Re: [cayugabirds-l] uploading pictures to ebird?

2021-09-10 Thread Sandy Podulka
I think a lot of people are trying to get their 
eBird sightings in in a timely fashion, when they 
are in the field reporting. They say "photos" at 
the time, and then later, when they get home, or 
the next day, when they have had time to download 
the photos from their camera and go through them, 
they DO upload them. So I think if you look back 
at the reports that say "photos," they will often be added later.

I admire the folks who get their reports in fast. 
I'm one of those who take forever, so it is not 
as useful for others to find the bird. Still 
working on my Piping Plover photos from this spring

Sandy

At 11:41 AM 9/10/2021, you wrote:
>Lots of people report rare birds and claim to 
>have photos but don’t include them in the 
>eBird report. Do they forget? Maybe they think 
>that saying you have evidence of something which 
>is unlikely to be true is as good as presenting evidence that it is true.
>
>It’s kinda like Joe McCarthy waving a sheaf of 
>blank papers while claiming he has a list of 
>Communists in the State Department (Ok, I’m 
>old). It’s like Rudy Giuliani claiming in 
>front of 4-Seasons Landscaping that there was 
>all kinds of election fraud but presenting nothing in court.
>
>EBird wants to do science, but the basis of 
>science is presenting reviewable evidence. Rare 
>birds are more than fun, they may be early signs 
>of birds changing their range, or changing which 
>sites they use, or changing the timing of their 
>migration. In other words, rarities can help us 
>understand how birds adapt to climate change, or 
>to odd weather, or to all the other stresses 
>that wiped out about a third of the breeding 
>population of North American birds over the past half century.
>
>A bird which eBird lists as rare is by 
>definition less likely than other species to be 
>at that place at that time. Even if it is a 
>familiar species or is common at other times of 
>year, it deserves a description to distinguish 
>it from similar species and it deserves even a lousy photo.
>
>Why doesn’t eBird ask for such info on common 
>birds? People surely make some ID errors on them 
>as well. I think there are several reasons. The 
>folks running eBird know it’s too much trouble 
>for you to describe every bird (even though 
>it’s a great exercise!). They also know that 
>reviewers don’t have time to look at reports 
>for that many birds. But regarding the science, 
>I think eBird is based on an assumption that 
>most people usually can ID the common everyday 
>birds most of the time. And besides, there’s 
>an assumption that the patterns of years past 
>probably still hold true. When there are Robins 
>on the lawn in Spring, it’s wonderful, but 
>it’s not a revelation. It doesn’t change how 
>we see the world. Scientifically speaking, who 
>cares? (Actually eBird does help us keep tabs on 
>the common species, too, and that’s important, 
>so that’s not an invitation to be sloppy or not to report common birds.).
>
>But a bird which shows up at a new time or at a 
>new place would help change our understanding of 
>that species a little bit. It nudges the edge of 
>the range map. It shifts the calendar a little. 
>So we want to be sure it’s valid information, 
>to know that the observer observed carefully and 
>to learn exactly what they observed. (Plus, vicarious birding is also fun.)
>
>I’ve looked at a lot of reports of rarities. 
>Reports of rare birds have a higher likelihood 
>to be mistakes. And a lot of reports are 
>essentially blank, devoid of supporting 
>information, so they can’t be trusted. The 
>rare bird is more likely to be unfamiliar. The 
>bird is certainly out of its usual context and 
>it may therefore act in an atypical manner. But 
>most of all, it’s simply more likely to be 
>something else by the definition of rarity. And 
>it’s not a matter of doubting anyone’s 
>personal birding skills. Even hotshots should be 
>noting enough field marks to ID any rare bird 
>and including a photo. Coasting on reputations 
>is how science fails. Nobody gave Einstein a 
>pass; his work was gone over with a fine-toothed 
>comb and is still being tested.
>
>But regular folks and beginners should also 
>include notes. Say why you think a bird is a 
>rarity with as much detail as you can muster. 
>I’ve done that, and many times I’ve had 
>rarities confirmed by eBird. Sometimes I have 
>been corrected, and the result was a better 
>record while I learned more about the species 
>involved. My first rare bird find was long 
>before eBird on a Christmas Bird Count, when 
>another teenager and I found a sparrow we’d 
>never seen before except in the field guides we 
>carried. Our simple yet accurate written 
>descriptions given to the compiler were enough 
>to bring experts to the scene. We helped herd 
>birds across a weedy field toward mistnets. Our 
>odd bird flew through the gap between a net and 
>a pole, but was captured by hand by 

[cayugabirds-l] Red-headed Woodpeckers in Trumansburg

2021-07-20 Thread Sandy Podulka
I checked the Red-headed Woodpeckers at 24 Congress St in Trumansburg this
afternoon, and saw 1 bird hanging around the nest hole (you can only see
this from the yard, and need permission from the homeowner, who is very
friendly).  The bird brought food to the hole about 8 times, but each time,
ate it. I never saw a head from inside the hole, although I stayed 80
minutes!  My guess is that the nest is close to hatching, as I saw
copulation on July 1. But, I would have liked to have seen the other bird
come out of the nest while I was there to be sure there was an active nest.

Sandy Podulka

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

[cayugabirds-l] Merlins

2021-07-20 Thread Sandy Podulka
This evening during the thunderstorm I stopped by Cass Park to check on the
Merlin nest by the Dog Park and saw three banded fledglings hanging around
the trees in the area of the boat launch. They were definitely working on
their landing, perching, and flying skills, and being seriously challenged
by the wind. Sometimes they called repeatedly, but I never saw a parent
nearby. Looks like they will be around for a while, as they did not move
far.

--Sandy Podulka

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

[cayugabirds-l] Yellow-Crowned Night-Heron Continues at Cass Park

2021-07-20 Thread Sandy Podulka
This evening at 7:30 during a thunderstorm I was driving along Route 89 by
Cass Park and a (presumably "the") juvenile Yellow-crowned Night-Heron flew
in front of my car and into a large willow tree. I think it then may have
gone down into the stream nearby.  This was on the west side of Route 89,
across from where Cove Ln (to the pool and tennis courts) enters Route 89.
So it appears to be remaining in the same area in which it was seen
recently.

Sandy Podulka

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

Re: [cayugabirds-l] Follow-up communication to Cornell re mowing of hay at peak nesting time

2021-06-27 Thread Sandy Podulka
Wonderful, Jody and everyone else who worked on 
this letter. Thank you so much for putting 
together something so thoughtful and informative, 
with constructive ways to move forward. Cornell 
may ignore it, but they certainly shouldn't.

Sandy Podulka

At 02:42 PM 6/27/2021, you wrote:
>Hello birders,
>
>After receiving lots of input, ideas, and resources from many of you, I put
>together the letter below and sent it to the President and one of the Vice
>Presidents at Cornell (as noted in the letter).  Thanks to all who have
>expressed their concern and who provided important input to this very first
>step in developing a solution.  Special shout out of thanks to Nancy
>Cusumano for her initial contact with the President, and to Suan Yong, Josh
>Snodgrass, and Ken Rosenberg for comments on an earlier draft of the
>letter.
>
>Martha E. Pollack
>
>President, Cornell University
>
>Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â 
>Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â 
>Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â 
>Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â 
>Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â  26 June 2021
>
>Â
>
>Dear President Pollack,
>
>Â
>
>Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â  I am writing as Chair of 
>the Conservation Action Committee of the Cayuga 
>Bird Club to communicate and amplify public 
>dismay about recent, poorly-timed mowing for 
>forage hay crops on Cornell lands during the 
>peak nesting period for grassland bird species 
>listed as being of special conservation concern 
>by the New York State Department of 
>Environmental Conservation and the U.S. Fish and 
>Wildlife Service.  I have been contacted by 
>many local birders, including farmers and 
>members of the Cornell University community who 
>are saddened and angry about the 
>situation.  Recent research lead by Cornell 
>scientists and published in the journal Science 
>(see Rosenberg, K. V., et al. 2019. Decline of 
>the North American avifauna. Science 365(6461)) 
>found that nearly 3 billion birds have been lost 
>from the U.S. and Canada just since 
>1970.  Populations of grassland bird species 
>like Bobolink, Eastern Meadowlark, Grasshopper 
>Sparrow, Savannah Sparrow, and others have 
>declined the most, down 53% in aggregate, 
>accounting for more than 720 million grassland 
>birds.  Poorly timed mowing of hay crops, 
>especially throughout the Northeast, is a major 
>contributing factor in the decline in grassland bird populations.Â
>
>Â
>
>Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â  Rather than contributing 
>to the problem, Cornell can help remedy 
>population declines of grassland bird species by 
>developing a plan for sustainable management of 
>the substantial acreage of hayfields and other 
>non-woody habitats under the University’s 
>control.  The Cayuga Bird Club stands ready to 
>collaborate with Cornell in developing a 
>plan.  We already have accumulated relevant 
>documents about research and practices aimed at 
>timing of mowing and other management actions 
>that would be of great use in developing a 
>Cornell sustainable grassland management 
>plan.  For example, mowing earlier in the 
>season before establishment of nests and when 
>growing hay is of high forage quality can have 
>nearly as much conservation benefit as delaying 
>mowing to a time when quality of the hay forage 
>is lower.  We also have established contacts 
>with federal and state natural resource agencies 
>who are knowledgeable of possible financial 
>reimbursement opportunities for which the University may qualify.Â
>
>Â
>
>Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â  Cornell University has an 
>opportunity to be a leader among all Land Grant 
>Universities by developing a model grassland 
>management plan that could be adopted by other 
>institutions throughout the Northeast and 
>beyond.  Such a management plan also could be 
>consistent with Cornell’s sustainability 
>initiatives.  While the current initiatives are 
>laudable, the focus on renewable energy, 
>transportation and built environments, and even 
>economic sustainability miss an important 
>need.  All of these actions are means to 
>achieving the fundamental end of a full and 
>functioning ecosystem of which we humans are a 
>part and are on which we are dependent for our survival.  Â
>
>Â
>
>Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â  The modern concept of 
>“sustainability” emerged fairly recently in 
>the famous 1987 Brundtland report, “Our Common 
>Future”, prepared for the U.N.  In that 
>report, sustainability was described in terms of 
>conserving the ecosystems and natural capital 
>which are necessary for the basic needs and 
>well-being of humans.  The fundamental

[cayugabirds-l] Montezuma Main Pool?

2021-06-25 Thread Sandy Podulka
Has anyone been up to Montezuma recently? Is there water in the Main 
Pool along the Wildlife Drive? Lots of birds around?


Sandy Podulka


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


Re: [cayugabirds-l] Fields being mowed.

2021-06-15 Thread Sandy Podulka
Ken and all,

Thank you so much for this clear, concise summary 
of this issue. I have some friends I am trying to 
convince to not mow too soon, so will use your words there, too.

Can anyone tell me what is a "safe" date for 
mowing?  Until when should I ask them to delay?

Thanks,
Sandy Podulka

At 04:07 PM 6/15/2021, Kenneth V. Rosenberg wrote:

>Linda, thanks for bringing this mowing to 
>everyone’s attention. In a nutshell, what is 
>happening today in those fields, repeated over 
>the entire U.S., is the primary cause of 
>continued steep declines in Bobolink and other grassland bird populations.
>
>
>
>Last year, because of the delays in mowing due 
>to Covid, the fields along Freeze and Hanshaw 
>Roads were full of nesting birds, including many 
>nesting Bobolinks that were actively feeding 
>young in the nests at the end of June. In the 
>first week of July, Cornell decided to mow all 
>the fields. Jody Enck and I wrote letters and 
>met with several folks at Cornell in the various 
>departments in charge of managing those fields 
>(Veterinary College, University Farm Services) – 
>although they listened politely to our concerns 
>for the birds, they went ahead and mowed that 
>week as dozens of female bobolinks and other 
>birds hovered helplessly over the tractors with 
>bills filled food for their almost-fledged young.
>
>
>
>The same just happened over the past couple of 
>days this year, only at an earlier stage in the 
>nesting cycle – most birds probably have (had) 
>recently hatched young in the nest. While mowing 
>is occurring across the entire region as part of 
>“normal” agricultural practices (with continued 
>devastating consequences for field-nesting 
>birds), the question is whether Cornell 
>University needs to be contributing to this 
>demise, while ostensibly supporting biodiversity 
>conservation through other unrelated programs. 
>Jody and I presented an alternative vision, 
>where the considerable acres of fields owned by 
>the university across Tompkins County could 
>serve as a model for conserving populations of 
>grassland birds, pollinators, and other 
>biodiversity, but the people in charge of this 
>management were not very interested in these options.
>
>
>
>And there we have it, a microcosm of the 
>continental demise of grassland birds playing 
>out in our own backyard, illustrating the 
>extreme challenges of modern Ag practices that 
>are totally incompatible with healthy bird 
>populations. I urge CayugaBirders to make as 
>much noise as possible, and maybe someone will listen.
>
>
>
>KEN
>
>
>
>Ken Rosenberg (he/him/his)
>
>Applied Conservation Scientist
>
>Cornell Lab of Ornithology
>
>American Bird Conservancy
>
>Fellow, Atkinson Center for a Sustainable Future
>
><mailto:k...@cornell.edu>k...@cornell.edu
>
>Wk: 607-254-2412
>
>Cell: 607-342-4594
>
>
>
>
>
>From: bounce-125714085-3493...@list.cornell.edu 
> on 
>behalf of Linda Orkin 
>Date: Tuesday, June 15, 2021 at 3:02 PM
>To: CAYUGABIRDS-L 
>Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Fields being mowed.
>
>After a couple year hiatus in which the Freese 
>Road fields across from the gardens have been 
>mowed late in the season allowing at least 
>Bobolinks to be done with their nesting and for 
>grassland birds to be lured into a false feeling 
>of security so they have returned and I’ve 
>counted three singing meadowlarks for the first 
>time in years,  Cornell has returned to early 
>mowing there as of today. And so the mayhem 
>ensues. How many more multitudes of birds will 
>die before we believe our own eyes and ears. Mow 
>the grass while it’s still nutritious but are we 
>paying attention to who is being fed. Grass 
>taken from the land to pass through animals and 
>in that inefficient process turning to food for humans.
>
>Linda Orkin
>Ithaca NY
>--
>
>Cayugabirds-L List Info:
><http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME>http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
>http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
><http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm>http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm
>
>ARCHIVES:
>1) 
><http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html>http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
>2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
>3) 
><http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html>http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html
>
>Please submit your observations to eBird:
><http://ebird.org/content/ebird/>http://ebird.org/content/ebird/
>
>--

[cayugabirds-l] OOB Acadian Flycatcher in Caroline

2021-06-05 Thread Sandy Podulka
There was an Acadian Flycatcher singing just a bit out of the Cayuga 
Lake Basin near the Finger Lakes Trail west of Coddington Road this 
morning.  To hear it, follow FLT west of Coddington (park in 
designated lot on Ridgeway, not Coddington). Stay on FLT, which is 
through private land. The FLT is the left fork, which heads uphill on 
a logging road. Maybe 50-100' beyond the fork, you can hear the bird 
to the north (on your right). I was looking for Magnolia Warblers (no 
luck), but this was a nice surprise!


Poor photos and recording here:
https://ebird.org/atlasny/checklist/S89697562

Sandy Podulka


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


Re: [cayugabirds-l] Juvenile birdies now in SSW feeder cam

2021-05-29 Thread Sandy Podulka
They are European Starlings. Not exactly a gorgeous voice right now.

At 03:03 PM 5/29/2021, Jane Leff wrote:
>A few hours ago, in person, I observed several 
>juvenile I don’t  know whats at SSW feeder. 
>Now I’m home, looking via the SSW feeder cam & 
>they’re still there. Could someone please identify them for me?Â
>Thanks, Janie Leff
>
>https://youtu.be/N609loYkFJo
>--
>Cayugabirds-L List Info:
>Welcome and Basics
>Rules and Information
>Subscribe,
> 
>Configuration and Leave
>Archives:
>The 
>Mail Archive
>Surfbirds
>BirdingOnThe.Net
>Please submit your observations to eBird!
>--

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

Re: [cayugabirds-l] N Waterthrush at Sapsucker

2021-04-27 Thread Sandy Podulka
Nice! We also had two Northern Waterthrush that arrived on our 
property overnight, singing early this morning!! They sure seem to 
come in waves.

