[cayugabirds-l] Northern mockingbird nesting on East Hill Way

2020-07-07 Thread Sandra Lynn Babcock
Every time I run on East Hill Way, I've been really delighted to hear a 
northern mockingbird going through its amazing repertoire of songs.  I've heard 
him singing since April, so he must be nesting.  He seems to hang out on East 
Hill Way just as it meets Maple Ave, near the horse pasture.

Best,
Sandra Babcock


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[cayugabirds-l] Howland Island report

2020-05-23 Thread Sandra Lynn Babcock
With the helpful guidance of many of you who responded to my query, I was able 
to bird Howland Island on Thursday, after a stop to see the prothonotary 
warbler at Armitage Road (a lifer! Yay!).  I did not see the same numbers of 
warblers that had been reported a few days earlier (no Cape Mays, for example), 
but saw many exciting birds, including 3 ceruleans (and heard at least seven 
others that I couldn’t spot), 1 blackburnian, 1 magnolia, dozens of redstarts 
and yellow warblers, warbling (2), yellow-throated (1) and red-eyed (1) vireos, 
Baltimore orioles (3), rose-breasted grosbeaks (2), tree swallows (4), eastern 
bluebird (1), indigo bunting (1), and great crested flycatcher (2).

A few instructions for those who haven’t been to the area and are interested in 
seeing ceruleans, in particular.  I parked by the Howland Island Road bridge, 
then walked over and took the first path/road on the right.  This path leads 
first to Lost Pond, where I heard the first two ceruleans.  I kept going, 
always staying to the right (per the instructions in “Birding the Cayuga Lake 
Basin”).  I spotted the first cerulean with the help of Katherine Graham and 
Kathleen Sheffield (?), high up in the treetops.  Most of the ceruleans seemed 
to be quite high up, and it was often difficult to spot them.  They move around 
a lot, often from tree to tree, even more so than other warblers, it seemed.  
Keep looking up and listening for their song. I finally got my best view up by 
wood duck lake, when one of the ceruleans flew to a tree right over the path.

The guidebook indicates that you will eventually see a sign for “Wood Duck 
Way,” at which you should turn left.  I missed the sign, and am not sure if 
it’s still there.  I used google maps to check my location, and ended up doing 
a slightly longer loop by heading up toward Cook Lake, then made a left on the 
grassy track heading south toward the Howland Island bridge. This is a more 
open path, where I saw the bluebird and nesting tree sparrows (these are also 
in full view by the Howland Island bridge).  By that time it was close to 
mid-day, and i didn’t hear any ceruleans on this stretch.

Thank you to everyone who provided helpful advice!

Best,
Sandra

Sandra Babcock
slb...@cornell.edu

Sent from my Ipad

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[cayugabirds-l] Prothonotary

2020-05-21 Thread Sandra Lynn Babcock
Hi all, 

I’m hoping someone can tell me where to locate the prothonotary nest box.  I am 
on Armitage road just past the iron bridge.  Thanks in advance for your help!

Best,
Sandra

Sandra Babcock 

Sent from my I-phone   
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[cayugabirds-l] Howland Island question

2020-05-20 Thread Sandra Lynn Babcock
I’m contemplating a trip to Howland Island tomorrow, but have never been before 
and am wondering if anyone has any tips.  Are there specific routes that are 
better for birders?  Do you recommend a driving loop or walking?

Thanks for any insights you can offer.

Best,

Sandra Babcock
Ithaca


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[cayugabirds-l] Magical evening at Monkey Run

2020-05-13 Thread Sandra Lynn Babcock
I birdied Monkey Run tonight, May 13, from about 6-7:15 p.m.  It was a lovely 
evening, and the trails were full of birds.  The highlights were a veery pair 
and a flock of warblers, including yellow, yellow-rumped, and a very 
cooperative black-throated blue (male). Great crested flycatcher, sapsuckers 
galore, a pair of orioles, a chattering belted kingfisher, and the usual 
repertoire of woodpeckers, catbirds, and red-winged blackbirds rounded out the 
evening.  And a chorus of spring peepers to escort me back to my car.

Sandra Babcock
slb...@cornell.edu

Sent from my Ipad

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[cayugabirds-l] New yard bird!

2020-05-03 Thread Sandra Lynn Babcock
Yesterday afternoon while I was gardening I heard a strange, intermittent 
squawking. I knew it was a bird I had never heard in my yard, but couldn’t 
identify it. I walked around under my trees with my binoculars, until I saw 
what appeared to be a heron perched in my maple tree, which abuts a tiny 
seasonal pond.  It continued to squawk and preen while I angled for a better 
view.  I was amazed to see that it was a green heron, which eventually flew 
away.

