting native species instead of 
> lawns, reducing plastic use and recycling plastic, and not consuming 
> sun-grown coffee. I would add bananas and sugar to that list of tropical 
> plantations which destroy habitat, and suggest generally eating locally. The 
> list also talks about advocating policies in each of those areas.
>  
> 
> Anyway, the suggestions are good, and I support them. Yet I think there’s an 
> elephant in the room. An issue which was not mentioned is destroying coastal 
> habitats, mountain habitats, and arctic habitats including sea ice. It is 
> causing desertification. It is producing larger wildfires, including where 
> plants and animals are not fire-adapted. It is destroying coral reefs which 
> are nurseries for fish. It has already moved the ranges of fish and other 
> aquatic bird food by hundreds of miles or affected their populations. It 
> creates increasingly powerful storms which can devastate islands, as we have 
> seen in Puerto Rico and the Bahamas.
>  
> 
> The problem is climate change, and it is predicted to move the growing 
> conditions for plants much faster than the plants can move and regrow, thus 
> destroying habitats for birds at range-wide scales. And that’s before 
> considering all the habitat destruction caused by humans trying to adapt, 
> move, fight over resources, and create new farm land to replace the areas 
> which are no longer usable.
>  
> 
> So, I think fighting climate change should be on that list for helping birds 
> (as well as helping many other creatures, including humans). And that means, 
> among many other things, reducing our carbon footprints to limit the future 
> damage. 
> 
> What is the carbon footprint of birding, and what would reducing it mean?
> Not flying?
>  
> Using an electric car charged with renewable energy or at least a high mpg 
> car?  (And even keeping renewable energy use at a moderate level, because 
> photovoltaic & wind “farms” also displace habitat and harm birds.) 
> Limiting miles driven? 
> Car-pooling to go birding? 
>  
> Using discretion when deciding what trips to take? How many gallons of 
> gasoline should be burned by people to see a little lost bird? Putting a 
> limit on the area in which to chase rarities. Staying in a county or a basin 
> rather than trying to personally cover a state, country, continent, or 
> planet? Forego chasing rarities which have been seen before? 
>  
> More positively, how about concentrating birding on a small area and getting 
> to know its birds well: places you can walk or bike to, places that are 
> already along your daily commute. 
>  
> And for myself, I have greatly enjoyed the photographs of birds and 
> descriptions of the birds’ activities which other people have contributed to 
> their eBird reports. Rather than envy, I can 

Re: [cayugabirds-l] [nysbirds-l] Fwd: News Alert: North America has lost 29% of its birds since 1970, study finds. Experts blame habitat loss, pesticides, light pollution and cats.

2019-09-20 Thread Regi Teasley
 I agree.
  If our agricultural system were not fixated on annual row crops and mono 
cultures, I suppose bird behavior would change. 
 I hope there is research underway examining how birds interact with 
regenerative agriculture, permaculture farms and carefully managed grazing.  
   There are many examples in the area of these approaches to food production.  
Let’s find out how it affects the birds.

Regi


What good is a house if you don’t have a tolerable planet to put it in?  Henry 
David Thoreau

> On Sep 20, 2019, at 7:17 PM, John Confer  wrote:
> 
> I get particularly incensed with the rationale for killing blackbirds. It is 
> intended to reduce blackbird depredation on grain in the next fall. Killing 
> birds in winter on an area where they gather from many directions has an 
> unknown and perhaps little impact on the population eating grain next fall. 
> It is not known that the killed birds were the ones eating the grain. Killing 
> in fall is followed by spring breeding. Density dependent, a widely accepted 
> theory of ecology, argues that lowering number at the start of the breeding 
> season enhances the breeding success of those that survive (better nest sites 
> available for a higher proportion means more young per nest attempt). It is 
> not clear that killing these birds fulfills its goal.
> 
> John Confer
> From: bounce-123939949-25065...@list.cornell.edu 
>  on behalf of AB Clark 
> 
> Sent: Thursday, September 19, 2019 8:48 PM
> To: David Nicosia 
> Cc: NYSBIRDS-L-for posts posts ; Cayuga Birds 
> ; BroomeBirds 
> Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] [nysbirds-l] Fwd: News Alert: North America has 
> lost 29% of its birds since 1970, study finds. Experts blame habitat loss, 
> pesticides, light pollution and cats.
>  
> This message originated from outside the Ithaca College email system.
> 
> a. Starlings are declining in Europe also, apparently due to farming 
> practices (no grain lying around?  hedgerows?).  But if you want to look for 
> some “black bird” related explanations, check out the USDA site to see how 
> many “nuisance” birds were killed using Avitrol on big feedlots where a LOT 
> of those pesky birds eat grains….feedlots=where our breeding populations 
> gather in the winter.  The USDA takes responsibility proudly for 1-2 million 
> a year.
> 
> b. When BU puts out pelletized lawn feeder/weed killer, there are usually 
> some dead robins.  
> 
> c. The deer problem is solvable (less deer and ardent replantings) but it 
> will take many generations.  Maybe you have heard my grad student Justin 
> describe his research.  There are basically no understory nesting warblers 
> and other species in the Nature Preserve now.  For instance.  And understory 
> takes a long time and replanting to come back after decades of being eaten.
> 
> d. Data is still out, of course, but wind farms at least appear to be the 
> largest problem for larger birds…eagles, hawks, vultures. Yes, there are 
> things that can be done to make them safer—studies done and published and 
> ongoing.  Wind farms probably won’t turn out to be biggies (my thought), but 
> much of this decline happened over the previous 4 decades, not just since 
> wind farms got big. 
> 
> e. Migrants are also definitely being hit in their wintering 
> grounds….remember the Amazon fires, as an ongoing example.  I don’t want to 
> think about how many tamarin and other small mammal species we have lost 
> forever in those…but burns don’t leave lots of habitat to return to after a 
> summer up here.  Thats only one kind of habitat loss.  The Bahamas wasn’t 
> trivial.
> 
> so many many hits..
> 
>> On Sep 19, 2019, at 8:03 PM, David Nicosia  wrote:
>> 
>> 
>> 1. Why are european starlings declining?  That is crazy but concerning when 
>> a seemingly adaptable invasive specie is dying off. 
>> 2. Could it be related (in part) to West Nile Virus? 
>> https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2015/11/west-nile-virus-still-wiping-out-birds-across-north-america
>> 3. Grassland birds have been declining for decades and will continue unless 
>> farming practices are changed and more bird friendly.  In the northeast U.S, 
>> we have lost many farms and they have reverted back to woodlands. I see this 
>> in many areas of Bradford Co. PA where I grew up. I remember a lot of field 
>> birds in places that are now full of saplings 30 feet tall. 
>> 4. Rampant deer populations destroying undergrowth for many ground nesters.  
>> The DEC locally needs to find a solution here. This is manageable! 
>> 5. Pesticides and herbicides (especially the lawn treatments) which are so 
>> common. I always wonder how this affects Robins and other birds that forage 
>> on the ground. I never use this stuff on my "lawn" and it has a lot of 
>> weeds. So what.  I could care less what people think.  
>> 6. Spruce budworm population cycles in our boreal forests. This could 
>> explain decline in warblers since there was a massive outbreak of budworms 
>> in the 70s and 

Re: [cayugabirds-l] [nysbirds-l] Fwd: News Alert: North America has lost 29% of its birds since 1970, study finds. Experts blame habitat loss, pesticides, light pollution and cats.