Sandy Podulk

At 04:44 PM 4/27/2021, sarah fern wrote:
>Today at about 1:30, I had wonderful views of a singing N 
>Waterthrush in its usual place, near the boardwalk near the small 
>pkg lot across the street from the main woods. Also present were a 
>Phoebe & a pair of Cowbirds
>
>Sarah Fern
>--
>Cayugabirds-L List Info:
>Welcome and Basics
>Rules and Information
>Subscribe,
> 
>Configuration and Leave
>Archives:
>The 
>Mail Archive
>Surfbirds
>BirdingOnThe.Net
>Please submit your observations to eBird!
>--

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

[cayugabirds-l] Huge Cormorant Flock off East Shore Park

2021-04-20 Thread Sandy Podulka
John Greenly reports at 2:30 today that there was a flock of 132 +- 
Double-crested Cormorants off East Shore Park (SE corner of Cayuga Lake).



--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


[cayugabirds-l] Snow Geese on Cayuga Lake

2021-03-19 Thread Sandy Podulka
Meena just reported a few thousand off the south end of Lower Lake 
Road where it hits Route 89, north to Woolfy's Restaurant.



--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


[cayugabirds-l] Snow Geese?

2021-03-19 Thread Sandy Podulka
Has anyone seen Snow Geese today or yesterday?  Where are the flocks 
hanging out?  Did they leave?


Sandy Podulka


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


[cayugabirds-l] Fox Sparrow in Brooktondale

2021-03-14 Thread Sandy Podulka
My daughter spotted our first Fox Sparrow of the year under our 
feeders in Brooktondale today. Love their bright colors!


Sandy


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


[cayugabirds-l] Goose Report

2021-03-10 Thread Sandy Podulka
I, too, checked a few places for geese this evening. W. Loop Road, 
north of Route 31 and west of Port Byron, had hundreds or more Canada 
Geese and ducks, easily visible from the overlook, but good light 
would be in the morning, as you are looking west.

Morgan Road was frozen--no birds, but along Carncross Rd. there were 
lots of Canada Geese and some ducks, including Northern Pintail.  At 
the end of Van Dyn Spoor Rd. there were many Canada Geese and ducks 
and a few Snow Geese.

No Snow Geese at East Road, but a few Canadas and ducks--still not 
nearly as busy as it often is.

When I reached Cayuga Lake around 5 pm, the huge flocks of Snow Geese 
were north of the Railroad Trestle, and could be seen in the distance 
from Route 89 north of Cayuga Lake State Park.  At the southern end 
of Cayuga Lake State Park, where Lake Rd. joins 89, the huge flock of 
mixed ducks and Canada Geese that Laura saw was still present. 
Because there is ice near shore, they are still fairly far out in the 
lake.  Just south of there along Route 89 were some small groups of 
Tundra Swans a bit closer to shore.

Hopefully as the ice continues to melt we will have closer views of 
all these birds!

Sandy Podulka



At 07:18 PM 3/10/2021, you wrote:
>Today (Wednesday), after spending the morning on our south facing 
>deck watching loads of Canada and snow geese fly over,  Ton and I 
>drove around Cayuga lake. On the northwest side, at the south end of 
>the ice (which is south of Cayuga Lake State Park, where Lake Rd. 
>rejoins 89) we found two huge flocks of snow geese in the water and 
>on the ice,  as well as a really big mixed raft of ducks.  Mostly 
>redheads, but also lots of scaup and smaller numbers of black ducks, 
>ring-necked ducks, wigeon, gadwall, pintails, canvasbacks, hooded 
>mergansers, red-breasted mergansers, bufflehead, mallards, swans, 
>black-backed gulls, a bald eagle (which got the snow geese up into 
>the air)..it was really amazing! We could pull off on Lake Road 
>just before it rejoins 89 and had great views - with and without a 
>scope.  They will probably be there tomorrow as well.  Highly recommended!
>Laura
>
>Laura Stenzler
>l...@cornell.edu

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

[cayugabirds-l] Spring Ornithology starting Soon....

2021-03-10 Thread Sandy Podulka
Folks,

Now that you know spring actually is coming, remember, Spring 
Ornithology starts March 30!  Still lots of space. Here's my blurb 
(please share with friends or family ANYWHERE).

--Sandy Podulka

\\\

Would you like to learn more about birds and their lives?  Consider 
taking the Cayuga Bird Club's Spring Ornithology with Steve Kress, 
held Tuesday evenings March 30 to May 18 via Zoom. Even if you are a 
seasoned birder, your future birding experiences will be enriched by 
this course, by exploring beyond finding and identifying birds.  Have 
a Tuesday night conflict? Classes are recorded for viewing or 
reviewing at your convenience.

This course is perfectly timed to help people identify spring 
migrants and better understand bird behavior. Each meeting features a 
group of migratory birds that are at the peak of their spring 
migration, with discussions about bird song, migration, courtship, 
family life, conservation, and how to create a bird-friendly habitat 
on your own property.

Dr. Kress, well known for his entertaining and engaging teaching 
style, illustrates each presentation with stunning photos and bird 
song recordings. Although the course focuses on birds of the 
northeastern U.S, most of the identification, behavior, and 
conservation tips are relevant to people everywhere.

Dr. Kress served for many years as Director of the Audubon Seabird 
Restoration Program and Hog Island Audubon Camp in Maine, and has 
written numerous books, articles, and online courses about birds and 
wildlife conservation. The course fee is $125 per household. Details 
and registration 
at: 
<http://www.cayugabirdclub.org/spring-ornithology>www.cayugabirdclub.org/spring-ornithology


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

[cayugabirds-l] Sheldrake ducks, geese, pipit, buntings

2021-02-22 Thread Sandy Podulka
Yesterday my daughter, Lisa, and I birded around the west side of 
Cayuga Lake. We found a nice concentration of ducks and geese at 
Sheldrake--many Canada Geese, Canvasbacks, and Mallards. Smaller 
numbers of Trumpeter Swans, Redhead, Common Mergansers, Ring-necked 
Ducks, Bufflehead, Common Goldeneye, and Red-breasted Mergansers. We 
also saw 5 Snow Geese on shore, including one blue phase, and a 
single Northern Pintail, Lesser Scaup, and Black Duck.  The viewing 
is nice because things are close. I just wish there were places for 
birders to pull over along the road.


On Morgan Road, which leads down to Sheldrake, there was a good-sized 
flock (I'm terrible at estimating numbers, so we'll leave it at that) 
of Snow Buntings at moderately fresh manure. Smaller numbers of 
Horned Larks, and one American Pipit right along the road, bobbing its tail.


eBird checklist with terrible pipit photos 
here:  https://ebird.org/atlasny/checklist/S82133028


If you want to see Redhead, head to Seneca Lake State Park--huge raft 
offshore there.


Sandy Podulka


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


[cayugabirds-l] Common Redpoll & Hermit Thrush in Brooktondale

2020-12-17 Thread Sandy Podulka
Snowed in, so had to make do with yard birds!  I was thrilled to 
FINALLY see our first winter finch--a single Common Redpoll at the 
feeders here in Brooktondale. Hope he brings his friends.


Also, a lingering Hermit Thrush was around again.

Sandy


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


[cayugabirds-l] CBC: Spring Ornith. with Steve Kress--birder gift, long distance, please share...

2020-12-09 Thread Sandy Podulka
Hi Folks,

The Cayuga Bird Club is running "Spring Ornithology with Steve Kress" 
via Zoom again this spring (sigh). BUT, because we know this ahead of 
time, we can use it as an opportunity to give as a gift to 
friends/relatives beyond driving distance (or, anywhere!!).  Here's 
our announcement--please share widely and think about people who 
could take it this year who normally can't--in nursing homes, with 
commitments in the evening, and so on. Check out our web page for details!

Thanks!!
Sandy Podulka

p.s. 12 Wild Turkeys at our feeders this morning.
\\

Spring Ornithology with Steve Kress:

If you're looking for a holiday gift for your favorite birder (or 
yourself), this might be it!  This Spring, the  Cayuga Bird Club will 
once again host our popular 8-week course, Spring Ornithology with 
Steve Kress, online.

Classes will be held on Tuesday evenings, March 30 to May 18, 2021, 
from 7 to 9 pm. Lectures also will be recorded and posted for later 
viewing, so you can watch or review them at your convenience.

Please share this announcement with friends or relatives anywhere who 
might be interested, including those well beyond driving distance 
from Ithaca who could actually participate this year because it will 
be over Zoom! Although the focus is on local birds, topics will 
interest bird enthusiasts throughout the country. Discussions and Q & 
A will include the locations where students live.

Dr. Stephen Kress's dynamic presentations, with stunning photos and 
audio recordings, will focus each week on a group of migratory birds 
that are at the peak of spring migration, with discussions about bird 
song, migration, courtship, family life, conservation, attracting 
birds, and creating a bird-friendly habitat.

Dr. Kress is the founder of Audubon's Project Puffin and served for 
many years as Director of the Audubon Seabird Restoration Program and 
Hog Island Audubon Camp in Maine. He is the author of more than ten 
books about birding, gardening for birds, and seabirds. His lectures 
about birds have been enjoyed by many people in the Ithaca area and beyond.

The course fee is $125. For more information, registration, and gift 
certificates, see: 
<http://www.cayugabirdclub.org/spring-ornithology>www.cayugabirdclub.org/spring-ornithology
 


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

[cayugabirds-l] Hermit Thrushes and Fox Sparrow in Brooktondale

2020-12-07 Thread Sandy Podulka
Our feeder Fox Sparrow continues, and today we also had two Hermit 
Thrushes in the yard, eating Wild Grape. I saw just one yesterday and 
joked we had to get our Hermit Thrush numbers up for our second day 
of Project FeederWatch (today), and then the second one showed up!


Sandy Podulka


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


[cayugabirds-l] Female Eastern Towhee and Fox Sparrows

2020-11-22 Thread Sandy Podulka
At our feeders in Brooktondale, along with 2 Song Sparrows. Have not 
seen a towhee for a few weeks.


Sandy Podulka


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


[cayugabirds-l] Crossbills, Siskins, Redpolls, Shrike at Morgan Hill SF

2020-11-12 Thread Sandy Podulka
Had a great, but very cold, dark morning yesterday at Red Crossbill 
site in Morgan Hill State Forest (as described by Bob McGuire).
Flocks of Pine Siskins, Red Crossbills, and Common Redpolls as well 
as a Northern Shrike. Birds were still active in the area at 11 am, 
when I left. Gritting, eating larch cones, and biting at 
twigs--possibly for lichen, bark, or insects. There were many 
flyovers, long intervals with no birds, and then times when many 
birds were nearby. Dress warmly!

https://ebird.org/atlasny/checklist/S76181348

Sandy Podulka


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


Re: [cayugabirds-l] Pine Siskins

2020-10-17 Thread Sandy Podulka
We have two at our feeders in Brooktondale as of today, also. Saw 3 a 
few days ago near the house.

At 09:52 AM 10/17/2020, Kevin J. Cummings wrote:
>Hi all,
>
>I was very excited to see two Pine Siskins among the feeder birds 
>here in Dryden this morning.
>
>Kevin
>
>
>Sent from my iPhone
>--
>
>Cayugabirds-L List Info:
>http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
>http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
>http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm
>
>ARCHIVES:
>1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
>2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
>3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html
>
>Please submit your observations to eBird:
>http://ebird.org/content/ebird/
>
>--

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

[cayugabirds-l] ID Help: Juvenile Hermit Thrush or Veery?

2020-08-08 Thread Sandy Podulka

Hi Folks,

I took these photos on July 20 at the top of Deputron Hollow Rd, 
where both Hermit Thrush and Veery breed nearby.

Can anyone tell me which this one is?

https://photos.app.goo.gl/LKt5cPaaGMnKiMGB9

Thanks,
Sandy


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


[cayugabirds-l] Link Info: 3 Mystery Calls!!

2020-07-13 Thread Sandy Podulka
Hi Folks,

No need for an account with Dropbox, which is how I posted the links. 
If a box comes up asking you to login or join, just close it and keep 
going. That is just marketing!

Sandy

\\\

Hi Folks,

I could use some help with 3 recent mystery calls.

(1) Sunday (yesterday) morning I went to Trevor Rd to look for the 
Red Crossbills that Kevin P. found. I did not see them, but in the 
same spot as Kevin, did pish and a bird called numerous times from 
medium-high in the trees, and then flew off. I never got a look. But 
it repeated a two-note "chirpy" call numerous times.  Here are two 
from different lousy phone recordings, linked together into one cut. 
Is this a Red Crossbill?  If not, what?  I know most local bird 
calls, and did not recognize this at all.
https://www.dropbox.com/s/bj6uexcftkdcyw2/Possible%20Red%20Crossbill%20at%20Trevor%20Rd.mp3?dl=0

(2) Along Deputron Hollow Road a week ago, I heard this call that 
sounded like begging. It occurs right at the beginning and at 6 
seconds into the cut, and is a repeated series of about 6 notes. It 
sounds a lot like a fledgling Baltimore Oriole, and it may be, but I 
have heard many lately, and this sounded like a larger, tougher, 
bird, and was a more raucous and low-pitched call than the orioles 
I've heard. This was coming from intact deciduous forest next to a logged area.
https://www.dropbox.com/s/p6bovlokv0uckuj/Mystery%20Begging%20Call%20Deputron%20Hollow%20Rd.mp3?dl=0

(3) The third call I have heard the last couple of weeks in Shindagin 
Hollow, along Trevor Road, and at Kingsbury Woods and I am quite sure 
it is a Broad-winged Hawk. But instead of the usual two-note, drawn 
out 'pe-w." This is a series of short "we we we we we we 
we" notes, but of similar quality to the usual call.  Could this be a 
fledgling Broad-winged Hawk? I have not heard this call all spring or 
early summer, but am now hearing it around.

Thanks for any help you can give me!

Sandy  
--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

[cayugabirds-l] 3 Mystery Calls!!

2020-07-12 Thread Sandy Podulka
Hi Folks,

I could use some help with 3 recent mystery calls.

(1) Sunday (yesterday) morning I went to Trevor Rd to look for the 
Red Crossbills that Kevin P. found. I did not see them, but in the 
same spot as Kevin, did pish and a bird called numerous times from 
medium-high in the trees, and then flew off. I never got a look. But 
it repeated a two-note "chirpy" call numerous times.  Here are two 
from different lousy phone recordings, linked together into one cut. 
Is this a Red Crossbill?  If not, what?  I know most local bird 
calls, and did not recognize this at all.
https://www.dropbox.com/s/bj6uexcftkdcyw2/Possible%20Red%20Crossbill%20at%20Trevor%20Rd.mp3?dl=0

(2) Along Deputron Hollow Road a week ago, I heard this call that 
sounded like begging. It occurs right at the beginning and at 6 
seconds into the cut, and is a repeated series of about 6 notes. It 
sounds a lot like a fledgling Baltimore Oriole, and it may be, but I 
have heard many lately, and this sounded like a larger, tougher, 
bird, and was a more raucous and low-pitched call than the orioles 
I've heard. This was coming from intact deciduous forest next to a logged area.
https://www.dropbox.com/s/p6bovlokv0uckuj/Mystery%20Begging%20Call%20Deputron%20Hollow%20Rd.mp3?dl=0

(3) The third call I have heard the last couple of weeks in Shindagin 
Hollow, along Trevor Road, and at Kingsbury Woods and I am quite sure 
it is a Broad-winged Hawk. But instead of the usual two-note, drawn 
out 'pe-w." This is a series of short "we we we we we we 
we" notes, but of similar quality to the usual call.  Could this be a 
fledgling Broad-winged Hawk? I have not heard this call all spring or 
early summer, but am now hearing it around.

Thanks for any help you can give me!

Sandy 
--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

Re:[cayugabirds-l] purple finch nest

2020-06-15 Thread Sandy Podulka
I'm betting a House Finch--sounds like a more typical nest spot for them.
But what a joy--would love to have them on my porch!!!

