[cayugabirds-l] Female Eastern Towhee and Fox Sparrows

2020-11-22 Thread Sandy Podulka
At our feeders in Brooktondale, along with 2 Song Sparrows. Have not 
seen a towhee for a few weeks.


Sandy Podulka


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[cayugabirds-l] Crossbills, Siskins, Redpolls, Shrike at Morgan Hill SF

2020-11-12 Thread Sandy Podulka
Had a great, but very cold, dark morning yesterday at Red Crossbill 
site in Morgan Hill State Forest (as described by Bob McGuire).
Flocks of Pine Siskins, Red Crossbills, and Common Redpolls as well 
as a Northern Shrike. Birds were still active in the area at 11 am, 
when I left. Gritting, eating larch cones, and biting at 
twigs--possibly for lichen, bark, or insects. There were many 
flyovers, long intervals with no birds, and then times when many 
birds were nearby. Dress warmly!

https://ebird.org/atlasny/checklist/S76181348

Sandy Podulka


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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Pine Siskins

2020-10-17 Thread Sandy Podulka
We have two at our feeders in Brooktondale as of today, also. Saw 3 a 
few days ago near the house.

At 09:52 AM 10/17/2020, Kevin J. Cummings wrote:
>Hi all,
>
>I was very excited to see two Pine Siskins among the feeder birds 
>here in Dryden this morning.
>
>Kevin
>
>
>Sent from my iPhone
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[cayugabirds-l] ID Help: Juvenile Hermit Thrush or Veery?

2020-08-08 Thread Sandy Podulka

Hi Folks,

I took these photos on July 20 at the top of Deputron Hollow Rd, 
where both Hermit Thrush and Veery breed nearby.

Can anyone tell me which this one is?

https://photos.app.goo.gl/LKt5cPaaGMnKiMGB9

Thanks,
Sandy


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[cayugabirds-l] Link Info: 3 Mystery Calls!!

2020-07-13 Thread Sandy Podulka
Hi Folks,

No need for an account with Dropbox, which is how I posted the links. 
If a box comes up asking you to login or join, just close it and keep 
going. That is just marketing!

Sandy

\\\

Hi Folks,

I could use some help with 3 recent mystery calls.

(1) Sunday (yesterday) morning I went to Trevor Rd to look for the 
Red Crossbills that Kevin P. found. I did not see them, but in the 
same spot as Kevin, did pish and a bird called numerous times from 
medium-high in the trees, and then flew off. I never got a look. But 
it repeated a two-note "chirpy" call numerous times.  Here are two 
from different lousy phone recordings, linked together into one cut. 
Is this a Red Crossbill?  If not, what?  I know most local bird 
calls, and did not recognize this at all.
https://www.dropbox.com/s/bj6uexcftkdcyw2/Possible%20Red%20Crossbill%20at%20Trevor%20Rd.mp3?dl=0

(2) Along Deputron Hollow Road a week ago, I heard this call that 
sounded like begging. It occurs right at the beginning and at 6 
seconds into the cut, and is a repeated series of about 6 notes. It 
sounds a lot like a fledgling Baltimore Oriole, and it may be, but I 
have heard many lately, and this sounded like a larger, tougher, 
bird, and was a more raucous and low-pitched call than the orioles 
I've heard. This was coming from intact deciduous forest next to a logged area.
https://www.dropbox.com/s/p6bovlokv0uckuj/Mystery%20Begging%20Call%20Deputron%20Hollow%20Rd.mp3?dl=0

(3) The third call I have heard the last couple of weeks in Shindagin 
Hollow, along Trevor Road, and at Kingsbury Woods and I am quite sure 
it is a Broad-winged Hawk. But instead of the usual two-note, drawn 
out 'pe-w." This is a series of short "we we we we we we 
we" notes, but of similar quality to the usual call.  Could this be a 
fledgling Broad-winged Hawk? I have not heard this call all spring or 
early summer, but am now hearing it around.

Thanks for any help you can give me!

Sandy  
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[cayugabirds-l] 3 Mystery Calls!!

2020-07-12 Thread Sandy Podulka
Hi Folks,

I could use some help with 3 recent mystery calls.

(1) Sunday (yesterday) morning I went to Trevor Rd to look for the 
Red Crossbills that Kevin P. found. I did not see them, but in the 
same spot as Kevin, did pish and a bird called numerous times from 
medium-high in the trees, and then flew off. I never got a look. But 
it repeated a two-note "chirpy" call numerous times.  Here are two 
from different lousy phone recordings, linked together into one cut. 
Is this a Red Crossbill?  If not, what?  I know most local bird 
calls, and did not recognize this at all.
https://www.dropbox.com/s/bj6uexcftkdcyw2/Possible%20Red%20Crossbill%20at%20Trevor%20Rd.mp3?dl=0

(2) Along Deputron Hollow Road a week ago, I heard this call that 
sounded like begging. It occurs right at the beginning and at 6 
seconds into the cut, and is a repeated series of about 6 notes. It 
sounds a lot like a fledgling Baltimore Oriole, and it may be, but I 
have heard many lately, and this sounded like a larger, tougher, 
bird, and was a more raucous and low-pitched call than the orioles 
I've heard. This was coming from intact deciduous forest next to a logged area.
https://www.dropbox.com/s/p6bovlokv0uckuj/Mystery%20Begging%20Call%20Deputron%20Hollow%20Rd.mp3?dl=0

(3) The third call I have heard the last couple of weeks in Shindagin 
Hollow, along Trevor Road, and at Kingsbury Woods and I am quite sure 
it is a Broad-winged Hawk. But instead of the usual two-note, drawn 
out 'pe-w." This is a series of short "we we we we we we 
we" notes, but of similar quality to the usual call.  Could this be a 
fledgling Broad-winged Hawk? I have not heard this call all spring or 
early summer, but am now hearing it around.

Thanks for any help you can give me!

Sandy 
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Re:[cayugabirds-l] purple finch nest

2020-06-15 Thread Sandy Podulka
I'm betting a House Finch--sounds like a more typical nest spot for them.
But what a joy--would love to have them on my porch!!!

Sandy

At 09:27 AM 6/15/2020, Marty Schlabach wrote:
>Are you sure it’s a purple finch?
>--Marty
>Interlaken, NY
>
>From: bounce-124702194-3494...@list.cornell.edu 
> On Behalf Of Rustici, Marc
>Sent: Monday, June 15, 2020 8:00 AM
>To: 'k...@empireaccess.net' ; lajews...@yahoo.com
>Cc: CAYUGABIRDS-L 
>Subject: RE: [cayugabirds-l] The Bald Eagle: A Conservation Success Story
>
>Good Morning,
>
>I am hoping someone can tell me or direct me to some information, please.
>
>We have some purple finches nesting on our front 
>porch in a hanging basket.  I saw they have laid 
>eggs.  My wife wants them gone (I am the 
>softee..) as they make quite a mess when the 
>young hatch…It was suggested I move the 
>nnest to an very nearby weeping birch (where they perch).
>
>Is this a viable option?
>
>Marc
>
>From: 
><mailto:bounce-124701128-62610...@list.cornell.edu>bounce-124701128-62610...@list.cornell.edu
> 
>[mailto:bounce-124701128-62610...@list.cornell.edu] 
>On Behalf Of <mailto:k...@empireaccess.net>k...@empireaccess.net
>Sent: Sunday, June 14, 2020 12:36 PM
>To: <mailto:lajews...@yahoo.com>lajews...@yahoo.com
>Cc: Cayugabirds
>Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] The Bald Eagle: A Conservation Success Story
>
>
>
>
>Attention: This email came from an external 
>source outside Arnot Health. Please use caution 
>when opening attachments or clicking links from 
>unknown senders or unexpected email.
>.
>
>
>
>Wish I could hear this Chris but have eschewed 
>zoom. It's a great story nationwide. I had the 
>honor of being the first survey and banding 
>crews in the Chesapeake Bay Region back in the 
>early 70s. These were done by a group called the 
>Raptor Information Center under the aegis of The 
>National Wildlife Foundation. We based in the 
>DC/MD area and worked the watershed of three 
>states. A handful of nests in the whole area and 
>very low reproduction rate at the beginning. 
>Climbing into an eagle nest was amazing and 
>locked me into ornithology for life and a new 
>career field. It is so satisfying to see the 
>tremendous increase in these terrific birds with 
>the less than ferocious voices!
>
>Best,
>John
>---
>John and Sue Gregoire
>5373 Fitzgerald Rd
>Burdett, NY 14818-9626
>"Conserve and Create Habitat"
>N 42.44307 W 76.75784
>
>
>On 2020-06-14 12:38, <mailto:lajews...@yahoo.com>lajews...@yahoo.com wrote:
>Tuesday, June 16 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM
>
>The Bald Eagle: A Conservation Success Story
>
>A symbol of national strength and unity, the 
>Bald Eagle has also become a parable for 
>nature's unshakable ties to humans. Estimated to 
>have numbered 100,000 in pre-colonial times, 
>shooting, cutting of forests, and finally 
>pesticides, took a toll on the bird, bringing it 
>to the brink of extinction by the early 1960's. 
>Join Montezuma Audubon Center Director Chris 
>Lajewski to hear the conservation success story 
>of our national bird and learn how the Montezuma 
>Wetlands Complex played an important role in 
>bringing the bird back from the brink. Fee: 
>$10/person. Click 
><https://act.audubon.org/a/bald-eagle-conservation-success-story-tickets>https://act.audubon.org/a/bald-eagle-conservation-success-story-tickets
> 
>to register for this workshop. You will receive 
>a Zoom link to the workshop in your confirmation email.
>
>This program is sponsored by the Friends of the Montezuma Wetlands Complex.
>
>Chris Lajewski
>
>Center Director
>
>Montezuma Audubon Center
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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Murder most Fowl - Saturday 5/30

2020-05-31 Thread Sandy Podulka
I can understand how a predator can get a bunch 
of chickens in a cage, but in the wild, after it 
got one, I think the others would fly away. So a 
predator getting them all seems unlikely to me. 
Am I missing something? Gary's suggestion here makes sense.

Sandy

At 02:29 PM 5/31/2020, Gary Kohlenberg wrote:
>I hadn’t thought of Mustelid or Possum as Wes suggested as a culprit.
>
>As only one bird lost his head that could be 
>predation after death. One other bird dead with 
>head attached and another dying with possible 
>neck issues makes the suggestion of botulism by 
>Kevin Cummings and Morgan Hapeman interesting. I 
>know Montezuma has had problems with this in the 
>past. The water in Shindagin is pretty stagnant 
>which could be a problem. It also better answers 
>the unlikely idea of multiple birds shot in such a manner.
>
>Gary
>
>On May 31, 2020, at 11:53 AM, Christopher T. 
>Tessaglia-Hymes  wrote:
>
> Just throwing this out there as another possibility: weasel or ferret.
>
>This is, as I understand it, classic kill method 
>used by these Mustelids. They’ve been know to 
>kill off an entire flock of chickens in a night, 
>severing heads with minimal disruption to the rest of the body.
>
>Thoughts?
>
>Sincerely,
>Chris T-H
>
>Sent from my iPhone
>
>
>
>On May 31, 2020, at 11:07, Sandy Podulka 
><<mailto:s...@cornell.edu>s...@cornell.edu> wrote:
>
>>That is also one of my favorite places!
>>
>>I have seen 4 male Mallards in that small pond 
>>consistently this spring (but not today, and I guess I now know why).
>>I have no idea what could kill so many birds in 
>>such an odd way except a hunter, or maybe a 
>>group of hunters--I would think an owl wouldn't 
>>have a chance at all of them at once, as the others would fly off.
>>
>>So sorry to hear this. As we are learning in so 
>>many ways these days, people can be truly cruel.
>>
>>Sandy Podulka
>>
>>At 10:08 AM 5/31/2020, Gary Kohlenberg wrote:
>>>Saturday I walked with my daughter down 
>>>Shindagin Hollow Rd., in the State Forest, to 
>>>the intersection with Gulf Creek Rd. for 
>>>exercise, fun and to show her the area. It was 
>>>very birdy and beautiful as usual especially 
>>>the beaver pond at the bottom of the hill. 
>>>This place always reminds me of the Adirondacks and is a favorite of mine.
>>>
>>>There was a surprising amount of traffic on 
>>>Shindagin Rd. both cars and mountain bikers 
>>>savoring the nice day. Some out of state 
>>>plates on cars of dozens parked at the 
>>>intersection and FLT crossing. I was reminded 
>>>how popular this area is and how much we need wild areas during a pandemic.
>>>
>>>We were amazed at how many Red Newts were 
>>>crossing the road. Some didn’t make it it 
>>>unharmed, but most of them did. I learned 
>>>about their life cycle, that they are toxic, 
>>>but contain off the charts cuteness. We tried 
>>>to help a couple on the journey, but they are 
>>>very independent minded and don’t need ed any intervention.
>>>
>>>We noticed a dead bird in the pond by the 
>>>outflow pipe under the road; a dead male 
>>>Mallard. Kayla thought it quite interesting 
>>>and checked to find it had no head. I thought 
>>>that was weird, but I have seen it before, and 
>>>guessed maybe an owl had decapitated it. 
>>>I’m not actually positive owls would or 
>>>coucould do this, but seem to remember some 
>>>discussion about this. If anyone knows if it 
>>>can be a thing please enlighten me.
>>>
>>>I scanned the pond and saw movement which was 
>>>another male Mallard struggling in the water. 
>>>His body floated with the head hanging 
>>>underwater unable to lift it up. He may have 
>>>had a broken neck. I wasn’t able to reach 
>>>the poor guy to end his misery whichh made me 
>>>sad. More scanning found a third male Mallard 
>>>floating in the pond dead. I didn’t see any 
>>>more, e, but there could have been one in the 
>>>grass. Three seems like a typical total for 
>>>this small water to hold on any particular day.
>>>
>>>My hypothesis is that they were all shot on 
>>>the water with a shotgun. To cleanly 
>>>decapitate a bird the shot would have to be at 
>>>very close range. The other birds could have 
>>>all been hit with the same shot if they had 
>>>been swimming very together. This water is 
>>>very small

Re: [cayugabirds-l] Murder most Fowl - Saturday 5/30

2020-05-31 Thread Sandy Podulka
That is also one of my favorite places!

