Re: [cayugabirds-l] question about white-throated sparrows

2021-02-03 Thread Whitings
Hi, 
I have had three or four all winter and I live in the village of Skaneateles. 
They are very reliable.

Diana Whiting

dianawhitingphotography.com


> On Feb 3, 2021, at 3:42 PM, Carol Cedarholm  wrote:
> 
> 
> I'm wondering where you all live? In the country?  I have had one only rarely 
> and live in town in Ithaca.  But the last few weeks I have had one almost 
> every day.  
> 
>> On Wed, Feb 3, 2021 at 3:07 PM Marilyn Ray  wrote:
>> About seven or eight winters ago, we had a pair of white throats all winter 
>> and have had them ever since until last year when we had our usual pair plus 
>> maybe two more and nor we've had about six or seven all this winter.  The 
>> first winter the pair only ate from fallen seeds beneath the feeders, but 
>> the last few winters they hav gradually learned to use he feeders and use 
>> them most of the time. 
>> 
>> On 2/2/2021 3:27 PM, Gary Kohlenberg wrote:
>>> I usually have 2-6 at my feeders all winter. They breed in the woods around 
>>> my house east of Ithaca. 
>>> Gary 
>>> 
>>> On Feb 2, 2021, at 2:23 PM, Linda Post Van Buskirk  wrote:
>>> 
>>> 
>>> How common is it for them to winter here?  I have one or possibly a pair at 
>>> my feeders this week.
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[cayugabirds-l] American Widgeon with yellow cheeks

2020-11-19 Thread Whitings
Hi All, 
Today I saw an American Widgeon with different colored cheeks than what I think 
would be normal. They were a golden yellow color. When I tried to look it up, I 
found it to be called a variant color. Anyway it was in the main pool and 
enjoying a lot of stolen meals from the coots. 
https://www.dianawhitingphotography.com/Galleries/Birds/Ducks/i-Prc4B7K/A


Diana Whiting

dianawhitingphotography.com


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[cayugabirds-l] Platform feeders

2020-11-03 Thread Whitings
Hi All, 
My husband is going to build me a couple platform feeders. I am a little 
concerned about birds getting their feet caught in the screen. Does anyone have 
any suggestions or experience to prevent that, but also allow for drainage and 
cleaning ?

Diana

dianawhitingphotograpy.com



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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Hummingbirds?

2020-09-12 Thread Whitings
Hi, ours appear to have left yesterday.

Diana

dianawhitingphotography.com


> On Sep 12, 2020, at 7:57 PM, Marie P. Read  wrote:
> 
> 
> Had a female/imm Ruby-throated Hummingbird at the feeder around 6:45pm. Saw 
> two yesterday feeding from the few remaining bee-balm flowers. 
> Marie
> 
> Marie Read Wildlife Photography
> 452 Ringwood Road
> Freeville NY  13068 USA
> 
> e-mail   m...@cornell.edu
> Website: http://www.marieread.com
> 
> NEW! The Magic of Loons 2021 Wall Calendar:
> https://www.createphotocalendars.com/Store/Loons+Calendar+2021-6267193593 
> 
> AUTHOR of:
> Mastering Bird Photography: The Art, Craft, and Technique of Photographing 
> Birds and Their Behavior
> 
> https://rockynook.com/shop/photography/mastering-bird-photography/?REF=101/
> 
> From: bounce-124936266-5851...@list.cornell.edu 
>  on behalf of Laura Stenzler 
> 
> Sent: Saturday, September 12, 2020 12:16 PM
> To: CAYUGABIRDS-L 
> Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Hummingbirds?
>  
> Last night was a big migration night. (Check out 
> https://birdcast.info/migration-tools/live-migration-maps/)
> 
> Has anyone seen hummingbirds today? Ours seem to have left. 
> 
> Laura
> 
> Laura Stenzler
> l...@cornell.edu
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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Prothonotary Warbler

2020-05-18 Thread Whitings
Thanks very much for your response! I appreciate it!