Sandy

At 09:27 AM 6/15/2020, Marty Schlabach wrote:
>Are you sure it’s a purple finch?
>--Marty
>Interlaken, NY
>
>From: bounce-124702194-3494...@list.cornell.edu 
> On Behalf Of Rustici, Marc
>Sent: Monday, June 15, 2020 8:00 AM
>To: 'k...@empireaccess.net' ; lajews...@yahoo.com
>Cc: CAYUGABIRDS-L 
>Subject: RE: [cayugabirds-l] The Bald Eagle: A Conservation Success Story
>
>Good Morning,
>
>I am hoping someone can tell me or direct me to some information, please.
>
>We have some purple finches nesting on our front 
>porch in a hanging basket.  I saw they have laid 
>eggs.  My wife wants them gone (I am the 
>softee..) as they make quite a mess when the 
>young hatch…It was suggested I move the 
>nnest to an very nearby weeping birch (where they perch).
>
>Is this a viable option?
>
>Marc
>
>From: 
>bounce-124701128-62610...@list.cornell.edu
> 
>[mailto:bounce-124701128-62610...@list.cornell.edu] 
>On Behalf Of k...@empireaccess.net
>Sent: Sunday, June 14, 2020 12:36 PM
>To: lajews...@yahoo.com
>Cc: Cayugabirds
>Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] The Bald Eagle: A Conservation Success Story
>
>
>
>
>Attention: This email came from an external 
>source outside Arnot Health. Please use caution 
>when opening attachments or clicking links from 
>unknown senders or unexpected email.
>.
>
>
>
>Wish I could hear this Chris but have eschewed 
>zoom. It's a great story nationwide. I had the 
>honor of being the first survey and banding 
>crews in the Chesapeake Bay Region back in the 
>early 70s. These were done by a group called the 
>Raptor Information Center under the aegis of The 
>National Wildlife Foundation. We based in the 
>DC/MD area and worked the watershed of three 
>states. A handful of nests in the whole area and 
>very low reproduction rate at the beginning. 
>Climbing into an eagle nest was amazing and 
>locked me into ornithology for life and a new 
>career field. It is so satisfying to see the 
>tremendous increase in these terrific birds with 
>the less than ferocious voices!
>
>Best,
>John
>---
>John and Sue Gregoire
>5373 Fitzgerald Rd
>Burdett, NY 14818-9626
>"Conserve and Create Habitat"
>N 42.44307 W 76.75784
>
>
>On 2020-06-14 12:38, lajews...@yahoo.com wrote:
>Tuesday, June 16 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM
>
>The Bald Eagle: A Conservation Success Story
>
>A symbol of national strength and unity, the 
>Bald Eagle has also become a parable for 
>nature's unshakable ties to humans. Estimated to 
>have numbered 100,000 in pre-colonial times, 
>shooting, cutting of forests, and finally 
>pesticides, took a toll on the bird, bringing it 
>to the brink of extinction by the early 1960's. 
>Join Montezuma Audubon Center Director Chris 
>Lajewski to hear the conservation success story 
>of our national bird and learn how the Montezuma 
>Wetlands Complex played an important role in 
>bringing the bird back from the brink. Fee: 
>$10/person. Click 
>https://act.audubon.org/a/bald-eagle-conservation-success-story-tickets
> 
>to register for this workshop. You will receive 
>a Zoom link to the workshop in your confirmation email.
>
>This program is sponsored by the Friends of the Montezuma Wetlands Complex.
>
>Chris Lajewski
>
>Center Director
>
>Montezuma Audubon Center
>--
>Cayugabirds-L List Info:
>Welcome and Basics
>Rules and Information
>Subscribe,
> 
>Configuration and Leave
>Archives:
>The 
>Mail Archive
>Surfbirds
>BirdingOnThe.Net
>Please submit your observations to eBird!
>--
>
>--
>Cayugabirds-L List Info:
>Welcome and Basics
>Rules and Information
>Subscribe,
> 
>Configuration and Leave
>Archives:
>The 
>Mail Archive
>Surfbirds
>BirdingOnThe.Net
>Please submit your observations to eBird!
>--
>
>
>--
>IMPORTANT NOTICE: This email is meant for the 
>use of the intended recipient. It may contain 
>confidential information which is legally 
>privileged or otherwise protected by law. If you 
>received this 

Re: [cayugabirds-l] Murder most Fowl - Saturday 5/30

2020-05-31 Thread Sandy Podulka
I can understand how a predator can get a bunch 
of chickens in a cage, but in the wild, after it 
got one, I think the others would fly away. So a 
predator getting them all seems unlikely to me. 
Am I missing something? Gary's suggestion here makes sense.

Sandy

At 02:29 PM 5/31/2020, Gary Kohlenberg wrote:
>I hadn’t thought of Mustelid or Possum as Wes suggested as a culprit.
>
>As only one bird lost his head that could be 
>predation after death. One other bird dead with 
>head attached and another dying with possible 
>neck issues makes the suggestion of botulism by 
>Kevin Cummings and Morgan Hapeman interesting. I 
>know Montezuma has had problems with this in the 
>past. The water in Shindagin is pretty stagnant 
>which could be a problem. It also better answers 
>the unlikely idea of multiple birds shot in such a manner.
>
>Gary
>
>On May 31, 2020, at 11:53 AM, Christopher T. 
>Tessaglia-Hymes  wrote:
>
> Just throwing this out there as another possibility: weasel or ferret.
>
>This is, as I understand it, classic kill method 
>used by these Mustelids. They’ve been know to 
>kill off an entire flock of chickens in a night, 
>severing heads with minimal disruption to the rest of the body.
>
>Thoughts?
>
>Sincerely,
>Chris T-H
>
>Sent from my iPhone
>
>
>
>On May 31, 2020, at 11:07, Sandy Podulka 
><<mailto:s...@cornell.edu>s...@cornell.edu> wrote:
>
>>That is also one of my favorite places!
>>
>>I have seen 4 male Mallards in that small pond 
>>consistently this spring (but not today, and I guess I now know why).
>>I have no idea what could kill so many birds in 
>>such an odd way except a hunter, or maybe a 
>>group of hunters--I would think an owl wouldn't 
>>have a chance at all of them at once, as the others would fly off.
>>
>>So sorry to hear this. As we are learning in so 
>>many ways these days, people can be truly cruel.
>>
>>Sandy Podulka
>>
>>At 10:08 AM 5/31/2020, Gary Kohlenberg wrote:
>>>Saturday I walked with my daughter down 
>>>Shindagin Hollow Rd., in the State Forest, to 
>>>the intersection with Gulf Creek Rd. for 
>>>exercise, fun and to show her the area. It was 
>>>very birdy and beautiful as usual especially 
>>>the beaver pond at the bottom of the hill. 
>>>This place always reminds me of the Adirondacks and is a favorite of mine.
>>>
>>>There was a surprising amount of traffic on 
>>>Shindagin Rd. both cars and mountain bikers 
>>>savoring the nice day. Some out of state 
>>>plates on cars of dozens parked at the 
>>>intersection and FLT crossing. I was reminded 
>>>how popular this area is and how much we need wild areas during a pandemic.
>>>
>>>We were amazed at how many Red Newts were 
>>>crossing the road. Some didn’t make it it 
>>>unharmed, but most of them did. I learned 
>>>about their life cycle, that they are toxic, 
>>>but contain off the charts cuteness. We tried 
>>>to help a couple on the journey, but they are 
>>>very independent minded and don’t need ed any intervention.
>>>
>>>We noticed a dead bird in the pond by the 
>>>outflow pipe under the road; a dead male 
>>>Mallard. Kayla thought it quite interesting 
>>>and checked to find it had no head. I thought 
>>>that was weird, but I have seen it before, and 
>>>guessed maybe an owl had decapitated it. 
>>>I’m not actually positive owls would or 
>>>coucould do this, but seem to remember some 
>>>discussion about this. If anyone knows if it 
>>>can be a thing please enlighten me.
>>>
>>>I scanned the pond and saw movement which was 
>>>another male Mallard struggling in the water. 
>>>His body floated with the head hanging 
>>>underwater unable to lift it up. He may have 
>>>had a broken neck. I wasn’t able to reach 
>>>the poor guy to end his misery whichh made me 
>>>sad. More scanning found a third male Mallard 
>>>floating in the pond dead. I didn’t see any 
>>>more, e, but there could have been one in the 
>>>grass. Three seems like a typical total for 
>>>this small water to hold on any particular day.
>>>
>>>My hypothesis is that they were all shot on 
>>>the water with a shotgun. To cleanly 
>>>decapitate a bird the shot would have to be at 
>>>very close range. The other birds could have 
>>>all been hit with the same shot if they had 
>>>been swimming very together. This water is 
>>>very small

Re: [cayugabirds-l] Murder most Fowl - Saturday 5/30

2020-05-31 Thread Sandy Podulka
That is also one of my favorite places!

I have seen 4 male Mallards in that small pond 
consistently this spring (but not today, and I guess I now know why).
I have no idea what could kill so many birds in 
such an odd way except a hunter, or maybe a group 
of hunters--I would think an owl wouldn't have a 
chance at all of them at once, as the others would fly off.

So sorry to hear this. As we are learning in so 
many ways these days, people can be truly cruel.

Sandy Podulka

At 10:08 AM 5/31/2020, Gary Kohlenberg wrote:
>Saturday I walked with my daughter down 
>Shindagin Hollow Rd., in the State Forest, to 
>the intersection with Gulf Creek Rd. for 
>exercise, fun and to show her the area. It was 
>very birdy and beautiful as usual especially the 
>beaver pond at the bottom of the hill. This 
>place always reminds me of the Adirondacks and is a favorite of mine.
>
>There was a surprising amount of traffic on 
>Shindagin Rd. both cars and mountain bikers 
>savoring the nice day. Some out of state plates 
>on cars of dozens parked at the intersection and 
>FLT crossing. I was reminded how popular this 
>area is and how much we need wild areas during a pandemic.
>
>We were amazed at how many Red Newts were 
>crossing the road. Some didn’t make it 
>unharmed, but most of them did. I learned about 
>their life cycle, that they are toxic, but 
>contain off the charts cuteness. We tried to 
>help a couple on the journey, but they are very 
>independent minded and don’t need any intervention.
>
>We noticed a dead bird in the pond by the 
>outflow pipe under the road; a dead male 
>Mallard. Kayla thought it quite interesting and 
>checked to find it had no head. I thought that 
>was weird, but I have seen it before, and 
>guessed maybe an owl had decapitated it. I’m 
>not actually positive owls would or could do 
>this, but seem to remember some discussion about 
>this. If anyone knows if it can be a thing please enlighten me.
>
>I scanned the pond and saw movement which was 
>another male Mallard struggling in the water. 
>His body floated with the head hanging 
>underwater unable to lift it up. He may have had 
>a broken neck. I wasn’t able to reach the poor 
>guy to end his misery which made me sad. More 
>scanning found a third male Mallard floating in 
>the pond dead. I didn’t see any more, but 
>there could have been one in the grass. Three 
>seems like a typical total for this small water to hold on any particular day.
>
>My hypothesis is that they were all shot on the 
>water with a shotgun. To cleanly decapitate a 
>bird the shot would have to be at very close 
>range. The other birds could have all been hit 
>with the same shot if they had been swimming 
>very together. This water is very small and 
>birds not hit would have flown and probably 
>circled around. It’s not likely they would 
>have been shot in the air and fallen back into this small area.
>
>This poaching event is very disturbing and we 
>had another event like this in the same general 
>area. I’m thinking of the eagle shooting over 
>bait. No hunter would shoot birds in a barrel or 
>sitting on the water even in season. In my 
>opinion this is just criminal at any time.
>
>We all have bigger social troubles overall, but 
>felt compelled to document this as a complete 
>view of birding in the finger lakes. The little things still go on.
>
>Happier birding today,
>
>Gary
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>--
>
>Cayugabirds-L List Info:
>http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
>http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
>http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm
>
>ARCHIVES:
>1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
>2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
>3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html
>
>Please submit your observations to eBird:
>http://ebird.org/content/ebird/
>
>--

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

[cayugabirds-l] YB Cuckoo, Olive-sided Flycatcher, Bay-breasted

2020-05-25 Thread Sandy Podulka
Yellow-billed Cuckoo yesterday on Olsefski Rd (off Coddington), 
Olive-sided Flycatcher hanging out by our house today (spotted by 
Eagle-eared and Eagle-eyed daughter), and several Bay-breasted 
Warblers and a Canada Warbler in our woods yesterday, in 
Brooktondale.  Just a few migrants around us today--but heard 
Mourning, Black-and-white, and Blackburnian in places they do not breed.


Has anyone been to the Hawthorns today?

Sandy Podulka


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


[cayugabirds-l] Lindsay-Parsons Worm-eating and Hooded Warblers

2020-05-17 Thread Sandy Podulka
Sorry for posting a day late too busy birding.  Bill and I 
checked out the Lindsay-Parsons Biodiversity Preserve yesterday 
(Saturday) and found many of the usual residents including the 
invisible Prairie Warblers, several Brown Thrashers, Northern 
Waterthrush (near the entrance), Yellow-throated Vireo, and Least 
Flycatcher. Only a few migrants--Cape May Warbler and Northern 
Parula. I posted a full list on eBird.


The highlight was finally, after several decades, seeing my first 
local Worm-eating Warbler. We first heard it singing from the purple 
trail, near its junction with the red trail, on the steep hill that 
goes up to Thatcher's Pinnacles, where Worm-eatings traditionally 
breed. After about 1.5 hours, finally got literally a glimpse, but 
that was a triumph.  Also saw a Hooded Warbler along the purple 
trail, where it usually breeds (could hear it from the RR tracks even).


And not one tick.

Sandy Podulka


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


[cayugabirds-l] Arnot Forest - Mournings and many other warblers

2020-05-17 Thread Sandy Podulka
Inspired by Suan's post (which sounded great to me), our family 
headed to Arnot Forest this morning. Martha Fischer gave us a tip to 
a patch of spruce trees down the road from Greensprings whose sunlit 
tops were teeming with migrants--Bay-breasted, Magnolia, 
Blackburnian, Cape May, Yellow-rumped, American Redstart, 
Black-throated Blue, and Black-throated Green. Ovenbirds were 
squabbling and one was carrying nest material!


Next we birded Decker Road, across Route 13 from Arnot Forest and 
found some of the same, and also Canada, Chestnut-sided, Tennessee, 
Nashville, Common Yellowthroat, and Northern Parula. Also most of the 
usual breeders and Yellow-throated, Blue-headed, Warbling, and 
Red-eyed Vireos. Veeries and Wood Thrushes, too. A male Rose-breasted 
Grosbeak was carrying a long string of nesting material and then 
couldn't resist singing and dropped it all! Heard our first Eastern 
Wood-Pewee there.


Headed up Banfield Road and finally heard a Yellow Warbler! Also 
Louisiana Waterthrush, lots of Canada Warblers (all invisible), 
several Winter Wrens, and quite a few other birds including a few 
migrant warblers. The highlight was watching two Mourning Warblers 
chase each other all over the place contesting a choice brush pile 
(while listening to a Hooded Warbler and Winter Wren).


Beautiful morning and very few people.

Sandy Podulka


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


[cayugabirds-l] Prairie Warbler in Brooktondale

2020-05-03 Thread Sandy Podulka
Prairie Warbler singing in our field in Brooktondale today, and newly 
arrived Baltimore Orioles, Ovenbird, and Common Yellowthroats--looks 
like they all hit town at once.


Sandy Podulka


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


[cayugabirds-l] Great Crested Flycatcher

2020-05-01 Thread Sandy Podulka

Here in Brooktondale this morning, calling away as if it never left.

Sandy Podulka


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


[cayugabirds-l] Northern Waterthrush in Brooktondale

2020-04-29 Thread Sandy Podulka
Singing near our house this morning in a skunk cabbage bog, but also 
95% sure I heard it yesterday, too. But didn't have time to track it 
down yesterday.


Also, a Chipping Sparrow and a Spotted Sandpiper arrived today, and a 
Fox Sparrow is still hanging around.


Sandy Podulka


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


Re: [cayugabirds-l] Of Unleashed Dogs and Waterthrushes

2020-04-27 Thread Sandy Podulka
I thought that with Covid-19 restrictions all 
dogs are supposed to be on leashes when out of 
the house (I assume out of one's yard).  A dog 
rushing up to someone else can carry virus to 
them (albeit this is a low risk), so it is even 
more irresponsible to have an unleashed dog in public right now.


