Re: [cayugabirds-l] Follow-up communication to Cornell re mowing of hay at peak nesting time

2021-06-27 Thread Wes Blauvelt
Well done Jody and all!

On Sun, Jun 27, 2021 at 2:42 PM Jody Enck  wrote:

> Hello birders,
>
> After receiving lots of input, ideas, and resources from many of you, I put
> together the letter below and sent it to the President and one of the Vice
> Presidents at Cornell (as noted in the letter).  Thanks to all who have
> expressed their concern and who provided important input to this very first
> step in developing a solution.  Special shout out of thanks to Nancy
> Cusumano for her initial contact with the President, and to Suan Yong, Josh
> Snodgrass, and Ken Rosenberg for comments on an earlier draft of the
> letter.
>
> Martha E. Pollack
>
> President, Cornell University
>
>
> 26 June 2021
>
>
>
> Dear President Pollack,
>
>
>
> I am writing as Chair of the Conservation Action Committee of
> the Cayuga Bird Club to communicate and amplify public dismay about recent,
> poorly-timed mowing for forage hay crops on Cornell lands during the peak
> nesting period for grassland bird species listed as being of special
> conservation concern by the New York State Department of Environmental
> Conservation and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.  I have been contacted
> by many local birders, including farmers and members of the Cornell
> University community who are saddened and angry about the situation.
> Recent research lead by Cornell scientists and published in the journal
> *Science* (see Rosenberg, K. V., et al. 2019. Decline of the North
> American avifauna. Science 365(6461)) found that nearly 3 billion birds
> have been lost from the U.S. and Canada just since 1970.  Populations of
> grassland bird species like Bobolink, Eastern Meadowlark, Grasshopper
> Sparrow, Savannah Sparrow, and others have declined the most, down 53% in
> aggregate, accounting for more than 720 million grassland birds.  Poorly
> timed mowing of hay crops, especially throughout the Northeast, is a major
> contributing factor in the decline in grassland bird populations.
>
>
>
> Rather than contributing to the problem, Cornell can help
> remedy population declines of grassland bird species by developing a plan
> for sustainable management of the substantial acreage of hayfields and
> other non-woody habitats under the University’s control.  The Cayuga Bird
> Club stands ready to collaborate with Cornell in developing a plan.  We
> already have accumulated relevant documents about research and practices
> aimed at timing of mowing and other management actions that would be of
> great use in developing a Cornell sustainable grassland management plan.
> For example, mowing earlier in the season before establishment of nests and
> when growing hay is of high forage quality can have nearly as much
> conservation benefit as delaying mowing to a time when quality of the hay
> forage is lower.  We also have established contacts with federal and state
> natural resource agencies who are knowledgeable of possible financial
> reimbursement opportunities for which the University may qualify.
>
>
>
> Cornell University has an opportunity to be a leader among all
> Land Grant Universities by developing a model grassland management plan
> that could be adopted by other institutions throughout the Northeast and
> beyond.  Such a management plan also could be consistent with Cornell’s
> sustainability initiatives.  While the current initiatives are laudable,
> the focus on renewable energy, transportation and built environments, and
> even economic sustainability miss an important need.  All of these actions
> are *means* to achieving the *fundamental end* of a full and functioning
> ecosystem of which we humans are a part and are on which we are dependent
> for our survival.
>
>
>
> The modern concept of “sustainability” emerged fairly recently
> in the famous 1987 Brundtland report, “Our Common Future”, prepared for the
> U.N.  In that report, sustainability was described in terms of conserving
> the ecosystems and natural capital which are necessary for the basic needs
> and well-being of humans.  The fundamental end of sustaining ecosystems and
> natural capital is noticeably missing from the *Sustainable Cornell *website.
> Indeed, it was unclear what individual from *Sustainable Cornell* would
> be the most important recipient of this letter.  I am copying Vice
> President, Rick Burgess, on this letter because he responded to Nancy
> Cusumano when she expressed her concern about mowing.  Also, I think it is
> somewhat ironic that one of four Cornell Chronicle articles headlined on
> the website of the Office of the President at Cornell, under the heading
> “Academic Distinction”, is this headline about the *Science* article I
> referenced earlier: “Nearly 30% of birds in the U.S. and Canada have
> vanished since 1970.”   Knowledge about the plight of birds exists at
> Cornell, but does the administration have the willingness and commitment to
> actively address that plight?
>
>
>
>

Re: [cayugabirds-l] Northward Bird migration already Lower Mississippi Valley / Texas

2021-02-03 Thread Wes Blauvelt
I noticed sightings of Tree Swallows at Breezy Point, Queens a couple of
days ago. Perhaps the radar is seeing early swallow arrivals as they
prepare to move up the Mississippi river valley?