I have seen 4 male Mallards in that small pond 
consistently this spring (but not today, and I guess I now know why).
I have no idea what could kill so many birds in 
such an odd way except a hunter, or maybe a group 
of hunters--I would think an owl wouldn't have a 
chance at all of them at once, as the others would fly off.

So sorry to hear this. As we are learning in so 
many ways these days, people can be truly cruel.

Sandy Podulka

At 10:08 AM 5/31/2020, Gary Kohlenberg wrote:
>Saturday I walked with my daughter down 
>Shindagin Hollow Rd., in the State Forest, to 
>the intersection with Gulf Creek Rd. for 
>exercise, fun and to show her the area. It was 
>very birdy and beautiful as usual especially the 
>beaver pond at the bottom of the hill. This 
>place always reminds me of the Adirondacks and is a favorite of mine.
>
>There was a surprising amount of traffic on 
>Shindagin Rd. both cars and mountain bikers 
>savoring the nice day. Some out of state plates 
>on cars of dozens parked at the intersection and 
>FLT crossing. I was reminded how popular this 
>area is and how much we need wild areas during a pandemic.
>
>We were amazed at how many Red Newts were 
>crossing the road. Some didn’t make it 
>unharmed, but most of them did. I learned about 
>their life cycle, that they are toxic, but 
>contain off the charts cuteness. We tried to 
>help a couple on the journey, but they are very 
>independent minded and don’t need any intervention.
>
>We noticed a dead bird in the pond by the 
>outflow pipe under the road; a dead male 
>Mallard. Kayla thought it quite interesting and 
>checked to find it had no head. I thought that 
>was weird, but I have seen it before, and 
>guessed maybe an owl had decapitated it. I’m 
>not actually positive owls would or could do 
>this, but seem to remember some discussion about 
>this. If anyone knows if it can be a thing please enlighten me.
>
>I scanned the pond and saw movement which was 
>another male Mallard struggling in the water. 
>His body floated with the head hanging 
>underwater unable to lift it up. He may have had 
>a broken neck. I wasn’t able to reach the poor 
>guy to end his misery which made me sad. More 
>scanning found a third male Mallard floating in 
>the pond dead. I didn’t see any more, but 
>there could have been one in the grass. Three 
>seems like a typical total for this small water to hold on any particular day.
>
>My hypothesis is that they were all shot on the 
>water with a shotgun. To cleanly decapitate a 
>bird the shot would have to be at very close 
>range. The other birds could have all been hit 
>with the same shot if they had been swimming 
>very together. This water is very small and 
>birds not hit would have flown and probably 
>circled around. It’s not likely they would 
>have been shot in the air and fallen back into this small area.
>
>This poaching event is very disturbing and we 
>had another event like this in the same general 
>area. I’m thinking of the eagle shooting over 
>bait. No hunter would shoot birds in a barrel or 
>sitting on the water even in season. In my 
>opinion this is just criminal at any time.
>
>We all have bigger social troubles overall, but 
>felt compelled to document this as a complete 
>view of birding in the finger lakes. The little things still go on.
>
>Happier birding today,
>
>Gary
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
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[cayugabirds-l] YB Cuckoo, Olive-sided Flycatcher, Bay-breasted

2020-05-25 Thread Sandy Podulka
Yellow-billed Cuckoo yesterday on Olsefski Rd (off Coddington), 
Olive-sided Flycatcher hanging out by our house today (spotted by 
Eagle-eared and Eagle-eyed daughter), and several Bay-breasted 
Warblers and a Canada Warbler in our woods yesterday, in 
Brooktondale.  Just a few migrants around us today--but heard 
Mourning, Black-and-white, and Blackburnian in places they do not breed.


Has anyone been to the Hawthorns today?

Sandy Podulka


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[cayugabirds-l] Lindsay-Parsons Worm-eating and Hooded Warblers

2020-05-17 Thread Sandy Podulka
Sorry for posting a day late too busy birding.  Bill and I 
checked out the Lindsay-Parsons Biodiversity Preserve yesterday 
(Saturday) and found many of the usual residents including the 
invisible Prairie Warblers, several Brown Thrashers, Northern 
Waterthrush (near the entrance), Yellow-throated Vireo, and Least 
Flycatcher. Only a few migrants--Cape May Warbler and Northern 
Parula. I posted a full list on eBird.


The highlight was finally, after several decades, seeing my first 
local Worm-eating Warbler. We first heard it singing from the purple 
trail, near its junction with the red trail, on the steep hill that 
goes up to Thatcher's Pinnacles, where Worm-eatings traditionally 
breed. After about 1.5 hours, finally got literally a glimpse, but 
that was a triumph.  Also saw a Hooded Warbler along the purple 
trail, where it usually breeds (could hear it from the RR tracks even).


And not one tick.

Sandy Podulka


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[cayugabirds-l] Arnot Forest - Mournings and many other warblers

2020-05-17 Thread Sandy Podulka
Inspired by Suan's post (which sounded great to me), our family 
headed to Arnot Forest this morning. Martha Fischer gave us a tip to 
a patch of spruce trees down the road from Greensprings whose sunlit 
tops were teeming with migrants--Bay-breasted, Magnolia, 
Blackburnian, Cape May, Yellow-rumped, American Redstart, 
Black-throated Blue, and Black-throated Green. Ovenbirds were 
squabbling and one was carrying nest material!


Next we birded Decker Road, across Route 13 from Arnot Forest and 
found some of the same, and also Canada, Chestnut-sided, Tennessee, 
Nashville, Common Yellowthroat, and Northern Parula. Also most of the 
usual breeders and Yellow-throated, Blue-headed, Warbling, and 
Red-eyed Vireos. Veeries and Wood Thrushes, too. A male Rose-breasted 
Grosbeak was carrying a long string of nesting material and then 
couldn't resist singing and dropped it all! Heard our first Eastern 
Wood-Pewee there.


Headed up Banfield Road and finally heard a Yellow Warbler! Also 
Louisiana Waterthrush, lots of Canada Warblers (all invisible), 
several Winter Wrens, and quite a few other birds including a few 
migrant warblers. The highlight was watching two Mourning Warblers 
chase each other all over the place contesting a choice brush pile 
(while listening to a Hooded Warbler and Winter Wren).


Beautiful morning and very few people.

Sandy Podulka


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[cayugabirds-l] Prairie Warbler in Brooktondale

2020-05-03 Thread Sandy Podulka
Prairie Warbler singing in our field in Brooktondale today, and newly 
arrived Baltimore Orioles, Ovenbird, and Common Yellowthroats--looks 
like they all hit town at once.


Sandy Podulka


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[cayugabirds-l] Great Crested Flycatcher

2020-05-01 Thread Sandy Podulka

Here in Brooktondale this morning, calling away as if it never left.

Sandy Podulka


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[cayugabirds-l] Northern Waterthrush in Brooktondale

2020-04-29 Thread Sandy Podulka
Singing near our house this morning in a skunk cabbage bog, but also 
95% sure I heard it yesterday, too. But didn't have time to track it 
down yesterday.


Also, a Chipping Sparrow and a Spotted Sandpiper arrived today, and a 
Fox Sparrow is still hanging around.


Sandy Podulka


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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Of Unleashed Dogs and Waterthrushes

2020-04-27 Thread Sandy Podulka
I thought that with Covid-19 restrictions all 
dogs are supposed to be on leashes when out of 
the house (I assume out of one's yard).  A dog 
rushing up to someone else can carry virus to 
them (albeit this is a low risk), so it is even 
more irresponsible to have an unleashed dog in public right now.


At 10:58 AM 4/27/2020, Meredith Leonard wrote:
>Sorry Robin, I apologize for singling you out. 
>You belong to a lucky cohort of dog owners with good dogs.
>But, even your well behaved dog really should be 
>leashed in natural or wild areas, especially 
>during mating, nesting, birthing and fledging seasons.
>Otherwise,
>a) you have no way to convey to someone who 
>fears dogs just what sort of behavior they can 
>expect from your particular dog, and
>b) your unleashed dog will tell other owners 
>that it is OK for their dogs to be unleashed, no 
>matter your argument or their dog.
>Please, all owners of good dogs, think of this 
>problem from a multitude of points of view. 
>Think of it as an environmental responsibility.
>Thank you, Meredith
>
>On Apr 27, 2020, at 7:17 AM, Robin Cisne  wrote:
>
>As the owner of a well-behaved dog who prefers 
>to be unleashed and leaves other people alone, 
>I'm very sorry this happened to 
>you.  Inconsiderate jackasses like that ruin it for the rest of us.
>
>Robin
>
>
>
> 
>
>
>
>
>On Sun, Apr 26, 2020 at 8:29 PM Magnus Fiskesjo 
> wrote:
>
>Nice poem!
>
>One of your dog men at least said sorry. At Hog 
>hole the other day, ignoring all the signs that 
>say dogs-on-leash-only, a man unleashed his 
>oversized filthy dog, and it rushed at and 
>jumped at my wife, who was quite scared, as she 
>tried to defend herself and fend it off. The man 
>did not say one word of apology, evidently could 
>not care less. I wanted to bash his head in, or 
>that of his dog, but did neither. The stupid 
>dogs aren't guilty of course, it's the dogs' 
>masters. There is something profoundly unseemly 
>and deeply intolerant in how these people wield 
>their dog slaves to insult and impose on others, 
>both on other people, and on wildlife.
>
>--yrs.
>Magnus Fiskesjö
>n...@cornell.edu
>_
>From: bounce-124583580-84019...@list.cornell.edu 
>[bounce-124583580-84019...@list.cornell.edu] on 
>behalf of Suan Hsi Yong [suan.y...@gmail.com]
>Sent: Sunday, April 26, 2020 7:58 PM
>To: CAYUGABIRDS-L
>Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Of Unleashed Dogs and Waterthrushes
>
>Despite the drenching rain today, I did my daily jog.
>Around the trails of six-mile creek I passed two groups with dogs.
>The first dog came a-leapin' at my thigh, against my wish.
>The owners said their sorries as they feigned to tend its leash.
>
>The second dog, also unleashed, was sniffing as it roamed,
>an area where a Waterthrush had surveyed for a home.
>Meanwhile from way up in the tree the Waterthrush did sing,
>O'er heavy rain and rushing creek the melody did ring.
>The song seemed more insistent, although I can't be sure,
>As if announcing to the world, "hey dog, get outta here!"
>Both dog and man soon left the scene, no harm it seems inflicted.
>As spring rolls on I hope to see if nesting was affected.
>
>Suan
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[cayugabirds-l] Solitary Sandpiper, Hermit Thrush leg quivering

2020-04-16 Thread Sandy Podulka
A solitary Solitary Sandpiper was foraging in the shallows of our 
pond in Brooktondale this morning, with a snowy backdrop. Louisiana 
Waterthrush singing at Shindagin Hollow, as well as a Winter Wren. A 
Hermit Thrush was in the road with many American Robins, and then 
moved to the leaf litter, where it foraged for a long time, 
repeatedly quivering a leg, then pouncing on something to eat 
(couldn't see what).  Apparently this behavior (new to me) is widely 
known, and thought to be a way of flushing out prey (or possibly even 
bringing worms up, though didn't seem like the latter today).


Sandy Podulka


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[cayugabirds-l] Yellow-rumped Warbler, Hermit Thrush, Pine Warbler

2020-04-12 Thread Sandy Podulka

All in our woods in Brooktondale, the warblers singing.
Along the Belle School Rd RR Grade, heard Brown Thrasher, Carolina 
Wren, and 3 Virginia Rails, 2 doing a duet grunt!


Sandy Podulka


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[cayugabirds-l] Louisiana Waterthrush, Winter Wren, Hermit Thrush

2020-04-11 Thread Sandy Podulka
Along Deputron Hollow Road this morning, wonderful to hear a singing 
Louisiana Waterthrush and Winter Wren, and to see a Hermit 
Thrush.  Also, several Field Sparrows singing.


Sandy Podulka


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[cayugabirds-l] Sandy Wold Bird Art Show

2019-08-27 Thread Sandy
I am not sure if I shared my art show with this listserve. Apologies if I
duplicated. If you want to see my bird artwork (watercolors and oils), a
collection is up until end of the month at the Alternatives Federal Credit
Union, and then it moves to Trumansburg Optical from mid September where it
will be for a few months. I am traveling internationally to focus on
developing my art! I hope people will go see this show so you can see how
my art changes after a year of focus! I hope to return to the Finger Lakes
region with improved skill! Best wishes to all!

https://www.facebook.com/SandyWoldArt





*S.L. Wold, author/originator/publisher of the Cayuga Basin Bioregion Map*(get
your second edition at the Ithaca Wegmans and the Ithaca Visitor's Bureau
before they sell out! There is no plan to reprint.)

*https://www.sites.google.com/site/cayugabioregionmap/
*

https://www.sandy-wold.com/

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[cayugabirds-l] fledgling mourning dove

2019-07-10 Thread Sandy
That is so sweeet, and s coool, Judith! Thank you for sharing! I
have never seen that particular behavior, but I have witnessed what I think
may be interspecies cooperation between birds a few times. Not only with
mob behavior around cats in my urban backyard, but also I once saw a
Pileated woodpecker fly directly into where a Hairy woodpecker nest. It was
there momentarily and then left quickly. I had the feeling it was serving
as an "auntie" who was "checking" on the eggs or babies to see how they
were doing (I can't remember if they had hatched yet or not).

I think we humans have much to learn from wildlife and the ways in which
they communicate with each other within their species and with other
species.

*S.L. Wold, author/originator/publisher of the Cayuga Basin Bioregion Map*
*https://www.sites.google.com/site/cayugabioregionmap/
*

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[cayugabirds-l] Spotting Scope, tripod, and birding backpack for sale

2019-06-04 Thread Sandy
Preference to someone who wants all for $800 total:

Vortex Viper spotting scope with protective neoprene cover, $750 obo
includes tripod (scope is in very good condition)
https://www.opticsplanet.com/vortex-viper-hd-20-60x80-spotting-scopes.html

Vanguard Endeavor 1600 Travel birding backpack (26L), paid $120, asking $90
(used for one trip, nearly spotless)
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01CZLGQBI/ref=ppx_od_dt_b_asin_title_s00?ie=UTF8=1

*S.L. Wold, author/originator/publisher of the Cayuga Basin Bioregion Map*
*https://www.sites.google.com/site/cayugabioregionmap/
*

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[cayugabirds-l] Frontenac Island Cormorants - can't we coexist?