At 10:58 AM 4/27/2020, Meredith Leonard wrote:
>Sorry Robin, I apologize for singling you out. 
>You belong to a lucky cohort of dog owners with good dogs.
>But, even your well behaved dog really should be 
>leashed in natural or wild areas, especially 
>during mating, nesting, birthing and fledging seasons.
>Otherwise,
>a) you have no way to convey to someone who 
>fears dogs just what sort of behavior they can 
>expect from your particular dog, and
>b) your unleashed dog will tell other owners 
>that it is OK for their dogs to be unleashed, no 
>matter your argument or their dog.
>Please, all owners of good dogs, think of this 
>problem from a multitude of points of view. 
>Think of it as an environmental responsibility.
>Thank you, Meredith
>
>On Apr 27, 2020, at 7:17 AM, Robin Cisne  wrote:
>
>As the owner of a well-behaved dog who prefers 
>to be unleashed and leaves other people alone, 
>I'm very sorry this happened to 
>you.  Inconsiderate jackasses like that ruin it for the rest of us.
>
>Robin
>
>
>
> 
>
>
>
>
>On Sun, Apr 26, 2020 at 8:29 PM Magnus Fiskesjo 
> wrote:
>
>Nice poem!
>
>One of your dog men at least said sorry. At Hog 
>hole the other day, ignoring all the signs that 
>say dogs-on-leash-only, a man unleashed his 
>oversized filthy dog, and it rushed at and 
>jumped at my wife, who was quite scared, as she 
>tried to defend herself and fend it off. The man 
>did not say one word of apology, evidently could 
>not care less. I wanted to bash his head in, or 
>that of his dog, but did neither. The stupid 
>dogs aren't guilty of course, it's the dogs' 
>masters. There is something profoundly unseemly 
>and deeply intolerant in how these people wield 
>their dog slaves to insult and impose on others, 
>both on other people, and on wildlife.
>
>--yrs.
>Magnus Fiskesjö
>n...@cornell.edu
>_
>From: bounce-124583580-84019...@list.cornell.edu 
>[bounce-124583580-84019...@list.cornell.edu] on 
>behalf of Suan Hsi Yong [suan.y...@gmail.com]
>Sent: Sunday, April 26, 2020 7:58 PM
>To: CAYUGABIRDS-L
>Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Of Unleashed Dogs and Waterthrushes
>
>Despite the drenching rain today, I did my daily jog.
>Around the trails of six-mile creek I passed two groups with dogs.
>The first dog came a-leapin' at my thigh, against my wish.
>The owners said their sorries as they feigned to tend its leash.
>
>The second dog, also unleashed, was sniffing as it roamed,
>an area where a Waterthrush had surveyed for a home.
>Meanwhile from way up in the tree the Waterthrush did sing,
>O'er heavy rain and rushing creek the melody did ring.
>The song seemed more insistent, although I can't be sure,
>As if announcing to the world, "hey dog, get outta here!"
>Both dog and man soon left the scene, no harm it seems inflicted.
>As spring rolls on I hope to see if nesting was affected.
>
>Suan
>--
>Cayugabirds-L List Info:
>Welcome and Basics
>Rules and Information
>Subscribe, Configuration and 
>Leave
>Archives:
>The Mail 
>Archive
>Surfbirds
>BirdingOnThe.Net
>Please submit your observations to eBird!
>--
>
>--
>
>Cayugabirds-L List Info:
>http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
>http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
>http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm
>
>ARCHIVES:
>1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
>2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
>3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html
>
>Please submit your observations to eBird:
>http://ebird.org/content/ebird/
>
>--
>
>--
>Cayugabirds-L List Info:
>Welcome and Basics
>Rules and Information
>Subscribe, Configuration and Leave
>Archives:
>The Mail Archive
>Surfbirds
>BirdingOnThe.Net
>Please submit your observations to eBird!
>--
>
>
>--
>
>Cayugabirds-L List Info:
>http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
>http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
>http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm
>
>ARCHIVES:
>1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
>2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
>3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html
>
>Please submit your observations to eBird:
>http://ebird.org/content/ebird/
>
>--

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:

[cayugabirds-l] Solitary Sandpiper, Hermit Thrush leg quivering

2020-04-16 Thread Sandy Podulka
A solitary Solitary Sandpiper was foraging in the shallows of our 
pond in Brooktondale this morning, with a snowy backdrop. Louisiana 
Waterthrush singing at Shindagin Hollow, as well as a Winter Wren. A 
Hermit Thrush was in the road with many American Robins, and then 
moved to the leaf litter, where it foraged for a long time, 
repeatedly quivering a leg, then pouncing on something to eat 
(couldn't see what).  Apparently this behavior (new to me) is widely 
known, and thought to be a way of flushing out prey (or possibly even 
bringing worms up, though didn't seem like the latter today).


Sandy Podulka


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


[cayugabirds-l] Yellow-rumped Warbler, Hermit Thrush, Pine Warbler

2020-04-12 Thread Sandy Podulka

All in our woods in Brooktondale, the warblers singing.
Along the Belle School Rd RR Grade, heard Brown Thrasher, Carolina 
Wren, and 3 Virginia Rails, 2 doing a duet grunt!


Sandy Podulka


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


[cayugabirds-l] Louisiana Waterthrush, Winter Wren, Hermit Thrush

2020-04-11 Thread Sandy Podulka
Along Deputron Hollow Road this morning, wonderful to hear a singing 
Louisiana Waterthrush and Winter Wren, and to see a Hermit 
Thrush.  Also, several Field Sparrows singing.


Sandy Podulka


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


[cayugabirds-l] Baldwin Tract Quiet, but Winter Wren...

2019-04-30 Thread Sandy Podulka
A walk at the Baldwin Tract of the Park Preserve was surprisingly 
quiet this morning--no waterthrushes (not even a Yellow-rumped 
Warbler), but did hear a Winter Wren in the gorge. Other highlights 
were Purple Finches, Red-breasted Nuthatch, Black-throated Green 
Warblers, and Ruby-crowned Kinglets. Wildflowers were mostly Spring 
Beauties. Didn't feel much like spring today!


Sandy Podulka


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


[cayugabirds-l] Cayuga Lake--no Snow Geese

2019-03-23 Thread Sandy Podulka
We checked out the NW end of Cayuga Lake this evening and found the 
large groups of Snow Geese mostly gone. There was one large white 
streak in the middle of the lake south of Cayuga Lake State Park at 
5:30 pm, but it was not visible when we drove back around 6:30, so 
perhaps they took off. I am assuming that was Snow Geese. There were 
many groups of Tundra Swans off the lake, especially off Cayuga Lake 
State Park, and there were still many scattered ducks there and farther south.


Has anyone checked the mucklands lately, or seen any Snow Geese 
elsewhere?  Do you think they are done, or are there lots more to 
come? I have some friends still hoping to see them


Sandy


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


Re: [cayugabirds-l] Montezuma, mucklands, etc. info

2019-03-20 Thread Sandy Podulka
This evening there were huge rafts of Snow Geese 
on Cayuga Lake visible from Cayuga Lake State 
Park as well as Route 89 just a few miles south 
of Cayuga Lake State Park.  Just south of the 
park, along Route 89, there was a flock of Tundra 
Swans very close to shore. There were scattered 
groups of Bufflehead, Redhead, Ring-necked Ducks, 
and American Wigeon, and the occasional scaup, 
Black Duck, Mallard, and Red-breasted Merganser. 
I'm sure there was much more, but I was there 
only briefly.  A simply stunning sight in the 
evening light, especially when the Snow Geese all took to the air!

Sandy Podulka

At 08:45 PM 3/20/2019, Mary Jane Thomas wrote:
>Does anyone have recent info about the bird life 
>status on the wildlife drive at MNWR or in the 
>Mucklands?  We’re planning on being in the 
>area on Saturday.  We’d like to see Snow Geese 
>while we’re in the general area - are they 
>more apt to be on Cayuga Lake still?
>
>Thanks for the help and advice.
>
>MJ
>
>Sent from my iPad
>
>--
>
>Cayugabirds-L List Info:
>http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
>http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
>http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm
>
>ARCHIVES:
>1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
>2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
>3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html
>
>Please submit your observations to eBird:
>http://ebird.org/content/ebird/
>
>--

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

Re: [cayugabirds-l] bird song recording (2)

2018-07-20 Thread Sandy Podulka
Hi Gordon,

It's a Song Sparrow.  The first few notes are 
very quiet and hard to hear, and then it bursts 
into the loud trill with the higher note at the 
end. Perhaps it is not always even singing those first few notes!

Sandy Podulka

At 10:35 AM 7/20/2018, you wrote:
>And here’s the second clip.
>
>
>
>cheers again,
>
>Gordon
>--
>Cayugabirds-L List Info:
><http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME>Welcome and Basics
><http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES>Rules and Information
><http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm>Subscribe,
> 
>Configuration and Leave
>Archives:
><http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html>The 
>Mail Archive
><http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds>Surfbirds
><http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html>BirdingOnThe.Net
>Please submit your observations to <http://ebird.org/content/ebird/>eBird!
>--
>

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

[cayugabirds-l] Black-billed Cuckoo in Brooktondale

2018-05-16 Thread Sandy Podulka

Had our FOY Black-billed Cuckoo today in Brooktondale--nice to hear them back.

Sandy Podulka


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


[cayugabirds-l] Nashville W and BH Vireo in Brooktondale

2018-04-25 Thread Sandy Podulka
Had a NASHVILLE WARBLER and a BLUE-HEADED VIREO this afternoon in 
Brooktondale, mixed in with the billions of Ruby-crowned Kinglets and 
Yellow-rumped Warblers foraging in the mist around our ponds. One 
Golden-crowned Kinglet was here yesterday, and a few PINE SISKINS persist.


Happy Spring,
Sandy Podulka


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


[cayugabirds-l] Addendum to Lake Trip report... Pipit, Wood Ducks

2018-04-09 Thread Sandy Podulka
I neglected to mention an AMERICAN PIPIT on the spit at Myers Point 
and a pair of WOOD DUCKS in the Mill Pond in Union Springs. That 
pheasant was off 34B N of Lansing Station Rd (thanks, Donna), and 
Donna Scott tells me she's been seeing small groups of them there for months.



Birded up the East side of Cayuga Lake to Montezuma with Lynn Leopold 
today. Lovely, despite the cold and occasional snow squalls! 
Highlights included many RED-BREASTED MERGANSERS on the lake and lots 
of GREEN-WINGED TEAL (no European) and NORTHERN SHOVELERS at 
Montezuma and Carncross Road. There were several GREATER YELLOWLEGS 
at LaRue's Lagoon along the Wildlife Drive and 10+ at Carncross Road. 
Quite a few COMMON LOONS on the lake, as well.  Most gorgeous bird of 
the day was a breeding-plumage HORNED GREBE close-in at Ladoga, among 
other Horned Grebes and one Pied-billed Grebe. Also at Montezuma were 
A. Wigeon, Gadwall, Ring-necked Duck, Blue-winged Teal, Mallard, 
Hooded Merganser, Bufflehead, and two N. Pintail. Redhead at the Mill 
Pond in Union Springs and the Factory St. Pond, and Lesser Scaup 
along the way. Common Mergansers at Myers Point.  At Salt Point, 
50-60 CEDAR WAXWINGS were living up to their names by devouring the 
Cedar berries.

Most surprising bird was a male RING-NECKED PHEASANT that crossed 
Route 90 about half a mile North of Lansing Station Road!

Still waiting for spring,
Sandy Podulka 
--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

[cayugabirds-l] Pheasant, Yellowlegs, RB Mergs, Horned Grebe E. Cayuga Lake and MNWR

2018-04-08 Thread Sandy Podulka
Birded up the East side of Cayuga Lake to Montezuma with Lynn Leopold 
today. Lovely, despite the cold and occasional snow squalls! 
Highlights included many RED-BREASTED MERGANSERS on the lake and lots 
of GREEN-WINGED TEAL (no European) and NORTHERN SHOVELERS at 
Montezuma and Carncross Road. There were several GREATER YELLOWLEGS 
at LaRue's Lagoon along the Wildlife Drive and 10+ at Carncross Road. 
Quite a few COMMON LOONS on the lake, as well.  Most gorgeous bird of 
the day was a breeding-plumage HORNED GREBE close-in at Ladoga, among 
other Horned Grebes and one Pied-billed Grebe. Also at Montezuma were 
A. Wigeon, Gadwall, Ring-necked Duck, Blue-winged Teal, Mallard, 
Hooded Merganser, Bufflehead, and two N. Pintail. Redhead at the Mill 
Pond in Union Springs and the Factory St. Pond, and Lesser Scaup 
along the way. Common Mergansers at Myers Point.  At Salt Point, 
50-60 CEDAR WAXWINGS were living up to their names by devouring the 
Cedar berries.


Most surprising bird was a male RING-NECKED PHEASANT that crossed 
Route 90 about half a mile North of Lansing Station Road!


Still waiting for spring,
Sandy Podulka


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


[cayugabirds-l] Phoebe in Brooktondale

2018-04-01 Thread Sandy Podulka

Our first Eastern Phoebe of the year showed up in Brooktondale this morning.

--Sandy Podulka


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


[cayugabirds-l] Ruddy Ducks, Eurasian Teal, Sandhills, Peregrine MNWR and Cayuga Lake.

2018-03-21 Thread Sandy Podulka
Highlights from a trip up the East side of Cayuga Lake and Montezuma 
National Wildlife Refuge today with Lynn Leopold were a small group 
of Ruddy Ducks at Mudlock, the Eurasian Teal at the MNWR Visitor's 
Center (foraging with Green-winged Teal), 2 Sandhill Cranes and 
thousands of gorgeous Northern Pintail at Carncross Road, and a 
Peregrine Falcon that buzzed the ducks and Tundra Swans at Carncross 
in the early evening. What a joy to see so many waterfowl in one day!

We failed to find Eurasian Wigeon or Cackling Goose, but not for lack 
of trying. There are just tons of birds to look through.  We did not 
see as many Snow Geese as others have reported--perhaps many 
left--but there were several white "puddles" in the middle of the 
lake at the north end, and one huge string of Snow Geese on the west 
side of Cayuga Lake, south of Cayuga Lake State Park. They appeared 
to be taking off in medium-sized groups and heading west in the early evening.

Sandy Podulka 
--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

[cayugabirds-l] FINALLY! 3 Siskins in Brooktondale.

2018-01-15 Thread Sandy Podulka

Yay. Now, bring on the Purple Finches!


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


[cayugabirds-l] Virginia Rail yard bird in Brooktondale

2017-07-19 Thread Sandy Podulka
After years of looking for rails and playing tapes unsuccessfully on 
our property, we finally saw a Virginia Rail walking along the 
driveway! It quickly ran into the grasses and called and another one 
answered it. It's been a while since we had a new yard bird here in 
Brooktondale!


Sandy Podulka


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


[cayugabirds-l] 13+ BC Night-Herons from East Road

2017-07-18 Thread Sandy Podulka
Montezuma was fairly quite this afternoon, but from the overlook on 
East Road we could see 13+ adult Black-crowned Night-Herons foraging 
in the marsh. The most I recall seeing outside of a rookery 
anywhere!  Also present were numerous Great Egrets and Great Blue 
Herons. I was especially surprised to see so many Night-Herons at 
3:30 in the afternoon!  Perhaps they are desperately feeding young right now?


--Sandy Podulka


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


Re: [cayugabirds-l] Why Do Bird Eggs Have Different Shapes? Look to the Wings - NYTimes.com

2017-06-23 Thread Sandy Podulka
I'm having a lot of trouble believing this. Many birds need to fly 
well, and it's hard to believe all (or most) eggs wouldn't be the 
best shape for flying, in general, if this were true.  I can't 
believe the flying needs of albatrosses and sandpipers, both of which 
fly long distances, are so different that they would produce such 
different shapes. And some owls migrate (saw-whet), whereas others do 
not (Eastern Screech-Owl), yet their eggs are a similar shape, quite 
spherical.  Why? They both nest in holes.  I still like the older 
theories. But maybe that's because I'm old.