2019-09-20 Thread Regi Teasley
Birders number in the millions.  If we became active as birders—many of us are 
involved in various activist organizations—we could make a big difference.

Regi


What good is a house if you don’t have a tolerable planet to put it in?  Henry 
David Thoreau

> On Sep 20, 2019, at 12:58 PM, Linda Orkin  wrote:
> 
> Perhaps it’s only because friends and family know me and know of my passion 
> for justice for all beings and it is that which is driving the multiple 
> forwards to me,  but it does feel that this horrible news in this blunt and 
> data driven report has  awakened many to realities we all try to avoid.  I 
> hope down to my very bones that the “despair leading to change” has good 
> staying power.  
> 
> 
> Linda Orkin  
> 
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
> 
>> "For the sake of some little mouthful of flesh we deprive a soul of the sun 
>> and the light, and of that proportion of life and time it had been born into 
>> the world to enjoy" Plutarch
>> 
>> If you permit 
>> this evil, what is the good
>> of the good of your life?
>> 
>> -Stanley Kunitz...
>> 
> 
> 
>> On Sep 20, 2019, at 6:21 AM,   wrote:
>> 
>> 
>> -
>> 
>>  Original Message 
>> 
>> Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] [nysbirds-l] Fwd: News Alert: North America 
>> has lost 29% of its birds since 1970, study finds. Experts blame habitat 
>> loss, pesticides, light pollution and cats.
>> Date:2019-09-20 10:19
>> From:k...@empacc.net
>> To:  David Nicosia 
>> 
>> Dave, the tower lighting change is not an immediate mandate but voluntary 
>> until replacement takes place. At that time the new type must be installed. 
>> All new towers are to use the new lighting. It's going to take a long time!
>> 
>> As a side note, when ABA started this drive we were able to pass a local law 
>> in the town of Hector that prohibits any structure above 200 ft AGL which is 
>> when lighting is mandatory. As it turns out we were first in the nation to 
>> do so. One tower remains in the National Forest with the old lights and is 
>> now scheduled for light replacement.
>> 
>> Of interest, one of the fall outs of public meetings required before 
>> enacting the local law was a complaint from those suffering certain seizures 
>> as strobe lights appear to be a trigger for some with that condition.
>> 
>> I agree with your other comments and would add the trend locally for dairy 
>> farms to become agribusinesses with thousands of cows. Each cow by law 
>> mandates a certain amount of acreage for manure disposal which has caused 
>> the removal of hedgerows, the deforestation of woodlots, the monocropping of 
>> fields with non-bird and prey species friendly crops and a new methods of 
>> harvest that leaves little gleaning for the bottom of the food web. Put 
>> together this is a massive hit to the avian community.
>> 
>> John
>> 
>> ---
>> John and Sue Gregoire
>> Field Ornithologists
>> Kestrel Haven Migration Observatory
>> 5373 Fitzgerald Rd
>> Burdett, NY 14818
>> 42.443508000, -76.758202000 
>> "Create and Conserve Habitat"
>> 
>> On 2019-09-20 00:03, David Nicosia wrote:
>> 
>> 
>> 1. Why are european starlings declining?  That is crazy but concerning when 
>> a seemingly adaptable invasive specie is dying off. 
>> 2. Could it be related (in part) to West Nile Virus? 
>> https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2015/11/west-nile-virus-still-wiping-out-birds-across-north-america
>> 3. Grassland birds have been declining for decades and will continue unless 
>> farming practices are changed and more bird friendly.  In the northeast U.S, 
>> we have lost many farms and they have reverted back to woodlands. I see this 
>> in many areas of Bradford Co. PA where I grew up. I remember a lot of field 
>> birds in places that are now full of saplings 30 feet tall. 
>> 4. Rampant deer populations destroying undergrowth for many ground nesters.  
>> The DEC locally needs to find a solution here. This is manageable! 
>> 5. Pesticides and herbicides (especially the lawn treatments) which are so 
>> common. I always wonder how this affects Robins and other birds that forage 
>> on the ground. I never use this stuff on my "lawn" and it has a lot of 
>> weeds. So what.  I could care less what people think.  
>> 6. Spruce budworm population cycles in our boreal forests. This could 
>> explain decline in warblers since there was a massive outbreak of budworms 
>> in the 70s and 80s. Many warbler's populations are tied to these cycles. The 
>> 1990s and 2000s there was a lull and now they are on their way up again. 
>> This could explain a more natural cycle in warbler populations independent 
>> of vireos. (this is speculation). 
>> 7. More towers and wind farms?  If a wind farm and tower are lighted 
>> properly does it kill that many songbirds at night?  The FCC has new 
>> guidelines which supposedly reduces tower kills. 
>> https://abcbirds.org/article/communication-tower-owners-change-lighting-protect-birds/
>>Not sure if this is working but 

[cayugabirds-l] Cuckoo

2019-05-23 Thread Regi Teasley
We just saw a cuckoo in our West Hill Neighborhood. We’re pretty sure it was 
the Black-billed Cuckoo.  It’s the first one we’ve seen here in the 18+ years 
we’ve lived here.

Regi
West Hill in the city 


What good is a house if you don’t have a tolerable planet to put it in?  Henry 
David Thoreau
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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn & migrant warblers

2019-05-20 Thread Regi Teasley
Hawthorns are underrated. The one the city planted in front of my home is a 
Cockspur, I think. I have planted Washingtons elsewhere on the property. Birds 
like them a,l hear round.

