[cayugabirds-l] Ivory-billed Woodpecker story on CBS Sunday Morning

2021-03-21 Thread Tim Gallagher
Here's a link to the Ivory-billed Woodpecker story that aired this morning on 
CBS Sunday Morning.

https://tinyurl.com/rc9akpvy
[https://cbsnews2.cbsistatic.com/hub/i/r/2021/03/20/73fce8f4-a25e-4593-9fda-85b87b490504/thumbnail/1200x630/713851c25074fffe05eb658fd438d930/ivory-billed-woodpecker-1280.jpg]
The return of "extinct" species
Every once in a while, in the midst of a human-caused extinction crisis, what's 
been lost can be found again, as when a species believed extinct is sighted – 
and hope is kept alive.
tinyurl.com



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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Yellow Bellied Sapsucker Question

2021-02-22 Thread Tim Gallagher
I saw a sapsucker in Freeville last Friday morning.


From: bounce-125408654-10557...@list.cornell.edu 
 on behalf of Tom Fernandes 

Sent: Monday, February 22, 2021 4:55 PM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L 
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Yellow Bellied Sapsucker Question

There seems to be numerous reports of sapsuckers in CNY this winter. In my 
thirty plus years living here I don't recall ever seeing one in the winter. 
Here in McGraw I have one visiting my feeders for the past few weeks. How 
common is it for them to winter in our area?

   Thanks, Tom Fernandes

[https://ipmcdn.avast.com/images/icons/icon-envelope-tick-green-avg-v1.png]
 Virus-free. 
www.avg.com
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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Chickadee flock?

2021-02-20 Thread Tim Gallagher
I've seen a Louis Agassiz Fuertes painting just like that, with chickadees 
picking meat from a deer's ribs.


From: bounce-125403547-10557...@list.cornell.edu 
 on behalf of Liz Brown 

Sent: Saturday, February 20, 2021 2:03 PM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L ; Suan Yong 
; Rachel Lodder 
Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Chickadee flock?

I was xc skiing on CT Hill about 10 years ago, and I came across a deer carcass 
- a skeleton, really, with bits of flesh clinging to it. It was covered with 
chickadees, like flies. At least 30 of them were working away at it, tugging 
and pecking at scraps of fat and meat.

It was one of the coolest things I've ever seen, and I'm kind of glad that it 
was pre-cell-phone-camera, and I just carry the image in my mind.

-Liz Brown

From: bounce-125403508-25000...@list.cornell.edu 
 on behalf of Rachel Lodder 

Sent: Saturday, February 20, 2021 1:23 PM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L ; Suan Yong 

Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Chickadee flock?

I once encountered A LOT of chickadees along Cayuga Lake. There was a row of 
trees beside the road, and as a couple of us were birding the lake, there was a 
steady stream of chickadees moving past us in the trees headed north, so it was 
easy to tell they weren't the same birds. I don't see my eBird checklist (maybe 
I didn't make one, I can't remember), so I don't have any more exact numbers, 
but we were all impressed with the number of chickadees that went by and I'm 
sure it was over 50. Not sure why or what they were up to!


From: bounce-125403482-81221...@list.cornell.edu 
 on behalf of Suan Yong 

Sent: Saturday, February 20, 2021 1:00 PM
To: Cayuga Birding List 
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Chickadee flock?

While cross-country skiing through Hammond Hill, I saw a flock of about 50 
small birds moving through some evergreens, in fairly tight quarters, in waves 
of 5-10 at a time. The only sounds I could hear and identify were chickadee 
chips and calls. I'm used to only encountering chickadees in small flocks of 
maybe 5-10, and this big flock seems unusual. They were too far to ID without 
binoculars. Conceivably they were redpolls or something else, but I heard 
nothing to suggest anything besides chickadees.

Suan
_
Composed by thumb and autocorrect.
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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Cooper's Hawk

2021-01-18 Thread Tim Gallagher
Hi Donna,

Gray squirrels are actually a fairly common prey item for local Red-tailed 
Hawks. I even saw a red-tail try to catch one in the field behind my house. 
They can give a nasty bite to a hawk. I've trapped numerous red-tails over the 
years that have scars on their feet from squirrel bites.

Tim


From: Donna Lee Scott 
Sent: Monday, January 18, 2021 10:55 AM
To: Tim Gallagher 
Cc: Lea LSF ; CAYUGABIRDS-L 

Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Cooper's Hawk

Hi Tim
Why don’t hawks or even eagles (many here by the lake) kill gray squirrels, of 
which I have many bird-seed-fattened individuals in my big yard? Yard Has tall 
trees & 2 fairly open expanses.

