Re: [cayugabirds-l] Huge Cormorant Flock off East Shore Park

2021-04-20 Thread david nicosia
 I just estimated 200+ DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANTS Whitney Point Reservoir in 
Broome County this evening! 

On Tuesday, April 20, 2021, 04:45:51 PM EDT, Donna Lee Scott 
 wrote:  
 
 Cormorants have been flying by to north in small flocks for at least an hour!

Donna ScottLansingSent from my iPhone
On Apr 20, 2021, at 3:31 PM, Donna Lee Scott  wrote:


Two days ago I saw a flock of about 10+ DC Cormorants flying north over Cayuga 
Lake. 

Donna ScottLansingSent from my iPhone
On Apr 20, 2021, at 3:23 PM, Sandy Podulka  wrote:


John Greenly reports at 2:30 today that there was a flock of 132 +- 
Double-crested Cormorants off East Shore Park (SE corner of Cayuga Lake).


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[cayugabirds-l] Large migration showing up now on radar; Sunday could be really good

2021-03-27 Thread David Nicosia
All,

Radar is showing major bird migration now in our area and with rain coming
in late tonight and Sunday it could be a really good day, especially on
area lakes.  The weather is going to be awful, lots of rain Sunday but bad
weather can mean great birds. I will be out and probably soaking wet but it
could be worth it.

see
https://weather.cod.edu/satrad/?parms=continental-conus-comp_radar-24-1-100-1=map=undefined

for radar loop.

Good Luck.
Dave Nicosia

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[cayugabirds-l] Snow geese heading your way!

2021-03-10 Thread David Nicosia
>From upper lisle whitney point ny I have had flock after flock of snow
geese today heading northwest toward the finger lakes.  Also quite a bit of
Canadas too.  I suspect the massive gatherings of snows will be building
building big-time next couple days!  What a great day!

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[cayugabirds-l] ZOOM Virtual Webinar on NY BBA Wednesday March 3rd 730-9pm

2021-02-28 Thread David Nicosia
All,

Here is another reminder on my first ZOOM Virtual NYBBA webinar meeting
March 3rd 730-9 pm. I plan on going over use of eBird, basics of Atlas,
progress in central NY from 2020, priorities for 2021 and an overview of
the whole process from start to finish. I will also be available for your
questions. Please plan on attending. The focus for this is central NY. But
all are welcome.

You are invited to a Zoom webinar.
When: Mar 3, 2021 07:30 PM Eastern Time (US and Canada)
Topic: NY Breeding Bird Atlas III  E-Bird Tutorial , Year 1 results,  and
Basics on Atlasing  March 3rd 730 pm

Register in advance for this webinar:
https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_7r5uMrZXSLCLCyP77H0mfQ

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing
information about joining the webinar.

Best,
Dave Nicosia Central NY NYSBBA III Regional Coordinator

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[cayugabirds-l] Massive Solar Farm coming to Cayuga County

2021-02-20 Thread david nicosia
All, 
see 
https://www.syracuse.com/news/2020/02/monster-cny-solar-farm-would-replace-corn-and-soybeans-with-power-for-3-homes.html

Does anyone have any more details on this? If it is done with wildlife in mind 
this could be a good thing. If they plant pollinator friendly and native 
grasses this could be a positive. But if it is just plain grass it could be at 
best just a trade-off and at worse a negative. These solar farms could be good 
for birds and pollinators. 
seehttps://www.audubon.org/news/can-solar-plants-make-good-bird-habitat 

Maybe you are all aware of this but the big renewable energy push through solar 
farms could be an opportunity to improve bird and pollinator habitats. Anyway, 
just wondering if any folks have information on this or have contacted solar 
farm companies on this. 
Best,Dave  





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Re: [cayugabirds-l] 50 Robins

2021-02-15 Thread david nicosia
 I have noticed a LOT of robins lately.  All over down here in Broome Co. 
On Monday, February 15, 2021, 02:02:47 PM EST, Suan Hsi Yong 
 wrote:  
 
 Just had at least 50 American Robins fly into the trees outside my
window here in Commonland on East Hill / Six-Mile Creek. They hung out
in the trees for about a minute before flying off. 50 is a
conservative lower-bound count of what I could see. When they
departed, there were small waves flying by from out of view, so there
could well have been 100.

Suan

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[cayugabirds-l] Zoom Virtual Meeting: NY Breeding Bird Atlas III Training Wednesday March 3rd 730 pm

2021-02-14 Thread david nicosia
All, 
I am planning on doing several zoom meetings leading up to the peak breeding 
season. We are going to focus on how to use ebird for the atlas, look at 
results of last year's efforts, what we need to focus on this year, and some 
basic atlasing, like blocks, breeding codes etc. Another thing I will discuss 
it the possibility of doing COVID-safe bird atlas walks in June for training 
purposes (central NY only).  I will also be on hand to answer questions. Please 
join me and consider helping in the NY BBA.  The audience is intended for folks 
in central NY but all in NY can attend. I just won't be able to do atlas 
training bird walks if you are far from central NY! 
Also please spread this email to as many birders, clubs as you sed fit. I tried 
to include the folks I know or the various central NY email listservs.  Some of 
these listservs don't seem to work anymore. So I would ask you to forward to 
all lists that you have.  Thanks. 
see below to sign up. 
Best,Dave Nicosia,  NYSBBA III Central Region Coordinator
David Nicosia is inviting you to a scheduled Zoom meeting.
Topic: NY Breeding Bird Atlas III  E-Bird Tutorial , Year 1 results,  and 
Basics on Atlasing  Time: Mar 3, 2021 07:30 PM Eastern Time (US and Canada)
Join Zoom 
Meetinghttps://us02web.zoom.us/j/85267683776?pwd=UEpjYkNjSWJLNzhNZkExSVRENklydz09
Meeting ID: 852 6768 3776Passcode: 885216One tap 
mobile+19294362866,,85267683776#*885216# US (New 
York)+13017158592,,85267683776#*885216# US (Washington DC)
Dial by your location        +1 929 436 2866 US (New York)        +1 301 715 
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7799 US (Houston)        +1 669 900 6833 US (San Jose)        +1 253 215 8782 
US (Tacoma)Meeting ID: 852 6768 3776Passcode: 885216Find your local number: 
https://us02web.zoom.us/u/kk7TU31vL
 
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Re: [cayugabirds-l] 50+ Robins /Florida Robins

2021-02-03 Thread David Nicosia
I saw a nice flock of around 20 american robins on lower lake road
northwest Cayuga Lake January 23rd. There were probably even more.

On Tue, Feb 2, 2021 at 4:50 PM Donna Lee Scott  wrote:

> Meanwhile, my brother in Bradenton Florida, south of Tampa Bay, reports
> that 1000s of Robins are coming into roost overnight in the mangroves
> across the Braden River from his house! Hundreds are lined up on the high
> power line that crosses the river there.
>
> In the past, I have seen this while visiting him there.
>
>
>
> Donna L. Scott
>
> 535 Lansing Station Road
>
> Lansing, NY 14882
>
>
>
> *From:* bounce-125353610-15001...@list.cornell.edu [mailto:
> bounce-125353610-15001...@list.cornell.edu] *On Behalf Of *David Ruppert
> *Sent:* Tuesday, February 02, 2021 4:45 PM
> *To:* CAYUGABIRDS-L 
> *Subject:* [cayugabirds-l] 50+ Robins
>
>
>
> About 50 American Robins flew into our yard along Ellis Hollow Creek Road
> slightly after 4pm this afternoon.  It appears that they are planning to
> roost here for the night.
>
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[cayugabirds-l] Northward Bird migration already Lower Mississippi Valley / Texas

2021-02-03 Thread David Nicosia
All,

I noticed some bird migration echoes in the lower Mississippi valley and
Texas early this morning. It's only early February.  Birdcast shows this
early migratory push. see

https://birdcast.info/migration-tools/live-migration-maps/

The birds were moving north so they are not wintering birds pushing further
south. There are southwest winds in this area.  Does anyone have an idea on
what species of birds these may be?  I know Horned Larks can nest early. I
am unfamiliar with the timing of migration in this area.

Thanks,
Dave Nicosia

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[cayugabirds-l] Red-Tailed Hawk borealis vs abieticola subspecies Stevenson Road Game Farm Today

2021-01-23 Thread David Nicosia
All,

I spent some time watching the numerous RED-TAILED HAWKs on Stevenson Road
over the Game Farm. Two subspecies (I believe) were present (see photos in
ebird report).


https://ebird.org/checklist/S79764223

I noticed much darker markings on some RED-TAILED HAWKs which I believe are
the abieticola subspecies or "northern" RED-TAILED HAWK. There were many
with lighter markings which is the borealis subspecies that nests here and
is our "eastern" RED-TAILED HAWK. This is kind of backwards since "boreal"
usually means north!