2019-05-15 Thread Sandy
Let's not vilify the cormorants, and strive to co-exist! Cayuga Lake is
enormous; so I find it hard to believe cormorants would deplete a fish
population. The eagle and osprey populations have been growing greatly
around the lake, so I don't think it would be fair for fishermen to blame a
supposed fish depletion on the cormorants. There could be other causes too.

I have enjoyed watching the cormorant rookery in Jetty Woods for the past
six(?) years. Before them, I recall when the Great Blue Herons had a
rookery there. Do we know 100% for sure that this is a cormorant population
explosion or could it be a temporary relocation that might last only a few
years? I've seen grackles nest around my home for a few years in a row,
then they are gone for a few years. I've seen this cycle for the past six
years with them and other species. I think it is a survival strategy to
keep predators guessing. Once the nests have been attacked too many times,
they relocate. I know I would!

And, yes, they poop and pee everywhere; and while the odor was not pleasant
at times, I did not observe any harm to vegetation at Jetty Woods as a
result.

Let's co-existpeace!
Sandy

*S.L. Wold, author/originator/publisher of the Cayuga Basin Bioregion Map*
*https://www.sites.google.com/site/cayugabioregionmap/
<https://www.sites.google.com/site/cayugabioregionmap/>*

http://www.sandy-wold.com/

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[cayugabirds-l] Squirrel starts bird mob behavior, FOY Baltimore Oriole arrives

2019-05-07 Thread Sandy
A squirrel climbed up a crabapple tree in my backyard this morning and
started making an alarm call. Within a minute, a grackle came and landed
near the squirrel, but slightly above, and was looking down and then
started adding to the alarm. I assumed it was one of my neighbors wandering
cats as I see birds often mob when one comes by. I've seen a squirrel do
this by itself, but this is the first time I saw a squirrel do it with
birds! Then two more grackles came. They were triangulating the target of
their wrath!  Then came a mourning dove who just watched and then I think I
heard a blue jay. My memory fades at this point, as everyone left shortly
after as the threat probably went in another direction.

Shortly thereafter, I heard my first Baltimore Oriole of the year. It was
dining in the crabapple.

*S.L. Wold, author/originator/publisher of the Cayuga Basin Bioregion Map*

*https://www.sites.google.com/site/cayugabioregionmap/
*
*http://www.sandy-wold.com/about  *

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[cayugabirds-l] Baldwin Tract Quiet, but Winter Wren...

2019-04-30 Thread Sandy Podulka
A walk at the Baldwin Tract of the Park Preserve was surprisingly 
quiet this morning--no waterthrushes (not even a Yellow-rumped 
Warbler), but did hear a Winter Wren in the gorge. Other highlights 
were Purple Finches, Red-breasted Nuthatch, Black-throated Green 
Warblers, and Ruby-crowned Kinglets. Wildflowers were mostly Spring 
Beauties. Didn't feel much like spring today!


Sandy Podulka


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[cayugabirds-l] Cayuga Lake--no Snow Geese

2019-03-23 Thread Sandy Podulka
We checked out the NW end of Cayuga Lake this evening and found the 
large groups of Snow Geese mostly gone. There was one large white 
streak in the middle of the lake south of Cayuga Lake State Park at 
5:30 pm, but it was not visible when we drove back around 6:30, so 
perhaps they took off. I am assuming that was Snow Geese. There were 
many groups of Tundra Swans off the lake, especially off Cayuga Lake 
State Park, and there were still many scattered ducks there and farther south.


Has anyone checked the mucklands lately, or seen any Snow Geese 
elsewhere?  Do you think they are done, or are there lots more to 
come? I have some friends still hoping to see them


Sandy


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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Montezuma, mucklands, etc. info

2019-03-20 Thread Sandy Podulka
This evening there were huge rafts of Snow Geese 
on Cayuga Lake visible from Cayuga Lake State 
Park as well as Route 89 just a few miles south 
of Cayuga Lake State Park.  Just south of the 
park, along Route 89, there was a flock of Tundra 
Swans very close to shore. There were scattered 
groups of Bufflehead, Redhead, Ring-necked Ducks, 
and American Wigeon, and the occasional scaup, 
Black Duck, Mallard, and Red-breasted Merganser. 
I'm sure there was much more, but I was there 
only briefly.  A simply stunning sight in the 
evening light, especially when the Snow Geese all took to the air!

Sandy Podulka

At 08:45 PM 3/20/2019, Mary Jane Thomas wrote:
>Does anyone have recent info about the bird life 
>status on the wildlife drive at MNWR or in the 
>Mucklands?  We’re planning on being in the 
>area on Saturday.  We’d like to see Snow Geese 
>while we’re in the general area - are they 
>more apt to be on Cayuga Lake still?
>
>Thanks for the help and advice.
>
>MJ
>
>Sent from my iPad
>
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[cayugabirds-l] Out of Basin Kestrels Mating

2019-03-18 Thread Sandy
Southwest of Basin, west of Bath, kestrels seemed to be everywhere for
miles! I watched a male mate with two females on a telephone pole crossing
a field. Each female waited her turn. Interesting deviance from pair
bonding. Could a male support two nests? Jeepers, I hope so!

*S.L. Wold, author/originator/publisher of the Cayuga Basin Bioregion Map*
*https://www.sites.google.com/site/cayugabioregionmap/
*

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[cayugabirds-l] Binoculars wanted to buy

2019-03-13 Thread Sandy
In a few months, I would like to buy two or three pairs of lighter-weight,
quality 8x42 binoculars (waterproof/fogproof) for a domestic and
international education project I am working on.

The Nikon Monarch 3, 8x42 is a size, weight, and quality that could work
for me (or smaller/lighter preferred for travel and backpacking...with ROOF
PRISM). So please keep me in mind if you are upgrading. Also, if you know
of a better brand/model that would fit this description, please let me
know.

Lastly, I'd like to consider 10x42s. Does anyone have a good pair that I
could borrow and try out for a week or two? I once had a pair, but it felt
awkward. So I want to give them another try.

Thank you!
Sandy

*S.L. Wold, author/originator/publisher of the Cayuga Basin Bioregion Map*
*https://www.sites.google.com/site/cayugabioregionmap/
<https://www.sites.google.com/site/cayugabioregionmap/>*

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[cayugabirds-l] Barred Owl flew west

2019-02-06 Thread Sandy
I went looking for the Barred Owl yesterday at 3:45-4:10pm. There was a
Pileated Woodpecker calling, and I could not find the owl where Mark had
described. As I walked back to my car, the woodpecker call intensified; and
I heard a scuffle high in the trees, then saw a large grey-backed bird fly
off. I think it was the owl but not 100% sure. It flew west, in the
direction of the medical complex. I drove around there and could not find
it. Would love to see one one day!!! Alas, so close, but yet so far.

*S.L. Wold, author/originator/publisher of the Cayuga Basin Bioregion Map*
*https://www.sites.google.com/site/cayugabioregionmap/
*

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[cayugabirds-l] Buntings and Horned Larks

2019-02-03 Thread Sandy
On Friday, February 1st
8am, on Wycoff in Lodi: three flocks of Snow Buntings. Each flock had over
100 and maybe as many as 200+ Snow Buntings. All three flocks were on the
same road in different fields. It was so cold I couldn't stay out long to
look for other species when they landed, but I did note one of the flocks
had mostly Horned Larks in them. They were feeding or resting and sunning
themselves.

*S.L. Wold, author/originator/publisher of the Cayuga Basin Bioregion Map*
*https://www.sites.google.com/site/cayugabioregionmap/
*

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[cayugabirds-l] Columbia Bird Fair - anyone going?

2019-01-29 Thread Sandy
Anyone planning to go to the Columbia Bird Fair this year? I am thinking
about going and have been wanting to go since the guest speaker came a few
years ago and told the bird club about this bird fair. If you are going and
want to connect, please write. If you have been, travel tips appreciated!
Thank you. https://colombiabirdfair.com/conferencistas/

*S.L. Wold, independent *
*writer/artist**https://www.sites.google.com/site/cayugabioregionmap/
*

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[cayugabirds-l] empty lake - Stewart Park Friday observation

2019-01-05 Thread Sandy
Yesterday, Friday, 4 January, around 11:30am, Stewart Park was also
strangely devoid of birds and wondered if someone came through with dogs?
There were absolutely no Canada Geese on the lawns, but ample fresh green
poop everywhere (as usual). I found several dozen hugging the lake
shoreline from west to east with a few mallards, and I think I saw four
sandpiper-size/shape birds flush and peep as they flew (not sure, did not
have my binoculars with me).




*S.L. Wold, independent *
*writer/artist/educator**"Chemtrails Ithaca" Facebook group admin
documenting local and regional geoengineering *


*http://woldpeace.squarespace.com/
**www.sites.google.com/site/cayugabioregionmap/about-author-and-artist
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[cayugabirds-l] snow bunting, raptor kettle, Lansing hilltop highlights, chemtrails

2018-10-27 Thread Sandy
Hi Marie,
Thanks for the post on the snow bunting because today I thought I caught
one in the corner of my eye while driving at 40mph on Triphammer. It was
perched on a telephone wire up in Lansing. I know they are usually in large
flocks foraging in farm fields, but this one had a cheek mark that made me
think snow bunting. Soon thereafter, I parked off the side of a nearby road
where I heard high pitched peeps in a farm field on Burdick Hill Road.  So
exciting!  Plus large kettles of raptors could be seen rising in thermals
and soaring southbound down the Cayuga Valley! (I saw them two days ago as
well from Caroline hilltop.) I estimate over 50 in one thermal today around
3pm.  I could not make out which raptors. I also saw flocks of what
appeared to be cormorants, some waterfowl, and passerines. I also saw two
ravens, one on a telephone wire, one foraging on the ground. Then looping
back, I saw a Turkey Vulture perched on a regular house rooftop looking
down into Cayuga Lake.  The raptors were too far away for me to confirm
identification.

Lastly, is anyone aware of, concerned, or keeping an eye on the skies for
chemtrails (not to be confused with contrails)? Please write to me
privately if you are. Thanks.

**

*Sandy Wold, independent **writer/artist*
*www.sites.google.com/site/cayugabioregionmap/about-author-and-artist
<https://www.sites.google.com/site/cayugabioregionmap/about-author-and-artist>*
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Re: [cayugabirds-l] bird song recording (2)

2018-07-20 Thread Sandy Podulka
Hi Gordon,

It's a Song Sparrow.  The first few notes are 
very quiet and hard to hear, and then it bursts 
into the loud trill with the higher note at the 
end. Perhaps it is not always even singing those first few notes!

Sandy Podulka

At 10:35 AM 7/20/2018, you wrote:
>And here’s the second clip.
>
>
>
>cheers again,
>
>Gordon
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[cayugabirds-l] Black-billed Cuckoo in Brooktondale

2018-05-16 Thread Sandy Podulka

Had our FOY Black-billed Cuckoo today in Brooktondale--nice to hear them back.

Sandy Podulka


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[cayugabirds-l] Why I'm Voting NO on the ICSD Budget: Urgent Need for Climate Focus

2018-05-06 Thread Sandy Wold
I am sharing my thoughts in communities I am a part of because
​1.  Our planet is in crisis and quickly approaching 2020; and we are at
1.5 degrees Celsius.  We can't go to 2.0 Celsius, or the planet will be
unlivable by 2050.  We need to mitigate both CO2 and CH4!  Eating less meat
and more veggies = cooler planet. Divest from natural gas.  Eat less rice.
...go solar!
2. ​

​Greenhouse gas mitigation
 has everything to do with bird
​ conservation​

​3.  ​M
any of the birders are
​ tax paying​
parents who want their children to enjoy the birds we all love!
​4.  ​M
arshland birds are threatened because of rising tides.  Seabirds are
further threatened because fish they need to feed their young are going
deeper or farther north to seek cooler waters.
5.  Endemic birds in the Caribbean are threatened by decreasing habitat due
to people, and bigger hurricanes make this problem worse than it already
is.
​
​Please, everyone who cares about the planet, don't get annoyed that I am
"off topic."  Instead, step into your power and write a letter to the
school board to support my letter and to city council to not sell off the
Green Street parking garage to another luxury apartment developer
ASAPthese issues are all connected!!!  We need green affordable housing
to address the poverty and reduce Carbon emissions.




*---**CLIMATE CHANGE ACTION YOU CAN TAKE: Divesting from animal agriculture
by switching to a plant-based diet can help our planet transform.  A vegan
diet is heart-healthy, non-violent, anti-colonial, and sustainable! **Pledge
the **Ithaca *
*10 or 30-day (Plant-based) Vegan
Challenge!**www.facebook.com/groups/IthacaVeganChallenge/
<https://www.facebook.com/groups/IthacaVeganChallenge/>*
Instagram* #VeganPlanet2020*

*---**Sandy Wold, **sustainability educator/artist*
B.S. Chemistry/Biochemistry, University of Florida
M.S. Science Education​, UC Santa Cruz/SUNY Cortland
https://www.linkedin.com/in/sandy-wold-877114a7/
https://sandy-wold.squarespace.com/

On Sun, May 6, 2018 at 7:31 PM, Alyce Anderson <aa-lap...@twcny.rr.com>
wrote:

> Why is this on the ebird list? It has nothing to do with birds. This is
> the most inappropriate item to appear on our list in all of my years of
> being on the list. Shame on you for using it.
>
> Alyce Anderson
>
>

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[cayugabirds-l] Why I'm Voting NO on the ICSD Budget: Urgent Need for Climate Focus

2018-05-06 Thread Sandy Wold
acceptable. The working poor have been forced to move 30-45 minutes
away, making their children (*our* ICSD children) more vulnerable to the
rise in gas prices and food insecurity in many areas.  We need a formula
that is transparent and correlates Cornell wealth with our poverty rate and
a formula that itemizes the City services that Cornell staff and students
have on our roads, water/sewer, and fire/police, plus the accelerated
deterioration of infrastructure. Cornell's voluntary contribution of $6.2
million per year is considered very low compared to other universities, and
is inadequate. Given our lack of affordable housing and that we have the
third highest poverty rate in New York State, this is not acceptable.