On Wed, Feb 3, 2021 at 6:14 AM David Nicosia  wrote:

> All,
>
> I noticed some bird migration echoes in the lower Mississippi valley and
> Texas early this morning. It's only early February.  Birdcast shows this
> early migratory push. see
>
> https://birdcast.info/migration-tools/live-migration-maps/
>
> The birds were moving north so they are not wintering birds pushing
> further south. There are southwest winds in this area.  Does anyone have an
> idea on what species of birds these may be?  I know Horned Larks can nest
> early. I am unfamiliar with the timing of migration in this area.
>
> Thanks,
> Dave Nicosia
> --
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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Loon migration alert - Sat morning

2020-11-21 Thread Wes Blauvelt
I observed 2 loons at 7:31 AM on a heading of 150* SSW from my location on
Park Hill Road in the Town of Erin. The site is at 1840’ elevation with an
open sky view following the Wyncoop Creek valley towards Chemung. I think
there is a good chance these birds started their day on Seneca Lake. Wes

On Sat, Nov 21, 2020 at 10:56 AM Bill Evans 
wrote:

> I counted 347 loons in southward migration over Danby from 6:52-9:06
> (Comfort Rd. migration watch site adjacent to the Finger Lakes Trail
> crossing, 1/4 mile south of Lieb Rd).
>
> Meade Period 1-9 totals: 11,22,60,12,22,52,66,49,32.
>
> Most of the flight was to the east of the watch. >90% were less than 600
> feet above my ground level and the early flight was seemingly at eye level
> coursing over the Michigan Hollow Valley.
>
> Bill
>
> *From:* Bill Evans 
> *Sent:* Friday, November 20, 2020 9:50 AM
> *To:* Cayuga Birds 
> *Subject:* Loon migration alert - Sat morning
>
> Thanks to all who posted loon migration reports last week. While I realize
> my credibility has taken a hit as a big flight prognosticator, all signs
> look good for a HEFTY loon flight tomorrow morning (Saturday 21Nov).
>
> If you’d like to report numbers using the old protocol developed by Bob
> Meade, tally totals for 15-minute periods with period 1 the 15 minutes
> before sunrise, period 2 the first 15 minutes after sunrise, and so forth.
> The peak loon flight typically comes off Cayuga & Seneca Lakes in periods
> 1-3 and the Lake Ontario peak passes over the Ithaca/Watkins Glen area and
> a broad swath of the Southern Tier during periods 5-9. Based on past
> reports, it seems loon migration largely finishes crossing the region by
> the end of period 10.
>
> Sunrise tomorrow in Ithaca is 7:06, so the Meade periods Saturday are:
>
> Period 1 – 6:52-7:06
> Period 2 – 7:07-7:21
> Period 3 – 7:22-7:36
> Period 4 – 7:37-7:51
> Period 5 – 7:52-8:06
> Period 6 – 8:07-8:21
> Period 7 – 8:22-8:36
> Period 8 – 8:37-8:51
> Period 9 – 8:52-9:06
> Period 10 – 9:07-9:21
>
> Urbi et Orbi!
>
> Bill Evans
> Town of Danby
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Re: [cayugabirds-l] LOON MIGRATION ALERT

2020-11-12 Thread Wes Blauvelt
Hello all - I had 3 loons fly directly overhead on a 180* heading between
7-8:30 AM at the very south end of Michigan Hollow Road. Wes Blauvelt

On Thu, Nov 12, 2020 at 9:50 AM Kenneth V. Rosenberg 
wrote:

> I had a total of 140 loons from Bluegrass Lane in Ithaca. All were far to
> the west, moving south in small groups of 5-20 birds. So, possibly also
> counted by others farther west than where I was.
>
> There were large distant flocks of blackbirds moving south, and a few
> other interesting flyovers including a single COMMIN REDPOLL and SNOW
> BUNTING.
>
> Ken
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> On Nov 12, 2020, at 9:07 AM, Martha Fischer  wrote:
>
> 
>
> Are birds moving?
>
> Get Outlook for iOS <https://aka.ms/o0ukef>
> --
> *From:* bounce-125123331-3494...@list.cornell.edu <
> bounce-125123331-3494...@list.cornell.edu> on behalf of Bill Evans <
> wrev...@clarityconnect.com>
> *Sent:* Wednesday, November 11, 2020 4:23:29 PM
> *To:* CAYUGABIRDS-L 
> *Subject:* [cayugabirds-l] LOON MIGRATION ALERT
>
>
> Folks, the conditions look excellent and such an opportunity doesn’t
> happen every year, so plan your morning accordingly!
>
>
>
> Favorable forecast for observing a large loon flight tomorrow morning (Nov
> 12):
>
> 1.   We are in the window when big fall flights have been documented
> in the past.
>
> 2.   We’ve had southerly winds with no loon movement since Nov 3rd (8
> days) - the spring is loaded.
>
> 3.   Weather forecast tomorrow is for NNW wind @ 7 mph - perfect for
> the spring to unload.
>
> 4.   Viewing conditions should be good – mostly cloudy with no lake
> effect snow.
>
> 5.   Temp ~43 F, so not brutally cold.
>
>
>
> Loons from current migratory aggregations on the Finger Lakes and southern
> Lake Ontario are likely to embark for southbound passage as early as 6:40
> am. The main flight off Cayuga & Seneca Lake will mostly vector down the
> lake basins and have passed on by 7:30 am.  So places like Stewart Park
> and Clute Park (Watkins Glen) should offer good viewing. If you can get
> there in time, Taughannock State Park can be a wonderful site to view the
> early flight down Cayuga.
>
>
>
> The peak of the flight off Lake Ontario will likely pass over
> Ithaca/Watkins Glen latitudes between 7:45 and 8:30, with lesser magnitude
> continuing thereafter. The densest flight vectors from Lake Ontario have
> been noted in the past coursing down the east side of the Seneca Lake Basin
> and the west side of the Cayuga Lake Basin, but the flight off Lake Ontario
> can be seen to some degree from high terrain anywhere in the southern
> Finger Lakes and Southern Tier counties of NY.
>
>
>
> If you have the opportunity to observe, please post your results here
> and/or eBird including the location & time period you counted, direction of
> flight, and the percentage of loons estimated to be flying below 1000
> feet/300 m above ground level.
>
>
>
> Best wishes!
>
>
>
> Bill Evans
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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Murder most Fowl - Saturday 5/30

2020-05-31 Thread Wes Blauvelt
I would add opossum to the lineup of possible perpetrators..they too
favor heads and will make quick work of your chickens.

On Sun, May 31, 2020 at 12:28 PM Jody Enck  wrote:

> Hi Gary and all,
>
> So sorry you came upon this scene.  However, it definitely does not sound
> like a shooting incident.  As a duck hunter myself, I will say that you
> would need to be within 5 or 6 feet (maybe less) in order to take the head
> off a duck via a shot.  At even 10-12 feet, the shotgun pellets start
> spreading out enough that it would be virtually impossible for the duck to
> lose its head.  Great Horned Owls can and do take heads off of birds
> (notoriously off of pheasants), but multiple birds having similar fates
> does suggest a mustelid, as others have mentioned.
>
> Jody
> Jody W. Enck, PhD
> Conservation Social Scientist, and
> Founder of the Sister Bird Club Network
> 607-379-5940
>
>
> On Sun, May 31, 2020 at 10:08 AM Gary Kohlenberg 
> wrote:
>
>> Saturday I walked with my daughter down Shindagin Hollow Rd., in the
>> State Forest, to the intersection with Gulf Creek Rd. for exercise, fun and
>> to show her the area. It was very birdy and beautiful as usual especially
>> the beaver pond at the bottom of the hill. This place always reminds me of
>> the Adirondacks and is a favorite of mine.
>>
>> There was a surprising amount of traffic on Shindagin Rd. both cars and
>> mountain bikers savoring the nice day. Some out of state plates on cars of
>> dozens parked at the intersection and FLT crossing. I was reminded how
>> popular this area is and how much we need wild areas during a pandemic.
>>
>> We were amazed at how many Red Newts were crossing the road. Some didn’t
>> make it unharmed, but most of them did. I learned about their life cycle,
>> that they are toxic, but contain off the charts cuteness. We tried to help
>> a couple on the journey, but they are very independent minded and don’t
>> need any intervention.
>>
>> We noticed a dead bird in the pond by the outflow pipe under the road; a
>> dead male Mallard. Kayla thought it quite interesting and checked to find
>> it had no head. I thought that was weird, but I have seen it before, and
>> guessed maybe an owl had decapitated it. I’m not actually positive owls
>> would or could do this, but seem to remember some discussion about this. If
>> anyone knows if it can be a thing please enlighten me.
>>
>> I scanned the pond and saw movement which was another male Mallard
>> struggling in the water. His body floated with the head hanging underwater
>> unable to lift it up. He may have had a broken neck. I wasn’t able to reach
>> the poor guy to end his misery which made me sad. More scanning found a
>> third male Mallard floating in the pond dead. I didn’t see any more, but
>> there could have been one in the grass. Three seems like a typical total
>> for this small water to hold on any particular day.
>>
>> My hypothesis is that they were all shot on the water with a shotgun. To
>> cleanly decapitate a bird the shot would have to be at very close range.
>> The other birds could have all been hit with the same shot if they had been
>> swimming very together. This water is very small and birds not hit would
>> have flown and probably circled around. It’s not likely they would have
>> been shot in the air and fallen back into this small area.
>>
>> This poaching event is very disturbing and we had another event like this
>> in the same general area. I’m thinking of the eagle shooting over bait. No
>> hunter would shoot birds in a barrel or sitting on the water even in
>> season. In my opinion this is just criminal at any time.
>>
>> We all have bigger social troubles overall, but felt compelled to
>> document this as a complete view of birding in the finger lakes. The little
>> things still go on.
>>
>> Happier birding today,
>>
>> Gary
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> --
>>
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>>
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>>
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[cayugabirds-l] Pink-footed Goose