In any event, this is a neat place to study RED-TAILED HAWKS since there
are so many here!  I have seen a few abieticola subspecies in Broome County
but there seemed to be at least several here.

There was also a large flock of EUROPEAN STARLINGs of which I found 4
BROWN-HEADED COWBIRDS. They are not rare but neat to see in winter.  I also
enjoyed seeing the many TURKEY VULTURES, again not rare here, but quite
rare in Broome County in winter. I didn't see any BLACK VULTURES which are
being seen here regularly.

I didn't go to the compost piles opting to stay on Stevenson road.

Best,
Dave Nicosia
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[cayugabirds-l] Red-Tailed Hawk borealis vs abieticola subspecies Stevenson Road Game Farm Today?

2021-01-23 Thread david nicosia
All, 
I spent some time watching the numerous RED-TAILED HAWKs on Stevenson Road over 
the Game Farm. Two subspecies (I believe) were present (see photos in ebird 
report).  
https://ebird.org/checklist/S79764223

I noticed much darker markings on some RED-TAILED HAWKs which I believe is the 
abieticola subspecies or "northern" RED-TAILED HAWK. There were many with 
lighter markings which is the borealis subspecies that nests here and is our 
"eastern" RED-TAILED HAWK. This is kind of backwards since "boreal" usually 
means north!   

In any event, this is neat place to study RED-TAILED HAWKS since there are so 
many here!  I have seen a few abieticola subspecies in Broome County but there 
seemed to be at least several here. 
There was also a large flock of EUROPEAN STARLINGs of which I found 4 
BROWN-HEADED COWBIRDS. They are not rare but neat to see in winter.  I also 
enjoyed seeing the many TURKEY VULTURES, again not rare here, but quite rare in 
Broome County in winter. I didn't see any BLACK VULTURES which are being seen 
here regularly. 
I didn't go to the compost piles opting to stay on Stevenson road. 

Best,Dave Nicosia
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Re: [cayugabirds-l] New Mexico Mass Motality

2020-09-23 Thread david nicosia
 Respectfully, please stop blaming this on climate change. This is weather, not 
climate. Rapid swings in temperature are actually common in the western/central 
U.S. This one just happened at a bad time for birds. The records are full of 
major temperature changes in the western U.S and Plains since records have been 
kept back to the 1800s. Nothing is different now in that regard.  The climate 
hasn't warmed enough to preclude severe cold air outbreaks or severe winters. 
They are getting less frequent because of global warming but they still DO 
occur. What I am saying is that if the Earth didn't warm we would still see 
such cold air outbreaks and they probably would be a little more frequent. 


On Wednesday, September 23, 2020, 04:01:07 PM EDT, Peg Burlew 
 wrote:  
 
 Hi All, 

I think it’s best to refer to it as “global climate change.”  Perhaps more 
descriptive of what is going on. The climate change deniers love to pounce on 
the term “global warming” whenever a severe cold front occurs.  In their eyes 
this is proof it’s not “warming.” Just saying...

Peg Burlew

Sent from my iPhone

> On Sep 17, 2020, at 11:49 AM, John Luther Cisne  
> wrote:
> 
> cold for s
  
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Re: [cayugabirds-l] New Mexico Mass Motality

2020-09-17 Thread David Nicosia
lame has been reduced enough that the water is no longer boiling,
> but it’s in a steady state where there are steam bubbles forming on the
> bottom which disappear before reaching the surface.
>
> The source of heat is the flame below, analogous to the sun. The heat, via
> the water, eventually goes into the room, our equivalent of outer space. If
> you look down at the water you should be able to see places on the surface
> where there are upwellings of warmer water rising. The water doesn’t rise
> everywhere at once, and the water is descending in between where it is
> rising. The pot itself is like the surface of the earth, warmer right over
> the flame (where sunlight is direct and prolonged) and cooler at the rim
> (everywhere else). The movements of water in the pot are like the weather
> on earth. The heat comes in, it gets moved around by the weather in a
> general pattern with lots of smaller scale differences, and the heat
> leaves, while the overall temperature remains fairly even.
>
> Now, suppose that, without changing the low flame, you partially cover the
> pot with a lid. It’s now a bit more difficult for the heat to escape, so
> the water temperature rises to a new stable level, and you may even get the
> water to boil again without increasing the flame. Also those convection
> currents in the water get stronger - both the hot currents going one
> direction and cooler currents going the other direction.
>
> The lid partially covering the pot is the equivalent of adding greenhouse
> gases to our atmosphere. The result is a warmer average temperature, and
> also stronger weather patterns, both warm winds and cold winds, and
> stronger storms (with lots of  water evaporating, condensing, freezing &
> melting) helping to redistribute heat as well. What happens at any
> particular location on earth is apt to be different from previous patterns,
> more extreme, more violent, and more variable. We can’t rely as much on our
> reassuring decades of weather records (the previous climate for any
> location) for what to expect anymore, because we have changed the
> atmosphere so that the system is more energetic.
>
> As a reward to birders who slogged through my weather & climate
> paragraphs, and as a distraction from the terrible migrant mortality out
> west, and as an attempt to redeem an otherwise non-bird post:
>
> An adult Junco showed up at my feeders yesterday and today, which to me is
> a sign of autumn. An immature junco was briefly here at the end of August
> in a streaky gray plumage which my 2nd edition Sibley guide did not depict.
>
> A male Rose-breasted Grosbeak first showed up at my feeders on 24 August
> and I assume it’s the same bird I’ve seen several times since, including
> today. He has been molting into a plumage which, again, my 2nd edition
> Sibley guide did not depict.
>
> - - Dave Nutter
>
> On Sep 16, 2020, at 8:41 PM, John Luther Cisne 
> wrote:
>
> Record cold over North America is indeed consistent with global warming.
> It is a regional consequence of the global phenomenon.
>
>
>
> To explain it simply (as I was supposed to do in the elementary course I
> taught of years and years, “Evolution of the Earth and Life”), the
> principle of the thing is that Arctic Basin warms not only by importing
> warm air from the south, mainly over oceans, but also by exporting cold air
> to the south, mainly over continents.  Export of air from the north makes
> space for import of air from the south, so to speak.  For now, at least,
> the export of cold air from the Arctic is concentrated over North America.
>
>
>
> Certain of my colleagues in the Department Earth and Atmospheric Sciences
> will be able to give everyone a far better and more detailed explanation.
>
>
>
>
>
> *From: * on behalf of "Kevin
> J. McGowan" 
> *Reply-To: *"Kevin J. McGowan" 
> *Date: *Wednesday, September 16, 2020 at 8:03 PM
> *To: *david nicosia , Peter Saracino <
> petersarac...@gmail.com>, Jody Enck 
> *Cc: *"atvaw...@gmail.com" , CAYUGABIRDS-L <
> cayugabird...@list.cornell.edu>
> *Subject: *RE: [cayugabirds-l] New Mexico Mass Motality
>
>
>
> “Record cold of this magnitude is not consistent with global warming. “
>
>
>
> Why not? Global warming doesn’t mean warming happens all over the globe
> evenly. I’ve been watching our area in the northeast for the last decade,
> thinking mostly about Snowy Owl incursions, and I’ve noticed strange
> changes in the distribution of cold across the arctic, perhaps changes in
> the “polar vortex” that seem to isolate the NE as a cold spot while Alaska
> warms up. The last ten years have shown Ithaca regularly with winter
> tempe

Re: [cayugabirds-l] New Mexico Mass Motality

2020-09-16 Thread david nicosia
 Let's get back to birds. This is a birding listserve. I have studied this at 
length and disagree. I do believe in man-made global warming but I don't 
believe it causes record cold. The climate has warmed 1C so we still can see 
record cold with our current climate. The frequency is less though, not more. 
Most meteorologists I know also don't agree that record cold is consistent with 
global warming. Some climatologists do.  If you want to discuss further, please 
direct the emails offline and not on the entire listserve.  I would be happy to 
discuss this issue (again offline) with the Dept Atmospheric Science folks at 
Cornell too if you want. I know most of them well. They are good people and 
also very intelligent. 
BestDave Nicosia
On Wednesday, September 16, 2020, 08:41:37 PM EDT, John Luther Cisne 
 wrote:  
 
 
Record cold over North America is indeed consistent with global warming.  It is 
a regional consequence of the global phenomenon. 
 
  
 
To explain it simply (as I was supposed to do in the elementary course I taught 
of years and years, “Evolution of the Earth and Life”), the principle of the 
thing is that Arctic Basin warms not only by importing warm air from the south, 
mainly over oceans, but also by exporting cold air to the south, mainly over 
continents.  Export of air from the north makes space for import of air from 
the south, so to speak.  For now, at least, the export of cold air from the 
Arctic is concentrated over North America.  
 
  
 
Certain of my colleagues in the Department Earth and Atmospheric Sciences will 
be able to give everyone a far better and more detailed explanation.
 