Sandy Podulka

At 01:03 PM 6/23/2017, Peter wrote:

><https://mobile.nytimes.com/2017/06/22/science/bird-eggs-shapes-flight.html?smprod=nytcore-iphone=nytcore-iphone-share=>https://mobile.nytimes.com/2017/06/22/science/bird-eggs-shapes-flight.html?smprod=nytcore-iphone=nytcore-iphone-share=
>
><http://www.avg.com/email-signature?utm_medium=email_source=link_campaign=sig-email_content=emailclient>
>[]
>  Virus-free. 
> <http://www.avg.com/email-signature?utm_medium=email_source=link_campaign=sig-email_content=emailclient>www.avg.com
>  
>
>--
>Cayugabirds-L List Info:
><http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME>Welcome and Basics
><http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES>Rules and Information
><http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm>Subscribe,
> 
>Configuration and Leave
>Archives:
><http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html>The 
>Mail Archive
><http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds>Surfbirds
><http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html>BirdingOnThe.Net
>Please submit your observations to <http://ebird.org/content/ebird/>eBird!
>--

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

Re: [cayugabirds-l] West Danby Nighthawk

2017-05-28 Thread Sandy Podulka
We've been hearing them for the last week as we garden in the 
evenings in Brooktondale. I wish they would stay the rest of the 
summer. It's wonderful to know they are up there working away, and 
great fun to hear them.

Sandy

At 08:21 PM 5/28/2017, Geo Kloppel wrote:
>Out working in the garden just now, I heard a Nighhawk! I looked up, 
>and there it was, moving rapidly north, calling out repeatedly and 
>hawking insects at the same time, like a talented juggler who can 
>weave a complicated path through a marching parade while keeping 
>three balls in the air and simultaneously telling a story to the crowd.
>
>-Geo
>
>
>
>--
>
>Cayugabirds-L List Info:
>http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
>http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
>http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm
>
>ARCHIVES:
>1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
>2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
>3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html
>
>Please submit your observations to eBird:
>http://ebird.org/content/ebird/
>
>--

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

[cayugabirds-l] Hawthorns?

2017-05-11 Thread Sandy Podulka

Did anyone go to Hawthorns today?  If so, how was it?  --Sandy


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


Re: [cayugabirds-l] checking, what insect is all about our faces now?

2017-05-02 Thread Sandy Podulka
They really are black flies, and they bite!
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_fly

I think the term "gnat" is kind of a lay term that people use for 
small flying things that annoy them, which would certainly include 
those dreaded black flies, which I try really hard to view as "bird 
food" and "what brings the warblers in spring." (But I rarely succeed.)

"Gnats" officially come in many varieties, such as Fungus Gnats and 
Wood Gnats, which look nothing like black flies.  Scroll down through 
this link to see the various groups of flies.
http://www.naturespot.org.uk/taxonomy/term/6

Sandy Podulka

p.s. Thanks for the head net link! It looks great and REI is a 
terrific company to support.

At 10:52 AM 5/2/2017, you wrote:
>Hi all, I always thought this little black flying insect around my 
>face as warblers show up was black fly. Am I right?
>In case they are driving you nuts, this is my solution. Best headnet 
>I have ever found!
><https://www.rei.com/product/102055/bens-invisinet-insect-head-net>https://www.rei.com/product/102055/bens-invisinet-insect-head-net
>--
>"Life is a hard battle anyway. If we laugh and sing a little as we 
>fight the good fight of freedom, it makes it all go easier. I will 
>not allow my life's light to be determined by the darkness around 
>me."  ~ Sojourner Truth
>
>Healing Hands of Ithaca
>MassageIthaca.com
>108 W. Buffalo Street, Ithaca,NY
>
>--
>Cayugabirds-L List Info:
><http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME>Welcome and Basics
><http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES>Rules and Information
><http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm>Subscribe,
> 
>Configuration and Leave
>Archives:
><http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html>The 
>Mail Archive
><http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds>Surfbirds
><http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html>BirdingOnThe.Net
>Please submit your observations to <http://ebird.org/content/ebird/>eBird!
>--

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

[cayugabirds-l] Ellis Hollow/George Rd. Comm. Solar Proj. Pub. Hearing Wed April 26, 7 pm--or email comments

2017-04-24 Thread Sandy Podulka
Dear Folks,

As you probably know, Distributed Sun is proposing several 
large-scale Community Solar Projects in the Town of  Dryden.
A public hearing is being held:

THIS WEDNESDAY, April 26, at 7 pm at the Neptune Fire Hall, 26 North 
St., Dryden

Please consider attending and giving your comments on the project in 
3 minutes (or less).

You also may email your comments on the project to:
<mailto:board--towncl...@dryden.ny.us>board--towncl...@dryden.ny.us

There are many reasons to support solar energy, of course--especially 
community solar, and this company appears to have been at least 
somewhat responsive to the concerns of neighbors. On the other hand, 
the project will use a vast amount of open space, and trees will be 
cut, including part of the evergreen stand on Dodge Rd. that is 
precious to birders (and birds). Several people have suggested on 
this listserv that the best placement of solar panels is on rooftops 
and above parking lots--I love those ideas.

Since I moved to this area 35 years ago, I have watched open space 
whittled away, piece by piece, and watched our rural landscapes 
become less and less attractive, both to people and wildlife. Many 
places I cherished are now gone. When will it stop? Should we have a 
plan for making sure enough open space is left? How do we place a 
value on open spaces?

Whatever your views, I hope you will express them. Below are links to 
the most helpful information. If you spend 5 minutes looking at each 
set of maps and 5 minutes reading the FAQ, you will have a pretty 
good feel for the project--in 15 minutes.

--Sandy Podulka


Town of Dryden Web page with info on the Solar Project:
http://dryden.ny.us/departments/planning-department/permit-review-links/special-use-permits/

FAQ on Project and Changes made: (from Distributed Sun)
http://dryden.ny.us/wp-content/uploads/2011/08/DrydenSolar_FAQ.Categ_.flc_.mm3_.pdf

Maps of development in Ellis Hollow:  (Scroll down to C-111 to see 
where trees at Dodge Road would be cut)
http://dryden.ny.us/wp-content/uploads/2011/08/2.-Ellis-Tract-Site-Plan-Drawings.pdf

Maps of development along George Road:
http://dryden.ny.us/wp-content/uploads/2011/08/2.-2150-Dryden-Road-Site-Plan-Drawings.pdf
 
--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

Re: [cayugabirds-l] URGENT ALERT: Dodge Rd Spruce Woods may be cut down for massive Solar Farm on Dodge rd, STARTING in APRIL !!

2017-03-21 Thread Sandy Podulka
Dave,

Thanks for this thoughtful discussion. You make 
really good points! --Sandy Podulka

At 05:40 PM 3/21/2017, Dave Nutter wrote:
>If the goal is to reduce greenhouse gas production, then cutting down trees
>is counterproductive when installing solar 
>panels. Also cutting trees down if they
>are just along the edge of the array makes 
>little sense because the great majority
>of solar energy is during the middle of the day, 
>not early morning nor late afternoon.
>
>Putting solar panels in places that are just 
>creating heat islands, not habitats, makes
>lots of sense. Put them on rooftops. Put them 
>over parking lots. Put them on lawns
>that were already getting mowed. That's why home 
>solar is great, but industrial scale
>makes problems. Those fields that are being 
>replaced as solar "farms" (cute name)
>will still get rain and have seeds blow in. How 
>will succession be blocked? Poisons?
>
>If Cornell first decided to put solar panels on 
>all its rooftops and over all its parking
>lots, then over, say, the Ag Quad, and had run 
>out places where they could put solar
>panels without being destructive, I'd be more 
>supportive. I think that grove is pretty
>special, having seen several Long-eared Owls and 
>a Northern Saw-whet Owl there.
>
>--Dave Nutter
>
>On Mar 20, 2017, at 12:18 PM, marsha kardon 
><<mailto:mfkar...@gmail.com>mfkar...@gmail.com> wrote:
>
>>Please consider this in your efforts to 
>>minimize your contribution to climate change:
>>
>>
>>
>>Rearing cattle produces more greenhouse gases 
>>than driving cars, UN report warns
>>
>>
>>
>>[]
>>
>>
>><http://www.un.org/apps/news/story.asp?newsID=20772#>6.3KShare
>>
>>  <http://www.un.org/apps/news/story.asp?newsID=20772#>Print
>>
>>29 November 2006 – Cattle-rearing generates 
>>more global warming greenhouse gasees, as 
>>measured in CO2 equivalent, than 
>>transportation, and smarter production methods, 
>>including improved animal diets to reduce 
>>enteric fermentation and consequent methane 
>>emissions, are urgently needed, 
>><http://www.fao.org/newsroom/en/news/2006/1000448/index.html>according 
>>to a new United Nations report released today.
>>
>>“Livestock are one of the most significant 
>>contributors to today’s most serious 
>>environmental problems,” senior UN Food and 
>>Agriculture Organization (FAO) official Henning 
>>Steinfeld said. “Urgent action is required to remedy the situation.”
>>
>>Cattle-rearing is also a major source of land 
>>and water degradation, according to the FAO 
>>report, 
>><http://www.virtualcentre.org/en/library/key_pub/longshad/A0701E00.htm>Livestock’s
>> 
>>Long Shadow–Environmental Issues and Options, 
>>of which Mr. Stteinfeld is the senior author.
>>
>>“The environmental costs per unit of 
>>livestock production must be cut by one half, 
>>just to avoid the level of damage worsening 
>>beyond its present level,” it warns.
>>
>>When emissions from land use and land use 
>>change are included, the livestock sector 
>>accounts for 9 per cent of CO2 deriving from 
>>human-related activities, but produces a much 
>>larger share of even more harmful greenhouse 
>>gases. It generates 65 per cent of 
>>human-related nitrous oxide, which has 296 
>>times the Global Warming Potential (GWP) of 
>>CO2. Most of this comes from manure.
>>
>>And it accounts for respectively 37 per cent of 
>>all human-induced methane (23 times as warming 
>>as CO2), which is largely produced by the 
>>digestive system of ruminants, and 64 per cent 
>>of ammonia, which contributes significantly to acid rain.
>>
>>With increased prosperity, people are consuming 
>>more meat and dairy products every year, the 
>>report notes. Global meat production is 
>>projected to more than double from 229 million 
>>tonnes in 1999/2001 to 465 million tonnes in 
>>2050, while milk output is set to climb from 580 to 1043 million tonnes.
>>
>>The global livestock sector is growing faster 
>>than any other agricultural sub-sector. It 
>>provides livelihoods to about 1.3 billion 
>>people and contributes about 40 per cent to 
>>global agricultural output. For many poor 
>>farmers in developing countries livestock are 
>>also a source of renewable energy for draft and 
>>an essential source of organic fertilizer for their crops.
>>
>>Livestock now use 30 per cent of the earth’s 
>>entire land surface, 

[cayugabirds-l] Evening Grosbeak in Brooktondale

2016-11-01 Thread Sandy Podulka
We just started putting out seed a few days ago for the season. Our 
first day we were visited by Wild Turkeys.
Today we were honored with a male Evening Grosbeak!  The first one 
I've seen in a few years here.


Sandy Podulka
Brooktondale


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


[cayugabirds-l] Mystery Song

2016-06-02 Thread Sandy Podulka
I checked Leonard Rd. yesterday near Shindagin Hollow but found no 
Acadian Flycatcher (rats!).  It's a beautiful drive up--so thanks to 
Stuart and Anne Marie for inspiring me to visit. I did hear a mystery 
bird, which I recorded with my cell phone (sorry!)--see link (you 
don't have to join Drop Box to listen--just click continue at the 
bottom). The bird sings right at the beginning, and then near the 
end, around 18 seconds in.

https://www.dropbox.com/s/x93e1mjpyyv49ap/Mystery%20Bird%20Song%20from%20Leonard%20Road%206-1-16.mp3?dl=0

This bird was singing loudly and clearly right in front of me for a 
long time, moving around [apparently in underground tunnels, as I 
never even had a glimpse of movement!]. I'm guessing it's a Louisiana 
Waterthrush, because of song quality and loudness and habitat, but it 
sure is an odd variant!

I could not tell if the bird was singing from high or low. It was a 
deciduous woods on a slope with a lovely stream nearby.  Other 
Louisiana Waterthrushes were there, as reported by Anne Marie Johnson.

What do others think?

Sandy Podulka
Brooktondale 
--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

Re: [cayugabirds-l] First 2016 Cayuga Lake Basin Records list is updated

2016-05-30 Thread Sandy Podulka
What a lot of careful work, Dave. Thanks so much for continuing to 
carry out this duty so equitably and conscientiously!

Sandy Podulka

At 08:06 PM 5/30/2016, Dave Nutter wrote:
>Content-type: text/html;
> charset="US-ASCII"
>X-Microsoft-Exchange-Diagnostics:
> 
>1;SN2PR04MB2237;9:Vly5lEhWzNrquB/vRhq/aYluguzijzcz64NiQbYw9KjA89vbW8cjWluIlTkKWU7feLgRvYhDcnzXSjruMB1zkqTKsCaZ5CTw/VBLYG9TNNGshIhsQu+0dnZmI6MH1/rItGyvxeP9wUTQjW81rwDW2tQoRVhj5CBW9idmnbaW/ro=
>
>I think I have the 2016 Cayuga Lake Basin First Records list up to date again:
><http://www.cayugabirdclub.org/Resources/cayuga-lake-basin-first-records>http://www.cayugabirdclub.org/Resources/cayuga-lake-basin-first-records
>
>I wasn't intentionally waiting to update the list. I prefer to keep 
>it current, but it got ahead of me.
>
>The expected locally breeding birds are all accounted for, I 
>think.  There are still shorebirds which may show up here on their 
>way north, or we may have to wait till early July when they start 
>south again in larger numbers, lingering longer, and ranging more 
>widely. And of course there are still birds showing up which simply 
>appear to be lost, or to put it more kindly, exploring.
>
>Please let me know of things on the list that look wrong - people, 
>locations, dates, whatever. With this much info and so many birds 
>and birders there's a high probability I've screwed up something, or 
>at least made it appear confusing.
>
>I try to include names of people in parties who independently find a 
>new species on the first day. Parties are not necessarily in any 
>order, but the places are in the same order as the parties.
>
>In the case of Black-bellied Plover the number of observers got very 
>long when a group of a dozen Cornell students on a basin big day 
>found a bird in breeding plumage at Knox-Marsellus in mid-afternoon 
>overlapping in time with several other observers, but in the evening 
>at K-M Ann Mitchell & I found one in non-breeding plumage. So I 
>included everybody, because no single party had clear priority over 
>either bird.
>
>The American Golden-Plovers at K-M that same day are a slightly 
>different story. The only people who appeared to independently 
>identify them were the student group.
>
>The Ruff which the same group reported was not described in enough 
>detail to distinguish it from a large male Pectoral Sandpiper which 
>Jay McGowan found there that evening. If it gets accepted by eBird, 
>I will include it.
>
>Eastern Whip-poor-will is another odd case. Brad Walker & Jay 
>McGowan saw one in their headlights along Bald Hill Road in Danby 
>while doing a basin big day. However the location on their eBird 
>report drains into Michigan Hollow where topo lines show that valley 
>drains south to the Susquehanna, so it is out of the Cayuga Lake 
>Basin. On the other hand Jeffrey Smith reported hearing one in 
>Virgil at the very edge of the Basin but along a creek which clearly 
>does drain to Cayuga Lake. It's a pretty obvious sound, so I'm not 
>sure why it hasn't been confirmed on eBird yet.
>
>White-rumped Sandpiper was reported a few days earlier than shown 
>but I don't know by whom (JF are you out there?). I like to include 
>observers names, not only to give credit, but also so that there's a 
>possibility of discussing more exactly where a bird was, what it was 
>doing, and how it was identified.
>
>Like many great birding spots, Shindagin Hollow is just outside of 
>the basin, so Melissa Groo's Red-headed Woodpecker is simply a 
>fantastic yard bird, and Ethan Chaffee was the first to report one 
>in the now-traditional area along South Mays Point Road in Tyre. 
>There was a vague report earlier which was not accepted by eBird.
>
>Have a great summer. I hope to meet you out birding.
>
>--Dave Nutter--
>Cayugabirds-L List Info:
><http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME>Welcome and Basics
><http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES>Rules and Information
><http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm>Subscribe,
> 
>Configuration and Leave
>Archives:
><http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html>The 
>Mail Archive
><http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds>Surfbirds
><http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html>BirdingOnThe.Net
>Please submit your observations to <http://ebird.org/content/ebird/>eBird!
>--

--



Cayugabirds-L List Info:

http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME

http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES

http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm



ARCHIVES:

1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html

2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds

3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html



Please submit your observations to eBird:

http://ebird.org/content/ebird/



--

[cayugabirds-l] N. Saw-whet continues in Brooktondale

2016-03-09 Thread Sandy Podulka
A N. Saw-whet Owl continues to call frequently every night from near 
our house in Brooktondale.