2020-03-02 Thread Wes Blauvelt
After spending the morning at the Philadelphia Flower Show, I drove over to
Lancaster County where a Pink-footed Goose has been seen the last few days.
I arrived at the eBird location just as >4,000 Snow Geese, including the
Pink-footed, lifted off into flight. So if you see a dark goose with pink
legs and feet among the Snow Geese that move through the basin over the
next few daystake a second look. It could be a pink-footed!

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Re: [cayugabirds-l] hurt hawk

2019-12-20 Thread Wes Blauvelt
Good news, just talked with Marc..the hawk flew off under its own power!

On Fri, Dec 20, 2019 at 11:42 AM Donna Lee Scott  wrote:

> Please call the Janet Swanson Wildlife Clinic of the Cornell Vet School
> 607 253 3060
> To help the hawk.
>
> I don't know if they come get injured birds.
>
> If you think you can catch it yourself,
> put on strong leather gloves, bring a medium-sized blanket and a closeable
> big cardboard box.
>
> Throw the blanket  over the hawk and carefully gather it up inside blanket
> and put hawk into box.
> Remove blanket if you can.
> Close flaps.
>
> If the bird has to be brought to Cornell, They will most likely meet you
> at the Small Animal Clinic next to the B Parking lot off NY RT. 366
> by the south side of north end of Cornell campus.
>
> Good luck and thanks,
>
> Donna L. Scott
> 535 Lansing Station Road
> Lansing, NY 14882
> 607-533-7228, 607-379-1694
> d...@cornell.edu
>
>
> -Original Message-
> From: bounce-124225028-15001...@list.cornell.edu [mailto:
> bounce-124225028-15001...@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Rustici, Marc
> Sent: Friday, December 20, 2019 11:16 AM
> To: Magnus Fiskesjo ; CAYUGABIRDS-L <
> cayugabird...@list.cornell.edu>
> Subject: RE:[cayugabirds-l] massive duck flock on SW of Cayuga lake
>
> Good Morning,
>
> I am hoping this reaches the correct person(s)
>
> I work at the Arnot Ogden Medical Center in Elmira.  A colleague just
> reported that a hawk (maybe coopers I have not seen it) flew into our
> building.  He has been observing it for a bit and it is moving its neck,
> tail and one wing.  The other wing is extended and thus maybe broken.  I
> have contacted our local nature center (Tanglewood) but they do not rescue
> birds.  I called someone in Montour Falls that the person at Tanglewood
> gave me and left a voice mail message.
>
> Can anyone help or point me in the right direction.
>
> Thanks to all,
> Marc Rustici
>
> -Original Message-
> From: bounce-124224855-62610...@list.cornell.edu [mailto:
> bounce-124224855-62610...@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Magnus Fiskesjo
> Sent: Friday, December 20, 2019 10:41 AM
> To: CAYUGABIRDS-L
> Subject: [cayugabirds-l] massive duck flock on SW of Cayuga lake
>
> Attention: This email came from an external source outside Arnot Health.
> Please use caution when opening attachments or clicking links from unknown
> senders or unexpected email.
> .
>
>
> There's a large mass of ducks on the SW of Cayuga lake.
> https://ebird.org/checklist/S62465727
>
> I don't think I have never seen such a massive group, and can't count it.
> Is it more than five thousand Redheads?
>
> It's visible by scope and bins, from the "Overlook, Rte. 89 N of Hog Hole"
> along house numbers like 830-840.
>
> Number 841 has a big parking lot with good views, but trees always block
> part of the MASSIVE flock.
>
> Redheads are 95%+, interspersed with a few other ducks and one lone
> Cormorant.
>
> Now back to grading exams