Regi


What good is a house if you don’t have a tolerable planet to put it in?  Henry 
David Thoreau

> On May 19, 2019, at 5:03 PM, Dave Nutter  wrote:
> 
> A couple weeks ago I came across a Hawthorn tree hosting migrant warblers. It 
> was on a residential street in downtown Ithaca a couple blocks from the 
> Dickcissel site. There were at least 8 birds in this single not-very-large 
> tree, including 4 species of warblers. It was surprising they could hide at 
> all. The other street trees on that block were different species, larger, 
> healthier, with thicker foliage, and I did not search them. I plan to ask the 
> City Forester what variety this shabby Hawthorn tree is, so I can get one! 
> EBird list below.
> 
> - - Dave Nutter
> 
>> NY:TOM:Ithaca: 2nd St #407 Hawthorn, Tompkins, New York, US
>> May 6, 2019 2:50 PM - 3:00 PM
>> Protocol: Stationary
>> Comments: Drove N on this street a couple minutes earlier while going 
>> around the block to be able to drop off a customer curbside in front of 
>> apartments on 3rd St, and I noticed a small fluttering bird in this tree. 
>> Came back with empty taxi and discovered that this ragged barely leafing out 
>> tree held several hiding foraging birds.
>> 6 species
>> 
>> Ruby-crowned Kinglet (Regulus calendula)  2 Maybe 3, foraging in 
>> Hawthorn. FOY Office.
>> Nashville Warbler (Oreothlypis ruficapilla)  2 2 foraging in Hawthorn. 
>> FOY Office.
>> Cape May Warbler (Setophaga tigrina)  1 Male foraging in Hawthorn. FOY 
>> Office.
>> Yellow Warbler (Setophaga petechia)  1 Male foraging in Hawthorn.
>> Yellow-rumped Warbler (Myrtle) (Setophaga coronata coronata)  2 Male & 
>> female foraging in Hawthorn. FOY Office.
>> Northern Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis)  1 Heard song nearby.
>> 
>> View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S55926931
> 
> 
> 
>>> On Sun, May 19, 2019 at 10:40 AM Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes 
>>>  wrote:
>>> > There is very little evidence of leafroller moth larvae (Tortricidae) 
>>> > being pervasive throughout the Hawthorn Orchard this year. Most hawthorn 
>>> > trees and leaves appear quite healthy and undamaged.
>>> > 
>>> > The significantly reduced findings of many warblers or vireos actively 
>>> > foraging in or making use of the hawthorns as a good food source, 
>>> > supports the idea and observation that the neotropical migrants are 
>>> > primarily targeting this location for the periodic abundance of food. The 
>>> > occurrence of leafroller moth larvae may be a biennial event or at least 
>>> > having some cyclical nature—hopefully the notable lack of larvae this 
>>> > year is not another example of the mass die-off of our insects.
>>> > 
> 
> --
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[cayugabirds-l] Fwd: Catbird

2019-04-22 Thread Regi Teasley
The Catbird has arrived.

Regi
West Hill 

What good is a house if you don’t have a tolerable planet to put it in?  Henry 
David Thoreau

Begin forwarded message:


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[cayugabirds-l] Catbird

2019-04-22 Thread Regi Teasley
My dear Catbird has arrived!

Regi
West Hill in the city

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[cayugabirds-l] Americans’ climate change concerns surge to record levels, poll shows | Environment | The Guardian

2019-01-22 Thread Regi Teasley
FYI 

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2019/jan/22/climate-change-concern-americans-poll


Regi
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David Thoreau
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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Redpolls, Aiken Rd. in Enfield

2019-01-09 Thread Regi Teasley
Thanks for this.  Does anyone know what they are eating?

Regi
What good is a house if you don’t have a tolerable planet to put it in?  Henry 
David Thoreau

> On Jan 9, 2019, at 4:40 PM, Rachel Lodder  wrote:
> 
> I saw them there today at 2 pm, as well - maybe 130-40? It was really 
> difficult counting them in the wind!
> They were about 1/4 mile down from the corner of Tucker and Aiken Roads, on 
> the east side of Tucker, feeding in the brush and vegetation alongside the 
> road. Very easy to see! Great!
> 
> From: bounce-123228757-81221...@list.cornell.edu 
>  on behalf of Barbara Bauer 
> Sadovnic 
> Sent: Tuesday, January 8, 2019 6:29 PM
> To: 
> Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Redpolls, Aiken Rd. in Enfield
>  
> At least 100 redpolls were at the corner of Aiken and Tucker Roads, and in 
> the weeds further up Tucker today.  I’ve seen them several times here in the 
> last few weeks, but this was the first time they let themselves be 
> photographed (badly!) and counted!
> 
> 
> https://www.dropbox.com/sh/u5m9a7m8lp2zy3a/AADn2OB5yDrEwujPpaaARrmma?dl=0
> --
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> 
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[cayugabirds-l] Fox Sparrow

2018-11-18 Thread Regi Teasley
We have a handsome Fox Sparrow under our backyard feeder.

Regi
West Hill in the City




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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Feeder birds

2018-11-13 Thread Regi Teasley
Why isn’t there much wild food?

Thanks,
Regi



Pray for the dead and fight like hell for the living.   Mother Jones

> On Nov 13, 2018, at 2:34 PM, Bard Prentiss  wrote:
> 
> Two Fridays ago Matt Young 
> stoped by for a visit. In the course of our chatting he mentioned that unlike 
> last year this’ll be a good year for feeder birds since there isn’t much wild 
> food. WOW was he right. In the last few days my feeders in Dryden village 
> have been visited by countless   Chickadees tufted tit mice. Downey and Harry 
> wood peckers small flocks of pine Siskins and. Gold finches. Several each of 
> white and red breasted nuthatches pairs of Carolina wren bousefinch and red 
> belly woodpeckers several morning doves and probably a lot more that slips my 
> mind. Some year. 
> Waiting for evening and blue grosbeaks. 
> 
> Best
> Bard 
> km
> Bard Prentiss 
> (607)882-0504
> --
> 
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[cayugabirds-l] RBNuthatch

2018-11-11 Thread Regi Teasley
We had a delightful visit from a Red Breasted Nuthatch.

Regi
West Hill in the City 


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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Bird on our feeder

2018-11-05 Thread Regi Teasley
Are its feathers fluffed out? If so, it probably is ill.  When it leaves, I 
would carefully clean the feeder.