Best,
Sandra Babcock
38 Hartwood Road, Ithaca

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[cayugabirds-l] Scopes - and Vortex

2020-04-29 Thread Sandra Lynn Babcock
Hi everyone,

For those of you looking at scopes who also want to throw your purchasing power 
behind companies whose values align with your own, you might want to do some 
digging into Vortex, which touts its support of the Second Amendment on its 
website.  I realize this is probably not an issue for many folks in our region, 
but it may be for others.

Best,
Sandra Babcock

On 4/29/20, 12:03 AM, "bounce-124589348-73410...@list.cornell.edu on behalf of 
Upstate NY Birding digest"  wrote:

CAYUGABIRDS-L Digest for Wednesday, April 29, 2020.

1. Re: Spotting scope question
2. RE: Spotting scope question
3. Etna: Low Sandhill Crane Flyover
4. RE: Spotting scope question
5. Re: Spotting scope question
6. RE: Spotting scope question
7. Re: Spotting scope question
8. Re: Spotting scope question
9. RE: Spotting scope question
10. Re: Spotting scope question

--

Subject: Re: Spotting scope question
From: Jody Enck 
Date: Tue, 28 Apr 2020 07:02:50 -0400
X-Message-Number: 1

Hi Pete,
For good value for price, check out Vortex products.  I bought my scope 10
years ago, so I won't mention specific products as they change over time.
However, I did learn several important lessons that I'd like to pass
along.  In no particular order

Get a decent tripod.  You want one that is stout enough to be steady in
wind, but not too heavy.  If the scope is bouncing around because the
tripod is not steady, the use of the scope is seriously diminished.  Also,
consider how small or big it is when it breaks down.  It's one thing to
reduce it to half size to fit in the back of your car.  It's a
completely different thing to want to take it in your carry-on on a plane.
Or, even get it to fit in your checked suitcase.

Consider power carefully.  I considered quality of the glass in the
eyepiece and whether it maintained clarity and correct color out to the
edges.  However, I chose a smaller power (45x) to cut costs.  Big mistake.
Everyone else has 60x or even 85x.  Ducks and grebes they are picking out
and discussing the finer points of feather molt just look like dark dots in
my scope.  Don't scrimp on power.

Shape of barrel (straight or angled).  Don't even consider a straight
barrel.  I have one.  That was by far the single worst decision I ever made
with any of my optics.  If the bird you are trying to look at is up in a
tree, the straight barrel is completely useless unless you lay on your back
on the ground.  If you want to show other people something through your
scope, you'll be constantly moving the scope up and down.  I lead field
trips, and my straight barrel is very, very frustrating.  Angled barrels
allow you to see things that are nearly straight up (at least 70 degrees),
and you can turn the scope on its side with a quick adjustment to allow a
shorter person to use it.

When you get it, practice with it a lot.  Carry it around with you all day
long.  Most importantly, use it to locate birds for hours on end.  The more
used to it you are, the more functional it will become, and the more fun
will be your birding.

Good luck!
Jody



Jody W. Enck, PhD
Conservation Social Scientist, and
Founder of the Sister Bird Club Network
607-379-5940


On Mon, Apr 27, 2020 at 8:45 PM Peter Saracino 
wrote:

> Hi folks. I'm in the market for a relatively inexpensive (but halfway
> decent)spotting scope (straight barrel), and am wondering if anyone out
> there can recommend one.
> Thank you.
> Pete Sar
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Subject: RE: Spotting scope question
From: "Gone" 
Date: Tue, 28 Apr 2020 10:26:36 -0400
X-Message-Number: 2


My wife and I use straight 60x  80mm scopes, hers is a Vortex Optics Viper 
HD and mine is a  Clestron Ultima 80  with a BAADER PLANETARIUM  Hyperion zoom 
8-24 mark III eyepiece. I found my Celestron lacking after looking through my 
wifes Viper with the ED glass so I 

[cayugabirds-l] Bluebirds checking out my nest box

2018-04-25 Thread Sandra Lynn Babcock
I was absolutely elated this morning to hear a bluebird singing lustily from 
the top perch of my feeder station.  That's the first bluebird I've ever seen 
in my yard in the four years I've been living in Ellis Hollow.  And as I 
watched, it flew off to investigate out one of my bluebird houses.  Fingers 
crossed!