Coopers or Sharpies occasionally kill birds near feeders here.
A few years ago I watched a Bald Eagle drop from a tree on my beach to catch a 
mink that had gone to water’s edge to drink. It flew up into another tree and 
ate it.
Thx
Donna

Donna Scott
Lansing
Sent from my iPhone

On Jan 18, 2021, at 10:47 AM, Tim Gallagher 
mailto:t...@cornell.edu>> wrote:

Hi Lea,

It certainly might have been a Cooper's Hawk that killed your chicken. We also 
have Great Horned Owls and Red-tailed Hawks in and around the village. This 
time of year, a lot of juvenile raptors are starving and desperate to catch 
something to eat. Most of them don't survive until spring. If a desperately 
hungry hawk sees a chicken out in the open, not protected by chicken wire, 
there's a decent chance it will attack it—which is completely understandable.

The Cooper's Hawks I've seen in the village might be local birds. I found a 
Cooper's Hawk nest a few years ago in the swamp behind the school. Maybe they 
nested there again last spring.

Best wishes,

Tim


From: Lea LSF mailto:leaelles...@gmail.com>>
Sent: Sunday, January 17, 2021 6:13 PM
To: Tim Gallagher mailto:t...@cornell.edu>>
Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Cooper's Hawk

Hi Tim,
I live at 22 Main Street in the village, and have observed what my best guess 
told me was a Cooper's Hawk hanging out in a tree over my chicken yard a 
handful of times.  Recently, an animal killed one of my chickens.  I'm guessing 
by the amount of chicken feathers around that it was a hawk who took the 
chicken out, though I don't know if a Cooper's Hawk is big enough.  I am so 
curious about whether this pair that you observed is living nearby. It does 
seem strange to have a food-begging hawk tagging along a parent during winter! 
I'll have to learn the begging call and listen out for it now. I wonder now 
that I'm writing this if hawks even live in one place during the winter, 
whether they even stay in their nests or move around.  I hope you get some 
fruitful responses to your question!
Best Wishes,
Lea

On Sun, Jan 17, 2021 at 12:36 PM Tim Gallagher 
mailto:t...@cornell.edu>> wrote:
I observed something interesting this morning while walking my dog on Main 
Street in Freeville. I heard the food-begging call of a Cooper's Hawk coming 
from the front of a house just past a big hedge. I carefully peeked past the 
hedge and spotted the bird, a juvenile female Cooper's Hawk, sitting on the 
porch rail and facing the house. Perhaps it saw its reflection in the window 
and was calling to it. Anyway, it took off, flying across Main Street and 
disappeared between some houses along the creek.

Last month, on December 6, I saw something similar—but this time it involved an 
adult female Cooper's Hawk and a juvenile male, which was following her around 
through the trees beside some houses and calling like the one this morning. I 
thought at the time that December seemed very late for a young hawk to be 
following its parent around, begging for food. I'd only heard that call before 
in the late spring and summer around Cooper's Hawk nests.

Has anyone else heard Cooper's Hawk food-begging calls in the winter?
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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Cooper's Hawk

2021-01-18 Thread Tim Gallagher
Hi Lea,

It certainly might have been a Cooper's Hawk that killed your chicken. We also 
have Great Horned Owls and Red-tailed Hawks in and around the village. This 
time of year, a lot of juvenile raptors are starving and desperate to catch 
something to eat. Most of them don't survive until spring. If a desperately 
hungry hawk sees a chicken out in the open, not protected by chicken wire, 
there's a decent chance it will attack it—which is completely understandable.

The Cooper's Hawks I've seen in the village might be local birds. I found a 
Cooper's Hawk nest a few years ago in the swamp behind the school. Maybe they 
nested there again last spring.

Best wishes,

Tim


From: Lea LSF 
Sent: Sunday, January 17, 2021 6:13 PM
To: Tim Gallagher 
Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Cooper's Hawk

Hi Tim,
I live at 22 Main Street in the village, and have observed what my best guess 
told me was a Cooper's Hawk hanging out in a tree over my chicken yard a 
handful of times.  Recently, an animal killed one of my chickens.  I'm guessing 
by the amount of chicken feathers around that it was a hawk who took the 
chicken out, though I don't know if a Cooper's Hawk is big enough.  I am so 
curious about whether this pair that you observed is living nearby. It does 
seem strange to have a food-begging hawk tagging along a parent during winter! 
I'll have to learn the begging call and listen out for it now. I wonder now 
that I'm writing this if hawks even live in one place during the winter, 
whether they even stay in their nests or move around.  I hope you get some 
fruitful responses to your question!
Best Wishes,
Lea