  
 
  
 
From:  on behalf of "Kevin J. 
McGowan" 
Reply-To: "Kevin J. McGowan" 
Date: Wednesday, September 16, 2020 at 8:03 PM
To: david nicosia , Peter Saracino 
, Jody Enck 
Cc: "atvaw...@gmail.com" , CAYUGABIRDS-L 

Subject: RE: [cayugabirds-l] New Mexico Mass Motality
 
  
 
“Record cold of this magnitude is not consistent with global warming. “
 
 
 
Why not? Global warming doesn’t mean warming happens all over the globe evenly. 
I’ve been watching our area in the northeast for the last decade, thinking 
mostly about Snowy Owl incursions, and I’ve noticed strange changes in the 
distribution of cold across the arctic, perhaps changes in the “polar vortex” 
that seem to isolate the NE as a cold spot while Alaska warms up. The last ten 
years have shown Ithaca regularly with winter temperatures lower than Nome, 
Alaska. That isn’t right. 
 
 
 
Global warming at the poles doesn’t mean every place warms up, it means that 
the consistencies of weather patterns we could count on could be disrupted. 
Colder Ithaca winters and heat waves in Alaska are totally consistent with a 
global warming scenario. Freak arctic blasts into the rockies while the north 
pole melts also points to something freakishly abnormal happening, totally 
consistent with global warming.
 
 
 
Kevin
 
 
 
 
 
From: bounce-124948138-3493...@list.cornell.edu 
On Behalf Of david nicosia
Sent: Wednesday, September 16, 2020 7:46 PM
To: Peter Saracino ; Jody Enck 
Cc: atvaw...@gmail.com; CAYUGABIRDS-L 
Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] New Mexico Mass Motality
 
 
 
The western U.S has a history of extreme temperature changes. This event ranks 
number 3 for the biggest temperature swing in history and it occurred during 
fall migration. Most of the other big swings in temperature
 
occurred in the winter. What is dramatic is how cold it got and the early snows 
that fell. Temperatures in parts of the Rockies fell to 9F with winds over 50 
mph. That is insanely cold for so early in the season. The Arctic high pressure 
that came across the Rockies has denser and heavier air which flows downslope 
into California, and Oregon warming by compression leading to high winds and 
VERY dry conditions. This fuels the tremendous fires.  So in a sense it is the 
brutal unseasonable cold air that is the real cause of the conditions that 
caused the fires. I assume the fires, combined with temperatures in the 80, 90s 
and 100s dropping to the teens 20s and 30s in many areas in the Rockies with 
early snows was too much for many birds to handle causing the high mortality 
rates. I have read that people are blaming climate change on this. I don't see 
it because it is the intense cold that really fueled the fires in CA and OR and 
probably had a negative effect on the birds. Record cold of this magnitude is 
not consistent with global warming. 
 
 
 
 
 
On Wednesday, September 16, 2020, 05:18:09 PM EDT, Jody Enck 
 wrote:
 
 
 
 
 
Thank, Pete, for passing along the Guardian article.  Additional information 
has been forthcoming recently.  Hypotheses include movements related to smoky 
conditions in some states, coupled with those weird temperature swings recorded 
last week (90 to 100 F one day and below freezing, with snow, the next day).  
Seems less likely to be a nefarious even (e.g., poisoning) than

Re: [cayugabirds-l] New Mexico Mass Motality

2020-09-16 Thread david nicosia
 I have to jump in here. Sorry. When it is warmer in Nome Alaska than Ithaca NY 
the jet stream has a very high amplitude. Waves with high amplitude have a lot 
of energy. The jet stream derives its energy from the temperature differences 
from polar regions to the midlatitudes and subtropics. Stronger temperature 
differences lead to high amplitude patterns. So it is the intense cold at high 
latitudes that leads to stronger high amplitude patterns that dump cold air 
down here. We saw such patterns in the 1960s and 1970s too a globally cool 
period. Canada was actually quite cold last winter so we had an highly 
amplified jet stream that deposited record cold in the central U.S.  A warmer 
Canada doesn't lead to cold polar vortexes displaced south. The cold originates 
from the Arctic and Canada and becomes so expansive that it reaches our 
latitude. There also have been many instances where is can get warmer in Alaska 
and colder in the east because of a high amplitude jet stream. The brutal 
winter of 1976-77 saw record heat in Alaska in January. This happens more than 
you think. 
The cold that hit the Rockies this September originated over the land in 
northern Canada. It was clear and strong radiational cooling caused it. Global 
warming from greenhouse gases would have modified this air mass enough to 
lessen the extreme cold. It didn't happen. The cooling "power" of the land 
masses of the high latitudes remains intense. We don't get a lot of bitter cold 
air from the Arctic ocean. Its Alaska,and northern Canada where we get our cold 
from. 
On Wednesday, September 16, 2020, 08:03:46 PM EDT, Kevin J. McGowan 
 wrote:  
 
 
“Record cold of this magnitude is not consistent with global warming. “
 
  
 
Why not? Global warming doesn’t mean warming happens all over the globe evenly. 
I’ve been watching our area in the northeast for the last decade, thinking 
mostly about Snowy Owl incursions, and I’ve noticed strange changes in the 
distribution of cold across the arctic, perhaps changes in the “polar vortex” 
that seem to isolate the NE as a cold spot while Alaska warms up. The last ten 
years have shown Ithaca regularly with winter temperatures lower than Nome, 
Alaska. That isn’t right. 
 
  
 
Global warming at the poles doesn’t mean every place warms up, it means that 
the consistencies of weather patterns we could count on could be disrupted. 
Colder Ithaca winters and heat waves in Alaska are totally consistent with a 
global warming scenario. Freak arctic blasts into the rockies while the north 
pole melts also points to something freakishly abnormal happening, totally 
consistent with global warming.
 
  
 
Kevin
 
  
 
  
 
From: bounce-124948138-3493...@list.cornell.edu 
On Behalf Of david nicosia
Sent: Wednesday, September 16, 2020 7:46 PM
To: Peter Saracino ; Jody Enck 
Cc: atvaw...@gmail.com; CAYUGABIRDS-L 
Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] New Mexico Mass Motality
 
  
 
The western U.S has a history of extreme temperature changes. This event ranks 
number 3 for the biggest temperature swing in history and it occurred during 
fall migration. Most of the other big swings in temperature
 
occurred in the winter. What is dramatic is how cold it got and the early snows 
that fell. Temperatures in parts of the Rockies fell to 9F with winds over 50 
mph. That is insanely cold for so early in the season. The Arctic high pressure 
that came across the Rockies has denser and heavier air which flows downslope 
into California, and Oregon warming by compression leading to high winds and 
VERY dry conditions. This fuels the tremendous fires.  So in a sense it is the 
brutal unseasonable cold air that is the real cause of the conditions that 
caused the fires. I assume the fires, combined with temperatures in the 80, 90s 
and 100s dropping to the teens 20s and 30s in many areas in the Rockies with 
early snows was too much for many birds to handle causing the high mortality 
rates. I have read that people are blaming climate change on this. I don't see 
it because it is the intense cold that really fueled the fires in CA and OR and 
probably had a negative effect on the birds. Record cold of this magnitude is 
not consistent with global warming. 
 
  
 
  
 
On Wednesday, September 16, 2020, 05:18:09 PM EDT, Jody Enck 
 wrote:
 
  
 
  
 
Thank, Pete, for passing along the Guardian article.  Additional information 
has been forthcoming recently.  Hypotheses include movements related to smoky 
conditions in some states, coupled with those weird temperature swings recorded 
last week (90 to 100 F one day and below freezing, with snow, the next day).  
Seems less likely to be a nefarious even (e.g., poisoning) than something more 
likely caused by challenging environmental factors.
 
  
 
I hope more information comes out soon.
 
 

 
Jody W. Enck, PhD
 
Conservation Social Scientist, and
 
Founder of the Sister Bird Club Network
 
607-379-5940
 
  
 
  
 
On Wed, Sep 16, 2020 at 5:03 PM Pete

Re: [cayugabirds-l] New Mexico Mass Motality

2020-09-16 Thread david nicosia
 The western U.S has a history of extreme temperature changes. This event ranks 
number 3 for the biggest temperature swing in history and it occurred during 
fall migration. Most of the other big swings in temperatureoccurred in the 
winter. What is dramatic is how cold it got and the early snows that fell. 
Temperatures in parts of the Rockies fell to 9F with winds over 50 mph. That is 
insanely cold for so early in the season. The Arctic high pressure that came 
across the Rockies has denser and heavier air which flows downslope into 
California, and Oregon warming by compression leading to high winds and VERY 
dry conditions. This fuels the tremendous fires.  So in a sense it is the 
brutal unseasonable cold air that is the real cause of the conditions that 
caused the fires. I assume the fires, combined with temperatures in the 80, 90s 
and 100s dropping to the teens 20s and 30s in many areas in the Rockies with 
early snows was too much for many birds to handle causing the high mortality 
rates. I have read that people are blaming climate change on this. I don't see 
it because it is the intense cold that really fueled the fires in CA and OR and 
probably had a negative effect on the birds. Record cold of this magnitude is 
not consistent with global warming. 