Regi 



Pray for the dead and fight like hell for the living.   Mother Jones

> On Nov 5, 2018, at 3:15 PM, Deborah Schmidle  wrote:
> 
> Thanks, Donna. 
> 
> Shortly after taking this photo, the sparrow untucked its head, looked at me, 
> and when I looked back, it was gone.
> 
> We were actually about to fill the feeder when we spotted this visitor. They 
> go through the feed like wildfire. Need to fill it almost daily.
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
> 
>> On Nov 5, 2018, at 3:02 PM, Donna Lee Scott  wrote:
>> 
>> I have seen this every so often.
>> 
>> Bird could be ill or injured. Perhaps it hit a window and is recovering from 
>> the shock.
>> Or it might just be sleeping, although that is unusual, since they sleep at 
>> night. With these shorter days, I would think most birds spend all daylight 
>> hours getting food.
>> 
>> I guess just let it be and see what happens. It might get rested and fly 
>> away.
>> For now, best not to disturb it, in case it can get better. (altho it looks 
>> like you need to fill the feeder at some point!)
>> 
>> Donna
>> 
>> Donna L. Scott
>> 535 Lansing Station Road
>> Lansing, NY 14882
>> 607-533-7228, 607-379-1694
>> d...@cornell.edu
>> 
>> 
>> -Original Message-
>> From: bounce-123072986-15001...@list.cornell.edu 
>> [mailto:bounce-123072986-15001...@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Deborah 
>> Schmidle
>> Sent: Monday, November 05, 2018 2:32 PM
>> To: CAYUGABIRDS-L 
>> Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Bird on our feeder
>> 
>> This bird has been sitting on our feeder with its head tucked out of sight 
>> for the last 20 minutes or so. It is breathing but I’ve never seen this kind 
>> of behavior before. Has anyone seen something like this?
>> 
>> We are wondering if it is ill.
>> 
>> Thanks,
>> 
>> Deb 
>> 
>> 
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Re: [cayugabirds-l] EVENING GROSBEAKS - Ringwood Rd

2018-11-01 Thread Regi Teasley
The little group of Evening Grosbeaks continues to show up at my feeder on West 
Hill.
I feel very lucky. 

Regi

Pray for the dead and fight like hell for the living.   Mother Jones

> On Nov 1, 2018, at 10:30 AM, Marie P. Read  wrote:
> 
> Two Evening Grosbeaks (male and  female) were on my feeders briefly, and are 
> currently (10:30) feeding in the ash tree out front along with several Purple 
> Finches.
> (Folks who came yesterday - I checked the tree many times and did NOT see 
> them yesterday)
> 
> Marie
> 
> 
> Marie Read Wildlife Photography
> 452 Ringwood Road
> Freeville NY  13068 USA
> 
> Phone  607-539-6608
> e-mail   m...@cornell.edu
> 
> Website: http://www.marieread.com
> Follow me on Facebook:  
> https://www.facebook.com/Marie-Read-Wildlife-Photography-104356136271727/
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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Hummingbird this morning

2018-09-15 Thread Regi Teasley
We have had regular visitors, but no adult males.  They come to the Rose of 
Sharon, Cardinal Flower and Zinnias.

Regi

West Hill in the city.



Pray for the dead and fight like hell for the living.   Mother Jones

> On Sep 15, 2018, at 8:23 AM, Nancy Cusumano  wrote:
> 
> I thought all my hummers were gone, but I saw  one this morning, a plump 
> little female, sitting on the garden fence and sipping from the red bee balm. 
> My feeders are still up too!
> 
> Nancy Cusumano
> 
> 
> Draft Gratitude is an all volunteer organization dedicated to saving the 
> lives of draft horses that were bound for slaughter, victims of neglect or 
> abuse, or whose owners are unable to provide for their needs. Learn more at 
> Draft Gratitude
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[cayugabirds-l] Pileated Woodpeckers

2018-08-27 Thread Regi Teasley
All,
I knew it was going to be a good day when I saw one, two, three! Pileated 
Woodpeckers fly across the back yard.  A Pileated Family?


Regi
Pray for the dead and fight like hell for the living.   Mother Jones
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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Brown Thrasher trapped in garage

2018-06-19 Thread Regi Teasley
Maybe just leave the garage open and give it space?

Regi

Pray for the dead and fight like hell for the living.   Mother Jones


> On Jun 19, 2018, at 8:32 PM, Melanie Uhlir  wrote:
> 
> I was thrilled to see a Brown Thrasher in our yard, until one went into the 
> garage and didn't come out! Fledgling, maybe? There is a second, very 
> concerned, Brown Thrasher calling anxiously. This second bird has some kind 
> of larva in its mouth.
> 
> Anyone know the best way to coax a bird out of the upper part of a garage?!?!
> 
> Anxiously awaiting advice!
> 
> Melanie
> 
> Freeville
> 
> 
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Re: [cayugabirds-l] downed tagged crow

2018-06-02 Thread Regi Teasley
I don’t have his contact information but Jay McGowan is the crow expert.
The Lab of Ornithology should have the info.

Regi

One touch of nature makes the whole world kin.  
Wm. Shakespeare


> On Jun 2, 2018, at 1:10 PM, Erica Jessup  wrote:
> 
> Thanks everyone, Prof Clark on the way!
>  
> From: bounce-122613570-3494...@list.cornell.edu 
>  On Behalf Of Erica Jessup
> Sent: Saturday, June 2, 2018 12:46 PM
> To: CAYUGABIRDS-L 
> Subject: [cayugabirds-l] downed tagged crow
>  
> Just discovered a crow on the ground in obvious distress white right wing tag 
> GE, can’t read left tag.  1442 Hanshaw Rd, Ithaca not sure who needs to know 
> but assured this list will.
>  
>  
> Can call me too at 607 227 6827,
>  
>  
> Thanks,
> Erica
>  
>  
> --
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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Juncos

2018-05-18 Thread Regi Teasley
And if you do keep your cat indoors, consider a “catio” as a compromise.