On Sun, Jan 17, 2021 at 12:36 PM Tim Gallagher 
mailto:t...@cornell.edu>> wrote:
I observed something interesting this morning while walking my dog on Main 
Street in Freeville. I heard the food-begging call of a Cooper's Hawk coming 
from the front of a house just past a big hedge. I carefully peeked past the 
hedge and spotted the bird, a juvenile female Cooper's Hawk, sitting on the 
porch rail and facing the house. Perhaps it saw its reflection in the window 
and was calling to it. Anyway, it took off, flying across Main Street and 
disappeared between some houses along the creek.

Last month, on December 6, I saw something similar—but this time it involved an 
adult female Cooper's Hawk and a juvenile male, which was following her around 
through the trees beside some houses and calling like the one this morning. I 
thought at the time that December seemed very late for a young hawk to be 
following its parent around, begging for food. I'd only heard that call before 
in the late spring and summer around Cooper's Hawk nests.

Has anyone else heard Cooper's Hawk food-begging calls in the winter?
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[cayugabirds-l] Cooper's Hawk

2021-01-17 Thread Tim Gallagher
I observed something interesting this morning while walking my dog on Main 
Street in Freeville. I heard the food-begging call of a Cooper's Hawk coming 
from the front of a house just past a big hedge. I carefully peeked past the 
hedge and spotted the bird, a juvenile female Cooper's Hawk, sitting on the 
porch rail and facing the house. Perhaps it saw its reflection in the window 
and was calling to it. Anyway, it took off, flying across Main Street and 
disappeared between some houses along the creek.

Last month, on December 6, I saw something similar—but this time it involved an 
adult female Cooper's Hawk and a juvenile male, which was following her around 
through the trees beside some houses and calling like the one this morning. I 
thought at the time that December seemed very late for a young hawk to be 
following its parent around, begging for food. I'd only heard that call before 
in the late spring and summer around Cooper's Hawk nests.

Has anyone else heard Cooper's Hawk food-begging calls in the winter?

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Re:[cayugabirds-l] Former Ithaca birder Ned Brinkley has passed

2020-11-22 Thread Tim Gallagher
I'm so sorry to hear that, Kevin. Ned got in touch with me just three months 
ago, and I was helping him arrange a trip to the Sierra Madre Occidental in 
Mexico. I'm just amazed. He was so full of life.

Tim


From: bounce-125162336-10557...@list.cornell.edu 
 on behalf of Kevin J. McGowan 

Sent: Sunday, November 22, 2020 6:10 PM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L 
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Former Ithaca birder Ned Brinkley has passed


I just got a phone call from former Cornell undergrad and super birder Adam 
Byrne that our good friend Ned Brinkley died today in Ecuador on a birding 
trip. No details except he was hiking up a trail, got short of breathe, sat 
down and died.



For those of you who were around in the 1990s, you will remember that Ned 
Brinkley was an irresistible force of nature who transformed the birding 
community here. He was getting his Ph.D. in German, but spent all his daylight 
hours birding. I think he only slept about 4 hours a night. When he was in 
charge of the Cayuga Bird Club field trips, and they were trying to decide on 
whether to have them on Saturdays or Sundays, Ned decided that we would do them 
on BOTH days, and he would lead them. He taught the Lab’s World Series of 
Birding team, the Sapsuckers, how to win, turning us from a middle-of-the-pack 
team to champions!



I’m not going to do an obituary tonight. I just wanted to get the word out. I 
know there are people on this list that knew Ned in the day, and will be 
saddened to learn of his death.



Kevin



Kevin J. McGowan, Ph.D.
Senior Course Developer and Instructor

Bird Academy
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road
Ithaca, NY 14850
k...@cornell.edu

607-254-2452



Do you know about our other distance-learning opportunities? Visit Bird 
Academy, 
https://academy.allaboutbirds.org/courses/  to see our list of courses.