On Wednesday, September 16, 2020, 05:18:09 PM EDT, Jody Enck 
 wrote:  
 
 Thank, Pete, for passing along the Guardian article.  Additional information 
has been forthcoming recently.  Hypotheses include movements related to smoky 
conditions in some states, coupled with those weird temperature swings recorded 
last week (90 to 100 F one day and below freezing, with snow, the next day).  
Seems less likely to be a nefarious even (e.g., poisoning) than something more 
likely caused by challenging environmental factors.
I hope more information comes out soon. 
Jody W. Enck, PhDConservation Social Scientist, andFounder of the Sister Bird 
Club Network607-379-5940

On Wed, Sep 16, 2020 at 5:03 PM Peter Saracino  wrote:

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2020/sep/16/birds-falling-out-of-the-sky-in-mass-die-off-in-south-western-us-aoe


On Tue, Sep 15, 2020, 6:47 PM Tom  wrote:

I just learned of the mass mortality of migrating birds in New Mexico.  I read 
a CNN report.  Is there any new information on the cause?  They’re talking 
hundreds of thousands, even millions.

Tom V

Sent from my iPhone


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[nysbirds-l] Radar showing large nocturnal flight tonight in NY

2020-09-14 Thread David Nicosia
All,

Radars in NY state are exploding with bird echoes after sunset. These are
the biggest radar migration signatures I have seen so far this fall.
Tomorrow could be really good. Hope you can get out there.

All the best and stay safe!

Dave Nicosia

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[nysbirds-l] Atlas Moment : Swainson's Thrush Probable Breeder New Michigan SF priority block.

2020-07-09 Thread David Nicosia
I refound both singing Swainsons Thrushes CCC Truck Rd west of North Rd New
Michigan SF.  Birds were counter singing by the big clearing where Jay
McGowan and Livia Santana had them June 21.  The habitat was more northern
hardwood hemlock with scattered Norway spruce.  Both birds were near a
fairly big clearing. This is a departure from what I have seen in the past.
Usually I found this species in deep dark Norway spruce stands.  That's
where I have been looking a lot to no avail this year.  In the past, at New
Michigan SF, they were found in such habitat.  Why the change?  Predation
pressure?  In the past, I did notice this species was distributed in some
spruce stands and absent in others.  Very spotty.  For this BBA I have been
focusing on documenting this species in Chenango County, a stronghold
outside the Adirondacks, Catskills and Allegheny Mtns in NY.  There seems
to be good habitat in the high elevations in southern Madison, southern
Onondaga, Cortland, and southeast Cayuga counties. It would be neat to find
them in these areas too.  Anyway just a quick atlas email on the
difficulties of finding breeders and how a group of birders and
perseverance helps.  We now are up to probable breeder for SWTH in a
priority block.  Gotta get that confirmed next!!

Best
Dave Nicosia

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[cayugabirds-l] Singing Swainson's Thrush New Michigan State Forest Chenango Co.: Finally

2020-06-21 Thread David Nicosia
All,

I did some atlasing early this morning and I heard my first singing
SWAINSON'S THRUSH on my atlas block which encompasses a good portion of New
Michigan State Forest. In the past I usually got there by mid morning or
sometimes birded in the evening. I decided to try getting there before
sunrise which for me meant an early start.  I left my house at 4 am and got
there around 450 am. Wow, what a dawn chorus! I checked all locations with
intact deep spruce forest and got all the usual warblers that I have
mentioned before and had VEERY, HERMIT THRUSH and WOOD THRUSHES singing
loudly, sometimes all within earshot. This was very nice except no
SWAINSON's.  Later in the morning around 7 to 730 am I was on the CCC truck
trail driving through the beginning of the tornado ravaged area and I heard
a SWAINSON'S THRUSH in full song!  The bird was singing outside the main
contiguous NORWAY SPRUCE stand in a patch of regrown spruce and aspen that
probably was about 20-25 feet high or so. It was very thick in there.  I
didn't expect this but referring to Cornell's Lab of Ornithology's Birds of
the World on SWTH"*Described as a bird of mature forests (86, 87), but
other studies show equal or higher densities in early-successional habitat,
particularly closed-canopy plantations (80, 81, 88)..."  *I didn't know
this. This is such a great resource by the way.  Anyway, I managed a poor
quality recording with my cell phone. Bird was singing close but my phone's
audio recording abilities are pretty bad. See
https://ebird.org/atlasny/checklist/S70663930   I certainly hope this
species will persist up here...

Dave Nicosia

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[cayugabirds-l] More Chenango Co Birding- Northern Goshawk and Warblers

2020-06-05 Thread David Nicosia
All,

I went to two more atlas blocks in Chenango Co today. The first I will not
disclose the location because I stumbled upon a NORTHERN GOSHAWK.  I trust
all people on these listservs but you never know if there is someone
trolling the web and the NOGO is a sensitive species. I was listening for
red crossbills and swainson's thrush in a dense Norway Spruce forest, of
which I found neither, when I heard the sharp calls of the Northern
Goshawk. I started to high tail down the trail to my car as I know these
birds can attack. Plus I didn't want to disturb them. When it stopped
calling, I looked back and it was perched on a horizontal branch in a
Norway Spruce in plain view, probably 150 yards or so away. I got great
views of this spectacular bird but only spent a little time watching so as
to not disturb further. I presume there was a nest given the behavior but I
didn't look for it and only saw the one bird. The other atlas block I did
was Beaver Meadows State Forest and had no NOGO encounters there.

In total, I travelled about 10 miles through mainly mixed forests of
northern hardwoods, white and red pine, hemlock and of course large plots
of almost pure mature Norway Spruce. Again, like New Michigan Forest and
vicinity, aside from the OVENBIRD, BLACKBURNIAN WARBLERS were the most
abundant warbler.  I had 58 birds in about 10 miles with 56 singing males
and 2 females. OVENBIRDS and RED-EYED VIREOS are the two most abundant
birds even in deep coniferous forest. I had 66 RED-EYED VIREOS, and 73
OVENBIRDS. It was also midday so I believe some birds likely weren't
singing.

I still haven't been able to come up with any RED CROSSBILLS or a singing
SWAINSON'S THRUSH yet and the habitat was really good for both. I know my
hearing is still good because I can get both blackburnian warblers and
golden-crowned kinglets singing from my car with the engine running up to
20 mph. I also know the calls for both RECR and SWTH very well. They have
got to be up there somewhere.  The DEC has done some management and logging
but not as much as New Michigan State Forest.  Because of the logging in a
few spots there were decent numbers of MOURNING WARBLERS. I counted 16
singing males. Hopefully I will be able to find nesting SWAINSON'S THRUSH
and RED CROSSBILLS for this atlas in Chenango County. My list is below
which is a total of all species and numbers for both atlas blocks and some
travel in between.

Summary
  Jun 5
Number of Species 62 -- -- -- -- -- --
Number of Individuals 667 -- -- -- -- -- --
Number of Checklists 3 -- -- -- -- -- --