On a related note, I was wondering if bluebirds have started to nest in the 
houses lined up alongside Turkey Hill Road.  Does anyone know?

Sandra Babcock
Cornell University


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RE:[cayugabirds-l] cayugabirds-l digest: June 08, 2017

2017-06-08 Thread Sandra Lynn Babcock
Hi Nari,

I live off of Ellis Hollow Road (on Hartwood) and I have a pair of pileateds 
(and occasionally their offspring) that eat at our suet feeders several times a 
day, starting in May.  They tend to disappear in late August and then we don't 
see them for the entire winter.  I've always wondered why they don't come to 
the suet feeder in the winter.  Any ideas?

Best,
Sandra

Sandra L. Babcock
Clinical Professor, International Human Rights Clinic
Faculty  Director, Center on the Death Penalty Worldwide
158A Myron Taylor Hall
Cornell Law School
Ithaca, NY 14853-4901
Tel. (607) 255-5278
slb...@cornell.edu
www.deathpenaltyworldwide.org


-Original Message-
From: bounce-121587338-73410...@list.cornell.edu 
[mailto:bounce-121587338-73410...@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Upstate NY 
Birding digest
Sent: Thursday, June 8, 2017 12:03 AM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L 
Subject: cayugabirds-l digest: June 08, 2017

CAYUGABIRDS-L Digest for Thursday, June 08, 2017.

1. Pileated eating suet
2. Re: Pileated eating suet
3. Grackle and Fish Crow(?) Observation

--

Subject: Pileated eating suet
From: "W. Larry Hymes" 
Date: Wed, 7 Jun 2017 07:11:55 -0400
X-Message-Number: 1

In response to Nari's post, every once in awhile we too have had PILEATED 
WOODPECKERS working on our suet feeders -- both male and female.  It's a little 
comical watching such a large bird clinging to such a relatively small feeder 
and successfully extracting suet.

Larry

-- 


W. Larry Hymes
120 Vine Street, Ithaca, NY 14850
(H) 607-277-0759, w...@cornell.edu



--

Subject: Re: Pileated eating suet
From: Judith Thurber 
Date: Wed, 7 Jun 2017 07:22:12 -0400
X-Message-Number: 2

Pileated are currently feeding several times a day at suet feeders on nails on 
side of tree. It seems they must be nesting nearby and come for reliable 
food supply.   (There have been periods in past years where I haven't seen them 
at feeder for months at a time.)   

Also Bluebirds balance on metal holders as best they can to get suet, but 
prefer to find scraps on the ground as do the Catbirds.   

Judy Thurber
Liverpool
Sent from my iPhone

> On Jun 7, 2017, at 7:11 AM, W. Larry Hymes  wrote:
> 
> In response to Nari's post, every once in awhile we too have had PILEATED 
> WOODPECKERS working on our suet feeders -- both male and female.  It's a 
> little comical watching such a large bird clinging to such a relatively small 
> feeder and successfully extracting suet.
> 
> Larry
> 
> --
> 
> 
> W. Larry Hymes
> 120 Vine Street, Ithaca, NY 14850
> (H) 607-277-0759, w...@cornell.edu
> 
> 
> 
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Subject: Grackle and Fish Crow(?) Observation
From: Sandy Wold 
Date: Wed, 7 Jun 2017 11:04:51 -0400
X-Message-Number: 3

Yesterday, while working in my garden in downtown Ithaca, I noticed out of the 
corner of my eye a black bird fly into the Norway Maple.  I assumed it was a 
grackle as they are nesting in the tree (and had a fledgling recently land in 
the street).  A Fed Ex guy stopped last week to relocate it to the grass.  
Anyway, I then heard a loud scuffle in the tree, looked up, saw a 
larger-than-grackle sized bird bolt out with something in its mouth.  My first 
thought was, "crow took a chick!"  Then about eight grackles chased after the 
crow scolding it up and over the towering Sugar Maple nearby.  I did not have 
my binoculars, but the object in the crow's mouth appeared to be about 
walnut-size or avocado-pit-size and black.  The object was predominantly round 
in and ball-shape, but I could kind of make out a large head and tiny body with 
damp feathers as the chase zipped by me in all of about two seconds before the 
crow and object were out of my view.

After the excitement, or trauma, depending on your perspective, I guessed it 
was a Fish Crow on the grounds that 1.  they have been the dominant crow call 
I've heard in my neighborhood this spring 2.  it almost passed for a grackle 
based on size (so smaller than American
Crow)
3.  I heard a Fish Crow call about thirty minutes later and no American Crows 
all day.