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Re: [cayugabirds-l] molting birds question

2020-05-13 Thread Tim Gallagher
Here's a link to a piece they ran a few years ago on the Lab of Ornithology 
website: 
https://www.allaboutbirds.org/news/i-have-a-bald-bird-at-my-feeder-is-it-sick/
[https://www.allaboutbirds.org/news/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/norcarBald_RohiniMehta_2_pre12-539x500.jpg]
I have a bald bird at my feeder. Is it sick? - All About 
Birds
We receive many inquiries about bald birds, especially Blue Jays and Northern 
Cardinals. In late summer and fall, when a bird molts, it usually grows and 
replaces its feathers gradually, but occasionally a bird loses all the feathers 
on its head at once. This is particularly true of Blue Jays, m ...
www.allaboutbirds.org



From: bounce-124627147-10557...@list.cornell.edu 
 on behalf of Peter Saracino 

Sent: Tuesday, May 12, 2020 4:58 PM
To: Linda Clark Benedict 
Cc: CAYUGABIRDS-L 
Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] molting birds question

Thanks for the info. Must be so m.j e as re molting non-essential feathers?

On Tue, May 12, 2020, 2:37 PM Linda Clark Benedict 
mailto:lbenedic...@gmail.com>> wrote:
We had a bald rose-breasted grosbeak at our feeder.

On Mon, May 11, 2020, 3:35 PM Peter Saracino 
mailto:petersarac...@gmail.com>> wrote:
Hi folks.
Recently I have seen one "bald" redwing on a tray feeder and another that was 
nearly bald. Now I see what appears to be an adult Oriole "losing" some of the 
black on its head. Is it normal for these birds to molt some of their 
non-flight feathers at this time of year?
Thanks for the help.
Pete Sar
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Re:[cayugabirds-l] My first kestrel of the season

2020-03-22 Thread Tim Gallagher
That's great, Eveline. I saw my first kestrel of year (a male) yesterday on the 
road between Freeville and Dryden. And also a Merlin later in the day. Nice to 
see them coming back.


From: bounce-124483352-10557...@list.cornell.edu 
 on behalf of Eveline V. Ferretti 

Sent: Sunday, March 22, 2020 11:38 AM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L 
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] My first kestrel of the season

Just glimpsed my first American kestrel of the year on the Mount Pleasant 
fields. Yay!

Eveline Ferretti
Public Programs & Communication Administrator
Mann Library / Cornell University Library
e...@cornell.edu
607-254-4993
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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Bald Eagle

2019-02-05 Thread Tim Gallagher
Author Darryl McGrath wrote an interesting book a few years ago about the 
successful efforts to reintroduce Bald Eagles and Peregrine Falcons in New York 
State. Here's a link: 
https://www.amazon.com/Flight-Paths-Heartbreak-Miracles-Excelsior/dp/1438459262

Flight Paths: A Field Journal of Hope, Heartbreak, and Miracles with New York's 
Bird People (Excelsior Editions): Darryl McGrath: 9781438459264: Amazon.com: 
Books
www.amazon.com
Fulfillment by Amazon (FBA) is a service we offer sellers that lets them store 
their products in Amazon's fulfillment centers, and we directly pack, ship, and 
provide customer service for these products.





From: bounce-123301377-10557...@list.cornell.edu 
 on behalf of Marty Schlabach 

Sent: Monday, February 4, 2019 10:13 PM
To: Dave Nutter; bob mcguire
Cc: Annette Nadeau; CAYUGABIRDS-L
Subject: RE: [cayugabirds-l] Bald Eagle


Bob,



Jenny Landry (DEC) jenny.lan...@dec.ny.gov is 
the wildlife biologist in DEC Region 8 who keeps track of eagle nests in Region 
8.  https://www.dec.ny.gov/about/617.html She might have some additional info 
of interest.  I believe she mentioned there are about 80 nests known in Region 
8, which I believe includes 11 counties.  Tompkins County is in Region 7, so 
perhaps there is a person with similar responsibilities in Region 7.



I remember visiting the eagle hacking site in the Iroquois Wildlife Refuge in 
in WNY in the 1970s when the program was underway.



Marty

===

Marty Schlabach   m...@cornell.edu

8407 Powell Rd. home  607-532-3467

Interlaken, NY 14847   cell315-521-4315

===





From: bounce-123301278-3494...@list.cornell.edu 
 On Behalf Of Dave Nutter
Sent: Monday, February 4, 2019 8:53 PM
To: bob mcguire 
Cc: Annette Nadeau ; CAYUGABIRDS-L 

Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Bald Eagle



I would add

* the creation of the EPA in 1970,

* the banning of DDT in 1972,

* a series of Endangered Species Acts in 1966, 1969, & 1973


According to Wikipedia, the Bald Eagle Protection Act was first passed in 1940, 
Golden Eagles were added in 1962, and it was amended many times including a 
major strengthening in 1972.