Diana

dianawhitingphotography.com


> On May 18, 2020, at 10:39 AM, Geo Kloppel  wrote:
> 
> Yes, tent tree or maybe forest tent caterpillar, or some similar 
> Lepidopteran that lays a compact mass of many hundreds of eggs that all hatch 
> simultaneously like those in the photo. Food for Cuckoos, but probably not 
> Prothonotary Warblers.
> 
> -Geo
> 
>>> On May 18, 2020, at 9:20 AM, Marie P. Read  wrote:
>>> 
>> Geo, do you think they're tent caterpillars? That's what I thought...
>> Marie
>> 
>> Marie Read Wildlife Photography
>> 452 Ringwood Road
>> Freeville NY  13068 USA
>> 
>> e-mail   m...@cornell.edu
>> Website: http://www.marieread.com
>> 
>> AUTHOR of:
>> Mastering Bird Photography: The Art, Craft, and Technique of Photographing 
>> Birds and Their Behavior
>> 
>> https://rockynook.com/shop/photography/mastering-bird-photography/?REF=101/
>> ____
>> From: Geo Kloppel [geoklop...@gmail.com]
>> Sent: Monday, May 18, 2020 9:12 AM
>> To: Marie P. Read
>> Cc: Whitings; CAYUGABIRDS-L
>> Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Prothonotary Warbler
>> 
>> It looks like there was an egg mass right on the box, and they’ve all just 
>> hatched. Be climbing the trees soon.
>> 
>> -Geo
>> 
>>> On May 17, 2020, at 6:59 PM, Marie P. Read  wrote:
>>> 
>>> Hi Diana and Cayugabirders,
>>> 
>>> Here is what birdsoftheworld.org (formerly Birds of North America online) 
>>> says about Prothonotary Warbler nesting:
>>> 
>>> >> Selection Process
>>> Males establish territories around one or several suitable nest sites, and 
>>> place moss inside cavities before females arrive. Male displays at each 
>>> cavity. Female selects nest cavity from among those available. Settlement 
>>> by female is related partly to quality or number of nest cavities available>
>>> and
>>> >> Construction Process
>>> Male places moss in potential nest sites. Amount of moss varies from 
>>> several pieces to foundation 1–8 cm deep, and male may fashion nest cup in 
>>> moss. Female alone constructs remainder of nest and lining, with male 
>>> accompanying but not assisting. >
>>> and
>>> >> Males place various amounts of moss (but not complete nests) in all 
>>> available cavities within their territory.>
>>> 
>>> No mention of larvae. I can't quite tell what kind of larvae they are from 
>>> the one photo I can see on your site. But very interesting observation. I 
>>> didn't notice anything like this obvious new hatch of larvae on the 3 boxes 
>>> I observed there last week at Armitage Rd. I also saw/heard at least 3 
>>> different males along the road.
>>> 
>>> Marie
>>> 
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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Prothonotary Warbler

2020-05-17 Thread Whitings
Thanks Marie, I will crop in the larvae and post it. Would they be harmful or 
influence the female to avoid this nest box? Appreciate your help!