Regi

One touch of nature makes the whole world kin.  
Wm. Shakespeare


> On May 18, 2018, at 8:11 PM, Marie P. Read  wrote:
> 
> Hi Jim,
> 
> It would not be legal to move it, and not likely to work anyway.
> You might try putting a chicken wire fence around the nest—several feet in 
> diameter so the adults can come and go easily. Hopefully when the young 
> fledge they will go up into the bush and not onto the ground. But at that 
> point you should keep your eye on the nest/the fledglings in case any 
> rescuing is needed.
> And you might consider keeping your cat indoors near fledging time.
> Some people also use cat bibs on their cats. They are not 100% effective by 
> any means, but the theory is that they interfere with the cat's pounce and 
> therefore slow them down. Cats generally quickly get used to having to wear 
> one.
> 
> Finally, please consider keeping your cat indoors. I have had outdoor cats in 
> the past, but having seen the havoc they wreak first hand, I was determined 
> that my most recent one would be indoors only. He is happy and healthy, and 
> my backyard birds are now safe.
> 
> Marie
> 
> Marie Read Wildlife Photography
> 452 Ringwood Road
> Freeville NY  13068 USA
> 
> Phone  607-539-6608
> e-mail   m...@cornell.edu
> 
> Website: http://www.marieread.com
> Follow me on Facebook:  
> https://www.facebook.com/Marie-Read-Wildlife-Photography-104356136271727/
> 
> From: bounce-122582573-5851...@list.cornell.edu 
> [bounce-122582573-5851...@list.cornell.edu] on behalf of Jgaffne2 
> [jgaff...@gmail.com]
> Sent: Friday, May 18, 2018 6:55 PM
> To: CAYUGABIRDS-L
> Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Juncos
> 
> In our perennial garden there is a junco nest with at least 3 eggs in the 
> leaves at the base of a bush. Our cat has not found it yet but when they 
> hatch I am afraid they are goners. I have relocated a junco ground nest to a 
> platform near by before and they were abandoned. There is a small tree nest 
> to their home. Should I 1) leave it alone 2) try to protect it better without 
> moving it 3) put it in the low branches of the adjacent tree 4)any other 
> thoughts other than removing our cat
> Thanks for any advise
> Jim Gaffney
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Why I'm Voting NO on the ICSD Budget: Urgent Need for Climate Focus

2018-05-07 Thread Regi Teasley
Thanks, Sandy. Business-as-usual is bringing us to the precipice. Now is the 
time to speak and act.

Regi

One touch of nature makes the whole world kin.  
Wm. Shakespeare


> On May 6, 2018, at 7:57 PM, Sandy Wold  wrote:
> 
> I am sharing my thoughts in communities I am a part of because
> ​1.  Our planet is in crisis and quickly approaching 2020; and we are at 1.5 
> degrees Celsius.  We can't go to 2.0 Celsius, or the planet will be unlivable 
> by 2050.  We need to mitigate both CO2 and CH4!  Eating less meat and more 
> veggies = cooler planet. Divest from natural gas.  Eat less rice.  ...go 
> solar!
> 2. ​ ​Greenhouse gas mitigation has everything to do with bird​ conservation​ 
> ​3.  ​Many of the birders are​ tax paying​ parents who want their children to 
> enjoy the birds we all love!  
> ​4.  ​Marshland birds are threatened because of rising tides.  Seabirds are 
> further threatened because fish they need to feed their young are going 
> deeper or farther north to seek cooler waters.
> 5.  Endemic birds in the Caribbean are threatened by decreasing habitat due 
> to people, and bigger hurricanes make this problem worse than it already is. 
> ​
> ​Please, everyone who cares about the planet, don't get annoyed that I am 
> "off topic."  Instead, step into your power and write a letter to the school 
> board to support my letter and to city council to not sell off the Green 
> Street parking garage to another luxury apartment developer ASAPthese 
> issues are all connected!!!  We need green affordable housing to address the 
> poverty and reduce Carbon emissions.
> 
> 
> ---
> CLIMATE CHANGE ACTION YOU CAN TAKE: Divesting from animal agriculture by 
> switching to a plant-based diet can help our planet transform.  A vegan diet 
> is heart-healthy, non-violent, anti-colonial, and sustainable! Pledge the 
> Ithaca 10 or 30-day (Plant-based) Vegan Challenge!
> www.facebook.com/groups/IthacaVeganChallenge/
> Instagram #VeganPlanet2020
> ---
> Sandy Wold, sustainability educator/artist 
> B.S. Chemistry/Biochemistry, University of Florida
> M.S. Science Education​, UC Santa Cruz/SUNY Cortland
> https://www.linkedin.com/in/sandy-wold-877114a7/
> https://sandy-wold.squarespace.com/ 
> 
>> On Sun, May 6, 2018 at 7:31 PM, Alyce Anderson  
>> wrote:
>> Why is this on the ebird list? It has nothing to do with birds. This is the 
>> most inappropriate item to appear on our list in all of my years of being on 
>> the list. Shame on you for using it.
>> 
>> Alyce Anderson
>> 
> 
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[cayugabirds-l] Pine Warbler at suet

2018-04-19 Thread Regi Teasley
We had a Pine warbler at our suet feeder this afternoon.

West Hill in the city
Regi 

One touch of nature makes the whole world kin.  
Wm. Shakespeare


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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Song id

2018-04-04 Thread Regi Teasley
The Carolina Wren can make a similar sound.

Regi

One touch of nature makes the whole world kin.  
Wm. Shakespeare


> On Apr 4, 2018, at 8:17 AM, Brad Walker  wrote:
> 
> Is it a Tufted Titmouse? https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/31065671
> 
>> On Wed, Apr 4, 2018 at 8:02 AM Mo Barger Rooster Hill Farm 
>>  wrote:
>> What early bird sounds similar to an lovebird (teacher teacher) but with a 
>> clear and loud voice? Calls in 3s. I have a bad recording I can share.
>> --
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> -- 
> Brad Walker
> Multimedia Collections Specialist
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[cayugabirds-l] Waxwings in Hawthorns

2018-04-03 Thread Regi Teasley
Need another reason to plant hawthorn trees? I just had a flock of beautiful 
Waxwings eating the haws in my Hawthorns.  
 West Hill in the city.

Regi

One touch of nature makes the whole world kin.  
Wm. Shakespeare


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[cayugabirds-l] Upcoming EMC event re: natural areas, March 15, 5:00-7:00 Borg Warner Rm.