Maybe it will stay and breed?

Sandy Podulka


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


[cayugabirds-l] Saw-whet in Brooktondale

2016-03-07 Thread Sandy Podulka
A Northern Saw-whet Owl is currently giving his tooting "back-up" 
call from across our pond in Brooktondale. The first one we've heard 
in a few years!!!


Sandy Podulka


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


[cayugabirds-l] Wilson's Phalarope and Swainson's Thrush at MNWR

2015-05-24 Thread Sandy Podulka
Highlights of our birding at Montezuma included a breeding plumage 
WILSON'S PHALAROPE in the Main Pool along the Wildlife Drive at 
Montezuma (add 1 to the total Dave mentions?) around 6:30 pm, a 
singing SWAINSON'S THRUSH along Armitage Rd. near the Prothonotary 
Warbler site, and a COMMON NIGHTHAWK along Van Dyne Spoor Road at 
dusk. Many more shorebirds than two days ago--nice variety along the 
Wildlife Drive as well as at Knox-Marsellus.

--Sandy Podulka

At 11:56 PM 5/24/2015, you wrote:
In the middle of this warm afternoon Ann Mitchell  I visited 
Montezuma NWR's Knox-Marsellus Marsh, viewing from East Rd. There 
were huge numbers of shorebirds. I estimated three thousand DUNLIN. 
But the heat shimmer was a problem, so we left and returned when the 
light was more behind us and the ground wasn't being heated so much. 
At 5:30pm conditions were better for scoping the distant shorebirds 
in shallow waters and wet or moist mud. There were at least 15 
BLACK-BELLIED PLOVERS in various plumages, several each of 
SEMIPALMATED PLOVERS, SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPERS, and LEAST SANDPIPERS, 
and 2 GREATER YELLOWLEGS. Ann also discovered a WILSON'S PHALAROPE, 
pot-bellied and very white running drunkenly and pecking randomly at 
the water's surface among a flock of sedately feeding Dunlin. As we 
showed it to other birders it kept moving, then it flushed along 
with all the nearby Dunlin. I refound a pale (male) Wilson's 
Phalarope only to have it walk up to another with a dark mark on the 
side of the upper neck (a female). They stood erect and walked tight 
circles around each other for a minute before resuming their odd 
foraging mode. Then I noticed 2 more males, for 4 Wilson's 
Phalaropes in the same view. This is the most I've encountered at 
once around here, and a great way to end a full day of birding, 
which included finding the adult GLOSSY IBIS in Larue's Lagoon along 
the Wildlife Drive. This was very fortunate, because Bob McGuire 
said (I think - bad phone connection) that he saw it in the Main 
Pool, which could have made it far harder to find or see well.

--Dave Nutter--
Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOMEWelcome and Basics
http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsRULESRules and Information
http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htmSubscribe,
 
Configuration and Leave
Archives:
http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.htmlThe 
Mail Archive
http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/CayugabirdsSurfbirds
http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.htmlBirdingOnThe.Net
Please submit your observations to http://ebird.org/content/ebird/eBird!
--

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

[cayugabirds-l] Yellow-billed Cuckoo in Brooktondale

2015-05-14 Thread Sandy Podulka
A Yellow-billed Cuckoo called a few times near our yard in 
Brooktondale this afternoon!


Sandy Podulka



--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


[cayugabirds-l] OT--Avian Influenza Found in Commercial Turkeys in Missouri (Mississippi Flyway)

2015-03-11 Thread Sandy Podulka
Within the Mississippi Flyway.

03/10/2015

USDA Confirms Highly Pathogenic H5N2 Avian Influenza in Commercial 
Turkey Flocks in Missouri

CDC considers the risk to people from these HPAI H5 infections in 
wild birds, backyard flocks and commercial poultry, to be low

WASHINGTON, March 10, 2015 -- The United States Department of 
Agriculture's (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service 
(APHIS) has confirmed the presence of highly pathogenic H5N2 avian 
influenza (HPAI) in two separate commercial turkey flocks in 
Missouri. The flocks are located in Jasper County and Moniteau 
County, within the Mississippi flyway where this strain of avian 
influenza has previously been identified. CDC considers the risk to 
people from these HPAI H5 infections in wild birds, backyard flocks 
and commercial poultry, to be low.

Samples from the turkey flocks, which experienced increased 
mortality, were tested at the Missouri Department of Agriculture 
Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory and the APHIS National Veterinary 
Services Laboratories in Ames, Iowa confirmed the findings. APHIS is 
working closely with the Missouri Department of Agriculture on a 
joint incident response. State officials quarantined the affected 
premises and the remaining birds on the properties will be 
depopulated to prevent the spread of the disease. Birds from the 
involved flocks will not enter the food system.

No human infections with these viruses have been detected at this 
time. The Missouri Department of Agriculture is working directly with 
poultry workers at the affected facility to ensure that they are 
taking the proper precautions. As a reminder, the proper handling and 
cooking of poultry and eggs to an internal temperature of 165 F kills 
bacteria and viruses.

As part of existing avian influenza response plans, Federal and State 
partners are working jointly on additional surveillance and testing 
in the nearby area. The United States has the strongest AI 
surveillance program in the world, and USDA is working with its 
partners to actively look for the disease in commercial poultry 
operations, live bird markets and in migratory wild bird populations.

USDA will be informing the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE) 
as well as international trading partners of this finding. USDA also 
continues to communicate with trading partners to encourage adherence 
to OIE standards and minimize trade impacts. OIE trade guidelines 
call on countries to base trade restrictions on sound science and, 
whenever possible, limit restrictions to those animals and animal 
products within a defined region that pose a risk of spreading 
disease of concern.

These virus strains can travel in wild birds without them appearing 
sick. People should avoid contact with sick/dead poultry or wildlife. 
If contact occurs, wash your hands with soap and water and change 
clothing before having any contact with healthy domestic poultry and birds.

All bird owners, whether commercial producers or backyard 
enthusiasts, should continue to practice good biosecurity, prevent 
contact between their birds and wild birds, and report sick birds or 
unusual bird deaths to State/Federal officials, either through their 
state veterinarian or through USDA's toll-free number at 
1-866-536-7593.  Additional information on biosecurity for backyard 
flocks can be found at 
http://healthybirds.aphis.usda.gov/http://healthybirds.aphis.usda.gov.

Additional background
  Avian influenza (AI) is caused by an influenza type A virus which 
can infect poultry (such as chickens, turkeys, pheasants, quail, 
domestic ducks, geese and guinea fowl) and is carried by free flying 
waterfowl such as ducks, geese and shorebirds. AI viruses are 
classified by a combination of two groups of proteins: hemagglutinin 
or H proteins, of which there are 16 (H1H16), and neuraminidase or 
NN proteins, of which there are 9 (N1N9). Many diffferent 
combinations of H and N proteins are possible. Each combination 
is considered a different subtype, and can be further broken down 
into different strains. AI viruses are further classified by their 
pathogenicity (low or high) the ability of a particular virus strrain 
to produce disease in domestic chickens.

The HPAI H5N8 virus originated in Asia and spread rapidly along wild 
bird migratory pathways during 2014, including the Pacific flyway. In 
the Pacific flyway, the HPAI H5N8 virus has mixed with North American 
avian influenza viruses, creating new mixed-origin viruses. These 
mixed-origin viruses contain the Asian-origin H5 part of the virus, 
which is highly pathogenic to poultry. The N parts of these viruses 
came from North American low pathogenic avian influenza viruses.

USDA has identified two mixed-origin viruses in the Pacific Flyway: 
the HPAI H5N2 virus and new HPAI H5N1 virus. The new HPAI H5N1 virus 
is not the same virus as the HPAI H5N1 virus found in Asia, Europe 
and Africa that has caused some human illness. Only the HPAI 

[cayugabirds-l] Redpoll and Carolina Wren in Brooktondale

2015-02-06 Thread Sandy Podulka
A single Common Redpoll graced our feeders in Brooktondale yesterday, 
spotted by my daughter, Lisa.


Two days ago we had our first-ever Carolina Wren visit the suet, and 
it's back again today poking around the vines on our house. I hope it 
stays.  It's not too often we get a new yard bird these days, and 
ones this cute are particularly welcome!


Sandy Podulka



--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


Re: [cayugabirds-l] Belle School Rd - CL Basin or Not?

2015-01-02 Thread Sandy Podulka
Bob,

I have always understood that the divide between the Susquehanna and 
St. Lawrence basins (The Cayuga Lake Basin is part of the St. 
Lawrence drainage) was somewhere between Belle School Rd and Ridgeway Road.

So, you have forced me to actually look at the maps.  Check out this 
link:  http://www.tompkins-co.org/gis/physical.html

Here you can download the following:

(1) Town of Caroline--Tompkins County (the physical map)

Then scroll down to Environmental Maps and download:

(2) Watersheds of Tompkins County
(3)  Danby Watershed

The most useful comparison is then to look at the Danby map vs the 
Town of Caroline, where you can see from the Danby map that they draw 
the divide mostly right along Belle School Road. Right around the 
road there it is quite flat and there is marsh on both sides. It is 
probably hard to tell exactly what water flows which way right there 
without testing it. You can see, however, that the watershed line 
(pink) bows away from the road on the south side in one spot fairly 
close to White Church Rd. The catbird was sitting in a bush along the 
road right about where that bows out (I am not making this up), so I 
think we're safe to say that when we saw it, it was in the basin!! 
The Towhee was on the north side of Belle School Road, right where 
the blue dotted line goes under the road (a culvert)--so definitely 
at least a few feet into the basin!! That stream definitely flows 
north between Coddington and White Church, and there is detectable 
flow at least 300' in, and probably sooner, but I can't remember 
seeing whether water flows under the road in one direction or the 
other.  The Field Sparrows were farther in, so not even debatable.

Enjoy,
Sandy

At 10:21 AM 1/2/2015, bob mcguire wrote:
Congratulations to Bill Podulka  friends for finding Catbird, 
Towhee, and Field Sparrow on (?) Belle School Rd for the Christmas 
count. Dave Nutter raised the question of whether they are in or out 
of the Cayuga Lake basin (for the few of us who really care!) 
Looking at the aerial photo on Google maps, I'd say that the road 
itself IS the boundary. So, depending on exactly the birds were 
seen, they could be in or out. BIll, can you add anything here?

Bob McGuire
--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

[cayugabirds-l] Rusty Blackbirds and Fox Sparrow

2014-11-10 Thread Sandy Podulka
We were thrilled to have a flock of 56 Rusty Blackbirds in our yard 
in Brooktondale, our first of the season, just in time for our 
ProjectFeederWatch count!  Today our first Fox Sparrow showed up, but 
a day late for the count!


Sandy Podulka 




--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


[cayugabirds-l] 67 Wild Turkeys!!

2013-12-31 Thread Sandy Podulka
In our yard right now in Brooktondale. I sure hope they show up 
tomorrow! --Sandy Podulka




--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


[cayugabirds-l] Moving the Christmas Count Date Earlier

2013-12-30 Thread Sandy Podulka
Moving the Christmas Count earlier would certainly make it impossible 
for us and many local families to participate--there are too many 
conflicting required school or work, or other social events the two 
weeks before Christmas. In addition, the compilation dinner would not 
be well-attended, and I think that is an important event bringing 
many local birders together--it's a nice way to start the new year.

Sandy

At 07:49 AM 12/30/2013, you wrote:
I'll stick my neck out and resurect the suggestion that we change 
our Christmas count date. It would be great to add the many students 
and holiday travelers to our group of counters. Maybe the second or 
third Saturday of December.

Laura

Laura Stenzler
lmailto:m...@cornell.edum...@cornell.edu

On Dec 29, 2013, at 10:52 PM, Dave Nutter 
mailto:nutter.d...@me.comnutter.d...@me.com wrote:

Perhaps the line of fire  proximity of people  buildings was the 
reason the DEC police called in the gunners who were in the SW 
corner of the lake tied to a tree along the shore of Treman. I saw 
in the background 2 adults and a child on the beach of the west 
shore, associated with the first house, a large new one.

I'd like to petition the DEC to have the south end of the lake, say 
the portion within the City of Ithaca, which does not allow firing 
guns, off limits to hunting.


--Dave Nutter
On Dec 29, 2013, at 08:47 PM, Anne Clark 
mailto:anneb.cl...@gmail.comanneb.cl...@gmail.com wrote:

It sounds as if some of these folks might be illegally close to 
buildings, although I suppose they argue that their guns are 
pointing down the lake.  On the other hand, in the park area, 
trails and inlets make a complex problem for claiming that nothing 
could be in the line of fire when shooting at ducks flying in and 
over.  Do they really stop firing when the ducks swing toward shore?

Per the DEC hunting regulations

Question: How far from a building do I have to be to discharge my firearm?
Answer: You cannot discharge a firearm or bow within 500 feet of 
any school, playground, occupied factory or church. You cannot 
discharge a firearm or bow within 500 feet of a dwelling, farm 
building, or structure unless you own it, lease it, are an 
immediate member of the family, an employee, or have the owner's 
consent. This does not apply to the discharge of a shotgun over 
water when hunting migratory game birds and no dwelling, public 
structure, livestock, or person is in the line of fire.

On Dec 29, 2013, at 5:07 PM, Kenneth V. Rosenberg wrote:

I birded at East Shore Park on Saturday mid-day, and at Stewart 
Park this morning -- I must say that I have never seen so much 
hunting pressure at the south end of the lake. I want to say 
clearly that I am not against legal duck hunting in well managed 
areas (and I buy a Migratory Bird Stamp to support wetland 
conservation), but what is going on this year does not seem to be 
sustainable or an appropriate use of such a large public space. 
Boats with hunters and decoys were anchored right under the trees 
at the Swan Pen at Stewart Park, at the tip of the red lighthouse 
jetty, at the wooden buoy marker, on the beach at Hogs Hole, and 
along East Shore -- yesterday there was an additional boat 
cruising the center of the lake to chase duck flocks. Needless to 
say there was not a single spot for ducks to rest safely anywhere 
in the southern quarter-mile or so of Cayuga Lake (and probably 
north past Myer's Point as well), and any flock that circled 
around over the south end of the lake (no matter how high) was 
shot at. I don't know if DEC would consider that proper 
management of this important waterfowl wintering area. This 
seemed pretty different from the past few years when a few 
hunters kept the duck flocks moving around but there was plenty 
of place for them to rest -- notably along the Stewart Park 
shoreline, which was not available today.

This activity will undoubtedly affect the numbers of waterfowl on 
this year's Christmas Bird Count on Wednesday (wasn't much to 
count today). If this trend continues in future years, I strongly 
recommend that the Cayuga Bird Club move its count to the days 
prior to the late hunting season  -- this slight straying from 
tradition will probably yield more accurate numbers of local 
waterfowl populations.

In spite of the hunting, I did manage to see a few distant 
LONG-TAILED DUCKS and a single WHITE-WINGED SCOTER far to the 
north of East Shore Park, and a flock of 12 RUDDY DUCKS, along 
with HORNED and PIED-BIILED GREBES, COMMON LOON, and 3 
DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANTS -- all decent CBC birds if they can 
hang in there. There were also TUNDRA SWANS around this morning 
-- 2 on the ice at Stewart Park east end when I arrived, and a 
flock of 40-50 in the center of the lake way out. Later in the 
morning, as I was scouting around the Farmers Market and 
Community Gardens, several small flocks of swans passed over 
Ithaca heading south.

Yesterday, at Taughannock Falls State 

[cayugabirds-l] Christmas Count big brother/sister needed

2013-12-28 Thread Sandy Podulka

Hi Folks,
	I have several different people willing to count in Area V who have 
counted before and know their areas and how to do it, but they are 
not comfortable with their bird IDs and have asked if I could find 
someone more skilled to go with them.  Any takers?  You wouldn't have 
to do any paperwork, but could help someone learn more about birds 
for a while on Jan. 1. (This counts as a good deed for the year.)