Diana

dianawhitingphotography.com


> On May 17, 2020, at 6:59 PM, Marie P. Read  wrote:
> 
> Hi Diana and Cayugabirders,
> 
> Here is what birdsoftheworld.org (formerly Birds of North America online) 
> says about Prothonotary Warbler nesting:
> 
>  Selection Process
> Males establish territories around one or several suitable nest sites, and 
> place moss inside cavities before females arrive. Male displays at each 
> cavity. Female selects nest cavity from among those available. Settlement by 
> female is related partly to quality or number of nest cavities available> 
> and 
>  Construction Process
> Male places moss in potential nest sites. Amount of moss varies from several 
> pieces to foundation 1–8 cm deep, and male may fashion nest cup in moss. 
> Female alone constructs remainder of nest and lining, with male accompanying 
> but not assisting. >
> and
>  Males place various amounts of moss (but not complete nests) in all available 
> cavities within their territory.>
> 
> No mention of larvae. I can't quite tell what kind of larvae they are from 
> the one photo I can see on your site. But very interesting observation. I 
> didn't notice anything like this obvious new hatch of larvae on the 3 boxes I 
> observed there last week at Armitage Rd. I also saw/heard at least 3 
> different males along the road.
> 
> Marie
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> Marie Read Wildlife Photography
> 452 Ringwood Road
> Freeville NY  13068 USA
> 
> e-mail   m...@cornell.edu
> Website: http://www.marieread.com
> 
> AUTHOR of:
> Mastering Bird Photography: The Art, Craft, and Technique of Photographing 
> Birds and Their Behavior
> 
> https://rockynook.com/shop/photography/mastering-bird-photography/?REF=101/
> 
> From: bounce-124636532-5851...@list.cornell.edu 
> [bounce-124636532-5851...@list.cornell.edu] on behalf of Whitings 
> [whiti...@roadrunner.com]
> Sent: Sunday, May 17, 2020 6:02 PM
> To: CAYUGABIRDS-L
> Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Prothonotary Warbler
> 
> Hi All,
> I was able to watch the Prothonotary Warbler on Armitage Rd. For.  an 
> extended period of time. In the morning it was mostly foraging and singing as 
> well as displaying periodically. Then in mid day, it started bringing moss 
> into the nest box. I was wondering if this is the male making moss offerings. 
> I never saw more than one bird together that day.  Occasionally it would 
> leave with a pale green larvae in it’s peak. After looking at photos when I 
> got home, I noticed that there was a whole area of larvae around the nest box 
> hole. Someone else who was observing at a different angle thought it was 
> adhering insects to the box. I only could see the bird bringing back moss, 
> but can anyone explain the larvae at the nest hole? There are a few photos 
> https://www.dianawhitingphotography.com/Galleries/Favorites/Favorites-2020/i-5q7LXPJ/buy
> 
> 
> Diana Whiting
> dianawhitingphotography.com
> 
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[cayugabirds-l] Prothonotary Warbler

2020-05-17 Thread Whitings

Hi All,
I was able to watch the Prothonotary Warbler on Armitage Rd. For.  an extended 
period of time. In the morning it was mostly foraging and singing as well as 
displaying periodically. Then in mid day, it started bringing moss into the 
nest box. I was wondering if this is the male making moss offerings. I never 
saw more than one bird together that day.  Occasionally it would leave with a 
pale green larvae in it’s peak. After looking at photos when I got home, I 
noticed that there was a whole area of larvae around the nest box hole. Someone 
else who was observing at a different angle thought it was adhering insects to 
the box. I only could see the bird bringing back moss, but can anyone explain 
the larvae at the nest hole? There are a few photos 
https://www.dianawhitingphotography.com/Galleries/Favorites/Favorites-2020/i-5q7LXPJ/buy


Diana Whiting
dianawhitingphotography.com


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[cayugabirds-l] Phoebe

2020-03-29 Thread Whitings
I heard the FOY Eastern Phoebe today in the yard. Staying home does have some 
perks.

Diana Whiting

dianawhitingphotography.com



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[cayugabirds-l] Osprey

2020-03-28 Thread Whitings
Hi All, 
 Yesterday there was a single Osprey on a nest on route 20 just west of the 
refuge entrance on the south side of the road. Lots of Turkey Vultures around 
the refuge complex too.

Diana Whiting


dianawhitingphotography.com



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[cayugabirds-l] Meadow lark

2020-01-20 Thread Whitings
Hi All,
Today I found a Meadow Lark on Center St. just east of Route 129. I noticed 
it’s silhouette in a shrubs and was able to make out some color besides the 
shape against the sun. Then it flew across the road landing low in the grass 
where I was able to get a couple very distant poor but identifying photos which 
are on ebird. I think it was an eastern variety, but not confident enough to 
make the call. Very quiet day otherwise.