2018-03-09 Thread Regi Teasley
FYI. 
> 
> Update ’18 Tompkins County EMC: Preserving Our Unique Natural Areas in a 
> Changing Climate
>  
> When: Thursday, March 15, 5:00-7:00pm
>  
> Where:  Borg Warner Room, Tompkins County Public Library
>101 E. Green Street, Ithaca, NY 14850
>  
> Join the Environmental Management Council and friends for an evening 
> discussion on preserving our community’s Unique Natural Areas in a time of 
> climate change. EMC members will also give annual update on the group’s 
> activities; light refreshments to follow. This event is free and open to the 
> public.
>  
> Scheduled Guest Speakers:  
>  
> A UNA Journey at Malloryville Bog – Bob Beck
> Bob Beck was raised on a dairy farm in Dryden and studied at Cornell with a 
> focus on evolutionary and field biology. Bob was a curator at the Cornell Lab 
> of Ornithology’s Library of Natural Sounds and served as a founding board 
> member and the first executive director of the Finger Lakes Land Trust. Bob 
> has served for many years on local environmental advisory boards, including 
> the Town of Dryden's Conservation Board and the Tompkins County Environmental 
> Management Council, where he helped develop the County’s Inventory of Unique 
> Natural Areas (UNAs). Currently, he is chair of the Town of Dryden’s Rail 
> Trail Task Force. After a short talk on his UNA journey as a conservationist, 
> homeowner, and land steward at the O.D. von Engeln Preserve at Malloryville, 
> Bob will delve further into his experiences in helping produce the UNA 
> inventory.
>  
> Wetlands Mapping in Tompkins County – Nick Hollingshead
> Nick Hollingshead specializes in geospatial applications for environmental 
> research, conservation planning, and natural resources monitoring. In 2013, 
> Nick began working with the Cayuga Lake Watershed Network to create a new 
> wetland map for Tompkins County using the latest remote sensing data and 
> geospatial technologies. The goal was to develop a more accurate and complete 
> wetland map to support local municipalities in their efforts to improve 
> wetland protections. The map, completed in 2015, can also serve as a baseline 
> for understanding how Tompkins County’s wetlands, and the ecological services 
> they provide in terms of water quality protection and ecological values, may 
> change in response to climate change and other factors in the coming years.
>  
> Invasive species, why are we concerned? – Robert Wesley
> Robert Wesley is an enthusiastic naturalist, conservationist, and educator. 
> Staff Botanist at the Cornell Botanic Gardens, he was for many years a 
> lecturer in the Department of Natural Resources, where he co-taught wetland 
> ecology and management. In addition, Robert has consulted on biological 
> conservation, vegetation management, and invasive species management for many 
> local, regional, and national groups, including the Tompkins County Planning 
> and Sustainability Department, the City and Town of Ithaca, Finger Lakes Land 
> Trust, and the U.S. Forest Service. He also enjoys environmental photography. 
> Robert will outline how invasive species affect our important natural areas, 
> including the Tompkins County UNAs, particularly as our climate changes.
>  
>  
>  

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[cayugabirds-l] Am. Tree Sparrow

2018-03-02 Thread Regi Teasley
We had an American Tree Sparrow under the feeder this morning.

Regi
West Hill in the City.

One touch of nature makes the whole world kin.  
Wm. Shakespeare


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Re: [cayugabirds-l] heated bird baths

2018-01-15 Thread Regi Teasley
Carol,
There are many different kinds, for example Duncraft catalog has several.  

   Or you can go to Agway and get a heater, an appropriate extension cord, a 
large clay pot bottom, add a couple of rocks and water and voila!   
   The water should be deep enough to cover the heater by a couple of inches. 
You'll find you need to freshen the water daily.
 It's a good idea.  I have two and the birds use them frequently.  I think 
that's what brings in the Bluebirds.
 I'm sure you know there should be cover nearby.

Regi

One touch of nature makes the whole world kin.  
Wm. Shakespeare


> On Jan 15, 2018, at 10:49 AM, Carol Cedarholm  wrote:
> 
> Hello all,
> I am thinking about setting up a heated bird bath on my deck.  Does anyone 
> have recommendations about kinds and how to set it up?
> Thanks,
> Carol Cedarholm
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[cayugabirds-l] RW Blackbird

2018-01-04 Thread Regi Teasley
We had a Red winged Blackbird under the feeder this morning.
West Hill in the City.

Regi

One touch of nature makes the whole world kin.  
Wm. Shakespeare


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Re: [cayugabirds-l] They're back!

2017-12-18 Thread Regi Teasley
Well, we have lots of Goldfinches and House Finches. 
Plus the usual suspects: Titmice, Nuthatches, Chickadees and woodpeckers (R-B, 
D, H) and M-doves, DE juncos. 
 The local Carolina wren continues to eat suet from the feeder.
We had a Bluebird drinking at the birdbath on one of those very cold days.
Also, we've had visits from a Cooper's Hawk and a Redtail.

West Hill in the city

Regi

One touch of nature makes the whole world kin.  
Wm. Shakespeare


> On Dec 18, 2017, at 12:32 PM, Laura J. Heisey  wrote:
> 
> I’m seeing quite a lot of activity at my feeders in Newfield, but fewer 
> American Goldfinches for some reason. Over 20 Mourning Doves, lots of House 
> Finches, DE Juncos, Northern Cardinals, Blue Jays, Chickadees and Tufted 
> Titmouse, several Downy, Hairy, and Red-bellied woodpeckers, 2 Pileated 
> woodpeckers, one American Tree Sparrow and 2 White-throated Sparrows (my 
> favorite). I also hear an Eastern Screech Owl once a week or so.
>  
> Laura
> Newfield
>  
> From: bounce-122138947-68441...@list.cornell.edu 
> [mailto:bounce-122138947-68441...@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Donna Lee 
> Scott
> Sent: Monday, December 18, 2017 9:15 AM
> To: CAYUGABIRDS-L 
> Subject: [cayugabirds-l] They're back!
>  
> Recent snowy spell his brought back many of my usual feeder birds. 
> 10 morning doves, 20 Gold finches, 3 titmouse, pair each of woodpeckers: 
> downy, hairy, red bellied; 2 - 3 White breasted nut hatch, a Starling, 7 DE 
> junco, 1 House finch, 12 House sparrow, ~4 Blue Jay, intermittent small 
> flocks Cedar waxwing, 2 Carolina Wren, 6 Northern cardinal. 
>  
> On Cayuga Lake yesterday lots CA Geese, 8 Red breasted merganser, 2 
> bufflehead. 
> 
> Donna Scott
> Lansing
> Sent from my iPhone
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[cayugabirds-l] Earth's sixth mass extinction event under way, scientists warn | Environment | The Guardian

2017-07-11 Thread Regi Teasley
On our watch

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2017/jul/10/earths-sixth-mass-extinction-event-already-underway-scientists-warn


Regi
"Love the animals, love the plants, love everything. If you love everything, 
you will perceive the divine mystery in things."  Dostoyevsky.


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Re: No birds - Re: [cayugabirds-l] Tree swallow

2017-06-17 Thread Regi Teasley
I have always felt that birders, from casual to die-hard, number in the 
millions and comprise a  group of potentially influential activists. 
 I would love to see an organization, or even discussion thread dedicated to 
furthering the convergence of birding and environmental activism.  While I know 
many birders are environmentalists, the groups have been relatively separate.  
Linking these would be powerful and creative!

IMHO We are all in a heap of trouble and we are running out of time to save our 
biosphere.

Meanwhile, hats off to those who are engaged in restoration and/or creating 
birding habitat.