About local Bald Eagles, I saw a pair of adults perched together in a tree at 
Dryden Lake in January. I bet they have been or are or will be nesting there.



The nest by the mouth of Paine’s Creek at the south end of Aurora is very 
accessible. It is not in the Montezuma Wetlands Complex, nor in the southern 
Cayuga Lake Basin.



In the last few days I have seen as many as 5 Bald Eagles (1 adult and 4 
different immatures) on or over the ice shelf at the south end of Cayuga Lake.



As someone who was growing up when Bald Eagles were near their population low 
point, I am thrilled every time I see one. It is wonderful to live in a place 
and time where we can personally experience the results of that recovery and 
know that efforts in our area were a part of the story. (Peregrine Falcons & 
Ospreys, too)



- - Dave Nutter

On Feb 4, 2019, at 7:48 PM, bob mcguire 
mailto:bmcgu...@clarityconnect.com>> wrote:

I am amazed - and heartened - by the continued (and increasing) reports of BALD 
EAGLES in the area. I have been looking into their increase in numbers because 
of my interest in the case of the shooting in Caroline in December. An article 
in Wikipedia noted that the US population crashed from some 300,000-500,000 
birds in the 18th century to only 412 nesting pairs in the Lower 48 by the 
1950’s. The primary causes of the decline were loss of habitat, shooting, and 
the effects of DDT (weakening eggshells so that they collapsed under the weight 
of the nesting adults).



With the passage of several laws (1918 Migratory Bird Treaty and 1950 Bald and 
Golden Eagle Protection Act) the population rebounded to some 100,000   birds 
in the early 1980’s. In the mid-1970’s New York State launched the most 
comprehensive restoration program in the country. In1976 a site was chosen at 
Tschache Pool in the Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge for the first hacking 
tower in the state with young wild birds brought in from the upper midwest. 
That program was discontinued in 1989 when the goal of ten nesting pairs was 
reached. The large Bald Eagle statue along the wildlife drive was recently 
installed to commemorate the 40th anniversary of the start of that program.



Today the MNWR boasts ten active nests with several more in the North Montezuma 
Wetlands Complex. During a recent winter raptor survey LaRue St. Clair spotted 
59 birds in one morning. In recent days the agglomeration of nearly 50 roosting 
Bald Eagles at the east end of Onondaga Lake has drawn national attention. See 
this article: 

[cayugabirds-l] Lost rehab Peregrine Falcon

2018-11-07 Thread Tim Gallagher
I've been rehabilitating a female Peregrine Falcon that was picked up with all 
of her flight feathers broken off. I molted her and have been exercising her in 
the field, building up her strength. Today she went off soaring in the pleasant 
weather in a field near Ithaca, and I lost her. She has two radio transmitters 
on her, and I tracked her to a field near the Game Farm but then lost her 
signal. I picked up a signal about an hour later near the SPCA, but she was 
obviously flying around, and I lost the signal again.  Unfortunately, I don't 
consider her to be quite ready to released, so I'd like to get her back and 
continue exercising her (stooping her to the lure, etc.).


Please let me know if anyone sees her. You can contact by email or call or text 
me at (607) 279-2516,


Thanks,


Tim Gallagher

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[cayugabirds-l] Book reading this Thursday at Buffalo Street Books

2018-05-22 Thread Tim Gallagher
I hope my Ithaca-area friends will join me this Thursday night from 5:30 to 
7:00 at Buffalo Street Books (Dewitt Mall, 215 N. Cayuga Street, Ithaca, NY). 
I’ll be reading from my latest book, Born to Fish (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 
2018). I’ll admit it’s not a bird book, but it does have a strong conservation 
element, covering the efforts of my good friend Greg Myerson to help save the 
Atlantic Coast population of striped bass, which are now in serious decline 
from overfishing and pollution.



The book has been praised by Helen Macdonald (author of H is for Hawk), who 
writes, “This is an extraordinary story of one man’s obsession, a tale of 
passion, brutality, tragedy, and redemption. It’s a book about a love of 
fishing that tackles the deepest themes of life and family, of history, 
education, masculinity, and America, and shows us not only how the natural 
world can be a place of grace, but a soul's complicated and beautiful savior;” 
Bobby Kennedy, Jr.; and Audubon Magazine’s Ted Williams.



In addition to reading from my new book, I’ll be glad to answer questions about 
raptors, Ivory-billed Woodpeckers, and other birds.


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[cayugabirds-l] Goshawk

2017-03-19 Thread Tim Gallagher
I just heard that the Cornell Raptor Program lost a goshawk yesterday from 
their facility on Game Farm Road, Ithaca. If anyone sees the bird, please 
contact Heather Jay Huson at 907-388-4485.