Diana

dianawhitingphotography.com



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[cayugabirds-l] U.S. Plan on Killing Birds in New York - CounterPunch.org

2019-12-03 Thread Whitings
Does anyone know about this? It seems insane.

Diana
https://www.counterpunch.org/2019/12/02/u-s-plan-on-killing-birds-in-new-york/


dianawhitingphotography.com



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[cayugabirds-l] Sandhill Cranes

2019-11-09 Thread Whitings
Hi All,

There were 57 Sandhill Cranes today at Knox Marcellus. They took off westerly 
at around 1:30. Earlier I saw some in a distant field just off of East Rd. 
heading towards Rt. 31.

Diana Whiting

dianawhitingphotography.com



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[cayugabirds-l] Wood Thrush

2019-05-06 Thread Whitings
Hi All,
 We had a Wood Thrush singing its heart out tonight here in the village of 
Skaneateles. That is a new yard bird. Must be all the trees we have planted 
make things a bit more attractive even if It is only a pit stop. On the other 
hand the Red-breasted Nuthatch pair continues in our yard. I thought they would 
have left by now.

Diana Whiting

dianawhitingphotography.com



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[cayugabirds-l] Fox Sparrow

2018-04-06 Thread Whitings
Hi All,
 If it can’t be a real fox, it was sure a nice surprise to see a beautiful Fox 
Sparrow under the feeder today. New yardbird for us In Skaneateles village.

Diana Whiting

dianawhitingphotography.com



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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Hummingbird!!!

2017-07-27 Thread Whitings
I have maintained a feeder all summer too with no results until yesterday when 
my husband saw one there briefly. We never seem to have any despite many 
plantings for them until August or when the Bee Balm and Rose of Sharon are 
flowering so I guess it is on time for our yard.

Diana

dianawhitingphotography.com


> On Jul 27, 2017, at 5:03 PM, Rustici, Marc  wrote:
> 
> I have heard that you need more than one feeder or food source to 
> consistently attract hummingbirds.  Do you have two sources of food for them 
> or is my information incorrect?
> 
> Thanks
> Marc
> 
> -Original Message-
> From: bounce-121683513-62610...@list.cornell.edu 
> [mailto:bounce-121683513-62610...@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Melanie Uhlir
> Sent: Thursday, July 27, 2017 4:46 PM
> To: W. Larry Hymes; cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu
> Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Hummingbird!!!
> 
> For a while the only evidence I had that hummingbirds were around was that 
> the nectar level would drop in the feeders. However, woodpeckers like to 
> drink the nectar too. But since my monarda started blooming I've been seeing 
> them on a more regular basis and the past few days I've seen two at a time, 
> chasing each other. I haven't seen an adult male for a few days. A 
> hummingbird moth has joined in the monarda celebration.
> 
> Melanie
> 
>> On 7/27/2017 3:21 PM, W. Larry Hymes wrote:
>> As we were talking with our son Chris in our living room on Tuesday,
>> he exclaimed excitedly, "A hummingbird just came to your feeder!!"  It
>> moved out of sight, but soon returned.  We had not seen one at our
>> feeders since May 11
>> I've written about this phenomenon before.  To paraphrase the "Field
>> of Dreams" movie, when he's here, the birds will come! This is
>> probably purely a matter of coincidence.   HOWEVER,  it has happened
>> enough times before to make me suspect that perhaps other "forces" may
>> be at play.
>> 
>> Have others of you been seeing hummingbirds of late?  If not, maybe I
>> could send our son to your house!
>> 
>> Larry
>> 
>> 
> 
> 
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[cayugabirds-l] Fwd: NNYBirds: Ross's Gull Phone Message 2/23/17

2017-02-23 Thread Whitings


dianawhitingphotography.com


Begin forwarded message:

> From: "'Joan Collins' joan.coll...@frontier.com [Northern_NY_Birds]" 
> 
> Date: February 23, 2017 at 7:47:49 PM EST
> To: , 
> Subject: NNYBirds:  Ross's Gull Phone Message 2/23/17
> Reply-To: northern_ny_bi...@yahoogroups.com
> 
> Hi Everyone,
> 
>  
> 
> I was out guiding today and just received my home phone messages – one of 
> them was from a cell phone number that I don’t recognize.  It was a man who 
> said the Ross’s Gull was back on Simon Pond today!  He mentioned that it flew 
> toward the Piercefield Flow.  (A few of us wondered if that was where it went 
> – we checked the Setting Pole Dam area several times, but no luck.  Most of 
> the Piercefield Flow area is inaccessible.)  The man didn’t leave his name 
> and I haven’t been able to reach him at his cell number.  I’ll keep trying.  
> His call came in at 2:30 p.m.  Very exciting news!
> 
>  
> 
> Joan Collins
> 
> President, NYS Ornithological Association
> 
> Editor, New York Birders
> 
> Long Lake, NY
> 
> (315) 244-7127 cell  
> 
> (518) 624-5528 home
> 
> http://www.adirondackavianexpeditions.com/  
> 
> http://www.facebook.com/AdirondackAvian
> 
> __._,_.___
> Posted by: "Joan Collins" 
> Reply via web post•   Reply to sender 
> •   Reply to group  •   Start 
> a New Topic   •   Messages in this topic (1)  
>  
>  
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[cayugabirds-l] Simon Pond

2017-02-23 Thread Whitings
Simon Pond
Tupper Lake, NY 12986

He viewed it from the bridge.

Diana
dianawhitingphotography.com


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[cayugabirds-l] Snowy Owl

2017-01-06 Thread Whitings
Hi All,

The bird that was attacked by the Gyrfalcon was one of the birds that has been 
banded. It has a really dark head, but upon viewing it on the computer, I could 
easily see a color difference in the dark head from the body. A check with a 
friend who is familiar with the banding process confirmed it as a banded bird 
which is marked with a black magic marker so it will be recognized as one 
already banded.