BTW I study people, not birds.  ‍‍
Regi

"Love the animals, love the plants, love everything. If you love everything, 
you will perceive the divine mystery in things."  Dostoyevsky.


> On Jun 17, 2017, at 11:20 AM, Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes 
>  wrote:
> 
> Oh, yeah. I forgot about Ruby-throated Hummingbirds. I remember when we used 
> to have them in the Northeast. They used to be a really common and cheerful 
> species of the summer. People used to put out these feeders filled with 
> sugar-water to attract them to their house for viewing pleasure. They were 
> these super tiny birds, about the size of a very large bee, and used to hover 
> from flower to flower feeding on nectar, and would glean insects from spider 
> webs from under the eaves of our house.
> 
> I’m obviously being facetious, but I’m greatly concerned that we are now 
> beginning to visibly see the effects of the greatest environmental 
> catastrophe since the fifth mass extinction – and this one being entirely 
> caused by human activity. Are we seeing the death of the canaries in the coal 
> mine? Is this finally becoming more visible and working it’s way up the food 
> chain? I haven’t seen a single fly-by Ruby-throated Hummingbird or heard any 
> chittery territorial calls from them this season.
> 
> Past few summers, insect numbers have been WAY down. Remember those longer 
> road trips across country, or just after a road trip for a few hours? My 
> windshield would get smattered solid with insect splatter – not so much any 
> more.
> 
> I’m concerned that we are all becoming complacent with these changes, and 
> accepting them as the “new norm”. This isn’t normal, this is a huge red flag, 
> and something should be done about it – the question is: what?
> 
> Party-pooper,
> Chris
> 
> 
> 
> On Jun 17, 2017, at 10:54 AM, Alicia Plotkin  wrote:
> 
> Thank you for sending this - it is exactly my experience & my concern.  I 
> don't worry quite so much about migration, which can skip over us easily due 
> to weather patterns.  In fact there was an odd weather pattern in late April 
> that seemed to sling a lot of 'my' warblers up to the coast of Maine where 
> the fallout was welcomed with delight and surprise. 
> 
> However the lack of nesters anywhere but prime habitat is far more worrisome, 
> especially without any readily identifiable weather event to explain it.  
> It's deeply concerning and I have wondered why no one is talking about it.  
> Thank you for bringing it up!
> 
> Alicia
> 
> P.S.  You left off hummingbirds, which are non-existent or in very low 
> numbers for everyone I know, both folks with feeders and people like me whose 
> plantings are tailored to their tastes.  I have not seen a single one in my 
> yard yet.  This is hard to believe, our habitat is pretty prime: we live in a 
> large clearing in the woods that is filled with wildflowers, additional 
> hummingbird-favored plants we have added, plenty of water, trees with perfect 
> forks for their nests (based on their past preference), and a neighbor who 
> puts fresh nectar in her feeder every day.
> 
>> On 6/17/2017 9:52 AM, Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes wrote:
>> Everyone, 
>> 
>> Just pointing out the obvious here, but bird numbers in my immediate area of 
>> Upstate NY are way down this year. I mean, WAY down. John, if you have full 
>> capacity of nesting Tree Swallows, it may be that the sites you host are 
>> prime and being filled to capacity because they are the best locations. It 
>> sounds to me like the sub-par sites are not being filled.
>> 
>> Acoustically, birds are seriously lacking this year. Visually, birds are 
>> lacking this year. Birding at the Hawthorn Orchard was a disaster, yet there 
>> was food and everything was primed to receive birds. Regular numbers of 
>> expected birds were hugely lacking. What happened to the Tennessee Warblers 
>> and Blackpoll Warblers? I think I recorded something like three Tennessee 
>> Warblers at most on one day at the Hawthorn Orchard, then they were just 
>> done. Blackpoll Warblers…you were lucky to see or hear a single bird this 
>> spring. Blackpoll Warblers used to come through here in droves – just 
>> driving around, you would pass singing Blackpoll Warbler after Blackpoll 
>> Warbler, during their peak migration through this area. 

[cayugabirds-l] Wood Pewee

2017-05-17 Thread Regi Teasley
Heard a Pewee up on West Hill in the city.
Welcome!

Regi
"Love the animals, love the plants, love everything. If you love everything, 
you will perceive the divine mystery in things."  Dostoyevsky.


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[cayugabirds-l] Nearly 400 migratory birds die from striking Texas skyscraper | Reuters

2017-05-07 Thread Regi Teasley
And has anyone learned anything from this?  What is "freakish" about this, the 
building manager's ignorance?  

http://www.reuters.com/article/us-texas-birds-idUSKBN18203M

Regi

"Love the animals, love the plants, love everything. If you love everything, 
you will perceive the divine mystery in things."  Dostoyevsky.


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[cayugabirds-l] Great Crested Flycatcher?

2017-04-30 Thread Regi Teasley
I would be willing to wager that I just heard the Great Crested Flycatcher's 
"Pett!" our West Hill neighborhood.  

Regi

"Love the animals, love the plants, love everything. If you love everything, 
you will perceive the divine mystery in things."  Dostoyevsky.


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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Hermit Thrush

2017-04-30 Thread Regi Teasley
Ha ha.  Weren't you lucky!
Well, we used to have an Oven Bird that moved through checking out our wood 
chip path where it found things to eat.  If we all leave leaf litter around the 
edges of our properties they will find it worth their while to stop by.

Regi
West Hill in the city 

"Love the animals, love the plants, love everything. If you love everything, 
you will perceive the divine mystery in things."  Dostoyevsky.


> On Apr 29, 2017, at 12:40 PM, W. Larry Hymes  wrote:
> 
> As I just happened to look out our kitchen window, I was very surprised to 
> see a thrush, which turned out to be a HERMIT THRUSH.  It walked along our 
> fence line for a minute or so before disappearing.  We live in a residential 
> neighborhood.  The bird had a bewildered look on it face, as if saying to 
> itself, "Where am I? How did I get here? This doesn't look anything like what 
> I expected."  Presumably it will find a much more suitable habitat before 
> long!
> 
> Larry
> 
> -- 
> 
> 
> W. Larry Hymes
> 120 Vine Street, Ithaca, NY 14850
> (H) 607-277-0759, w...@cornell.edu
> 
> 
> 
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[cayugabirds-l] Gnatcatcher, Yellow at Swan Pen

2017-04-29 Thread Regi Teasley
Today around 3:30 we were birding at the Swan Pen and saw the following:

Blue-Gray Gnatcatcher, Yellow warbler, small flocks of Palm warblers and 
Yellow-Rumped warblers and. Spotted Sandpiper

Regi
"Love the animals, love the plants, love everything. If you love everything, 
you will perceive the divine mystery in things."  Dostoyevsky.