>
> --yrs.
> Magnus Fiskesjö, PhD
> Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, Cornell University McGraw
> Hall, Room 201. Ithaca, NY 14853, USA
> E-mail: magnus.fiske...@cornell.edu, or: n...@cornell.edu
>
> Affiliations at Cornell University, WWW:
> Anthropology Department, anthropology.cornell.edu/faculty/ Southeast Asia
> Program (SEAP), seap.einaudi.cornell.edu/faculty_directory
> East Asia Program (EAP), eap.einaudi.cornell.edu/faculty_directory
> CIAMS (Archaeology), ciams.cornell.edu/people/ Cornell Institute for
> Public Affairs (CIPA), cipa.cornell.edu/academics/fieldfaculty.cfm
> 
> From: bounce-124189267-84019...@list.cornell.edu [
> bounce-124189267-84019...@list.cornell.edu] on behalf of Jody Enck [
> jodye...@gmail.com]
> Sent: Saturday, December 7, 2019 8:24 AM
> To: Colleen Richards
> Cc: CAYUGABIRDS-L
> Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Cayuga Bird Club December meeting
>
> Hi All,
> Piggy-backing on Colleen's message about the Cayuga Bird Club meeting on
> Monday.
> Read below about an opportunity to donate binoculars.
>
> First, I promise that the talk will be fun and interesting even though it
> is based on real social science data.
>
> Second, if you have a pair of binoculars sitting around your house in good
> working order, but otherwise not being used much, please consider donating
> them to our cause.  We've had high school students working here in Ithaca
> on our habitat restoration project, and we are going to be connecting them
> to students in Honduras working on conservation projects there.  These
> projects benefit the exact same bird species at different times and places
> in their annual life cycle.  In January, MPS student Mary McKean, who is
> working on the project with us, will be traveling to Honduras to meet with
> Bird Clubs and some school kids with whom they work.  She is willing to
> deliver any binoculars we donate for the kids in Honduras to use.  She will
> gladly collect any binoculars you want to donate 

Re: [cayugabirds-l] C Loons

2019-10-21 Thread Wes Blauvelt
While closing down my camp at Frontenac Point I did a 180 degree sweep of
the lake with my scope. 66 Common Loons..with many of them making their
“Hoot” calls. Nice day to be on the lake.

On Mon, Oct 21, 2019 at 1:56 PM Donna Lee Scott  wrote:

> Several Common Loons well across Cayuga Lake from E. Side /Lansing Station
> Rd.
>
> Donna Scott
> Lansing
> Sent from my iPhone
> --
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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Multiple thousands of geese

2018-02-24 Thread Wes Blauvelt
Observing similar display in Van Etten. Horizon to horizon.10,000+.

On Sat, Feb 24, 2018 at 2:32 PM Tobias Dean  wrote:

> More than I personally have ever seen at once flying north over Danby. At
> least 15 minutes or more of V's crossing the sky at high altitude. there
> are subsequent groups going over.
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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Wild Turkey fight

2017-03-29 Thread Wes Blauvelt
Oblivious of the cameraman, too!
Nice killdeer background calls.


On Wed, Mar 29, 2017 at 3:37 PM Dave K  wrote:

> These two Toms were between Rt96 and the Seneca Depot fence this
> AM, oblivious to the traffic zooming by a few feet away.
>
>
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/105424358@N06/33568506032/in/datetaken-public/
>
> Turkey Tussle 3-29-17 RT96 Seneca Depot
> 
> 
>
>
>
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