In conclusion, like the air we breathe, sustainability, equity, and social
justice need to be woven into every school and City decision. Please see
links below for background info, and I look forward to seeing you tomorrow.
Sincerely,

Sandy Wold
Ithaca, NY 14850
ICSD Budget Hearing: Monday, May 7, 2018 at 6:00 PM in the District Office
Board Room at 400 Lake Street. If you cannot make it, there is a tele-Town
Hall meeting that same night at 7pm.
http://www.ithacacityschools.org/districtpage.cfm?pageid=214
https://datausa.io/profile/geo/ithaca-ny/
http://www.ihstattler.com/static/february2008/view.php?a=_nC
ornellContributions
http://www.ithaca.com/news/cornell-compared-ithaca-mayor-cal
ls-out-his-alma-mater-on/article_e8e56ab4-93e9-11e3-90ed-0019bb2963f4.html
https://shadowproof.com/2018/05/02/labor-progressive-organiz
ations-seattle-ramp-pressure-amazon-fund-affordable-housing/
http://www.restroomdirect.com/elkay-water-cooler-LZS8WSLK.aspx?gclid=
Cj0KCQjw5fDWBRDaARIsAA5uWTjmFLnRoiUjBIi_wF_lN9EKQZh_
1C0GuJilDgUxlFvkaHfu4t8sqL8aAuiCEALw_wcB
http://www.restroomdirect.com/pdf/Elkay/Elkay%20LZS8WSLK,%20LZS8WSSK,%20LZSDWSLK,%20LZSDWSSK%20Spec%20Sheet.pdf


*---**CLIMATE CHANGE ACTION YOU CAN TAKE: Divesting from animal agriculture
by switching to a plant-based diet can help our planet transform.  A vegan
diet is heart-healthy, non-violent, anti-colonial, and sustainable! **Pledge
the **Ithaca *
*10 or 30-day (Plant-based) Vegan
Challenge!**www.facebook.com/groups/IthacaVeganChallenge/
<https://www.facebook.com/groups/IthacaVeganChallenge/>*
Instagram* #VeganPlanet2020*

*---**Sandy Wold, **sustainability educator/artist*
B.S. Chemistry/Biochemistry, University of Florida
M.S. Science Education​, UC Santa Cruz/SUNY Cortland
https://www.linkedin.com/in/sandy-wold-877114a7/
https://sandy-wold.squarespace.com/

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[cayugabirds-l] cat bib recommendation during bird fledge time

2018-05-03 Thread Sandy Wold
A neighbor recommended this bib and says it works!  https://catgoods.com//


*---**CLIMATE CHANGE ACTION YOU CAN TAKE: Divesting from animal agriculture
by switching to a plant-based diet can help our planet transform.  A vegan
diet is heart-healthy, non-violent, anti-colonial, and sustainable! **Pledge
the **Ithaca *
*10 or 30-day (Plant-based) Vegan
Challenge!**www.facebook.com/groups/IthacaVeganChallenge/
<https://www.facebook.com/groups/IthacaVeganChallenge/>*
Instagram* #VeganPlanet2020*

*---**Sandy Wold, **sustainability educator/artist*
B.S. Chemistry/Biochemistry, University of Florida
M.S. Science Education​, UC Santa Cruz/SUNY Cortland
https://www.linkedin.com/in/sandy-wold-877114a7/
https://sandy-wold.squarespace.com/

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[cayugabirds-l] My work with an NGO in the Republic of Georgia

2018-05-02 Thread Sandy Wold
I have been traveling internationally to raptor "bottlenecks" to learn and
write for children about the conservation issues.  Last Fall, I traveled to
Batumi, Georgia to volunteer with the international NGO Batumi Raptor Count
and ended up working in the schools:  Go to page 22 to learn more.

http://www.batumiraptorcount.org/sites/default/files/imce/Member-Magazine/BRC-Member-Magazine-2017.pdf


*---**CLIMATE CHANGE ACTION YOU CAN TAKE: Divesting from animal agriculture
by switching to a plant-based diet can help our planet transform.  A vegan
diet is heart-healthy, non-violent, anti-colonial, and sustainable! **Pledge
the **Ithaca *
*10 or 30-day (Plant-based) Vegan
Challenge!**www.facebook.com/groups/IthacaVeganChallenge/
<https://www.facebook.com/groups/IthacaVeganChallenge/>*
Instagram* #VeganPlanet2020*

*---**Sandy Wold, **sustainability educator/artist*
B.S. Chemistry/Biochemistry, University of Florida
M.S. Science Education​, UC Santa Cruz/SUNY Cortland
https://www.linkedin.com/in/sandy-wold-877114a7/
https://sandy-wold.squarespace.com/

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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Looking for writer's retreat

2018-04-30 Thread Sandy Wold
Hi Susan,
I think it is better if you try to resolve the posting problem and then
post yourself. This is the address I use to post: cayugabirds-l@
list.cornell.edu
There is IT support if you hunt around, you should be able to figure it out
or call IT: https://it.cornell.edu/lyris
Chance are you subscribed from a different email address and can only post
from that email address.  Good luck!

Sandy


*---**CLIMATE CHANGE ACTION YOU CAN TAKE: Divesting from animal agriculture
by switching to a plant-based diet can help our planet transform.  A vegan
diet is heart-healthy, non-violent, anti-colonial, and sustainable! **Pledge
the **Ithaca *
*10 or 30-day (Plant-based) Vegan
Challenge!**www.facebook.com/groups/IthacaVeganChallenge/
<https://www.facebook.com/groups/IthacaVeganChallenge/>*
Instagram* #VeganPlanet2020*

*---**Sandy Wold, **sustainability educator/artist*
B.S. Chemistry/Biochemistry, University of Florida
M.S. Science Education​, UC Santa Cruz/SUNY Cortland
https://www.linkedin.com/in/sandy-wold-877114a7/
https://sandy-wold.squarespace.com/

On Mon, Apr 30, 2018 at 11:08 AM, Susan Gateley <su...@silverwaters.com>
wrote:

> Hey can you post this to bird watcher list? I can 't seem to make it go.
>
> Thanks!
> Looking for ideas to help Fair Haven Ospreys
>
>
> *We suspect the recent waterfront home erected by Mr. and Mrs Osprey on
> the end of the Fair Haven west pier is going to lead to some conflicts
> later in the summer with the two legged neighbors.*
>
> *The Coast Guard might intervene and remove the nest though it may not be
> interfering with the nav aid right now. At some point though I’m worried a
> trigger happy local might get mad at the preemption of his fishing spot.Or
> some kid might get dive bombed by a pissed off protective parent bird.*
>
>
> *Providing alternative nest platforms is chancy.I've seen the birds
> relocate to another utility pole rather than use a nice platform made for
> em. Any ideas out there on how to make one more attractive to fish hawks? *
>
>
> *Susan P. Gateley   su...@silverwaters.com <su...@silverwaters.com>*
>
>
>
>
>
> On Thu, Apr 26, 2018 at 7:12 AM, Sandy Wold <sandra.w...@gmail.com> wrote:
>
>> I am working on several art and writing projects and am looking for a
>> place to do writing retreats.  Ideally, it would have any of the following:
>>
>> --I can pay rent or do pet-sitting (I love dogs/cats)
>> --location (nearby, in the U.S. or in a Spanish-speaking country)
>> --birding/hiking opportunity
>> --quiet location (no noisy neighbors)
>> --reliable electricity/wifi
>> --could be for several weeks or months (now-September)
>> --could be in winter (January-May)
>> --non-smoking, clean, no strong fragrance cleaners
>>
>> Please keep my name.  Thank you in advance!
>> Sandy
>>
>>
>> *---**CLIMATE CHANGE ACTION YOU CAN TAKE: Divesting from animal
>> agriculture by switching to a plant-based diet can help our planet
>> transform.  A vegan diet is heart-healthy, non-violent, anti-colonial, and
>> sustainable! **Pledge the **Ithaca *
>> *10 or 30-day (Plant-based) Vegan 
>> Challenge!**www.facebook.com/groups/IthacaVeganChallenge/
>> <https://www.facebook.com/groups/IthacaVeganChallenge/>*
>> Instagram* #VeganPlanet2020*
>>
>> *---**Sandy Wold, **sustainability educator/artist*
>> B.S. Chemistry/Biochemistry, University of Florida
>> M.S. Science Education​, UC Santa Cruz/SUNY Cortland
>> https://www.linkedin.com/in/sandy-wold-877114a7/
>> https://sandy-wold.squarespace.com/
>> --
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>> <http://ebird.org/content/ebird/>!*
>> --
>>
>
>

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[cayugabirds-l] Stewart Park Bustle

2018-04-28 Thread Sandy Wold
This morning 8:30-10am I saw so many birds in my loop through Renwick Woods
to the Swan Pond and then through the Golf Course.

Here are the highlights and many FOYs for me:
--flicker kek-kek-keking incessantly near the top of a tree near a snag.  I
think it was a she (no mustache)
--I estimate that there were at least 12 Golden-rumped Warblers.  They were
all sitting around the main pond on shrubs or up in trees darting out to
snag a bug over the water and back.  This was happening so fast, I could
not accurately count them.  The loud music and yelling over with the crew
team did not seem to affect them or their calling.
--By 9:30am, I noticed a second warbler, the Yellow Warbler!  They had more
of a swallow-like insect hunting behavior.  At times I thought I saw a
third species of warbler and other species of swallow, and then they
disappeared.  I thought I heard a flycatcher a few times, but never saw
it.  The swallows showed up soon thereafter, and I think they sound
slightly different.
--Then by 10am, a huge swarm of swallows arrived, about 30!  They were all
over the pond zipping back and forth.  I watched to see if the GRWs
stopped.  They seemed to break for a minute or two, but then they went back
at it.  It was quite the choreography, and they seemed to operate at
different heights above the pond. I definitely saw Barn Swallows and think
I may have seen one of the other kinds.
*---As all of this was going on, the bull frogs started up.*
*--As I walked across the golf course, the tree frog went at it.*
*--Heard but not seen: Kingfisher, Song Sparrow, American Redstart*

*Welcome back friends!!!*

*CLIMATE CHANGE ACTION YOU CAN TAKE: Divesting from animal agriculture by
switching to a plant-based diet can help *
*​mitigate significant amounts of methane*
*.  A vegan diet is heart-healthy, non-violent, anti-colonial, and
sustainable! **Pledge the **Ithaca *
*10 or 30-day (Plant-based) Vegan
Challenge!**www.facebook.com/groups/IthacaVeganChallenge/
<https://www.facebook.com/groups/IthacaVeganChallenge/>*

Instagram* #VeganPlanet2020*

*---**Sandy Wold, **sustainability educator/artist*
B.S. Chemistry/Biochemistry, University of Florida
M.S. Science Education​, UC Santa Cruz/SUNY Cortland
https://www.linkedin.com/in/sandy-wold-877114a7/
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[cayugabirds-l] Looking for writer's retreat

2018-04-26 Thread Sandy Wold
I am working on several art and writing projects and am looking for a place
to do writing retreats.  Ideally, it would have any of the following:

--I can pay rent or do pet-sitting (I love dogs/cats)
--location (nearby, in the U.S. or in a Spanish-speaking country)
--birding/hiking opportunity
--quiet location (no noisy neighbors)
--reliable electricity/wifi
--could be for several weeks or months (now-September)
--could be in winter (January-May)
--non-smoking, clean, no strong fragrance cleaners

Please keep my name.  Thank you in advance!
Sandy


*---**CLIMATE CHANGE ACTION YOU CAN TAKE: Divesting from animal agriculture
by switching to a plant-based diet can help our planet transform.  A vegan
diet is heart-healthy, non-violent, anti-colonial, and sustainable! **Pledge
the **Ithaca *
*10 or 30-day (Plant-based) Vegan
Challenge!**www.facebook.com/groups/IthacaVeganChallenge/
<https://www.facebook.com/groups/IthacaVeganChallenge/>*
Instagram* #VeganPlanet2020*

*---**Sandy Wold, **sustainability educator/artist*
B.S. Chemistry/Biochemistry, University of Florida
M.S. Science Education​, UC Santa Cruz/SUNY Cortland
https://www.linkedin.com/in/sandy-wold-877114a7/
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[cayugabirds-l] Nashville W and BH Vireo in Brooktondale

2018-04-25 Thread Sandy Podulka
Had a NASHVILLE WARBLER and a BLUE-HEADED VIREO this afternoon in 
Brooktondale, mixed in with the billions of Ruby-crowned Kinglets and 
Yellow-rumped Warblers foraging in the mist around our ponds. One 
Golden-crowned Kinglet was here yesterday, and a few PINE SISKINS persist.


Happy Spring,
Sandy Podulka


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[cayugabirds-l] Killdeer, Bluebirds, Osprey

2018-04-25 Thread Sandy Wold
All heard and seen at Stewart Park yesterday!  Happy spring!


*---**CLIMATE CHANGE ACTION YOU CAN TAKE: Divesting from animal agriculture
by switching to a plant-based diet can help our planet transform.  A vegan
diet is heart-healthy, non-violent, anti-colonial, and sustainable! **Pledge
the **Ithaca *
*10 or 30-day (Plant-based) Vegan
Challenge!**www.facebook.com/groups/IthacaVeganChallenge/
<https://www.facebook.com/groups/IthacaVeganChallenge/>*
Instagram* #VeganPlanet2020*

*---**Sandy Wold, **sustainability educator/artist*
B.S. Chemistry/Biochemistry, University of Florida
M.S. Science Education​, UC Santa Cruz/SUNY Cortland
https://www.linkedin.com/in/sandy-wold-877114a7/
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[cayugabirds-l] Tamron 150-600mm lens for sale

2018-04-14 Thread Sandy Wold
Excellent condition!  Compatible with Nikon camera body.  Willing to do
partial barter for 8 x 40 binoculars.
https://ithaca.craigslist.org/for/d/tamron-600mm-lens-and/6561089729.html

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[cayugabirds-l] Addendum to Lake Trip report... Pipit, Wood Ducks

2018-04-09 Thread Sandy Podulka
I neglected to mention an AMERICAN PIPIT on the spit at Myers Point 
and a pair of WOOD DUCKS in the Mill Pond in Union Springs. That 
pheasant was off 34B N of Lansing Station Rd (thanks, Donna), and 
Donna Scott tells me she's been seeing small groups of them there for months.