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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Game bird farm

2015-06-02 Thread Tim Gallagher
I didn't hear anything about it closing either. They made such a big deal about 
it in 2008 when it almost closed that the state had to reverse itself. You'd 
think there would be some articles if it were happening again.


Tim Gallagher
Editor-in-Chief
LIVING BIRD
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road
Ithaca, New York 14850
(607) 254-2443
t...@cornell.edu

From: bounce-119344523-10557...@list.cornell.edu 
bounce-119344523-10557...@list.cornell.edu on behalf of Chris R. Pelkie 
chris.pel...@cornell.edu
Sent: Tuesday, June 2, 2015 1:57 PM
To: Richard Tkachuck
Cc: CAYUGABIRDS-L
Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Game bird farm

Really? I was there 2 weeks ago, full of pheasants, topped by lots of TUVUs and 
1 Common Raven in the adjacent field near the road.
Did they just open the gates?

ChrisP
__

Chris Pelkie
Information/Data Manager; IT Support
Bioacoustics Research Program
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road
Ithaca, NY 14850

On Jun 2, 2015, at 12:10, Richard Tkachuck 
rictkal...@gmail.commailto:rictkal...@gmail.com wrote:

When did the pheasant farm close and is there a DEC facility that still breeds 
birds for release?
Richard Tk
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RE: [cayugabirds-l] Accipiter eating bats

2014-08-11 Thread Tim Gallagher
Here's a link to a Naturalist's Notebook column by John Schmitt about observing 
a Peregrine Falcon catching bats.


http://www.allaboutbirds.org/page.aspx?pid=1107

Naturalist Notebook - Winter 2009 Living Bird
Use our Bird Guide to identify birds, learn about the life history, listen to 
the sounds, and watch bird behavior on video--the most comprehensive guide to 
North American birds
Read more...http://www.allaboutbirds.org/page.aspx?pid=1107

?




Tim Gallagher
Editor-in-Chief
LIVING BIRD
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road
Ithaca, New York 14850
(607) 254-2443
t...@cornell.edu

From: bounce-117710864-10557...@list.cornell.edu 
bounce-117710864-10557...@list.cornell.edu on behalf of Geo Kloppel 
geoklop...@gmail.com
Sent: Monday, August 11, 2014 6:42 AM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L
Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Accipiter eating bats

That's right, on the web you can find videos of Red-tailed Hawks hunting at 
dusk as vast clouds of bats emerge from their roosting cave. Here's one such:

http://www.liveleak.com/view?i=e22_1344450135

The presence of multiple remains under the pole in the TCAT parking lot 
suggests that this accipiter has discovered a bat roost in the area. Might be 
fun to find out where that is.

-Geo Kloppel

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RE: [cayugabirds-l] Fish Story

2013-09-20 Thread Tim Gallagher
This reminds me of a poem by Raymond Carver, which I can't resist pasting here:


Eagles
by Raymond Carver from Where Water Comes Together With Other Water (Vintage 
Books/Random House)

It was a sixteen inch ling cod that the eagle
dropped near our feet
at the top of Bagley Creek canyon,
at the edge of the green woods.
Puncture marks in the sides of the fish
where the bird gripped with its talons!
That, and a piece torn out of the fish’s back.
Like an old painting recalled,
or an ancient memory coming back,
that eagle flew with the fish from the Strait
of Juan de Fuca up the canyon to where
the woods begin, and we stood watching.
It lost the fish above our heads,
dropped for it, missed it, and soared on
over the valley where wind beats all day.
We watched it keep going until it was
a speck, then gone. I picked up
the fish. That miraculous ling cod.
Came home from the walk and—
why the hell not? —cooked it
lightly in oil and ate it
with boiled potatoes and peas and biscuits.
Over dinner, talking about eagles
and an older, fiercer order of things.

Tim Gallagher
Editor-in-Chief
LIVING BIRD
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road
Ithaca, New York 14850
(607) 254-2443
t...@cornell.edu

From: bounce-107976781-10557...@list.cornell.edu 
[bounce-107976781-10557...@list.cornell.edu] on behalf of Donna Scott 
[d...@cornell.edu]
Sent: Friday, September 20, 2013 3:33 PM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Fish Story

I just posted photos from this Fish Story on Cayuga Bird Club Facebook page.