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[cayugabirds-l] Climate Change: Vital Signs of the Planet: U.S. desert songbirds at risk in a warming climate

2017-04-03 Thread Regi Teasley
FYI

https://climate.nasa.gov/news/2559/us-desert-songbirds-at-risk-in-a-warming-climate/


Regi
"Love the animals, love the plants, love everything. If you love everything, 
you will perceive the divine mystery in things."  Dostoyevsky.


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[cayugabirds-l] Hawthorns, Robins and Waxwings

2017-02-10 Thread Regi Teasley
Hi Folks,
 Do you need a reason to plant Hawthorn trees--apart from the fact that 
they grow fast and Woolly Mammoths won't eat them?
Today we've had a flock of Robins accompanied by a few Waxwings dining on 
the "haws"  or berries.  It makes this winter day much more pleasant.

Regi
"Love the animals, love the plants, love everything. If you love everything, 
you will perceive the divine mystery in things."  Dostoyevsky.


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[cayugabirds-l] Fox Sparrow

2016-11-21 Thread Regi Teasley
We had a Fox Sparrow eating millet seed near bushes in our yard this snowy 
morning.
We're up on West Hill in the city and we garden for birds and other wildlife.  

Regi
"Love the animals, love the plants, love everything. If you love everything, 
you will perceive the divine mystery in things."  Dostoyevsky.


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[cayugabirds-l] Juvenile Goshawk?

2016-10-31 Thread Regi Teasley
We think we just saw a juvenile Goshawk at the Plantations, sitting on top of 
the corn stalks between the horse barns and the garden that has plants of the 
world.  Saw it around 3. 


"Love the animals, love the plants, love everything. If you love everything, 
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[cayugabirds-l] Juvenile RBG

2016-09-09 Thread Regi Teasley
Not a rarity but a welcome visitor to our tray feeder: a juvenile male Rose 
Breasted Grosbeak.
West Hill.

Regi
"Love the animals, love the plants, love everything. If you love everything, 
you will perceive the divine mystery in things."  Dostoyevsky.


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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Red Headed Woodpecker Question

2016-08-05 Thread Regi Teasley
We have seen Downy Woodpeckers eating something on Mullen flower heads/stalks. 
Is this a typical behavior?

Regi
"Love the animals, love the plants, love everything. If you love everything, 
you will perceive the divine mystery in things."  Dostoyevsky.


> On Aug 5, 2016, at 4:59 PM, Sue Barth  wrote:
> 
> Hi Carol, those actually look more like Red-Osier Dogwood berries in its 
> mouth to me.  I was surprised to see a pair of Eastern Kingbirds, another 
> insectivore, eating berries yesterday morning - so maybe these birds are 
> supplementing their diets with berries.  Maybe it's a seasonal behavior or 
> maybe, because it's been so dry, it's another way to obtain fluids?
> 
> ~ Sue
> 
> Sent from my iPad
> 
>> On Aug 5, 2016, at 4:31 PM, Carol Keeler  wrote:
>> 
>> I have an image of this year's Red Headed Woodpecker.  It's not great but 
>> you can see what you need to for this question.   Do they eat eggs of other 
>> birds?  Are those eggs or fecal sacs?  I watched it up in a tree and then it 
>> dove into some bushes.  It came up on the dead tree with what you see in its 
>> mouth.  I think it robbed eggs from another bird's nest, but I'm not sure.  
>> I don't think it was around its own nest hole to remove fecal sacs. It had 
>> been in a green tree, not a dead one.   Any ideas?  It was the only time I 
>> was able to find the bird this year.  
>> 
>> http://www.pbase.com/carol_keeler_photo/image/163815697
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Re: [cayugabirds-l] blessedly quiet morning...

2016-07-31 Thread Regi Teasley
Right.  A lawnmower-free future lies ahead.  Gardens, groves and meadows will 
replace them.  Let's hope it's sooner rather than later.  Why not create more 
bird, butterfly and general critter habitat?  So heartening to hear the sounds 
of the natural world.

Regi
"Love the animals, love the plants, love everything. If you love everything, 
you will perceive the divine mystery in things."  Dostoyevsky.


> On Jul 31, 2016, at 10:42 AM, marsha kardon  wrote:
> 
> The drought is terrible in most ways but there is one thing I appreciate 
> about it.  I can eat dinner on my screened porch, or walk around in my garden 
> without hearing lawn mowers!  My neighborhood has many HUGE lawns and most 
> summers it is unusual to be outside without hearing at least one, often more. 
>   The quietness is wonderful!
> 
>> On Sun, Jul 31, 2016 at 10:30 AM, Donna Lee Scott  wrote:
>> …on rural Lansing Station Rd by Cayuga Lake. Mostly nature sounds and no 
>> lake-enhanced human voices, lawn mowers or motor boats, as I enjoy my coffee 
>> on the screened part of the back deck that is surrounded by huge oak 
>> branches! It is truly a tree house.
>> 
>>  
>> 
>> The local Common Loon uttered its haunting cry a couple times right here at 
>> #535; yesterday it was up north by Milliken Point.
>> 
>> A male Rose Breasted Grosbeak had a standoff with a Blue Jay on the perch of 
>> my squirrel-proof sunflower feeder and won.
>> 
>>  
>> 
>> A mother BC Chickadee finally seems to have taught its juvenile how to get 
>> seeds from this feeder on the open part of my deck. Yesterday I saw her 
>> laboriously peck open a seed and feed the contents to the baby, who then 
>> turned around and seemed to get its own seed. The A. Goldfinch gang is on 
>> the Nyjer seed feeder as usual, and the Mo Does are cooing on the platform 
>> feeder in the yard, often joined by C. Grackles.
>> 
>>  
>> 
>> The Downy Woodpecker is pecking the wooden trim on my house (sigh) between 
>> getting seeds. Its relatives, the Red Bellied and the Hairy fly in now and 
>> then. The Tufted Titmouse family zooms in too and the Carolina Wren is 
>> calling nearby. Somebody flew out from my front porch ceiling bird nest 
>> basket area when I went out there earlier – a late nest?
>> 
>>  
>> 
>> The quiet continues at 10:20, a nice interlude in the usual noisy hum of 
>> human motors and activities.
>> 
>>  
>> 
>>  
>> 
>> Donna L. Scott
>> 
>> 535 Lansing Station Road
>> 
>> Lansing
>> 
>>  
>> 
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