Total Number of Birds Show Sample Size
*Species Name* Jun 5
Wood Duck 1 -- -- -- -- -- --
Ruffed Grouse 1 -- -- -- -- -- --
Ruby-throated Hummingbird 2 -- -- -- -- -- --
Northern Goshawk 1 -- -- -- -- -- --
Broad-winged Hawk 3 -- -- -- -- -- --
Red-tailed Hawk 1 -- -- -- -- -- --
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker 5 -- -- -- -- -- --
Hairy Woodpecker 2 -- -- -- -- -- --
Pileated Woodpecker 1 -- -- -- -- -- --
Northern Flicker 1 -- -- -- -- -- --
Eastern Wood-Pewee 11 -- -- -- -- -- --
Alder Flycatcher 3 -- -- -- -- -- --
Least Flycatcher 7 -- -- -- -- -- --
Eastern Phoebe 2 -- -- -- -- -- --
Eastern Kingbird 1 -- -- -- -- -- --
Blue-headed Vireo 13 -- -- -- -- -- --
Red-eyed Vireo 66 -- -- -- -- -- --
Blue Jay 30 -- -- -- -- -- --
American Crow 1 -- -- -- -- -- --
Black-capped Chickadee 32 -- -- -- -- -- --
Tree Swallow 1 -- -- -- -- -- --
Barn Swallow 3 -- -- -- -- -- --
Golden-crowned Kinglet 18 -- -- -- -- -- --
Red-breasted Nuthatch 15 -- -- -- -- -- --
White-breasted Nuthatch 5 -- -- -- -- -- --
Brown Creeper 18 -- -- -- -- -- --
House Wren 1 -- -- -- -- -- --
Winter Wren 7 -- -- -- -- -- --
European Starling 4 -- -- -- -- -- --
Gray Catbird 7 -- -- -- -- -- --
Veery 8 -- -- -- -- -- --
Hermit Thrush 3 -- -- -- -- -- --
Wood Thrush 4 -- -- -- -- -- --
American Robin 11 -- -- -- -- -- --
Cedar Waxwing 27 -- -- -- -- -- --
Purple Finch 5 -- -- -- -- -- --
American Goldfinch 4 -- -- -- -- -- --
Dark-eyed Junco 17 -- -- -- -- -- --
White-throated Sparrow 6 -- -- -- -- -- --
Song Sparrow 3 -- -- -- -- -- --
Swamp Sparrow 1 -- -- -- -- -- --
Eastern Towhee 5 -- -- -- -- -- --
Bobolink 10 -- -- -- -- -- --
Eastern Meadowlark 1 -- -- -- -- -- --
Red-winged Blackbird 6 -- -- -- -- -- --
Ovenbird 73 -- -- -- -- -- --
Northern Waterthrush 1 -- -- -- -- -- --
Nashville Warbler 1 -- -- -- -- -- --
Mourning Warbler 16 -- -- -- -- -- --
Common Yellowthroat 32 -- -- -- -- -- --
Hooded Warbler 2 -- -- -- -- -- --
American Redstart 3 -- -- -- -- -- --
Magnolia Warbler 19 -- -- -- -- -- --
Blackburnian Warbler 58 -- -- -- -- -- --
Chestnut-sided Warbler 41 -- -- -- -- -- --
Black-throated Blue Warbler 13 -- -- -- -- -- --
Pine Warbler 4 -- -- -- -- -- --
Yellow-rumped Warbler 6 -- -- -- -- -- --
Black-throated Green Warbler 7 -- -- -- -- -- --
Canada Warbler 7 -- -- -- -- -- --
Scarlet Tanager 7 -- -- -- -- -- --
Rose-breasted Grosbeak 3 -- -- -- -- -- --

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[cayugabirds-l] New Michigan State Forest Pharsalia, NY Chenango County Today 5/26/20

2020-05-26 Thread David Nicosia
All,

I went 12.5 miles in and around New Michigan State Forest Pharsalia, NY
today focusing on the large stands of norway spruce forests. I also checked
out areas with native balsam fir and red spruce too , the tornado paths,
and cutover areas.   I went generally between 1 and 2 miles per list to
stay within BBA blocks. I also birded a lot from my car with engine running
at times so I may have missed a few birds.

Highlights: some incredible numbers of warblers, and vireos. On a couple
lists I just estimated (conservatively) and in others I did my best not to
double count. I was saddened to only get 1 swainson's thrush here and it
was calling, not singing.  I am concerned that with the 2011 tornado damage
and the DEC logging and management program, they are disappearing from this
place. Also it is possible that some of these numbers below are still
migrants so I suppose more SWTH are on the way but that seems doubtful. I
did have a couple blackpolls, and 1 bay-breasted warbler. The bay-breasted
warbler was singing in a red spruce woodland with tree height probably no
more than 30 feet. Probably a migrant but I will be back to check for the
BBA. I also didn't get any red crossbills which was disappointing too. I am
sure they are around but I just missed them.

My full list is below which is the total number of mainly singing males
that I heard.

Some notable numbers in 12.5 miles:
102 red-eyed vireos
41 blue-headed vireos
43 golden-crowned kinglets
46 dark-eyed juncos
31 white-throated sparrows (mostly in cutover or tornado damaged areas)
166 ovenbirds!
24 mourning warblers (again in cutover or tornado damaged areas)
69 Magnolia warblers
120 blackburnian warblers-  this species is amazingly abundant in these
forests even patches of spruces left behind from the logging.
81 chestnut-sided warblers
42 Black-throated blue warblers (mainly in areas with clearings both
deciduous and conifers)
14 canada wartblers- again in clearings, cutover areas etc.

Full list is below from ebird from 9 separate checklists, 58 species.


May 26
Number of Species 58 -- -- -- -- -- --
Number of Individuals 1,160 -- -- -- -- -- --
Number of Checklists 9 -- -- -- -- -- --

Total Number of Birds Show Sample Size
*Species Name* May 26
Turkey Vulture 1 -- -- -- -- -- --
Red-shouldered Hawk 1 -- -- -- -- -- --
Broad-winged Hawk 4 -- -- -- -- -- --
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker 3 -- -- -- -- -- --
Hairy Woodpecker 2 -- -- -- -- -- --
Eastern Wood-Pewee 6 -- -- -- -- -- --
Alder Flycatcher 13 -- -- -- -- -- --
Least Flycatcher 2 -- -- -- -- -- --
Eastern Phoebe 4 -- -- -- -- -- --
Great Crested Flycatcher 2 -- -- -- -- -- --
Eastern Kingbird 1 -- -- -- -- -- --
Blue-headed Vireo 41 -- -- -- -- -- --
Warbling Vireo 1 -- -- -- -- -- --
Red-eyed Vireo 102 -- -- -- -- -- --
Blue Jay 17 -- -- -- -- -- --
American Crow 6 -- -- -- -- -- --
Common Raven 16 -- -- -- -- -- --
Black-capped Chickadee 32 -- -- -- -- -- --
Tree Swallow 1 -- -- -- -- -- --
Golden-crowned Kinglet 43 -- -- -- -- -- --
Red-breasted Nuthatch 16 -- -- -- -- -- --
Brown Creeper 12 -- -- -- -- -- --
House Wren 1 -- -- -- -- -- --
Winter Wren 9 -- -- -- -- -- --
European Starling 3 -- -- -- -- -- --
Gray Catbird 8 -- -- -- -- -- --
Veery 8 -- -- -- -- -- --
Swainson's Thrush 1 -- -- -- -- -- --
Hermit Thrush 14 -- -- -- -- -- --
Wood Thrush 7 -- -- -- -- -- --
American Robin 20 -- -- -- -- -- --
Purple Finch 8 -- -- -- -- -- --
American Goldfinch 9 -- -- -- -- -- --
Chipping Sparrow 6 -- -- -- -- -- --
Dark-eyed Junco 46 -- -- -- -- -- --
White-throated Sparrow 31 -- -- -- -- -- --
Song Sparrow 6 -- -- -- -- -- --
Eastern Towhee 5 -- -- -- -- -- --
Bobolink 1 -- -- -- -- -- --
Red-winged Blackbird 6 -- -- -- -- -- --
Ovenbird 166 -- -- -- -- -- --
Black-and-white Warbler 10 -- -- -- -- -- --
Nashville Warbler 10 -- -- -- -- -- --
Mourning Warbler 24 -- -- -- -- -- --
Common Yellowthroat 51 -- -- -- -- -- --
American Redstart 2 -- -- -- -- -- --
Magnolia Warbler 69 -- -- -- -- -- --
Bay-breasted Warbler 1 -- -- -- -- -- --
Blackburnian Warbler 120 -- -- -- -- -- --
Chestnut-sided Warbler 81 -- -- -- -- -- --
Blackpoll Warbler 2 -- -- -- -- -- --
Black-throated Blue Warbler 42 -- -- -- -- -- --
Yellow-rumped Warbler 15 -- -- -- -- -- --
Black-throated Green Warbler 19 -- -- -- -- -- --
Canada Warbler 14 -- -- -- -- -- --
Scarlet Tanager 8 -- -- -- -- -- --
Rose-breasted Grosbeak 9 -- -- -- -- -- --
Indigo Bunting 2 -- -- -- -- -- --

Dave Nicosia

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[cayugabirds-l] Impressive Radar echoes this morning and other comments

2020-05-26 Thread David Nicosia
Our radar at Binghamton had very impressive radar returns of migrating
birds early  this morning.  I suspect a lot of arriving breeders and a
continuation of the later passerine migrants. Of interest, despite decent
southerly winds across much of the southern U.S east of the plains, the
radar returns are pretty much lacking or very light from roughly Delaware
to West Virginia to Illinois and points south. This looks to be the end of
the passerine spring migration and its approaching our area. I suspect by
the end of the week it will be largely over for us.

Yesterday I still had Blackpoll Warblers pretty much all over and, as I
write this, I have one singing really close!  Migrant blackburnian,
magnolia and black-throated green warblers are still around too. I haven't
seen any yellow-rumped warbler migrants lately just a few breeders here and
there. Red-eyed vireos are still increasing on their breeding grounds in
Broome as they arrived very late this year. I am waiting for my first
Philadelphia vireo (we have had a couple reports down here already). I
still haven't gotten the yellow-bellied flycatcher yet( I don't believe we
have had one reported in Broome yet).  I did have my first black-billed
cuckoo the other day and I am hearing one distant this morning from my
patio. Cedar waxwings have poured into the region the past few days with
flocks all over now.