A local man who does work for me was driving in his large pick up truck down 
Lansing Station Rd. Lansing, near Cayuga Lake, a couple hours ago. All of a 
sudden a huge, dark bird with big, broad wings was flying very low towards 
him  the truck, with a fish in its talons; it dropped the fish on the road and 
swooped up and away. Josh phoned me, and I went there. The fish is a fresh Pike 
about 1 lb., a little over a foot long.

We thought the bird might have been an immature Bald Eagle and we guessed that 
the bird felt it could not gain altitude quickly enough to avoid hitting the 
truck, so it dropped the fish in the road and flew away.
Josh remembered that the bird was flying very low under tree branches that hang 
over the road, so it was low enough that it could have hit the top of the 
truck. It might just have come up from the lake with its catch.

Earlier I saw 3 T. Vultures circling over my house. Maybe they will find the 
Pike which we left in the grass by the side of the road.


Donna L. Scott
Lansing Station Road
Lansing, NY 14882
d...@cornell.edumailto:d...@cornell.edu
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[cayugabirds-l] Imperial Woodpecker talk this Wednesday

2013-05-14 Thread Tim Gallagher
In case you missed my Imperial Woodpecker Monday Night Seminar last month at 
the Lab of Ornithology, I'm presenting an updated version of the talk at the 
Tompkins County Public Library this Wednesday (May 15) at 6:00 p.m. Details 
below. -- Tim Gallagher
WEDNESDAY, MAY 15, 2013
Library to Host Imperial Dreams Author
Tompkins County Public Library will host Tim Gallagher for a reading and 
signing of his acclaimed book Imperial Dreams: Tracking the Imperial Woodpecker 
Through the Wild Sierra Madre, May 15 at 6 p.m. in the BorgWarner Community 
Room.

An award-winning author and editor of Living Bird magazine at the Cornell Lab 
of Ornithology, Gallagher set out for Mexico's Sierra Madre armed only with a 
dream of locating the world’s rarest bird, the Imperial Woodpecker, and a map 
of area sightings given to him by a dying friend.  Gallagher’s journey through 
the mysterious and dangerous Sierra Madre Occidental results in encounters with 
AK-47-armed drug dealers, the discovery of fields of opium poppies and 
marijuana, burning houses, and fleeing villagers.

Imperial Dreams beautifully captures Gallagher’s journey, the people of the 
Sierra Madre, and the decline of their homeland.

Gallagher has also penned the acclaimed The Grail Bird, about the Ivory-billed 
Woodpecker, and Falcon Fever about his lifelong interest in birds of prey.

This program is free and open to the public.  Copies of Imperial Dreams will be 
available for purchase at the event, courtesy of Buffalo Street Books.  For 
more information, contact Carrie Wheeler-Carmenatty at (607) 272-4557 extension 
248 or cwhee...@tcpl.orgmailto:cwhee...@tcpl.org.

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RE:[cayugabirds-l] lost falcon

2013-02-03 Thread Tim Gallagher
As a followup to Kevin's post, the falcon was recovered safe and sound this 
morning.

Tim Gallagher
Editor-in-Chief
LIVING BIRD
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road
Ithaca, New York 14850
(607) 254-2443
t...@cornell.edu

From: bounce-72650717-10557...@list.cornell.edu 
[bounce-72650717-10557...@list.cornell.edu] on behalf of Kevin J. McGowan 
[k...@cornell.edu]
Sent: Saturday, February 02, 2013 9:12 PM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] lost falcon

A falconer friend of mine lost her bird today, last seen flying toward Lansing. 
 It is a Gyrfalcon x Saker Falcon cross.  I post this for two reasons. If 
anyone sees it, she would love to hear about where it is; she figures it’s 
terrified and cold.  Also, any Gyrfalcon sightings in the vicinity are suspect 
for a while.  It does NOT have jesses, but does have a radio.

Kevin


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RE: [cayugabirds-l] Why don't RTHA eat all the pheasants at the game farm?

2011-03-03 Thread Tim Gallagher
I've seen red-tails eating pheasants there several times, and the people who 
work there have told me that they often see them catch them. 

Tim Gallagher
Editor-in-Chief
LIVING BIRD
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road
Ithaca, New York 14850
(607) 254-2443
t...@cornell.edu

From: bounce-8672008-10557...@list.cornell.edu 
[bounce-8672008-10557...@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Bill Evans 
[wrev...@clarityconnect.com]
Sent: Thursday, March 03, 2011 2:47 PM
To: cayugabirds-l
Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Why don't RTHA eat all the pheasants at the game 
farm?

Has anyone ever seen a hawk take/eat a pheasant at the game farm?