Birded up the East side of Cayuga Lake to Montezuma with Lynn Leopold 
today. Lovely, despite the cold and occasional snow squalls! 
Highlights included many RED-BREASTED MERGANSERS on the lake and lots 
of GREEN-WINGED TEAL (no European) and NORTHERN SHOVELERS at 
Montezuma and Carncross Road. There were several GREATER YELLOWLEGS 
at LaRue's Lagoon along the Wildlife Drive and 10+ at Carncross Road. 
Quite a few COMMON LOONS on the lake, as well.  Most gorgeous bird of 
the day was a breeding-plumage HORNED GREBE close-in at Ladoga, among 
other Horned Grebes and one Pied-billed Grebe. Also at Montezuma were 
A. Wigeon, Gadwall, Ring-necked Duck, Blue-winged Teal, Mallard, 
Hooded Merganser, Bufflehead, and two N. Pintail. Redhead at the Mill 
Pond in Union Springs and the Factory St. Pond, and Lesser Scaup 
along the way. Common Mergansers at Myers Point.  At Salt Point, 
50-60 CEDAR WAXWINGS were living up to their names by devouring the 
Cedar berries.

Most surprising bird was a male RING-NECKED PHEASANT that crossed 
Route 90 about half a mile North of Lansing Station Road!

Still waiting for spring,
Sandy Podulka 
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[cayugabirds-l] Pheasant, Yellowlegs, RB Mergs, Horned Grebe E. Cayuga Lake and MNWR

2018-04-08 Thread Sandy Podulka
Birded up the East side of Cayuga Lake to Montezuma with Lynn Leopold 
today. Lovely, despite the cold and occasional snow squalls! 
Highlights included many RED-BREASTED MERGANSERS on the lake and lots 
of GREEN-WINGED TEAL (no European) and NORTHERN SHOVELERS at 
Montezuma and Carncross Road. There were several GREATER YELLOWLEGS 
at LaRue's Lagoon along the Wildlife Drive and 10+ at Carncross Road. 
Quite a few COMMON LOONS on the lake, as well.  Most gorgeous bird of 
the day was a breeding-plumage HORNED GREBE close-in at Ladoga, among 
other Horned Grebes and one Pied-billed Grebe. Also at Montezuma were 
A. Wigeon, Gadwall, Ring-necked Duck, Blue-winged Teal, Mallard, 
Hooded Merganser, Bufflehead, and two N. Pintail. Redhead at the Mill 
Pond in Union Springs and the Factory St. Pond, and Lesser Scaup 
along the way. Common Mergansers at Myers Point.  At Salt Point, 
50-60 CEDAR WAXWINGS were living up to their names by devouring the 
Cedar berries.


Most surprising bird was a male RING-NECKED PHEASANT that crossed 
Route 90 about half a mile North of Lansing Station Road!


Still waiting for spring,
Sandy Podulka


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[cayugabirds-l] Phoebe in Brooktondale

2018-04-01 Thread Sandy Podulka

Our first Eastern Phoebe of the year showed up in Brooktondale this morning.

--Sandy Podulka


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[cayugabirds-l] Ruddy Ducks, Eurasian Teal, Sandhills, Peregrine MNWR and Cayuga Lake.

2018-03-21 Thread Sandy Podulka
Highlights from a trip up the East side of Cayuga Lake and Montezuma 
National Wildlife Refuge today with Lynn Leopold were a small group 
of Ruddy Ducks at Mudlock, the Eurasian Teal at the MNWR Visitor's 
Center (foraging with Green-winged Teal), 2 Sandhill Cranes and 
thousands of gorgeous Northern Pintail at Carncross Road, and a 
Peregrine Falcon that buzzed the ducks and Tundra Swans at Carncross 
in the early evening. What a joy to see so many waterfowl in one day!

We failed to find Eurasian Wigeon or Cackling Goose, but not for lack 
of trying. There are just tons of birds to look through.  We did not 
see as many Snow Geese as others have reported--perhaps many 
left--but there were several white "puddles" in the middle of the 
lake at the north end, and one huge string of Snow Geese on the west 
side of Cayuga Lake, south of Cayuga Lake State Park. They appeared 
to be taking off in medium-sized groups and heading west in the early evening.

Sandy Podulka 
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[cayugabirds-l] Alizé Carrère Talk Recorded?

2018-03-19 Thread Sandy Wold
Does anyone know if the talk from last week by Alizé Carrère was recorded
and available online?  Thank you.
Sandy

*Climate Change Action: Ithaca Whole Foods Plant-Based (Vegan) Challenge
The best way to help the Earth is to switch to a plant-based diet. *
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<https://www.facebook.com/groups/IthacaVeganChallenge/>*
Instagram* #veganplanet2020*

*---**Sandy Wold, **sustainability educator, artist*
B.S. Chemistry/Biochemistry, University of Florida
M.S. Science Education​, University of CA, Santa Cruz and SUNY Cortland
https://www.linkedin.com/in/sandy-wold-877114a7/
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[cayugabirds-l] Early Woodcock Peenting

2018-02-27 Thread Sandy Wold
Last time I wrote on early territorial calling behavior, several people
wrote and "definitively" asserted that this breeding behavior is day
light-dependent.  ...but if it is "definitively" dependent on the amount of
light in a day, then why would the woodcock be showing up a week or so
earlier?Could there be a gene that tells a woodcock to migrate when the fat
reserves are high enough?  and if these woodcocks are from a coastal
location, as suggested by Pete, then it seems to me that the coastal
woodcocks are responding to temperature, or is this a random group of
woodcocks who have enough fat reserves and are willing to be hungry in
order to get the best breeding spot, so maybe it's worth it? And are
they eating if they show up in a snow storm?  Very interesting to ponder!


*---**Climate Change Action: 10 or 30-day Ithaca Whole Foods Plant-Based
(Vegan) Challenge (prepare for Earth Day 2018).  **Education, support,
potluck social gatherings: **www.facebook.com/groups/IthacaVeganChallenge/
<https://www.facebook.com/groups/IthacaVeganChallenge/>*
Instagram* #veganplanet2020*

Being non-vegan is taking a side.
It is taking the side of the oppressor.
It is not a neutral position.
It is a pro-actively violent position.

Switch sides.  Go vegan.

Christopher Sebastian McJetters


*---**Sandy Wold, **sustainability/nutrition lecturer **and concerned
citizen *
*for climate change, free speech, and democracy *
B.S. Chemistry/Biochemistry, University of Florida
M.S. Science Education​, University of CA, Santa Cruz and SUNY Cortland
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[cayugabirds-l] Junco mating call

2018-02-21 Thread Sandy
I’ve been hearing the junco call and seen them high up in tree tops for about a 
week now. They seem to stay local all winter. Usually I don’t hear them until 
March or April. Does anyone else agree?

Sent from my iPhone
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[cayugabirds-l] Bird Signs of Earlier Spring?

2018-02-13 Thread Sandy Wold
Maybe this is obvious to everyone on this list with people reporting the
call of a cardinal or "raven with nest material" in February.  But I also
have been noticing sounds of spring (cardinal, titmouse, Carolina Wren,
...), crows checking out tree tops and pairing, crows bombing raptors,...
since February 1st (maybe even second or third week of January?).  I meant
to write dates and temps in my notebook this year, but didn't.

It seems like all of this is happening a month or two early, am I wrong?
Are there any scientific studies that show what triggers the timing of
these territorial behaviors? Could it be a certain number of days above
freezing?  I know the media talks about the growing seasons lengthening and
things blooming earlier,... but I haven't seen anything written on bird
nesting behavior.  Just curious, thanks!
Sandy


*---**Climate Change Action: 30-day Ithaca VEGAN CHALLENGE (pledge for
Earth Day 2018)*
*No-blame, no-shame support here: *
*https://www.facebook.com/groups/IthacaVeganChallenge/
<https://www.facebook.com/groups/IthacaVeganChallenge/>**Less meat = Less
heat, 4 min. video  *
*www.youtube.com/watch?v=lLhEmGx8YQE
<https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lLhEmGx8YQE>*
*---**Sandy Wold*
Author/Originator of Cayuga Basin Bioregion Map
(available at Wegmans (near ATM), Autumn Leaves, Cornell Plantations, and
Ithaca Visitor's Bureau)
https://www.linkedin.com/in/sandy-wold-877114a7/
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[cayugabirds-l] Greater White-fronted geese

2018-02-06 Thread Sandy
I found two feeding near the large flocks of Canada geese near Boynton Middle 
school yesterday afternoon. Got close up photos posted on CAyuga Birds 
Facebook. They let
Me get close to them. Could they be barnyard escapees?

Sent from my iPhone
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[cayugabirds-l] FINALLY! 3 Siskins in Brooktondale.

2018-01-15 Thread Sandy Podulka

Yay. Now, bring on the Purple Finches!


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Re:[cayugabirds-l] cayugabirds-l digest: December 18, 2017

2017-12-18 Thread Sandy Wold
Does the Lab of Ornithology have any information?  How are their feeders
doing? any info from their Feeder Watch data collection?  Sorry if I missed
this info.  My feeders have been relatively silent since years past as
well.  But it seems that the juncos go crazy when I'm not around.  When I
come home, I see their cute little footprints all over the ground within a
five foot radius of the feeder.  I did note several chickadees and two
titmice about a month ago at my feeder, and heard a downy or hairy
woodpecker, but that's about it.  When looking for the Red-headed
Woodpecker in Palmer Woods, which I still have not seen, grrr, I noted many
cardinals, blue jays, juncoes, bluebirds, downy or hairy woodpeckers
feeding in the shrubs which were bountiful with berries and sumac.  I have
noticed *all* conifer trees at the Plantations especially to be bountiful
this year.

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[cayugabirds-l] Bird survives rough ride through Hurricane Irene

2017-11-28 Thread Sandy
In case someone did not see this article on the radio tagged whimbrel, I am 
sharing the good news with link below. 

I was googling what happens to hummingbirds during a hurricane. Sounds like 
there are stories of them being tough and surviving, but I am more concerned 
for the endemic species in the Caribbean, such as the Cuban Bee Hummingbird and 
their already stressed and fragile habitat. I know Cuba got slammed almost as 
bad as Puerto Rico. Does anyone know?
http://content.usatoday.com/communities/sciencefair/post/2011/08/bird-survive-rough-ride-through-hurricane-irene/1


Sent from my iPhone
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[cayugabirds-l] Native Pagoda Dogwood offer - u dig

2017-10-26 Thread Sandy Wold
I have a Native Pagoda Dogwood I need to rehome. It needs more sun than I
can give it and is supposed to grow about 3ftx3ft, but is growing taller
and spindly because not enough sun on the west side of my house and partly
shaded by a mature tree, and I wonder if it was mislabeled and could become
more of an understory tree.  I think it would do well on the east side of a
house with no shade.  Sunday afternoon would be a good day to come get it.
I can help dig.  It's been there about three years.  I am located near
Hickey's Music, downtown Ithaca.  Please contact me off-list.


*---Sandy Wold*
Author/Originator of Cayuga Basin Bioregion Map
(for sale at Wegmans, Autumn Leaves, Cornell Plantations, and Visitor's
Bureau)
https://www.linkedin.com/in/sandy-wold-877114a7/
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[cayugabirds-l] Where are all my feeder birds?

2017-10-26 Thread Sandy Wold
I was noticing an eerie silence in my garden since this original post but
did have a few Tufted Titmouses (Titmice?) show up that day at my feeder
along with a group of chickadees and jays.  I think it is cool that feeder
birds continue to scout and forage for the "good" stuff and then probably
also communicate with others about it.  Isn't the bounty due to the amazing
rains we had this past springbut I am noticing some growth spurts on my
fruit trees now after the recent rains, when they should be dropping leaves
by now.  Freaky.


*---Sandy Wold*
Author/Originator of Cayuga Basin Bioregion Map
(for sale at Wegmans, Autumn Leaves, Cornell Plantations, and Visitor's
Bureau)
https://www.linkedin.com/in/sandy-wold-877114a7/
*https://sites.google.com/site/cayugabioregionmap/about-author-and-artist
<https://sites.google.com/site/cayugabioregionmap/about-author-and-artist>*
www.Sandy-Wold.com <http://www.sandy-wold.squarespace.com/>

*"Don't ask what the world needs. Ask what makes you come ALIVE, for what
the world needs is people who have come ALIVE."  **- Dr. Howard Thurman,
American Theologian, Clergyman and Activist (1900-1981) *

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[cayugabirds-l] Red-headed Woodpecker

2017-09-04 Thread Sandy Wold
Woh, ho!  I've been waiting to hear news like this   I had a
feeling we should be seeing more of them in the Finger Lakes, shouldn't
we???!   I never hear it reported other than near Montezuma (or did I miss
meetings where it was reported). Thanks for sharing, Shawn, and thanks to
Dave Toews for finding it!!!

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[cayugabirds-l] Montezuma Highlights - Correction

2017-08-19 Thread Sandy Wold
Thanks, Ann. There was a guy from Brooklyn there who said it was Clapper
Rail and got a good photo of it when it came out from behind the reeds.
Then when I checked my Peterson's Guide, it seemed to match the
description, but you are right!  I forgot to check its region!  Boy, the
power of suggestion (and intimidation of those honking-big bazooka
cameras!) Gotta always check region, no matter what!  Thanks for the
reminder!