Take Care,
Sandy Podulka



--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


Re: [cayugabirds-l] SFO and playback

2013-04-10 Thread Sandy Podulka
Here is a reply from Steve Kress, SFO course leader:

The SFO recommended practice on use of audio playbacks is for 
instructors to use them minimally for educational purposes.  We 
recommend playbacks only when unassisted viewing has proven to be 
unsatisfactory (e.g. owls and rails) or to demonstrate 
territoriality.  In any event, the audio playback should be turned 
off once the bird is visible to the class, it should not be used for 
attracting rare species, declining species and out of range 
species.  Likewise, we ask leaders not to use recordings in 
areas  where birders are abundant (so as not to confuse birds and 
birders). We discourage birders from using audio playback for 
recreational or list building purposes.


At 08:13 AM 4/10/2013, John and Sue Gregoire wrote:
Does SFO approve of/teach using playback calls for recreational 
birding? Recent SFO
trip reports would indicate that this is a sanctioned procedure and 
is also subject
to overuse by the guide. With so many groups and so many students as 
well as the
proliferation of playback devices and call sources, this could 
easily get out of
hand much to the detriment of bird populations. Even worse if it even appears
Cornell sanctions this method of birding.

John
--
John and Sue Gregoire
Field Ornithologists
Kestrel Haven Avian Migration Observatory
5373 Fitzgerald Road
Burdett,NY 14818-9626
  Website: http://www.empacc.net/~kestrelhaven/
Conserve and Create Habitat




--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

[cayugabirds-l] Pine Warbler still a regular in Brooktondale

2013-04-03 Thread Sandy Podulka
Seems to be camped at our feeders, enjoying suet and sunflower 
hearts. --Sandy Podulka




--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


[cayugabirds-l] Pine Warbler in Brooktondale

2013-03-31 Thread Sandy Podulka
A nice Easter treat--a Pine Warbler is visiting our suet feeder this 
morning (and on our Project FeederWatch day, too!)


--Sandy Podulka



--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


[cayugabirds-l] Fox Sparrow in Brooktondale

2013-03-13 Thread Sandy Podulka
Yesterday, at my feeder with lots of A. Tree Sparrows. Very welcome! 
--Sandy Podulka




--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


[cayugabirds-l] Hoary Redpoll in Brooktondale

2013-01-20 Thread Sandy Podulka
We have a Hoary Redpoll that's been coming consistently to our 
feeders in Brooktondale for the last few days!!  It has taken me 
about 30 looks and a few pictures to convince myself, but it really 
does look different


Sandy Podulka



--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


Re: [cayugabirds-l] purpose of the list serve.

2013-01-07 Thread Sandy Podulka
Personally, I find the debates and discussions about birds and bird 
conservation among the most interesting postings on this 
listserv--and in the long run, these issues are very important to our 
continued ability to enjoy watching birds in this area (or anywhere), 
so they are quite relevant to the listserv topic.

Sandy Podulka

At 12:10 PM 1/7/2013, you wrote:
I totally agree with Linda that the Cayuga Birds List Serve is not 
the arena for debates. I thought this site was for bird observations.

 
Dick Clements

 


From: mailto:wingmagi...@gmail.comLinda Orkin
Sent: Monday, January 07, 2013 11:43 AM
To: mailto:m...@cornell.eduMeena Haribal
Cc: mailto:cayugabird...@list.cornell.eduCAYUGABIRDS-L
Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Birders  Hunters on Cayuga Lake

Hey All,

I would just like to reiterate that I think this subject is very 
worthy of further discussion with knowledgeable people engaged in 
the pros and cons of establishing some gun free zones around the 
lake shore. I do not consider myself to be that knowledgeable person 
but I see from what has already been offered here that there are 
many of you out there.

The listserv will probably not be the best arena for this, as is 
already apparent.  Passions can run high on a subject like this.  As 
passions can escalate quickly on almost any conservation issue, land 
use issue, pet freedom issue etc.

Can some of us take steps to begin a face to face conversation and 
see where this might take us?  I am not sure if the Conservation 
Action Committee of the Cayuga Bird Club would be a willing 
facilitator but I think that might offer at least a venue.

Perhaps interested people can communicate privately about next steps?

Thanks.

Linda Orkin
Cayuga Bird Club



On Mon, Jan 7, 2013 at 11:15 AM, Meena Haribal 
mailto:m...@cornell.edum...@cornell.edu wrote:

Hi all,



First of all, after reading John's post, when I suggested that CBC 
should do something about hunting was not to stop hunting, but to 
designate some locations on the lake to be free from  being hunting 
locations, so both birders and birds can enjoy some peace.



Why is it wrong if birders feel that they love to have some 
locations free of hunters and hunting? Don't we think we also have 
same right as hunters who think they would love to hunt in all 
areas? So come to a compromise!



So what is wrong in making some good locations on Cayuga Lake bird 
and birder friendly?



Hunters can share some locations with us for our pleasure! I think 
number of  birders and hunters around Cayuga lake must be very 
similar if not higher for birders.



I think sport hunting is the one which bothers me, if you are 
hunting for food then it is ok with me, but just for the pleasure of 
killing something that definitely annoys me. If you are thinking of 
sports of hunting flying objects, have some artificial targets or 
may be try some falling leaves or some other similar targets.



Sorry for bursting out like this, instead of working on the proposal!



Meena









From: 
mailto:bounce-72561577-3493...@list.cornell.edubounce-72561577-3493...@list.cornell.edu
 
[mailto:bounce-72561577-3493...@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Nari Mistry
Sent: Monday, January 07, 2013 10:53 AM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Birders  Hunters on Cayuga Lake



I  strongly endorse the wise comments of Jody Enck  Ken Rosenberg 
asking for restraint in advocating for a ban on duck hunting on Cayuga Lake.
Birders tend to believe that we are a huge beneficial community that 
can do no wrong. The reality is that the world looks at us with 
benign amusement. To set ourselves up as our viewpoint is best for 
everyone is a mistake.  I am just as concerned about gunshots and 
disturbance of wildlife and humans, but I don't think we can justify a ban.
While bird conservation arguments may be useful, it does not appear 
to me that waterfowl conservation is threatened by hunting on Cayuga 
Lake, as Ken has pointed out. So the argument becomes just my 
preference against others'.
Pushing for a ban on duck-hunting on the lake can easily be regarded 
by hunters as the first step in trying to ban hunting in the fields 
and woods, leading to acrimonious name-calling and the end of any 
good relationship between birders and land-owners, hunters and real people.
A much better course of action would be to have a dialog with 
duck-hunters clubs and to explain the beneficial need for hunting 
away from shore and avoiding deliberate disturbance and flushing of 
birds to gain an advantage.
I hope a reasonable course of action is chosen.
Nari Mistry

--
Nari B. Mistry, Ithaca, NY
To see my paintings, visit
http://www.ArtbyNari.comhttp://www.ArtbyNari.com

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:

http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOMEWelcome and Basics

http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsRULESRules and Information

http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htmSubscribe,
 
Configuration

Re:[cayugabirds-l] (Long comment) Exempt part of Cayuga Lake from hunting diving ducks

2013-01-05 Thread Sandy Podulka
This would be a great project for the CBC and 
John has made thoughtful, thorough points.  It 
will be a tough sell to DEC, though, as in my 
experience, many people at DEC (but hopefully not 
all) view wildlife only as stuff to hunt.

--Sandy Podulka

At 09:29 AM 1/5/2013, Linda Orkin wrote:
Hello All,

Yes, I think this could be a project of the bird 
club with this input and support from people 
like John and Bill and their  extensive 
knowledge and experience with 
authorities.  Let us pursue this worthy 
goal.  What would be a good next step? Should 
those of us interested get together?

John's points are so well presented and thought 
out it seems to be the perfect starting place.

Linda Orkin

On Sat, Jan 5, 2013 at 9:02 AM, Meena Haribal 
mailto:m...@cornell.edum...@cornell.edu wrote:

Hi all,



I think this would be great conservation project 
for CBC to take up, with inputs from Bill and 
John and anyone else to be part of it.



Cheers

Meena


Meena Haribal
Ithaca NY 14850
http://haribal.org/http://haribal.org/
http://meenaharibal.blogspot.com/


--
From: 
mailto:bounce-72558715-3493...@list.cornell.edubounce-72558715-3493...@list.cornell.edu
 
[mailto:bounce-72558715-3493...@list.cornell.edubounce-72558715-3493...@list.cornell.edu]
 
on behalf of Bill Evans 
[mailto:wrev...@clarityconnect.comwrev...@clarityconnect.com]
Sent: Saturday, January 05, 2013 8:52 AM
To: John Confer; CAYUGABIRDS-L
Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] (Long comment) 
Exempt part of Cayuga Lake from hunting diving ducks

This would be a nice accomplishment that is long 
overdue. I’ve thought that the “few 
individuals...greatly reducing the pleasure of 
many” angle should be enough to produce such an 
exemption, but your approach of population 
analysis and presenting a scientific case for 
the exemption might help facilitate the change 
for DEC.  Certainly the issue of hunting in such 
close proximity to a population center seems 
like it could be a driver – besides the safety 
issue, the sound of gunshots can be quite unnerving for some in our society.

 From the birding and environmental education 
 perspective, it would be wonderful to enjoy 
 viewing large rafts of Aythya ducks and their 
 cohorts on a more consistent basis.

Nearly 20 years ago Common Council voted to ban 
hunting in Allan Treman Marine Park – apparently 
the City of Ithaca had allowed hunting there 
after it was purchased by the state in 1976. 
Hunting currently occurs in the water offshore, 
and I’m not clear on jurisdiction involved.

Bill E

From: mailto:con...@ithaca.eduJohn Confer
Sent: Thursday, January 03, 2013 2:55 PM
To: mailto:Cayugabirds-L@cornell.eduCayuga 
Bird List ; 
mailto:confergoldw...@aol.comConfer, Karen ; 
mailto:j...@cornell.eduj...@cornell.edu
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] (Long comment) Exempt 
part of Cayuga Lake from hunting diving ducks

Hi Folks,

 CBC are always fun for many reasons. It 
 tickles the grey cells to think about 
 population trends and regulatory factors. I 
 shared a fun discussion about the impact of 
 hunting on waterfowl on the south end and the 
 rest of Cayuga Lake and we discussed if there 
 were objective data on population abundance to 
 justify preventing such hunting. This got me thinking.
   The Fish and Wildlife spends an immense 
 amount of effort to census waterfowl every 
 year: extensive aerial surveys that criss-cross 
 the prairie potholes and elsewhere and Hudson 
 Bay coast, really extensive banding efforts, 
 and hundreds of hours of ground surveys, etc. 
 All of this provides an estimate of pop 
 abundance for each species. This is used to set 
 bag limits. This immense effort is predicated 
 on the belief that hunters are one of the 
 significant factors that regulate waterfowl 
 abundance, and that to sustain the population 
 at nearly level numbers over the long term, one 
 must adjust the bag limit in some proportion to 
 the abundance at the start of fall migration. 
 In the same line of reasoning, the spring snow 
 goose hunting season and the split canada goose 
 hunting season are all based on the belief that 
 hunting in general regulates waterfowl 
 abundance. The newly proposed expansion of 
 waterfowl hunting on snow geese for Montezuma 
 is also based on hunting will continue to 
 regulate abundance. Either, hunting does 
 regulate waterfowl abundance, or the FWS is fooling us and themselves.
   It is impossible to acquire the specific, 
 statistically-based evidence that hunting 
 regulates the specific population of waterfowl 
 using Cayuga Lake for several reasons. There is 
 no reason to believe that the impact of hunting 
 of waterfowl on Cayuga Lake is exempt from this 
 generality. In fact, it would be incumbent for 
 the merit of such an argument to provide 
 evidence why Cayuga Lake is an exception to the 
 general concept of waterfowl management.
 Difficulties in making data-based arguments 
 about waterfowl on Cayuga Lake include many factors.
1

[cayugabirds-l] Common Redpolls in Brooktondale

2012-12-01 Thread Sandy Podulka
6 Common Redpolls at our feeders in Brooktondale this morning. All 
the Pine Siskins and Purple Finches and the Red-breasted Nuthatch 
have left, however.


Sandy Podulka



--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


[cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchards: Public Meeting on UNA Designation

2012-10-15 Thread Sandy Podulka
Hawthorn Orchards (and Salt Road Fen) to be 
designated Unique Natural Areas. This announces a 
public meeting. I don't know much about it, but 
looks like this is an info session for the public 
rather than one at which the public speaks. 
Perhaps someone can add more details?

Sandy Podulka


Use this link to see the same info with better formatting:
http://www.tompkins-co.org/emc/docs/10_16_2012_UNA_Poster.pdf

If you are concerned about land preservation, please show your support.
http://www.tompkins-co.org/emc/index.htmTompkins 
County Environmental Management Council

You're Invited!
To a Public Meeting on Unique Natural Areas (UNAs)
Tuesday, October 16, 2012 at 7:00 PM
In the Borg Warner Room of the Tompkins County Public Library
(101 East Green Street, Ithaca)

 The Tompkins County Environmental Management 
Council invites the public to a special presentation
about two new proposed UNAs. This presentation 
will explain the Unique Natural Areas Inventory,
and provide details on the two newly-identified 
additions. For more information go to:
http://www.tompkins-co.org/emchttp://www.tompkins-co.org/emc

 Unique Naturals Areas feature outstanding 
environmental qualities that deserve special attention
for preservation in their natural state, and 
have locally rare plants, animals, or interesting assemblages
of plants and animals that are locally uncommon. 
They may also include a designated preserve;
a state-designated wetland; historical, 
cultural, botanical, zoological or geological importance;
recreational value; scenic vista; wilderness; 
archeological or paleontological site; and/or urban
greenspace.

 The UNA inventory promotes the conservation 
and/or preservation of UNAs for the benefit of future
generations, and is an information tool to help 
people make the wisest choices possible in protecting
the rural character and natural beauty of Tompkins County.

 The UNA inventory was started in 1973. It 
was greatly expanded and updated in 1990, and was
revised in 2000. Currently, within Tompkins 
County there are 192 UNAs encompassing over 15,000
acres. These sites were included in the 
inventory based on the work of ecologists, botanists, animal
scientists, geologists, and wetland specialists 
who, when permission was granted, surveyed many of
these sites on foot. Other parcels that were not 
field-visited were surveyed from the road or adjacent
parcels, or by using topographic maps and aerial photography.

 The EMC has identified Hawthorn Orchards and 
Salt Road Fen as meeting the criteria to be
included in the UNA Inventory.

 Hawthorn Orchard is south of Mitchell Street 
and west of Pine Tree Road, near the Cornell tennis
and equestrian centers. It consists of 50 acres 
in the Town and City of Ithaca, and
includes Cornell property. It has outstanding 
birding during spring migration, some public
access, and is an important teaching site.

 Salt Road Fen encompasses 74 acres in the 
Town of Groton. There are rare or scarce plant
communities and species and it is an important 
rich fen habitat with known population of Trollius
laxus, the globally rare globeflower.

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

Re: [cayugabirds-l] Owasco Flats

2012-06-26 Thread Sandy Podulka
Sounds great!  Perhaps your mystery bird call is a Veery. See if it 
sounds like the call at the end of this 
clip:  http://allaboutbirds.org/guide/Veery/sounds

Sandy Podulka

At 11:45 PM 6/26/2012, Donna Scott wrote:
On this lovely 70 degree day (Tues. 6/26). , I took a leisurely 
drive over hill and dale to Owasco Flats by NY Rt. 38 (#41 in our 
wonderful Cayuga Basin guidebook) and walked around the loop trail 
along the inlet stream and old RR bed Some parts were very wet  
muddy and I wore the wrong shoes, now also very muddy. I may also 
have poison ivy on my legs in a few days... The paths could use a 
little trim. While there is not too much PI right by the trail, I 
would recommend long pants, not shorts.

It was peaceful and quiet by the inlet portion of the path, except 
for the faint traffic noise on Rt. 38. Luckily, some of the birds 
were not quiet and I heard and saw several VEERYS and GRAY CATBIRDS, 
and saw,  of course heard, 2 BELTED KINGFISHERS.
Heard the irregular knocking of a YELLOW BELLIED SAPSUCKER across 
the inlet, then saw one close by on my side. Kept hearing a GREAT 
CRESTED FLYCATCHER and saw a smaller flycatcher I could not 
identify. I learned the Sapsucker knock sound from Sandy Padulka, 
one of our field guides in the SFO class. She found just the right 
stick to bang on a tree to show us how it sounds!
Saw a GREEN HERON flying away and a TURKEY VULTURE in the distance.