Diana Whiting

dianawhitingphotography.com


> On Jan 6, 2017, at 8:45 AM, Asher Hockett  wrote:
> 
> So it is a gray phase, but is not the gray landfill agent, if I read this 
> correctly.
> 
>> On Fri, Jan 6, 2017 at 8:01 AM, Kevin J. McGowan  wrote:
>> Gyrfalcons come in a variety of colors, from nearly pure, Snowy Owl white 
>> with scattered dark feather edging, to nearly all sooty black, usually with 
>> some light streaking and spotting on the chest and belly. David's bird fits 
>> cleanly in the middle, with dusky gray back and face and mostly pale 
>> underside. That is what is currently known as "gray," and is the most common 
>> form to reach our area. In fact, I've personally never seen anything except 
>> Gyrfalcons colored like this.
>> 
>> 
>> I hope it sticks around.
>> 
>> 
>> Kevin
>> 
>> 
>> From: John and Sue Gregoire 
>> Sent: Friday, January 6, 2017 7:23 AM
>> To: Asher Hockett
>> Cc: Kevin J. McGowan; k...@empacc.net; Caroline Manring; CAYUGABIRDS-L
>> Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Thorpe road Gyrfalcon
>>  
>> Dorsal appearance plays in that call Asher, and I believe from Dave K's 
>> photo that
>> this is a dark phase. All three appear light on the ventral side with the 
>> beautiful
>> white gyr a real eye stopper.
>> 
>> Many years ago (late 70s I think) we enjoyed all three at one time at a 
>> quarry in SE
>> Pennsylvania. Caravans of birders racing through Amish country was something 
>> the
>> locals surely still talk about.
>> 
>> We also remembered one (I think it was a gray) here up at Canoga marsh back 
>> around
>> the time when Andy Farnsworth was a student here and several members of the 
>> bird
>> club were able to see it hunt. Andy's sharp eyes spotted it while the rest 
>> of us
>> stared at blank sky for quite awhile.
>> 
>> John
>> 
>> -- 
>> John and Sue Gregoire
>> Field Ornithologists
>> Kestrel Haven Avian Migration Observatory
>> 5373 Fitzgerald Road
>> Burdett,NY 14818-9626
>> N 42 26.611' W 76 45.492'
>>  Website: http://www.empacc.net/~kestrelhaven/
>> 
>> Kestrel Haven Avian Migration Observatory Burdett New York
>> www.empacc.net
>> Connected with the Finger Lakes National Forest and a large hemlock wetland, 
>> this 60-acre sanctuary is known as Kestrel Haven Avian Migration ...
>> 
>> "Conserve and Create Habitat"
>> 
>> On Thu, January 5, 2017 15:58, Asher Hockett wrote:
>> > And the photo from Thorpe Rd is? I am confused because it seems very white,
>> > where it isn't spotted, and not gray at all.
>> >
>> > Asher not-very-experienced-with Gyrfalcons
>> >
>> > On Thu, Jan 5, 2017 at 2:54 PM, Kevin J. McGowan  wrote:
>> >
>> >> I believe that is true.
>> >>
>> >> Kevin
>> >>
>> >> -Original Message-
>> >> From: John and Sue Gregoire [mailto:k...@empacc.net]
>> >> Sent: Thursday, January 05, 2017 2:45 PM
>> >> To: Kevin J. McGowan 
>> >> Cc: Caroline Manring ; CAYUGABIRDS-L <
>> >> cayugabird...@list.cornell.edu>
>> >> Subject: RE: [cayugabirds-l] Thorpe road Gyrfalcon
>> >>
>> >> What color phase is the landfill Gyr? Thought it was a gray.
>> >> --
>> >> John and Sue Gregoire
>> >> Field Ornithologists
>> >> Kestrel Haven Avian Migration Observatory
>> >> 5373 Fitzgerald Road
>> >> Burdett,NY 14818-9626
>> >> N 42 26.611' W 76 45.492'
>> >>  Website: http://www.empacc.net/~kestrelhaven/
>> >> "Conserve and Create Habitat"
>> >>
>> >> On Thu, January 5, 2017 13:42, Kevin J. McGowan wrote:
>> >> > Check the legs for jesses. They use a Gyrfalcon to keep gulls away
>> >> > from the landfill over on Rt 414.
>> >> >
>> >> > Kevin
>> >> >
>> >> > -Original Message-
>> >> > From: bounce-121125912-3493...@list.cornell.edu
>> >> > [mailto:bounce-121125912-3493...@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of
>> >> > Caroline Manring
>> >> > Sent: Thursday, January 05, 2017 1:32 PM
>> >> > To: CAYUGABIRDS-L 
>> >> > Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Thorpe road Gyrfalcon
>> >> >
>> >> > Here now, 1:30-- no snowies to be seen but several good long looks at
>> >> > a Gyrfalcon on both sides of the road, both on ground and on telephone
>> >> pole!
>> >> >
>> >> > Caroline
>> >> >
>> >> > Sent from my iPhone
>> >> > --
>> >> >
>> >> > Cayugabirds-L List Info:
>> >> > http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
>> >> > http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
>> >> > http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave
>> >> > .htm
>> >> >
>> >> > ARCHIVES:
>> >> > 1) 

Re: [cayugabirds-l] Etna: House Wren

2016-04-23 Thread Whitings
Hi, 
 House Wrens returned last Sunday in Skaneateles along with some White-throated 
Sparrows and a Yellow-bellied Sapsucker which is a new yardbird.

Diana Whiting

Sent from my iPad

> On Apr 23, 2016, at 11:53 AM, Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes 
>  wrote:
> 
> Did anyone else notice if House Wren arrived in their neighborhood today? One 
> has been bubbling away in our yard all morning, bouncing from territory edge 
> to territory edge.
> 
> Nice to hear them back.
> 
> Good birding!
> 
> Sincerely,
> Chris T-H
> 
> --
> Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
> Field Applications Engineer
> Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
> 159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
> W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 607-254-1132
> http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp
> 
> --
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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Long-eared Short-eared Owls

2014-12-23 Thread whitings
Hi,
It is in Baldwinsville. The trail is not too far, but want you to know it can 
be ice covered so you might want those ice trackers for your boots. Hate to 
have someone fall. I haven't been this year, but I know from other times. Good 
luck!