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[cayugabirds-l] Looking for 65mm field scope

2017-08-05 Thread Sandy Wold
I know this is a long-shot, bt does anyone have a field scope they
aren't using?  Any suggestions for a field scope that would be good to view
raptors?  From what I've read, it sounds like straight (vs. angled) is
better for tracking. I'm going to be a volunteer with the Batumi Raptor
Count this fall, run by an NGO conservation group, and they want me to
bring one; but I can't afford the Swarovski 65mm field scope.  Last year, I
saw some of the raptor migration as they crossed from a place near Tarifa,
Spain to northern Africa, and it was one of the most exhilarating
experiences of my life - if not   t h e   most exhilarating. The perils
these birds face is astonishing, and I am working on an art education
project for children about them.

Would love to find a decent second-hand field scope that is not too heavy?
3.5 pounds is the current weight, and I noticed a Nikon 50mm is only about
1 pound.  I don't know scopes well enough to know if the 50mm is adequate.
I suspect not.  Also, where I am going has a lot of clouds, so light entry
into the scope is a huge factor.  I know, a long-shot; but miracles do
happen!  Thanks in advance for any suggestions or advice.  I've learned and
continue to learn so much from you all and am so grateful

*Sandy Wold*
Author/Originator of Cayuga Basin Bioregion Map
(for sale at Wegmans, Autumn Leaves, Cornell Book Store, Cornell
Plantations, and Visitor's Bureau)
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[cayugabirds-l] Virginia Rail yard bird in Brooktondale

2017-07-19 Thread Sandy Podulka
After years of looking for rails and playing tapes unsuccessfully on 
our property, we finally saw a Virginia Rail walking along the 
driveway! It quickly ran into the grasses and called and another one 
answered it. It's been a while since we had a new yard bird here in 
Brooktondale!


Sandy Podulka


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[cayugabirds-l] 13+ BC Night-Herons from East Road

2017-07-18 Thread Sandy Podulka
Montezuma was fairly quite this afternoon, but from the overlook on 
East Road we could see 13+ adult Black-crowned Night-Herons foraging 
in the marsh. The most I recall seeing outside of a rookery 
anywhere!  Also present were numerous Great Egrets and Great Blue 
Herons. I was especially surprised to see so many Night-Herons at 
3:30 in the afternoon!  Perhaps they are desperately feeding young right now?


--Sandy Podulka


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[cayugabirds-l] Fwd: LATC Senior discount for lifetime national parks price going up soon!

2017-07-14 Thread Sandy Wold
from someone who
...recently purchased my national parks lifetime pass for seniors for this
reason.  You can get yours from the Finger Lakes National Forest office in
Hector.  Call ahead - they sometimes run out of passes and have to wait for
more.

http://www.dec.ny.gov/outdoor/6.html

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[cayugabirds-l] Good News: Harry's back at it! (sic)

2017-06-25 Thread Sandy Wold
I've been hearing the Hairy Woodpeckers calling to each other again for a
few days now and drilling out a new nest (mature Silver Maple)!

*"Don't ask what the world needs. Ask what makes you come ALIVE, for what
the world needs is people who have come ALIVE."  - Dr. Howard Thurman,
American Theologian, Clergyman and Activist (1900-1981) *

Sandy Wold
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www.sites.google.com/site/cayugabioregionmap
<https://sites.google.com/site/cayugabioregionmap/>
Educator, www.linkedin.com/pub/sandra-sandy-wold/a7/114/877
Artist, www.Sandy-Wold.com <http://www.sandy-wold.squarespace.com/>

*To be astonished is one of the surest ways not to be old too quickly.* -
Sidonie-Gabrielle Colette

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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Why Do Bird Eggs Have Different Shapes? Look to the Wings - NYTimes.com

2017-06-23 Thread Sandy Podulka
I'm having a lot of trouble believing this. Many birds need to fly 
well, and it's hard to believe all (or most) eggs wouldn't be the 
best shape for flying, in general, if this were true.  I can't 
believe the flying needs of albatrosses and sandpipers, both of which 
fly long distances, are so different that they would produce such 
different shapes. And some owls migrate (saw-whet), whereas others do 
not (Eastern Screech-Owl), yet their eggs are a similar shape, quite 
spherical.  Why? They both nest in holes.  I still like the older 
theories. But maybe that's because I'm old.

Sandy Podulka

At 01:03 PM 6/23/2017, Peter wrote:

><https://mobile.nytimes.com/2017/06/22/science/bird-eggs-shapes-flight.html?smprod=nytcore-iphone=nytcore-iphone-share=>https://mobile.nytimes.com/2017/06/22/science/bird-eggs-shapes-flight.html?smprod=nytcore-iphone=nytcore-iphone-share=
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[cayugabirds-l] Hairy Woodpecker Nest Update

2017-06-19 Thread Sandy Wold
Sadly, yesterday's storm with high winds destroyed the Hairy Woodpecker I
reported yesterday. Now the nest is silent, and I saw the dad perched on a
telephone pole calling.  I have not heard the female responding yet (would
she have been the one in the nest at night?), and I do not know what to do
but am asking around and notified the City forester.  I assume the babies
may have succumbed to hypothermia by now.  I have pictures before and
after.  I guess this is what to expect with greater storm intensity.

*"Don't ask what the world needs. Ask what makes you come ALIVE, for what
the world needs is people who have come ALIVE."  - Dr. Howard Thurman,
American Theologian, Clergyman and Activist (1900-1981) *

Sandra (Sandy) Wold
Author/Originator/Designer/Publisher of Cayuga Basin Bioregion Map,
www.sites.google.com/site/cayugabioregionmap
<https://sites.google.com/site/cayugabioregionmap/>
Educator, www.linkedin.com/pub/sandra-sandy-wold/a7/114/877
Artist, www.Sandy-Wold.com <http://www.sandy-wold.squarespace.com/>

*To be astonished is one of the surest ways not to be old too quickly.* -
Sidonie-Gabrielle Colette

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[cayugabirds-l] Close Encounters: Hairy Woodpecker Behavior in Fall Creek

2017-06-17 Thread Sandy Wold
Last week, on June 11th, I found the nest hole of a pair of Hairy
Woodpeckers in a mature 100+ year old Sugar Maple which hangs over into my
yard. According to allaboutbirds.org, it will be another two weeks from now
before they fledge.  The perfectly round hole is about 30 feet up on a
dying limb of the tree.  Today, before I took off on my bike, I heard a
Pileated(?) woodpecker calling in the tree of the nest.  It called for
about a minute, then flew off, and has not been calling from here for
months. I couldn't help but think the bird was coming by to visit (like an
auntie) to check on the babies!  I could not make out the bird, but it was
large, mostly black and surprisingly close to the nest cavity (about five
feet, maybe less).  I do not think this was an accident as I have not heard
the Pileated or the Red-bellied for several months.  I later read that
Hairy woodpeckers sometimes follow Pileated woodpeckers to eat the bugs
they miss, but no mention was made of the other way around.

Shortly thereafter, four blocks from my house near the corner of Yates and
Cayuga, while I was on my bike, a black and white bird undulated in front
of me and landed in a small tree near me.  I stopped to watch and saw it
was a Hairy.  Since it was so close to my house, I suspect it was likely
the female I have been watching all week, and that she was foraging for
insects for her babies.  It then went from its perch to the rooftops and
looked in gutters and peaked in several holes of uncaulked crevices of
houses.  The male called from down the street, and the female responded.
It looked like she had a "routine" path, as if she knew where the insect
"hiding hotspots" were.  Why do I say this?  Because it would fly directly
to a gutter corner, then zig zag backwards to a crevice, then up to a roof,
look under a loose shingle, then without hesitation bolt between two houses
to the tree behind.  The bird appeared to "know" where she was going as she
promptly left for the next spot if no bug or spider was found.  Very cool!
Kind of like how squirrels "remember" where they hide their nuts (and my
stolen unripe peaches)?

So I am left wondering does anyone else have these kinds of
close-encounters? I was on my way to the library, minding my own business,
when the Hairy flew a few feet in front of me, at eye level, and landed in
a young tree.  What kind of coincidence is this? What are the chances that
a Hairy would pass me as I was biking???  That's almost as crazy as the
time I felt the tail wind of a Sharp-shinned Hawk swoop up and over my
helmet as I was on my bike at Newman Golf Course and it was hunting a flock
of Mourning Doves (or were they sparrows?).  It came out of no where and
suddenly swooped up behind, over, and in front of me while I was peddling
hard.  Both of these incidents were so close I could have easily collided
into these bird(s) with only a mili-second in time difference.
Coincidence???  Clearly, they are agile and highly skilled flyers who know
their abilities and can out-maneuver me; but why did they choose to go in
front of me instead of wait until I passed by?  I have my theories,
wondering what others think or have experienced.

Regardless, the entire experience helped me better understand why the
parents can be gone for 15-20 minutes at a time before returning to the
nest to feed the noisy nestlings!  Also, I have even greater appreciation
for birds, especially those who reduce the number of spiders and bugs on
our houses!

*"Don't ask what the world needs. Ask what makes you come ALIVE, for what
the world needs is people who have come ALIVE."  - Dr. Howard Thurman,
American Theologian, Clergyman and Activist (1900-1981) *

Sandra (Sandy) Wold
Author/Originator/Designer/Publisher of Cayuga Basin Bioregion Map,
www.sites.google.com/site/cayugabioregionmap
<https://sites.google.com/site/cayugabioregionmap/>
Educator, www.linkedin.com/pub/sandra-sandy-wold/a7/114/877
Artist, www.Sandy-Wold.com <http://www.sandy-wold.squarespace.com/>

*To be astonished is one of the surest ways not to be old too quickly.* -
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[cayugabirds-l] Grackle and Fish Crow(?) Observation

2017-06-07 Thread Sandy Wold
Yesterday, while working in my garden in downtown Ithaca, I noticed out of
the corner of my eye a black bird fly into the Norway Maple.  I assumed it
was a grackle as they are nesting in the tree (and had a fledgling recently
land in the street).  A Fed Ex guy stopped last week to relocate it to the
grass.  Anyway, I then heard a loud scuffle in the tree, looked up, saw a
larger-than-grackle sized bird bolt out with something in its mouth.  My
first thought was, "crow took a chick!"  Then about eight grackles chased
after the crow scolding it up and over the towering Sugar Maple nearby.  I
did not have my binoculars, but the object in the crow's mouth appeared to
be about walnut-size or avocado-pit-size and black.  The object was
predominantly round in and ball-shape, but I could kind of make out a large
head and tiny body with damp feathers as the chase zipped by me in all of
about two seconds before the crow and object were out of my view.

After the excitement, or trauma, depending on your perspective, I guessed
it was a Fish Crow on the grounds that
1.  they have been the dominant crow call I've heard in my neighborhood
this spring
2.  it almost passed for a grackle based on size (so smaller than American
Crow)
3.  I heard a Fish Crow call about thirty minutes later and no American
Crows all day.  Last year, American Crow was the dominant crow call I heard.

I found many things interesting about this observation.
1.  It appears there is a colony in this tree, and this is the first time I
observed a visible count of what appeared to be an entire colony defense
system.  There was silence in the tree as the chase ensued.  Did any stay
behind?  This flying after a crow is different than watching a robin or
sparrow fly into the tree and just get scolded (not chased)...where I could
only hear but not visibly count.
2.  The crow flew in as if it "knew" exactly what it wanted, where to go,
and how it would leave.  The entire theft took about five seconds from
start to flight over maple.  I've heard it calling all spring from within a
block of my house.  So it probably has been "watching" grackles to figure
out where it nestsa bit creepy.  Yes, so intelligent, as we know!!!
3.  I usually hear the Fish Crows dominate about five blocks in another
direction, and have never seen grackles nest in my yard.  So I think this
explains why a bird would want to change nest locations every year.  And
has anyone ever speculated why the Osprey at the inlet at the Newman Golf
Course stopped building its nest?  Great Horned Owl?  Did the GHO nest
again nearby?
4.  I have since noticed one grackle "standing on guard" perched on a phone
wire looking directly at the nesting tree.  I never thought about it
before, but after this incident, I think that is what it may be doing.
5.  I did see a grackle once dash into the nesting tree like a lightening
bolt when a robin entered.  Robin left promptly but lagged for a moment.

*"Don't ask what the world needs. Ask what makes you come ALIVE, for what
the world needs is people who have come ALIVE."  - Dr. Howard Thurman,
American Theologian, Clergyman and Activist (1900-1981) *

Sandra (Sandy) Wold
Author/Originator/Designer/Publisher of Cayuga Basin Bioregion Map,
www.sites.google.com/site/cayugabioregionmap
<https://sites.google.com/site/cayugabioregionmap/>
Educator, www.linkedin.com/pub/sandra-sandy-wold/a7/114/877
Artist, www.Sandy-Wold.com <http://www.sandy-wold.squarespace.com/>

*To be astonished is one of the surest ways not to be old too quickly.* -
Sidonie-Gabrielle Colette

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[cayugabirds-l] Hog Island carpool?

2017-06-05 Thread Sandy Wold
Is anyone going to Hog Island to work at the upcoming workshop starting
this Sunday and would like to carpool?  If so, please contact me.  Thank
you.
Sandy

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Re: [cayugabirds-l] West Danby Nighthawk

2017-05-28 Thread Sandy Podulka
We've been hearing them for the last week as we garden in the 
evenings in Brooktondale. I wish they would stay the rest of the 
summer. It's wonderful to know they are up there working away, and 
great fun to hear them.

Sandy

At 08:21 PM 5/28/2017, Geo Kloppel wrote:
>Out working in the garden just now, I heard a Nighhawk! I looked up, 
>and there it was, moving rapidly north, calling out repeatedly and 
>hawking insects at the same time, like a talented juggler who can 
>weave a complicated path through a marching parade while keeping 
>three balls in the air and simultaneously telling a story to the crowd.
>
>-Geo
>
>
>
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[cayugabirds-l] best bet for bird bonanza?

2017-05-25 Thread Sandy Wold
Hi Melanie,
I share your challenge, and often bird in the early evening. My typos and
word jumble mistakes posted on this list I attribute to a year of sleep
deprivation. You might really enjoy the path along the inlet in Renwick
Woods (closer to the "stone" arch entrance near the RR tracks).  There I
hear reliable Wood Thrush, Oven Bird, Yellow Warbler, and many other
incredible sounds in the last 2-3 hours of the day!!!  Mosquitoes were
merciless, be prepared!