Shorebird migration continues pretty much on schedule this spring as we had
our first semipalmated sandpiper yesterday. Is this because they don't rely
on arboreal insects which come out with leaves?

Some observations on numbers. This year, rose-breasted grosbeaks, gray
catbirds, eastern towhees, common yellowthroats, chestnut-sided warblers,
and veeries seem especially common. Ovenbirds are all over like usual. I
also have more wood thrushes than recent years. I have noticed increases in
black throated blue warblers too. Since many of these species like
undergrowth and edges I wonder if it is due to the loss of many ash trees?
We are seeing significant mortality in Broome County and lots of
undergrowth as a result. I wonder if this trend will continue. Our hemlocks
continue to be healthy despite the hemlock woolly adelgid.

Birds that I feel are scarcer than recent years,  house finch!  Its getting
hard to find this species locally. They are around but not like they used
to be.

Anyway its time to get birding  for the day. I hope many of you can get out
and enjoy the summery weather today. Tomorrow its over for me, back to
work!

Best,
Dave

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[cayugabirds-l] Prolonged Period of South Winds Tonight through Wednesday Night

2020-05-23 Thread David Nicosia
All,

Beginning tonight and lasting right through at least Wednesday night, we
will see  southerly winds in central NY. I expect a lot of nocturnal
migration each night. Temperatures also are expected to be in the 70s
Sunday and Monday and 80s Tuesday-Thursday. I can see a rapid period of
migration as birds hurry to get to their breeding grounds up north. The
weather is going to feel like summer Tuesday- Thursday, Humidity also will
come up to seasonal summer levels. I see a rapid leaf out of our trees. I
wouldn't be surprised if the neotropical passerines that nest north of
central NY are gone by Wed or Thurs.  Shorebird migration will pick up
significantly for our area as well.

Good luck, good birding and stay safe!
Dave Nicosia

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[cayugabirds-l] Delay in Migration

2020-05-21 Thread David Nicosia
All,

For the past few days there has been an upper level low pressure system
spinning about over the Ohio and Tennessee Valleys. This feature is cut off
from the main polar jet stream current which is flowing across Canada see
https://earth.nullschool.net/#current/wind/isobaric/250hPa/orthographic=-88.35,51.52,650
 The effect of this is rain south of NY from Ohio to the Carolinas. For the
past few mornings, I have looked at the radar echoes and our area and much
of the northeast U.S has seen modest radar echoes. BUT south of us, there
has been little migration as detected by radar. This mean there is a net
flux of birds *out of our area*. Indeed, I have noticed a major drop in
white-crowned sparrows and white-throated sparrows to a point that I have
none left at my feeders. A few days ago, they were abundant, especially
white-throated sparrows. Fortunately, forecast models show this upper level
low does get kicked out by another upper level feature by Saturday and then
the door opens up. From Sunday to Tuesday morning, there will be a nice
southwest flow in the lower atmosphere from the Gulf of Mexico up through
the Ohio Valley to the northeast with warmer temperatures.  Red-eyed vireos
are still not that common down here in Broome Co. and Scarlet tanagers are
not up to normal numbers yet! I suspect the rest of these and other later
common species will make their arrivals early next week.  I hope the later
migrant birds that breed north of us don't just overfly our area!  That
could happen...

This has been the slowest evolving May that I can remember going way back
to the 1990s. Temperatures at the Binghamton airport for May are averaging
5.4 degrees below normal. The leaves on our oak trees are really delayed
and just budding now and our maples down here in the southern tier are
finally started to show some light green. This is way behind normal years
where leaf out is rapid by now and almost complete.

Anyway, warmer times are ahead and I hope you all can get out and enjoy the
coming long weekend!
Best,
Dave Nicosia

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[cayugabirds-l] Slowest spring migration in a very long time Broome Co., flood gates of migration soon to open...

2020-05-12 Thread David Nicosia
All,

This spring season is the slowest evolving migration season that I can
remember in a long time in Broome Co. (20 years at least). I basically am
seeing the same warbler species that I had May 2-3: Black-throated blues,
greens, blackburnian, ovenbird, nashville, northern and louisiana
waterthrush, black and white, palm, prairie, yellow-rumped, blue-winged,
yellow, chestnut-sided, northern parula and american redstarts.  These
species arrived between May 1-5 and are still around and in most cases
really good numbers I am happy to say. Many of them are on their breeding
grounds now too.  Yesterday, May 11th, I had 102 species of birds in
Broome County with no new neotropical migrants which is crazy! I also had
102 species on May 3rd many of the same species!

Still lacking (or very scarce) in Broome Co. are: cape may, bay-breasted,
tennessee, hooded, magnolia, canada, wilson's, mourning and of course
blackpoll warblers. I still am not seeing very many indigo buntings yet,
just a few here and there. I have yet to get a scarlet tanager although
there are a few reports here and there in Broome co. Also lacking or very
scarce are red-eyed vireos. I have yet to get one with a few reports
trickling in sporadically from others. On the other hand, blue-headed
vireos are very common this year in Broome Co. Is it because they are not
be drowned out by the red-eyed vireo's incessant singing?

I have been off since May 2nd on my annual birding vacation and its like
the "groundhog day" of birding: same species different day. But it has been
a lot of fun with such great species that we have! I have seen and really
enjoyed blackburnian, black-throated blues and greens, prairie and others
numerous times with great views. I can't complain about that! Today I had a
close encounter with a blackburnian warbler. The bird was foraging fairly
low in a norway spruce tree at Greenwood Park in Broome co. I was very
still and the bird came within about 6 feet of me. It was neat watching the
warbler, naked eye, forage and finding small insects to eat on a windy and
bitter cold day. It was 38F with winds gusting to 25 mph at least. The bird
was also singing occasionally and didn't seem to care about the brutally
cold conditions. With the lack of leaves on the trees, I have gotten
spectacular views of many of these warbler species which often is not the
case as leaves unfold fast in more normal Mays.

After today May 12th, conditions in upstate NY are going to change. Warmer
weather is on the way and yes we are going to see southerly winds
especially Wednesday night and Thursday night and a few days next week. I
think migrants are going to arrive fast and furious so expect a very active
period from May 14-21 and even beyond for our beloved neotropical migrants.
I have noticed that our shorebird species are arriving pretty much on-time
and not really affected by the cold May. In any event, the next week to 10
days, I predict is going to be a lot of fun. I hope you can get out and
enjoy the finest time of the year!!

Best,
Dave Nicosia

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[cayugabirds-l] Weather for May 9th Global Big Day in central NY....not good news

2020-05-07 Thread David Nicosia
All,

I hate to be the bearer of bad news, but Saturday's weather is looking
downright awful.  We are looking at a record breaking cold air mass with
strong northwest winds and temperatures mainly in the 30s most of the day.
In addition, there will be off and on snow/rain showers which will reduce
visibility at times. The winds are going to be the worst averaging around
20 mph or more sustained w/ gust to 35 mph at times. The eastern and
southern shores of the Finger Lakes could see wind gusts of 45 mph or more.
With temperatures in the 30s most of the day, that equates to wind chill
temperatures in the low 20s.  If you want to bird the finger lakes you may
want to consider the western sides of the lakes.

See https://go.usa.gov/xvG7S  which is Ithaca's detailed NOAA forecast

I also did one for Montezuma since I know a lot folks like to bird the
complex...  https://go.usa.gov/xvGA3

The web page that allows you pick any point in the CONUS can be found
here https://www.weather.gov/forecastpoints   Go to this site, zoom and
click on the map of desired location or enter zipcode or name of town and
state. These forecasts are updated at least once per 3 hours or more.  Let
me know if you have questions. This is probably the best free weather site
for detailed forecast information from NOAA!

Best, good luck and bundle up!!!
Dave Nicosia

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[cayugabirds-l] Important- Contributing to the NY Breeding Bird Atlas Project via EBird.

2020-04-19 Thread david nicosia
All, 
The only way to contribute to the NY Breeding Bird Atlas is through the special 
NY BBA portal on ebird.  To do this, you must go into your ebird checklist(s) 
and in the upper right click on "Checklist Tools" and a drop down menu appears 
and you will see "change portal". Click on that and scroll down to find NY 
Breeding Bird Atlas III portal. Change the portal and you will be contributing 
to the BBA and also the main ebird database. A really good website on how to do 
all this and for your mobile app and computer can be found here. 
https://ebird.org/atlasny/about/submitting-data
To sign-up for a block go to this website: https://lab.nynhp.org/bba/  Left 
click on the block you are interested in and then click on request sign-up. 
Only the blocks in gray are available for you to be a principal atlaser. The 
role of the principal atlaser is to make sure over the next 5 breeding seasons 
that the following is completed for your block:    
   -
20+ hours of daytime birding

   -
2+ hours of nocturnal birding

   -
55-95+ species reported (highly variable throughout the state)

   -
50% of reported species marked as ‘Confirmed’

   -
Visits in 3+ times of year (e.g., April, June, July)

   -
All accessible habitats in a block are visited


IMPORTANT: Other birders can contribute to any block!! As a principal atlaser, 
you don't have to do it all nor should you. That is what is different this time 
around. Other birders who submit through the NYBBA portal are contributing. 
All you need to know about NY's BBAIII project can be found on this website: 
https://ebird.org/atlasny/about  I highly recommend looking through this. 
Any questions let me know. I would like to do more workshops and more 
importantly lead some BBA walks this June but we can't at this point due to 
COVID-19. I am trying to find the best way to do at least do more virtual 
workshops. 
Best and stay well,David NicosiaNY BBAIII Central Region Coordinator. 