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RE: [cayugabirds-l] Why don't RTHA eat all the pheasants at the game farm?

2011-03-03 Thread Tim Gallagher
True. I know those birds catch a lot of mice, etc., that are attracted there by 
the grain. And Cooper's Hawks catch pigeons, starlings, and House Sparrows 
there, which are also attracted by the grain.

Tim Gallagher
Editor-in-Chief
LIVING BIRD
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road
Ithaca, New York 14850
(607) 254-2443
t...@cornell.edu

From: bounce-8672541-10557...@list.cornell.edu 
[bounce-8672541-10557...@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Bill Evans 
[wrev...@clarityconnect.com]
Sent: Thursday, March 03, 2011 4:23 PM
To: cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu
Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Why don't RTHA eat all the pheasants at the game 
farm?

What I guess we don't know is what proportion of their diet it pheasant
versus rodent.


- Original Message -
From: Linda Orkin wingmagi...@gmail.com
To: Chris Tessaglia-Hymes c...@cornell.edu
Cc: cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu
Sent: Thursday, March 03, 2011 4:11 PM
Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Why don't RTHA eat all the pheasants at the
game farm?


Yes. I totally agree Chris. And what a totally unnatural environment and
conditions, with those blinders on and totally exposed to all inclement
weather.

Linda

Sent from my iPhone

On Mar 3, 2011, at 4:03 PM, Chris Tessaglia-Hymes c...@cornell.edu wrote:

 Wouldn't these Red-tailed Hawks primarily be targeting the weak or sick;
 the
 ones that might die off (in this unnatural environment) anyway?

 --
 Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
 TARU Product Line Manager and Field Applications Engineer
 Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
 159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
 W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 607-254-1132
 http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp



 -Original Message-
 From: bounce-8672169-3488...@list.cornell.edu
 [mailto:bounce-8672169-3488...@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Tim
 Gallagher
 Sent: Thursday, March 03, 2011 3:19 PM
 To: cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu
 Subject: RE: [cayugabirds-l] Why don't RTHA eat all the pheasants at the
 game farm?

 I've seen red-tails eating pheasants there several times, and the people
 who
 work there have told me that they often see them catch them.

 Tim Gallagher
 Editor-in-Chief
 LIVING BIRD
 Cornell Lab of Ornithology
 159 Sapsucker Woods Road
 Ithaca, New York 14850
 (607) 254-2443
 t...@cornell.edu
 
 From: bounce-8672008-10557...@list.cornell.edu
 [bounce-8672008-10557...@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Bill Evans
 [wrev...@clarityconnect.com]
 Sent: Thursday, March 03, 2011 2:47 PM
 To: cayugabirds-l
 Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Why don't RTHA eat all the pheasants at the
 game farm?

 Has anyone ever seen a hawk take/eat a pheasant at the game farm?

 --

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RE: [cayugabirds-l] Fwd: Peregrine

2010-08-10 Thread Tim Gallagher
This is a Red-tailed Hawk, not a peregrine.

Tim Gallagher
Editor-in-Chief
LIVING BIRD
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road
Ithaca, New York 14850
(607) 254-2443
t...@cornell.edu

From: bounce-6167404-10557...@list.cornell.edu 
[bounce-6167404-10557...@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Karen Edelstein 
[k...@cornell.edu]
Sent: Tuesday, August 10, 2010 4:47 PM
To: cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Fwd: Peregrine

-- Forwarded message --
From: Marc Keane i...@mpkeane.commailto:i...@mpkeane.com
Date: Tue, Aug 10, 2010 at 3:56 PM
Subject: Re: Peregrine
To: Karen Edelstein k...@cornell.edumailto:k...@cornell.edu


Hi Karen;

Posted one vid-clip to YouTube.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ULdXBHzCjqc

Marc


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[cayugabirds-l] Goshawk?

2009-12-26 Thread Tim Gallagher
John Parks in Animal Science (director of the Cornell Raptor Program) 
asked me to put this message on the list-serv. He lost an adult 
female Goshawk several days ago near Turkey Hill Road. John is out of 
town for a few days, and i said I'd monitor any sighting reports and 
try to recover the bird for him.


If anyone sees an adult goshawk, please contact me at this e-mail 
address or leave a message on my work phone, below.


Thanks,
--
Tim Gallagher
Editor-in-Chief
LIVING BIRD
Cornell Laboratory of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road
Ithaca, New York 14850
(607) 254-2443
FAX: (607) 254-2415
e-mail: t...@cornell.edu

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