Part way down the path, by the small bridge with railings (some torn 
off by vandals), I found a lovely wild Canada Lily in full bloom.

Along the old RR part of the path, I heard a few birds I can't yet 
identify by sound, including one I have never heard:
It called a plain sound - yurr or your with a faint buzzy 
undernote - called once with pauses in between calls. Can anybody 
tell me what bird this might be? I imitated it and the bird called 
back (I think), but wouldn't come to where I could see it.

Did see a nice female AMERICAN REDSTART there, and heard what I 
thought was a RED EYED VIREO, and heard a WOOD THRUSH very close to me.

On the gravel road part of the trail I saw a HOUSE SPARROW, an AMER. 
GOLDFINCH, AMER. ROBINS, NORTHERN FLICKERS, DOWNY WOODPECKER, an E. 
KINGBIRD, and a YELLOW WARBLER. Some RED WINGED BLACKBIRDS and C. 
GRACKLES flew out to the nearby marsh. Saw several CEDAR WAXWINGS 
and TREE SWALLOWS, including some babies lined up on a dead tree 
branch, opening their mouths in unison when a parent flew near.

Over or on Owasco Lake were several BARN SWALLOWS, MALLARDS, and 
RING BILLED GULLS.

On the drive over to Owasco through rural country, I saw a lot of 
birds including many, many BARN SWALLOWS - some sitting in the dirt 
and gravel on a dirt road, just sitting there, not bathing in the 
dust; several NO. MOCKINGBIRDS, an AMER. KESTREL, and an EASTERN 
BLUEBIRD; also, a BELTED KINGFISHER and a YELLOW WARBLER by a little 
stream. Lots of other common birds, as well.

Kevin McGowan is right - there are lots of birds out there and this 
is a great part of the world - - rural NY in lush, green summer can't be beat!
Now I need to try Fillmore Glen State Park, also described in #41.

Donna
--
Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOMEWelcome and Basics
http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsRULESRules and Information
http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htmSubscribe,
 
Configuration and Leave
Archives:
http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.htmlThe 
Mail Archive
http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/CayugabirdsSurfbirds
http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.htmlBirdingOnThe.Net
Please submit your observations to http://ebird.org/content/ebird/eBird!
--

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

Re: [cayugabirds-l] Red-necked Phalarope and other birds there

2012-05-24 Thread Sandy Podulka
Still no Phalarope at 9:30 am. Sorry I was busy with my other 
springtime activity, gardening, and missed the emails last night! 
--Sandy Podulka

At 08:48 AM 5/24/2012, David McCartt wrote:
Unfortunately, I did not learn about this Red-necked Phalarope until 
until last night.  I stopped by this morning, 5/24, but alas it was 
NOT there.  I talked to a couple of residents and they had not seen 
it either today.  I did see 2 SPOTTED SANDPIPERS and 3 KILLDEER.

David McCartt

--- On Wed, 5/23/12, Jeff Gerbracht ja...@cornell.edu wrote:

From: Jeff Gerbracht ja...@cornell.edu
Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Red-necked Phalarope and other birds there
To: cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu
Date: Wednesday, May 23, 2012, 7:39 PM

This pond has been good for shorebirds since it was created, I just
looked through my eBird reports and the first record I have is a
Lesser Yellowlegs on May 3 and Dunlin on May 5.  I've made this an
eBird hotspot so it'll be easier for everyone to find and enter their
birds.
Cheers,
 Jeff

On Wed, May 23, 2012 at 2:48 PM,  bilba...@pop.lightlink.com wrote:
  I came home from errands to Shannon telling me about Steve's report of a
  Red-necked Phalarope in Brooktondale.  I went right back out
 
  As of 2 PM the bird was still at the small man made pond on Boiceville Rd,
  having been seen and photographed by a number of people. This is a
  beautiful breeding plumage bird that is very cooperative, coming and
  feeding within 20 yards of people at one point. Aside from the birding
  community there were at least 6 people who lived right there that got very
  good views and were interested in it.
 
  Thanks Steve for finding and posting this wonderful bird!
 
  Also there were Killdeer,  a Spotted Sandpiper, and 3 Least Sandpipers that
  I didn't notice until they finally flew.
 
  The pond itself is only about 3 weeks old. I spoke with one of the
  contractors there and he said it is only 2 feet deep at it's deepest. As
  much as I regret what had been a great field for Woodcocks and field birds
  becoming a small development,  it seems the pond has at least some
  potential..
 
  Bill
  Baker
 
  -
  This message was sent using Endymion MailMan.
  
 http://www.endymion.com/products/mailman/http://www.endymion.com/products/mailman/
 
 
 
  --
 
  Cayugabirds-L List Info:
  
 http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOMEhttp://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
  http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
  
 http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htmhttp://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm
 
  ARCHIVES:
  1) 
 http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.htmlhttp://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
  2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
  3) 
 http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.htmlhttp://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html
 
  Please submit your observations to eBird:
  http://ebird.org/content/ebird/http://ebird.org/content/ebird/
 
  --



--
Jeff Gerbracht
Lead Application Developer
Neotropical Birds, Breeding Bird Atlas, eBird
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
607-254-2117

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOMEhttp://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htmhttp://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) 
http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.htmlhttp://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) 
http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.htmlhttp://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

--
Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOMEWelcome and Basics
http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsRULESRules and Information
http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htmSubscribe,
 
Configuration and Leave
Archives:
http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.htmlThe 
Mail Archive
http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/CayugabirdsSurfbirds
http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.htmlBirdingOnThe.Net
Please submit your observations to http://ebird.org/content/ebird/eBird!
--

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your

[cayugabirds-l] Mourning and Hooded at Shindagin

2012-05-07 Thread Sandy Podulka
Enjoyed a very bird-full walk with my family along Shindagin Hollow 
Road this morning--many residents warblers (Chestnut-sided, 
Black-throated Blue, Black-throated Green, Ovenbird, A. Redstart, 
Yellow-rumped, Magnolia, Black-and-white, Common Yellowthroat, 
Canada, Nashville, Blackburnian, Yellow, Hooded,  Mourning, and 
Northern Parula). Lots of Scarlet Tanagers, Rose-breasted Grosbeaks, 
Least Flycatchers, and other birds as well.  Did not hear Winter Wren 
or Louisiana Waterthrush, but we didn't get there until 8 am.


Another Hooded Warbler was singing along Bailor Road.

Sandy Podulka



--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


[cayugabirds-l] Shindagin Golden Eagle and more

2012-04-14 Thread Sandy Podulka
Our Spring Field Ornithology group went to Shindagin Hollow in 
Caroline this morning (just out of the Cayuga Lake Basin) and we were 
all thrilled to have a great look at an immature Golden Eagle over 
the beaver pond/Balsam Fir Swamp area. We were also treated to very 
good views of Brown Creepers, Winter Wren (poking around in the 
stream at the junction of Shindagin Hollow and Gulf Creek Roads), at 
least 4 Hermit Thrushes, and Yellow-bellied Sapsuckers. We heard a 
number of songs from a Louisiana Waterthrush (probably the same one 
Matt Medler heard) and one or two Blue-headed Vireos.


At Goetchius Preserve on Flat Iron Road we watched a Red-shouldered 
Hawk, among other things.


A beautiful morning to be out.

Sandy Podulka



--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


[cayugabirds-l] Pine Warbler at Suet

2012-04-12 Thread Sandy Podulka
The last two days we've been delighted to have a Pine Warbler 
visiting our suet feeder in Brooktondale.  We also had a Fox Sparrow 
and White-throated Sparrow in the yard today, and several days ago my 
daughter discovered a Mourning Dove nest in a Pine Tree that 
contained two well-feathered young!


Sandy Podulka



--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


[cayugabirds-l] Bufflehead in Brooktondale

2012-03-29 Thread Sandy Podulka
We were thrilled to have a completely new yard bird, a male and 
female Bufflehead, on our small pond in Brooktondale this morning, 
along with the regulars: Wood Ducks, Hooded Mergansers, Mallards, 
and Canada Geese. (And a Common Merganser on a nearby pond.) Finally, 
some good weather for ducks as well as plants!


Sandy Podulka



--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


[cayugabirds-l] Corpse Flower starting to open now: Sunday!

2012-03-18 Thread Sandy Podulka

Check it out!!

http://bhort.bh.cornell.edu/Atitanum/index.html



--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


[cayugabirds-l] Winter Wren Spotted!

2011-06-24 Thread Sandy Podulka

Hi Folks,
	Thanks to everyone who sent Winter Wren sites in response to my 
plea. After three mornings of looking, my friend finally got a decent 
(but brief) binocular view of a singing Winter Wren in Shindagin 
Hollow State Forest this morning. It was at the south end of the 
Balsam Swamp along Shindagin Hollow Road, just before the clearing 
and beaver ponds as you head south.
	Just walking along that road was beautiful and great for birds--we 
heard all sorts of birds even late in the day. Continuing south past 
the junction with Gulf Creek Road, on the section of road that runs 
along the stream on the left side of the road we found another area 
with much bird activity.


Sandy Podulka



--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


[cayugabirds-l] Winter Wren Location?

2011-06-22 Thread Sandy Podulka

Hi Folks,
	I have a friend visiting once again from North Carolina who wants to 
see a Winter Wren. (I failed to deliver this bird last year.)  The 
friend has had hip replacements and can't walk too far on a bumpy 
trail, but can hike in flat areas.  Does anyone know a good spot near 
Ithaca where one can actually see (not just hear) Winter Wren without 
hiking way back in?

Thanks!

Sandy Podulka



--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


[cayugabirds-l] Turkey Vulture List

2011-05-25 Thread Sandy Podulka

Hi Folks,
	A friend of mine not on this list asked me to report that he is 
monitoring an active Turkey Vulture nest with two eggs. It is in a 
medium-sized gorge on the west side of Cayuga Lake, and the eggs are 
basically laid right on the ground, maybe with a few extra dried 
leaves under them.


Sandy Podulka



--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


[cayugabirds-l] Black-bellied Hairy

2011-05-12 Thread Sandy Podulka

Hi Folks,
	This is a new one for me:  yesterday we had what looked just like a 
Hairy Woodpecker, but with a completely black breast and belly.  I 
didn't get a good look, so can't say exactly where the black began 
and ended, but it was extensive. I've scoured the bird book and don't 
see any other species that looks like it. The head and back were 
normal Hairy Woodpecker.
	Is anyone studying them and dying them locally?  Is it a genetic 
mutation?  Was it really dirty? (Didn't look like dirt.)  Has anyone 
ever seen this before?


Sandy Podulka



--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


[cayugabirds-l] Common Redpolls in Brooktondale

2010-12-29 Thread Sandy Podulka
8 Common Redpolls showed up today at our feeders in 
Brooktondale---and on our Project FeederWatch day.  And it's a good 
thing, because all the other birds we've been watching all week seem 
to have evaporated with the warmer weather.


We had a little excitement a few days ago when a Long-tailed Weasel 
(in its white plumage with black tip to tail) showed up in our 
shed. It was very curious and gave us great looks, even though my 
husband had unknowingly dumped out its cache of 5 dead mice in a 
bucket a few days previously, not realizing they belonged to someone. 
It apparently accepted his apologetic offering of a couple of chunks 
of suet in exchange.


--Sandy Podulka



--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html
3) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


[cayugabirds-l] Anyone Adventuresome want to tackle 6-mile Creek in Caroline?

2010-12-27 Thread Sandy Podulka

Hi Folks,
	I am looking for someone who wants to beat the bushes for the Xmas 
Bird Count along 6-mile Creek from the Upper Dam out to 
Caroline--it's a great area for finding rarities such as Hermit 
Thrush and Yellow-bellied Sapsucker, as well as ducks, herons, and 
sparrows--depending on how much open water there is by the weekend. 
This requires someone with the spirit of adventure, and usually ends 
up being one of the best places to find birds!

Any takers?

Sandy Podulka



--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html
3) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


[cayugabirds-l] winged warbler singing like Golden-winged at Park Preserve

2010-05-24 Thread Sandy Podulka
Stu,
Several weeks ago on a trip with SFO classes we saw that winged 
warbler at the Park Preserve and heard it sing the same song you have 
described. Despite my best efforts at producing something different, 
it is (unfortunately) a Blue-winged Warbler (at least by appearance).

--Sandy Podulka

At 04:12 PM 5/24/2010, Stuart Krasnoff wrote:
Sorry for the late and lengthy post.  The gist of it is there's a 
Canada Warbler singing very close to Hammond Hill Rd. near Irish 
Settlement and a winged warbler of indeterminate parentage in the 
Park Preserve not-seen but-heard singing alot like a Golden-winged.

Details and other highlights are as follows:  After a visit to Salt 
Pt., which was alive with Orchard Orioles, Willow Flycatchers, 
Warbling Vireos and Yellow Warblers early yesterday (Sunday) 
morning, I headed up to Hammond Hill and ran into Sandy, Bill, and 
Lisa Podulka who, along with Lynn Leopold, directed me to a Canada 
Warbler singing on the brushy slope above the road near the 
intersection with Irish Settlement Rd.  I headed back down to the 
spot, quickly located the bird by ear, and then persisted for 15 
minutes before getting a glimpse of it.  A little later I got better 
views of either the same bird and or a second one ca. 100 yards up 
the road on the same side.  This time the song lacked the distinct 
chip note before the burst that I'd heard in the earlier bout of 
singing leading me to think it might be a second bird.

I then went to the Park Preserve where I walked down the Blue Trail 
past a singing a Blue-winged Warbler, an Alder Flycatcher along the 
creek, and other expected residents. Near the beginning of the Red 
Trail I heard a singing Magnolia Warbler in the spruces and while 
trying to get a look at it, a Yellow-billed Cuckoo with nesting 
material in its bill popped out of a nearby spruce 20 feet away at 
eye-level and retreated just as I got it focussed in my scope for a 
digishot that never happened.  As I continued to look for the 
Magnolia the cuckoo popped out twice, each time retreating before I 
could get off a shot.

Just past where the Red Trail meets the Orange Trail a Prairie 
Warbler was singing persistently in a clearing (with several 20-foot 
white pines that have had their lower branches neatly trimmed) and 
while I was maneuvering to locate him I heard a winged warbler 
singing a 5-syllable song that sounds like the first sample of 
Golden-winged Warbler on the Stokes Guide CD.  I did not see the 
bird, but I recorded the song and got opinions from knowledgeable 
birders that range from possible Golden-winged, through probable 
hybrid, to possible Blue-winged singing Golden-winged.  I will try 
to post an mp3 to the web, but in the meantime if anyone is 
interested please contact me off-list and I will send the sound file by email.

Today, a little past noon, I went back and after several 
circumambulations I located what I think is the same bird, singing 
the same song-variant that I recorded yesterday.  I recorded it 
again today.  I found this bird on the blue trail just past (if 
you're headed in) where the red trail branches off to the right.  It 
was in or near some white pines that sit above the end of the narrow 
goldenrod meadow that runs along the creek.  Once again I did not 
see the bird but heard it close to the trail and then down in the 
thick brush at the end of the meadow, so it was 150 to 200 yards 
away from where I heard it yesterday and moving yet further away 
when I left.   On the way out today on the Blue trail pretty close 
to the lean-to I heard and saw what I believe is the same Blue 
Winged Warbler I digiscoped yesterday and then I am pretty sure I 
heard yet another Blue-winged singing bee-bizz while the first one foraged.

One more thing...on the way into the Park Preserve today I heard a 
Raven croaking and looked up to see a Turkey Vulture, a Red-tailed 
Hawk, 6-8 crows, and the noisy Raven gyring about and mixing it up.

Best...Stuart










--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html
3) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html
3) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

[cayugabirds-l] 80 Turkey Vultures on Waterburg Rd.

2009-10-16 Thread Sandy Podulka
My daughter, Lisa, and I saw a group of 80 Turkey Vultures circling and 
sitting in the snow-covered trees along Waterburg Rd, between Rt. 79 and 
Aiken Rd. in Enfield, around noon today. When we passed by about 20 minutes 
later, they were gone, but we encountered large groups of TVs in flight on 
nearby Connecticut Hill (the same group?) and later along Coddington Rd. on 
South Hill. Migrating groups moving through and perhaps not pleased with 
the state of the weather and thermals today?


--Sandy Podulka



--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES

Archives:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--