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Re: [cayugabirds-l] The phoebe is back!

2020-03-26 Thread david nicosia
 Yep. We have had a few Phoebe reports in Broome Co. too. 
On Thursday, March 26, 2020, 09:01:55 AM EDT,  
wrote:  
 
 
The male phoebe ( or A male phoebe) just landed confidently on our deck railing 
and surveyed the yard!  We have had a pair nesting here for last three years 
and they love foraging off the fence and grabbing insects from the green woven 
wire. This bird looked like it was familiar with the fence and surround. 
Sent from my iPhone
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[cayugabirds-l] NY Breeding Bird Atlas III 2020-2025 information

2020-02-27 Thread David Nicosia
All,

First of all I want every one to know that any breeding bird atlas
question(s) that you have, please contact me via email.

Secondly, to contribute to the breeding bird atlas you need to use ebird
and be in the NY Breeding Bird Atlas portal. Both android and iphones have
an excellent ebird app that many of you probably use. You need to go into
the setup in the app to change to the  NY Breeding Bird Atlas portal.  If
you use ebird on a computer or laptop, you can also easily change to the NY
BBA portal.

Third if you want to sign up to lead the atlas effort in a priority block
go to this website  https://lab.nynhp.org/bba/  The blocks that are colored
purple are still available. Left click on the block you want and a small
window pops up. You will see "request sign-up". Click on this and a form
will open up which you fill out.

Most importantly, the NY breeding bird atlas ebird website has a ton of
information on atlasing, forms, etc. Please visit this site to learn more
https://ebird.org/atlasny/about

And lastly, in mid to late June, I am going to lead a Cayuga Bird Club
field trip to an atlas block in the basin and we will do altlasing.  This
will be a great opportunity to learn more about atlasing.

Thanks
Dave Nicosia
NY Breeding Bird Atlas III Central NY Coordinator

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[nysbirds-l] Black-Headed Gull southeast corner of Cayuga Lake Today

2020-02-09 Thread David Nicosia
see ebird list for photos and more details.

https://ebird.org/atlasny/checklist/S64270371

Best,
Dave Nicosia

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[cayugabirds-l] Black-headed Gull - credit where credit is due

2020-02-09 Thread David Nicosia
I have noticed a few ebird reports that state I found the BHGU. It was
Ken Kemphues
who originally found what he thought was a Bonaparte's gull. There were 5
of us, Ken, Diane Morton, Suzanne Giffin, myself and of course Bob McGuire
who was leading the field trip. After looking at bird we collectively began
thinking BHGU given the larger red bill, very red legs and lighter gray
mantle. Ken actually started this conversation.  Since the bird would be
such a mega rarity we wanted to be 100 percent sure. I sent a photo to Jay
McGowan who confirmed it for us. Since I had a decent photo I sent the RBA
out.  A great bird no doubt. A lifer for me!

Glad a lot of folks enjoyed it.  Hope it sticks around. Good birding to
all!!

Best,
Dave Nicosia

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[cayugabirds-l] Black headed gull se Cayuga Lake

2020-02-09 Thread David Nicosia
Bird is in water by ice edge just below East shore park now.  We are
looking at it from across from sewage plant.

Dave Nicosia

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Fwd: [cayugabirds-l] Varied Thrush in Candor

2020-01-02 Thread David Nicosia
-- Forwarded message -
From: Wes Blauvelt 
Date: Thu, Jan 2, 2020, 11:49 AM
Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Varied Thrush in Candor
To: David Nicosia 


Thanks Dave. I along with Adam Troyer staked our the location for about an
hour this morning. If the pin location is correct, the spot is along the
creek and in a public area that should not create privacy issues if
relocated. I’m placing my bets on Adam. Wes

On Thu, Jan 2, 2020 at 11:41 AM David Nicosia  wrote:

> No information at all
>
> On Thu, Jan 2, 2020, 10:50 AM Wes Blauvelt 
> wrote:
>
>> Hi Dave - Do you have anymore details on the location of the Varied
>> Thrush? I am at the eBird pin site, but no luck so far. Any information
>> would be appreciated. Wes Blauvelt
>>
>> On Wed, Jan 1, 2020 at 6:07 PM David Nicosia 
>> wrote:
>>
>>> I sent him an email. I have it from being an ebird reviewer for Tioga
>>> co.  I asked him to text or call me if he relocates it. I also asked if it
>>> would be ok to come by and try to relocate it.   I'll keep people posted.
>>>
>>> On Wed, Jan 1, 2020, 3:20 PM Lee Ann van Leer 
>>> wrote:
>>>
>>>> Anyone know if homeowner in Candor that posted to a FB group images of
>>>> Varied Thrush in his backyard in Candor is allowing visitors? I messaged
>>>> him through messenger but don’t know him personally. Mark Hollenbeck.
>>>>
>>>> Sent from my iPhone
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Fwd: [cayugabirds-l] Varied Thrush in Candor

2020-01-02 Thread David Nicosia
I have not received any information on varied thrush.  Wes Blauevelt is at
the exact location from ebird with no luck so far.

-- Forwarded message -
From: Wes Blauvelt 
Date: Thu, Jan 2, 2020, 10:50 AM
Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Varied Thrush in Candor
To: David Nicosia 


Hi Dave - Do you have anymore details on the location of the Varied Thrush?
I am at the eBird pin site, but no luck so far. Any information would be
appreciated. Wes Blauvelt

On Wed, Jan 1, 2020 at 6:07 PM David Nicosia  wrote:

> I sent him an email. I have it from being an ebird reviewer for Tioga co.
> I asked him to text or call me if he relocates it. I also asked if it would
> be ok to come by and try to relocate it.   I'll keep people posted.
>
> On Wed, Jan 1, 2020, 3:20 PM Lee Ann van Leer  wrote:
>
>> Anyone know if homeowner in Candor that posted to a FB group images of
>> Varied Thrush in his backyard in Candor is allowing visitors? I messaged
>> him through messenger but don’t know him personally. Mark Hollenbeck.
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone
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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Varied Thrush in Candor

2020-01-01 Thread David Nicosia
I sent him an email. I have it from being an ebird reviewer for Tioga co.
I asked him to text or call me if he relocates it. I also asked if it would
be ok to come by and try to relocate it.   I'll keep people posted.

On Wed, Jan 1, 2020, 3:20 PM Lee Ann van Leer  wrote:

> Anyone know if homeowner in Candor that posted to a FB group images of
> Varied Thrush in his backyard in Candor is allowing visitors? I messaged
> him through messenger but don’t know him personally. Mark Hollenbeck.
>
> Sent from my iPhone
> --
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[cayugabirds-l] American Crows calling after dark

2019-10-26 Thread David Nicosia
I had a fire in my burn pit this evening well after sunset in the dark. I
thought I heard a crow caw in the distance a few times. Then I was certain
as the bird came pretty close to my house overhead. There was other
american crows cawing at times too for at least an hour or so between 800
and 900 pm well after dark. They were not mobbing anything as they seemed
to be flying by singly. I couldn't ascertain direction but could they be
migrating at night? I don't believe I have ever heard a crow at night
before. anyone ever experience this?

Dave Nicosia

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Re: [cayugabirds-l] US population trends; time frame for bird study

2019-09-26 Thread David Nicosia
What's even more confusing is that 100 years ago there wasn't nearly the
forest cover locally. Is it possible that the small patches of woods that
were present back then were loaded with forest migrants so the perception
was many more birds(like the central park effect?)? It's hard to believe
that many of our local breeding forest birds were more common 100 years
with such a lack of habitat. Our field birds certainly have declined
tremendously as farmland and fields have reverted back to forest. It is
also confusing that DDT was banned in the early 1970s and numbers of birds
continued to drop. The loss of juncos has me baffled too. They are a very
adaptable species nesting in suburbs close to people now. They also like
openings in forests and forest edges. Maybe the maturation of the forests
has diminished their breeding habitats? Deer browsing understory could be
another cause I suppose. Same could be said for white-throated sparrows.
Forest dwelling birds like red-eyed vireos, blue-headed vireos, and various
warblers that are tree nesters are doing well according to BBS and banding
studies. Maybe its the maturation of our forests that is the cause of some
declines of other species and leading to increases in others. I don't see
how global warming would cause declines locally. Our summers really aren't
any warmer. Its the winters that are a few degrees warmer now which helps
many species like juncos, WT sparrows etc. So many questions and not a lot
of answers.