Diana Whiting

Sent from my iPhone

 On Dec 23, 2014, at 10:09 AM, Chris R. Pelkie chris.pel...@cornell.edu 
 wrote:
 
 Ann asked about this site: (Onondaga Parks system, so $4 entry fee, I think 
 per car)
 
 Beaver Lake Nature Center
 Beaver Lake County Park
 8477 East Mud Lake Road
 Baldwinsville, NY 13027
 On Dec 23, 2014, at 07:20 , Ann Mitchell annmitchel...@gmail.com wrote:
 
 Where is baldwisville nature ctr? Thanks. Ann
 
 Sent from my iPhone
 
 On Dec 22, 2014, at 4:47 PM, Chris R. Pelkie chris.pel...@cornell.edu 
 wrote:
 
 I think we (Ann’s group) were pleasantly surprised the SEOWs were so active 
 in mid-afternoon on Sat. However, it was a leaden sky so maybe they thought 
 dusk had arrived earlier. At Long Pt (which we skipped that day), they seem 
 to wait until pre-dusk before magically appearing; there is still half an 
 hour or so of light to see and photograph them in. I assume other observers 
 will chime in with their anecdotes.
 
 I trekked up to Baldwinsville Nature Ctr today and batted out on the LEOW 
 as did the 30 or so other birders who were there in the morning. Maybe it 
 will reappear today at dusk as apparently it did yesterday. I chatted with 
 one of the folks who got photos of it yesterday in dim light, sitting high 
 on a tree. I was not expecting to see it in that position this AM (and 
 didn’t) and intense scanning of the dense evergreens/hemlocks did not make 
 it appear on its day roost either. Sigh. He said this was the first ever 
 LEOW at that site, so it was big news in the area.
 
 However, the same photog (Everett) told me the Saw-whet was a regular and 
 liked to hang out at the beginning of Bog Trail Loop, so I waited for a 
 good half hour there hoping for a stray movement from the Long-ear. Just as 
 my feet were getting cold, 2 then 3 titmice starting freaking out, then 
 joined by 2 chickadees, 2 WB nuthatches and a Downy, all shrieking in a 
 single small tree. Classic owl mob, so I trundled down the path and after 
 some searching found the NORTHERN SAW-WHET OWL with a mouseful (sic) of 
 Deer Mouse. He didn’t give a hoot (ick) about me standing 15’ away and 
 shooting madly but also did not give me a real good full-body look, 
 occluded by one branch or another no matter how I contorted myself. I 
 couldn’t get closer because the icy trail is on a raised walk over a 
 semi-frozen bog. But I’m happy my little birdy friends ran him down cause 
 he would have been invisible otherwise.
 
 Batted out completely on Bob’s Salt Rd Snowy and any others that might have 
 been on Indian Fields Rd as I took that on the way back.
 
 ChrisP
 
 
 On Dec 22, 2014, at 11:25 , Glenn Wilson wil...@stny.rr.com wrote:
 
 Are these seen basically during dawn and dusk or are they also seen during 
 the day? Thanks all. 
 