I was there yesterday around 6pm, all of these birds were there, and I am
99% sure I had a Wilson's Warbler!  It was backlit and high up in the tree
tops, so I could not be sure.  I saw the underside of the tail which was
white/light gray with darker gray tips.  Its call matched the recording and
responded to it; and I heard the same song at Fuertes Bird Sanctuary the
week before.
Happy bird listening!
Sandy

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[cayugabirds-l] Lab of O and Fuertes Highlights

2017-05-16 Thread Sandy Wold
Lab of O. main trail and Fuertes Bird Sanctuary (both = *)
Canada Warbler
Yellow Warbler*
Yellow-rumped Warbler*
Baltimore Orioles*
Warbling Vireo*
Blue-winged Vireo (Fuertes only)
As I was admiring the shiny blue iridescent heads of two grackles, one of
them pecked a Bull Frog in the butt and harassed it for a few more moments
after it jumped into the water.  It then went back to flipping the leaves
and bark as it and a friend went along foraging along fallen logs in a
swampy part of the pond.  I had no idea birds might have a sense of humor!
Maybe more likely to be seen when food is abundant and weather is nice.  :)
 Happy birding!

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[cayugabirds-l] Hawthorns?

2017-05-11 Thread Sandy Podulka

Did anyone go to Hawthorns today?  If so, how was it?  --Sandy


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[cayugabirds-l] Hummingbird tongue video 2011

2017-05-11 Thread Sandy Wold
https://www.wired.com/2011/05/hummingbird-tongue-drinking/

I did not know the hummingbird tongue splits/operates like this!  Did
you

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Re: [cayugabirds-l] checking, what insect is all about our faces now?

2017-05-02 Thread Sandy Podulka
They really are black flies, and they bite!
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_fly

I think the term "gnat" is kind of a lay term that people use for 
small flying things that annoy them, which would certainly include 
those dreaded black flies, which I try really hard to view as "bird 
food" and "what brings the warblers in spring." (But I rarely succeed.)

"Gnats" officially come in many varieties, such as Fungus Gnats and 
Wood Gnats, which look nothing like black flies.  Scroll down through 
this link to see the various groups of flies.
http://www.naturespot.org.uk/taxonomy/term/6

Sandy Podulka

p.s. Thanks for the head net link! It looks great and REI is a 
terrific company to support.

At 10:52 AM 5/2/2017, you wrote:
>Hi all, I always thought this little black flying insect around my 
>face as warblers show up was black fly. Am I right?
>In case they are driving you nuts, this is my solution. Best headnet 
>I have ever found!
><https://www.rei.com/product/102055/bens-invisinet-insect-head-net>https://www.rei.com/product/102055/bens-invisinet-insect-head-net
>--
>"Life is a hard battle anyway. If we laugh and sing a little as we 
>fight the good fight of freedom, it makes it all go easier. I will 
>not allow my life's light to be determined by the darkness around 
>me."  ~ Sojourner Truth
>
>Healing Hands of Ithaca
>MassageIthaca.com
>108 W. Buffalo Street, Ithaca,NY
>
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[cayugabirds-l] Chickadee Drive-by (Part II): Nest material feedback received

2017-04-25 Thread Sandy Wold
Feedback received from recent posting:

--do *not* put out string; entanglement issues reported
--stuff nesting material into mesh bag, grapevine ball, suet cage, tree
cavity,...
--if you read the allaboutbirds link (posted again below), note the
discussion at the very end.  It reveals potential problems reported with
providing string, human hair, animal hair, colorful fabrics/pile, dryer
lint,...  best solution sounds like learning what in your garden they like
for nesting, encourage that to grow, and set aside in a pile for birds
--let the garden "go" wild in fall through late spring if you can
--be mindful when "spring cleaning in the garden" (e.g. set aside pine
needles, plant fluff like milkweed,...)

https://www.allaboutbirds.org/providing-nest-material-for-birds-dos-donts/

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[cayugabirds-l] Chickadee Drive-by

2017-04-25 Thread Sandy Wold
Yesterday, while sitting with a friend in the warm sunshine, having dinner
on the patio, and admiring the many birds calling and coming to the feeder,
a chickadee landed on the thistle feeder.  Maybe they always land with
aggression, but this time it seemed to be a "don't mess with me" grip.
Maybe I read too much into things, but just then it came full speed, like a
bullet, right toward us, between us, under the table umbrella, about two
inches from my head, and headed up to the Norway Maple nearby.  It was
close enough to make me scream (and laugh with surprise)!

I looked at my friend and said, "that was *no* accident!"  The chickadees
usually fly *over* the umbrella and up to the tree when leaving the
feeder.  As we went back to our conversation, the chickadee returned
without warning (from direction of the tree), this time even closer to my
head.  So close, I flinched, turned away to avoid impact, and heard the
wind of its path!  We laughed again, and I said, "see, that was *no*
accident!  It's after me!  What does it want?" and before I could answer
the question, it came back a third time, making me scream and duck again!
The chickadee might have been screaming too.  I don't know but would love
to have seen this on video in slow motion.

I have light blonde hair.  My friend's hair is a darker blonde.  I think it
wanted my hair, so I pulled out as much hair as I could and left some
behind before going back inside, but I'd like to know what else would be
eco to leave out as an offering?  I will look for some string today, and
thought I'd share this article about the do's and don'ts of leaving out
nesting material:
https://www.allaboutbirds.org/providing-nest-material-for-birds-dos-donts/

Happy spring everyone!!!

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[cayugabirds-l] Ellis Hollow/George Rd. Comm. Solar Proj. Pub. Hearing Wed April 26, 7 pm--or email comments

2017-04-24 Thread Sandy Podulka
Dear Folks,

As you probably know, Distributed Sun is proposing several 
large-scale Community Solar Projects in the Town of  Dryden.
A public hearing is being held:

THIS WEDNESDAY, April 26, at 7 pm at the Neptune Fire Hall, 26 North 
St., Dryden

Please consider attending and giving your comments on the project in 
3 minutes (or less).

You also may email your comments on the project to:
<mailto:board--towncl...@dryden.ny.us>board--towncl...@dryden.ny.us

There are many reasons to support solar energy, of course--especially 
community solar, and this company appears to have been at least 
somewhat responsive to the concerns of neighbors. On the other hand, 
the project will use a vast amount of open space, and trees will be 
cut, including part of the evergreen stand on Dodge Rd. that is 
precious to birders (and birds). Several people have suggested on 
this listserv that the best placement of solar panels is on rooftops 
and above parking lots--I love those ideas.

Since I moved to this area 35 years ago, I have watched open space 
whittled away, piece by piece, and watched our rural landscapes 
become less and less attractive, both to people and wildlife. Many 
places I cherished are now gone. When will it stop? Should we have a 
plan for making sure enough open space is left? How do we place a 
value on open spaces?

Whatever your views, I hope you will express them. Below are links to 
the most helpful information. If you spend 5 minutes looking at each 
set of maps and 5 minutes reading the FAQ, you will have a pretty 
good feel for the project--in 15 minutes.

--Sandy Podulka


Town of Dryden Web page with info on the Solar Project:
http://dryden.ny.us/departments/planning-department/permit-review-links/special-use-permits/

FAQ on Project and Changes made: (from Distributed Sun)
http://dryden.ny.us/wp-content/uploads/2011/08/DrydenSolar_FAQ.Categ_.flc_.mm3_.pdf

Maps of development in Ellis Hollow:  (Scroll down to C-111 to see 
where trees at Dodge Road would be cut)
http://dryden.ny.us/wp-content/uploads/2011/08/2.-Ellis-Tract-Site-Plan-Drawings.pdf

Maps of development along George Road:
http://dryden.ny.us/wp-content/uploads/2011/08/2.-2150-Dryden-Road-Site-Plan-Drawings.pdf
 
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[cayugabirds-l] Goldfinch behavior and Fall Creek Highlights

2017-04-22 Thread Sandy Wold
Two days ago, in the early evening, when the heavens opened up and heavy
rains fell steady, cold, and dreary, I was outside and ran to seek
shelter.  As I entered my back porch, I turned around to watch the rain and
noticed several small birds fluttering in an amongst a tall and leaning
Norway Maple.  My first thought was hummingbird because they appeared so
small with the naked eye and momentarily would hover, but I knew it was too
early for them.

Turns out they were five goldfinches looking for the best spot to wait out
the storm.  Within a few moments, they settled down for the storm.  I
watched them for about thirty minutes, and I noticed the following.  One
brightly colored male took a position very close to the tree trunk.  The
position was ideal as there was a limb immediately above him that protected
him from the rain like an umbrella.  He looked quite content yet stared
intently at the female who perched about an inch or two from him.  She
looked miserable and held a steady gaze back at him.  I kept scanning the
tree and noticed others chose similar spots or spots with less rain
falling, but had to shake off water periodically. A few times, one or two
or three would take flight and settle somewhere else.  There was one moment
where the first male lunged out and pecked at the female, who I think tried
to get closer to him and get more shelter.  After that peck, she stayed put
and did not try again.

At the same time, a Chipping Sparrow caught my eye in the adjacent
crabapple tree.  He also found an amazing shelter spot, similar to the
first male goldfinch I described (but better):  in a nook where two limbs
were close together, one on top of the other, creating a nook and a
shelter.  This sparrow stayed put through out the storm, rhythmically
looking left and right, and center.  I did not see any other sparrows in
that tree until the rain lightened up.  When the rain slowed down, there
was movement in both trees.

Other bird highlights in my yard I've seen/heard in past few days
(*photographed):
--at or below the feeder or in my garden:  Golden-winged Warbler* (yes!),
 Chipping Sparrows*, White-crowned Sparrows*, doves, grackles, juncoes,...
--passersby heard/nearby: kingfisher, Red-bellied Woodpecker, bluebird
--heard in higher tree tops of mature trees: titmouse, cardinal,
chickadees, ...
--missing for months:  Pileated, Downy, and Hairy woodpeckers

I am so grateful for this birding community.  My life is so much more rich
because of it.  Thank you.

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[cayugabirds-l] Stewart Park Highlights

2017-04-22 Thread Sandy Wold
Yesterday around 7pm, I saw three sandpipers on the rocky shore of Fall
Creek near the Cascadilla Boat house.  I think they were juvenile Spotted
Sandpipers:  bobbing tails, pink/orange bills with a dark tip on the bill,
thrush-like markings on the upper breast, soft peeping calls, flew off
toward Jetty Woods.  Last year, they hung out on the jetty where the
concrete pebbles are loose.

After that, I watched the 154+ cormorants settling in for the night on the
top of the sycamores over at Jetty woods; I couldn't help but be curious
how a handful of them would suddenly leave their roost, bolting upstream
high above the creek, and then make a sharp u-turn near the bridges, and
then glide back to the roost.  Then another handful would leave and do the
same thing.  This went on for about twenty minutes, and I wondered if it
was just juveniles who did this; but then all of a sudden, the entire tree
load of cormorants (about 116, leaving the dead one which is still in the
tree) took off and did the exact same thing as the previous cormorants.  It
seemed to me that they were enjoying the fun of flying as fast as they
could with the wind (upstream) and then gliding back on the wind.

I couldn't help by see how much that was a bit like the fun that can be had
when kayaking white water, but in reverse:  paddle as hard as you can
against the current, then make a sharp u-turn, and go as fast as you can
with the current.  Or even a bike:  peddle hard up a long windy road, then
coast as fast as you can down the other side.

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[cayugabirds-l] Dead Cormorant in Tree at Jetty Woods

2017-04-15 Thread Sandy Wold
Yesterday early evening at Jetty Woods, after I picked up a few handfuls of
styrofoam cup aquatic debris deposited after recent flooding, I noticed the
entire herd of cormorants were back, and one was dangling from a tree.  The
others went about perching normally in the tree. Bald-headed Eagle?

This bird had what looked to me like breeding plumage (black tufts on top
of head).  I could not see any orange and not sure if that was because of
the angle.  Do birds lose their color after death?  If so, how long is it
before the color starts to diminish?
Sandy

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[cayugabirds-l] killdeer

2017-03-27 Thread Sandy
I heard killdeer flying over Fall Creek and then up near the Pyramid Mall 
yesterday afternoon (Monday)!

Sent from my iPhone
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Re: [cayugabirds-l] URGENT ALERT: Dodge Rd Spruce Woods may be cut down for massive Solar Farm on Dodge rd, STARTING in APRIL !!