 Glenn Wilson
 Endicott, NY
 www.WilsonsWarbler.com
 
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Re: [cayugabirds-l] MNWR discsussion

2014-08-06 Thread whitings
Hi,
I find it interesting in this discussion that there is no mention of all the 
other places that one can walk in the complex as well as the MAC. The wildlife 
drive to my knowledge is the only place where they ask you to stay in the car. 
Yes, Knox Marcellus might be more accessible, but they have had guided walks 
there. Let' a remember too, that the very people you want to recruit as nature 
lovers use the drive usually without any binoculars or scopes. What can anyone 
see that follows in the wake of people flushing birds away from the edge? 
Surely, the same birds, butterflies, and flowers can be seen at most of the 
places with similar habitat that one is allowed to walk. I am also surprised 
that in this discussion I am reading of how peoples needs and desires somehow 
justify not respecting the rule as it stands presently. I learned like Marie 
that staying in the car was not so bad after all. You see more and so will the 
next person after you. The refuge could do a lot here by just clarifying their 
policy. Like Mark said, they are very busy right now moving all that dirt, and 
would get nothing done if they had to stop every five minutes to police people. 
I am all for promoting the natural world. I think the refuge meets both needs 
while respecting what their mission statement is. Walk into the other areas and 
you can probably still have the same experience you are looking for.


Diana Whiting

Sent from my iPhone

 On Aug 6, 2014, at 10:26 AM, Melissa Groo melg...@gmail.com wrote:
 
 If there is one thing I've learned, it's that people won't care about 
 protecting wild spaces and wild animals if they don't see how special these 
 spaces and animals are. 
 
 Yes, the most important charge of these refuges is to provide a haven for 
 wildlife in protected, vitally important habitat. But nwrs also see public 
 education and the affording of recreation (birding, hiking, fishing, hunting, 
 photography) as an important part of their mission. I spent some time talking 
 to refuge managers on a recent trip to North Dakota and learned firsthand 
 about the importance of this. 
 
 From the NWRA web site, at 
 http://refugeassociation.org/what-we-do/friends-groups-engagement/recreation/
 
 At least one national wildlife refuge is located in every U.S. state and 
 territory. These areas are set aside primarily to protect wildlife and 
 habitats, but they are also created for the use and enjoyment of the public. 
 These landscapes belong to all of us, and we each have the right to explore 
 refuges responsibly, with an eye to safeguarding them for future generations 
 to enjoy.
 
 I think thoughtful, responsible use of a refuge is in the best interests of 
 both wildlife and people, and I hope that moving forward, Montezuma NWR can 
 find that sensitive balance. 
 
 Melissa
 
 
 
 
 On Tue, Aug 5, 2014 at 8:48 AM, Marie P. Read m...@cornell.edu wrote:
 Yes, wildlife refuges are not nature parks, they are set aside to provide 
 a refuge…for the wildlife, a refuge from HUMANS and their encroachment!
 
 Marie (yes I'm a human, yes I encroach with the best of 'em!)
 
 Marie Read Wildlife Photography
 452 Ringwood Road
 Freeville NY  13068 USA
 
 Phone  607-539-6608
 e-mail   m...@cornell.edu
 
 http://www.marieread.com
 
 Author of Sierra Wings: Birds of the Mono Lake BasinAvailable here:
 
 http://marieread.photoshelter.com/gallery/Sierra-Wings-Birds-of-the-Mono-Lake-Basin/GNlCxX37uTzE/CBPFGij6nLfE
 
 From: bounce-117689184-5851...@list.cornell.edu 
 [bounce-117689184-5851...@list.cornell.edu] on behalf of John and Sue 
 Gregoire [k...@empacc.net]
 Sent: Tuesday, August 5, 2014 7:47 AM
 To: CAYUGABIRDS-L
 Subject: [cayugabirds-l] MNWR discsussion
 
 Many interesting points have been mentioned and certainly are worthwhile 
 exploring
 if they fall within the purview of MNWR. Certainly out of car areas could be
 established  once the major construction is complete. The north area would 
 be ideal
 and still allow the first portion of the drive through Benning to be 
 pedestrian
 free. But, before we go saying things like MNWR is a bug and butterfly 
 refuge or
 primarily a place to bird and study nature we should know what a NWR is and
 specifically what Montezuma is supposed to do.
 --
 
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 -- 
 
 Melissa Groo
 photographer . wildlife biographer . educator 
 www.melissagroo.com
 
 Follow my work on Facebook:
 www.facebook.com/melissa.groo
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