2017-03-21 Thread Sandy Podulka
Dave,

Thanks for this thoughtful discussion. You make 
really good points! --Sandy Podulka

At 05:40 PM 3/21/2017, Dave Nutter wrote:
>If the goal is to reduce greenhouse gas production, then cutting down trees
>is counterproductive when installing solar 
>panels. Also cutting trees down if they
>are just along the edge of the array makes 
>little sense because the great majority
>of solar energy is during the middle of the day, 
>not early morning nor late afternoon.
>
>Putting solar panels in places that are just 
>creating heat islands, not habitats, makes
>lots of sense. Put them on rooftops. Put them 
>over parking lots. Put them on lawns
>that were already getting mowed. That's why home 
>solar is great, but industrial scale
>makes problems. Those fields that are being 
>replaced as solar "farms" (cute name)
>will still get rain and have seeds blow in. How 
>will succession be blocked? Poisons?
>
>If Cornell first decided to put solar panels on 
>all its rooftops and over all its parking
>lots, then over, say, the Ag Quad, and had run 
>out places where they could put solar
>panels without being destructive, I'd be more 
>supportive. I think that grove is pretty
>special, having seen several Long-eared Owls and 
>a Northern Saw-whet Owl there.
>
>--Dave Nutter
>
>On Mar 20, 2017, at 12:18 PM, marsha kardon 
><<mailto:mfkar...@gmail.com>mfkar...@gmail.com> wrote:
>
>>Please consider this in your efforts to 
>>minimize your contribution to climate change:
>>
>>
>>
>>Rearing cattle produces more greenhouse gases 
>>than driving cars, UN report warns
>>
>>
>>
>>[]
>>
>>
>><http://www.un.org/apps/news/story.asp?newsID=20772#>6.3KShare
>>
>>  <http://www.un.org/apps/news/story.asp?newsID=20772#>Print
>>
>>29 November 2006 – Cattle-rearing generates 
>>more global warming greenhouse gasees, as 
>>measured in CO2 equivalent, than 
>>transportation, and smarter production methods, 
>>including improved animal diets to reduce 
>>enteric fermentation and consequent methane 
>>emissions, are urgently needed, 
>><http://www.fao.org/newsroom/en/news/2006/1000448/index.html>according 
>>to a new United Nations report released today.
>>
>>“Livestock are one of the most significant 
>>contributors to today’s most serious 
>>environmental problems,” senior UN Food and 
>>Agriculture Organization (FAO) official Henning 
>>Steinfeld said. “Urgent action is required to remedy the situation.”
>>
>>Cattle-rearing is also a major source of land 
>>and water degradation, according to the FAO 
>>report, 
>><http://www.virtualcentre.org/en/library/key_pub/longshad/A0701E00.htm>Livestock’s
>> 
>>Long Shadow–Environmental Issues and Options, 
>>of which Mr. Stteinfeld is the senior author.
>>
>>“The environmental costs per unit of 
>>livestock production must be cut by one half, 
>>just to avoid the level of damage worsening 
>>beyond its present level,” it warns.
>>
>>When emissions from land use and land use 
>>change are included, the livestock sector 
>>accounts for 9 per cent of CO2 deriving from 
>>human-related activities, but produces a much 
>>larger share of even more harmful greenhouse 
>>gases. It generates 65 per cent of 
>>human-related nitrous oxide, which has 296 
>>times the Global Warming Potential (GWP) of 
>>CO2. Most of this comes from manure.
>>
>>And it accounts for respectively 37 per cent of 
>>all human-induced methane (23 times as warming 
>>as CO2), which is largely produced by the 
>>digestive system of ruminants, and 64 per cent 
>>of ammonia, which contributes significantly to acid rain.
>>
>>With increased prosperity, people are consuming 
>>more meat and dairy products every year, the 
>>report notes. Global meat production is 
>>projected to more than double from 229 million 
>>tonnes in 1999/2001 to 465 million tonnes in 
>>2050, while milk output is set to climb from 580 to 1043 million tonnes.
>>
>>The global livestock sector is growing faster 
>>than any other agricultural sub-sector. It 
>>provides livelihoods to about 1.3 billion 
>>people and contributes about 40 per cent to 
>>global agricultural output. For many poor 
>>farmers in developing countries livestock are 
>>also a source of renewable energy for draft and 
>>an essential source of organic fertilizer for their crops.
>>
>>Livestock now use 30 per cent of the earth’s 
>>entire land surface, 

[cayugabirds-l] DIY Bird Saver for Window Treatment

2017-03-20 Thread Sandy Wold
Thanks for recent posts.  Looks like American Bird Conservancy also offers
tips on how to make your own "Acopian Bird Saver"
https://www.birdsavers.com/ (click "Make Your Own")
or go here:
https://www.birdsavers.com/buildyourown.html

They look nice on the bigger windows and look easy to make.

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[cayugabirds-l] Stewart Park / Fall Creek Highlights

2017-03-19 Thread Sandy Wold
Today, I heard a bluebird in a Sugar Maple outside my window in Fall Creek,
first time!.  I usually see them around Boynton Middle School in years
past, and today I saw a pair today down near the inlet near the fire
practice area with two finches that had a rosy blush on the chest.  They
left before I could get my binoculars on them.

At the Fuertes Sanctuary, I came across a Red-tailed Hawk resting on a log
near the water.  Looked like it had just eaten given blood stains around
its mouth.  I could not see perfectly without a scope, but from the black
and white markings, size, and shapes, it looked like there were many Hooded
Mergansers and possibly four Buffleheads.

Could hear lots of starlings and blackbirds along the inlet, mourning
doves.  I'm finding I am getting lazy when I hear a bird I know the call
of.  I don't even bother to pick up my binoculars any more.  I guess I
should because there might be other species mixed in.  Gorgeous day
nonetheless, hope everyone got to get out or will get out soon!

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[cayugabirds-l] Downy woodpecker behavior question

2017-03-09 Thread Sandy Wold
I've been meaning to post this for a few months.  I noticed a female downy
at my feeder about six weeks ago who did not move for about 25 minutes.  I
was super busy that day going in and out of the kitchen, and after about
two or three minutes, noted she had never moved her position. Usually, she
does not stay for more than a few minutes, but this day she was so still
that I could see her inner eye cover things blink over her eyes.  A few
times she moved her eyes to look, but stiller than still.  I tried to see
what it was she was looking at but saw no hawks...later, I remembered
hearing American crows coming from the direction of the tree she was
looking up at, and they were calling the entire time.  So I am wondering if
anyone has ever seen a crow go after a downy

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[cayugabirds-l] Pixar Short Film on Sandpiper

2017-02-13 Thread Sandy Wold
Enjoy!!!
https://vimeo.com/199896284

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[cayugabirds-l] Travel Vest for Sale

2017-02-04 Thread Sandy Wold
Brand new, did not use for a trip I went on.  Paid $73, would love to get
$65price has increased, almost double, since I bought it last year!
Says, women's large, and it could pass for unisex.  Sizing info on one of
the photos on this link:

SCOTTeVEST Women's RFID Travel Vest, Gray, Large



https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/B00MTZBFH6/ref=oh_aui_search_detailpage?ie=UTF8=1

I can bring to next CBC meetingle'me know!

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[cayugabirds-l] Stewart Park Highlights

2017-01-29 Thread Sandy Wold
I walked through the woods along Fall Creek to the Boat House and along the
shore of Stewart Park.  I saw Common Mergansers and heard a kingfisher
along the creek.  I saw two cormorants out on a log, far out; and then what
I thought might have been two grebes, but they were dabbling far out.  They
came closer, and I could see dark markings as a cap and eyeline, body brown
like a female mallard, tail had black on the upper side, legs orange, lower
mandible yellow.  I'm still not sure what they were.  any suggestions?
juvenile BLACK DUCKS?

There were many geese and gulls, as usual.  Then I had a nice surprise: two
swans very close to shore, bathing, then standing.  They were twice as big
as the Canada geese nearby.  I could not see any yellow lore and their
heads/necks/wings looked very dirty, so I'm thinking juvenile TRUMPETER
SWANS?  If anyone can verify or correct me, that would be great!  Thanks.

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[cayugabirds-l] Evening Grosbeak in Brooktondale

2016-11-01 Thread Sandy Podulka
We just started putting out seed a few days ago for the season. Our 
first day we were visited by Wild Turkeys.
Today we were honored with a male Evening Grosbeak!  The first one 
I've seen in a few years here.


Sandy Podulka
Brooktondale


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[cayugabirds-l] Pick up from Montezuma WR?

2016-08-29 Thread Sandy
Anyone going to be at MWR and then coming to IThaca who could pick something up 
for me from the visitor center by September 3?  It would save me a trip, and 
I'd be very grateful!!!  Thank you! 
Sandy

Sent from my iPhone
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[cayugabirds-l] Stewart Park Highlights Today

2016-07-16 Thread Sandy Wold
Today, Ann Mitchell and I assisted this morning's Lab of O's Bird Sleuth
Summer Educator Retreat bird walk in Stewart Park (7-8:30am).  Participants
included a middle school teacher from Los Angeles who teaches an eighth
grade ornithology elective for 80 students in addition to a birding section
in her 7th grade science class.  Her district supports her in offering this
class, and she got a grant to buy binoculars for the class!  They go out
once a week to bird and four days are spent in class.  She was very excited
to get 23 new life birds on this outing. There were also two Peruvian
Amazonian tour guides among many educators.

It was a gorgeous morning and very bird active along the shore.   Jody
simultaneously met another group out at Cass Park.   Highlights included:
 three Green Herons flying from the Swan Pond and then from willow to
willow down the shoreline and back around to the pond.  They
"chirped/squawked" loudly within the trees.  I don't remember seeing these
guys last year, and I am wondering if they are part of the migration Dave
Nutter announced?

Last year, I recall the American Bittern was hanging out in this pond for
most of the summer. Did it return?

Other highlights for participants:  Blue-headed Vireo, Yellow Warbler,
female or immature Hooded Merganser hanging out with 4 Mallards, Northern
Flicker adult and immature, Fish Crows and American Crows calling, Wood
Frog calling, Cedar Waxwing, DC Cormorants, GB Gull, highly cooperative
Kingfishers, female Wood Duck, 3 Brown-headed Cowbirds, Osprey, kingbirds
begging and being fed by a parent at the pond, ...  I think Jody said we
got about 46 species today compiled.

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[cayugabirds-l] Perennial Bird Garden, pre-Fall Creek Garden Tour, Sunday, July 10

2016-07-05 Thread Sandy Wold
On Sunday, July 10, 11-3, is the annual Fall Creek garden tour, pick up
maps at Thompson Park.  I am not on this list but am opening my perennial
bird garden from 8-11am that same day.  I live downtown on the border of
Renwick Woods, Fall Creek, and Newman Golf Course and have over 30 species
of birds that either visit or fly by from the inlet to the lake/creek (e.g.
kingfisher, Screech Owl, Red-tailed Hawk, Osprey, starlings, grackles,
killdeer, gulls, vultures,...).  .  I know this is nothing compared to the
65+ species some people get out in the countryside, but if you are
interested in urban birding, maybe you might like to visit my garden?

Regular backyard/neighborhood birds include: doves, two species of finches,
chickadees, cardinals, woodpeckers, juncoes, nuthatches, Tufted Titmouse,
Baltimore Oriole, Blue Jays, two species of wren, four species of sparrow,
juncoes, robins, hummingbird, ...  Higher in the canopy yard birds include:
Merlin, Northern Parula, Yellow-rumped Warbler, Ruby-crowned Kinglets...and
I painted a bird mural on the front porch to honor them!

Mature maples surrounding the house and a crabapple help lure the birds
nearby, but some of them really like the seeds/ flowers and berries I am
growingand because I don't mulch all of my garden, many (dove, robin,
wren, juncoes, White-throated Sparrow, White-crowned Sparrow,...) like to
peck at the soil.  I just planted native serviceberries, dogwood, and
chokecherry.   Please RSVP, and I'll send you my address.  Children welcome.

Good birding!


Sandy Wold
Conservation Educator, Artist
www.Sandy-Wold.com <http://www.sandy-wold.squarespace.com>
*www.sites.google.com/site/cayugabioregionmap
<https://sites.google.com/site/cayugabioregionmap/about-author-and-artist>.com*
*www.linkedin.com/pub/sandra-sandy-wold/a7/114/877
<http://www.linkedin.com/pub/sandra-sandy-wold/a7/114/877>*


*To be astonished is one of the surest ways not to be old too quickly.* -
Sidonie-Gabrielle Colette

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[cayugabirds-l] Jetty Woods Highlights

2016-06-22 Thread Sandy Wold
Sorry to hear that the merlin nests did not do well this year.  Today, I
was happy to see a baby oriole pop its head then full body launched out
suddenly and perch on the top of the nest ..or possibly its sibling's head?
  The nest is extremely well concealed.  I only noticed because mom and dad
had been feeding them.

The nestling flicked its wings and preened a bit, looked around for the
longest time, then returned deep into its nest, which silenced the
squawking sibling.  The nest is hanging well hidden over the gravel road
that goes to Jetty Woods, near the utility building

I am also seeing baby robins everywhere, saw a baby song sparrow trying to
sing and sounding hoarse, and hearing the wren nest next door go crazy ever
15 minutes.  Momma Wood Duck and her five ducklings paddled around the
light house, goslings are looking huge!  Is this the second round of
hatchlings?

The wild flowers blooming on and around the base of the jetty are
absolutely stunning and magnificent right now.  Other highlights:  Eastern
Kingbird, Yellow Warbler, American Redstart, Catbirds, Osprey with fish in
air, many swallows,...

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[cayugabirds-l] Close Encounter Mystery Bird

2016-06-21 Thread Sandy Wold
Yesterday, late in the sweltering heat of late afternoon, when I was
watering a plant in my garden, a bird flew from behind me and landed about
a foot from my feet.  Without hesitation, it promptly stepped in to drink
voraciously.  I thought it was going to open its mouth to let water pour
in, it was that close; but drank from the ground instead.  The soil was
gravely, so the water puddled for only a second before the ground soaked it
up.  We watched for the water pool again, and it drank again. This lasted
for all of about a minute because the water I had left was very little.  So
interesting that it chose to drink next to a human in my small yard
downtown rather than go to the creek two blocks away!  I guess my garden is
pretty sweet.

As it stood there, I could not for the life of me identify it!...  size of
a starling, maybe a bit bigger, mostly a dull black all over with brown
under the wing (sweat spot) and underside.  The slope of the head and bill
were low, that of a Red-winged Blackbird.  I could have sworn I was looking
at yellow lore spots, and this really through me off...everything matches a
female Grackle, except the yellow lores.  any ideas?  was I hallucinating
in the heat?

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[cayugabirds-l] Audubon Havell double-elephant folio exhibit report

2016-06-12 Thread Sandy
Here is my report. I figured out how to see this thanks to the "Lost Bird" 
documentary and asking. You can see it next year!  Read on. I'll be looking for 
Fuertes' artwork next. 

https://www.facebook.com/groups/cayugabirdclub/permalink/1028812670489881/

Sent from my iPhone
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[cayugabirds-l] Audubon double-elephant exhibit today, 10:30-4?

2016-06-11 Thread Sandy Wold
Sorry for late posting.  I think today is the "open house" for the Cornell
Rare Manuscript Library's Audubon double-elephant prints, 10:30-4pm.


Sandy Wold
Conservation Educator, Self-Taught Artist
www.Sandy-Wold.com <http://www.sandy-wold.squarespace.com>
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*To be astonished is one of the surest ways not to be old too quickly.* -
Sidonie-Gabrielle Colette

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