On Thu, Sep 26, 2019 at 2:13 PM Kevin J. McGowan  wrote:

> 1970 is used as the starting point because that was when the Breeding Bird
> Survey started taking data. Data on bird populations simply didn’t exist
> before that, with the exception of the Christmas Bird Count. The BBS was
> started partly in response to the perceived decline in birds already
> occurring.
>
>
>
> Kevin
>
>
>
> Kevin McGowan
>
>
>
> *From:* bounce-123961049-3493...@list.cornell.edu <
> bounce-123961049-3493...@list.cornell.edu> *On Behalf Of *Alicia
> *Sent:* Thursday, September 26, 2019 1:54 PM
> *To:* CAYUGABIRDS-L 
> *Subject:* Re: [cayugabirds-l] US population trends; time frame for bird
> study
>
>
>
> *Decrease in children per family*: In the 1970's, there were an average
> of 2.12 children per family, while from 2009-2018, the number had decreased
> to an average of 1.88 and is holding steady there - a decrease of over 11%
> . (For more info, check here
> .)
> The percentage of single child families doubled from 11% of all families in
> 1975 to 22% in 2016.  At this point, the birth rate alone is considerably
> less than replacement rate and even with the increase in longevity, the
> only reason the US population size is increasing is immigration.  (That is
> a factual, not a political, statement - for the record, I am not against
> immigration!)
>
> *When did the decline in bird population begin*? The effect of human
> population size and, particularly, habitat destruction and the changing
> chemistry of our soil, air, and water, surely have taken a huge toll on
> birds.  But in at least aspect of the new bird population study is
> misleading.  Its baseline is 1970, about 50 years ago, but speaking as
> someone who was in high school then and who learned from birders who were
> alive at the beginning of the 20th century, it is clear that at least
> spring migration already was had suffered a significant decline by 1970.
> One very reliable birder I got to know was born in 1905, and he assured me
> that by 1980, spring migration was a shadow of what it had been in the
> 1920s & 30s in Tompkins County.  He wondered if migratory routes had
> changed but said for whatever reason, there were only a fraction of the
> warblers, vireos, orioles, and tanagers moving through the area in the
> spring that there were 50 yrs before.  (This was a man who spent pretty
> much every waking hour of his 93 years being outdoors birding, fishing, or
> when he was younger hunting.)  Other people who had been around birding in
> the 1930s before told me much the same.
>
> If you check accounts in Birds By Bent you'll find supporting evidence for
> this in reports made at the time.  For example, a few years ago I had 25
> Palm Warblers in one group.  eBird was skeptical, but later when I checked
> Birds by Bent, there were several accounts of palm warbler flocks,
> including one from Wm Brewster (co-founder of the American
> Ornithologists' Union), writing from Massachusetts in 1906, who noted
> casually that in spring "one may often meet up with fifteen or twenty in a
> single flock or forty or fifty in the course of a morning walk."  I don't
> think any of us thinks of a walk that yields 50 Palm Warbler as a migration
> event that 'often' happens now.
>
> So as we think about this, we need to be careful not to assume that 1970
> was the beginning of the end, just because few of us around today 

Re: [cayugabirds-l] could someone explain the radar tonight?

2019-09-15 Thread David Nicosia
Birds are still moving despite south winds.

On Fri, Sep 13, 2019 at 9:36 PM Alicia  wrote:

> It looks like there is a significant radar bloom on the Binghamton radar
> that has expanded a bit over the past 90 minutes, yet according to
> windy.com, there are steady and significant south winds all over the
> east, and they get stronger at higher altitudes. That's consistent with
> what I feel in our yard.
>
> Are birds or insects moving?  If not, what's the bloom? If so, why not
> wait a few days for the north winds that area forecast for Monday &
> Tuesday?
>
> Thanks to any weather maven who can help!
>
> Alicia
>
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[nysbirds-l] Montezuma Knox-Marsellus Marsh Dike Walk Sun Sept 8th, 2019

2019-09-08 Thread David Nicosia
We had a smaller group today vs previous weeks, I counted 26 at one point.
This is no surprise given the Muckrace the day before. Nevertheless, we had
an excellent outing with still a nice group of shorebirds and an even
greater group of people.  We had all levels from beginner to advanced.
Many people got on life birds which was awesome!  There really wasn't
anything new for Knox-Marsellus that we could find. But we focused a lot on
shorebird and other species ID. A special thanks to Dave Nutter, who even
after doing the Muckrace the day before, came out and assisted in leading
part of the group.  All these weeks, Dave Nutter has been a fixture on
these walks either leading or assisting and they wouldn't be the same
without him! Thanks Dave!  I would like to thank Adrian Burke from
Binghamton University who also assisted in finding birds for the group.

We were fortunate to be joined by Dr.Ken Rosenberg and Dr. Adriaan M.
Dokter of the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.  I appreciate Ken's insights on
the details and life histories of our shorebirds and other species. Ken
went over the finer points of shorebird ID with BAIRD'S SANDPIPER,
LONG-BILLED vs SHORT-BILLED DOWITCHER, and several other species. He also
explained molting patterns, aging and other finer points. This was much
appreciated among the more advanced birders and beginners alike. Thanks
Ken!

Bird Highlights: nice views of BAIRD'S SANDPIPER, AMERICAN GOLDEN-PLOVER,
STILT SANDPIPERS, LONG BILLED DOWITCHERS, PECTORAL SANDPIPERS, and good
comparison views of LEAST and SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPERS, and GREATER vs
LESSER YELLOWLEGS. The AMERICAN WHITE PELICAN was still present and took
off right in front of us. The summering CANVASBACK was still present. We
had one thermal that had 2 BALD EAGLES, OSPREY, several TVs, a BROAD-WINGED
HAWK, and a monarch butterfly. Above these raptors (and butterfly) were a
load of migrating swallows which was really cool. We also saw thousands of
mainly red-winged blackbirds which was an awesome sight over the fields by
the mucklands.

Here is the list we complied.  https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S59615396

We didn't bird much in the woods. I know Dave Nutter had a group that got
on some warblers and I believe a red-eyed vireo in the woods at the
beginning that we didn't .

We had a long discussion on the difference between Long and Short-billed
Dowitcher in juvenile plumage. I have a nice photo of both species in an
ebird list that shows photos of both species in juvenile plumage that I
promised I would link. See this ebird list from a few week ago.
https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S59198143   The LBDO is third bird from
the right all photos. Rest are SBDOs.

This is the last of the shorebird walks this fall migration season. I would
like to thank Linda Ziemba for doing a nice job at managing Knox-Marsellus
Marsh for the shorebirds and Andrea Van Beusichem for advertising and
promoting these walks.

Best,
Dave Nicosia

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[cayugabirds-l] Guided Shorebird Walk Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge Sunday Sept 8th 7 am

2019-09-06 Thread David Nicosia
We will be doing another guided shorebird walk at Montezuma KM marsh this
coming Sunday September 8th. We will meet at the visitor's center at 7 am.
The dike between K-M marsh and Puddler's Marsh will be open to us. If folks
want to meet at the East Rd parking area that is fine too. The group will
arrive there by 715 am.

This will be the last of these guided shorebird walks of this "fall"
migration season.

As always bring water, snacks, insect repellent and sunscreen. Sunday looks
to be a bit cooler, with highs in the 60s. Morning temperatures in the 50s
with a northwest wind. Northerly winds next couple days should bring down
more migrants.

Any questions let me or Andrea Van Beusichem know (I cc'ed her on this
email).  Thanks to both Andrea and Linda Ziemba from Montezuma for
continuing this popular program.

Best,
Dave Nicosia

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[cayugabirds-l] 50+ American Golden-Plovers Montezuma Knox-Marsellus Marsh Today Aug 31 2019

2019-08-31 Thread David Nicosia
During our guided shorebird walk this morning, which was attended by 60-70
people, we had a large number of AMERICAN GOLDEN-PLOVERS flyover with some
landing. There were a few smaller flocks but I and others got on a larger
flock of medium sized shorebirds moderately high up. I was able to get my
scope on this flock and zoom to 70X and confirm AGPL.  The white patterning
on the top of the head down the neck was apparent and various molting
stages of black in the underbelly were apparent with light  anxillaries. I
counted only 27 but I was so focused on keeping the birds in my scope on
high power that I  underestimated my count. I found out later than someone
got a photo of this same flock and counted 40 at least!  There were
other occasions where Jay McGowan, I and others heard AGPLs overhead but
couldn't locate them. We did see a flock of 6 land and another 2.  Sum
total of the entire group was about 58. This is an ebird record for Seneca
County. Of course we also had many other great birds including a flyover
DICKCISSEL early calling, and many got on this bird, the continuing first
Cayuga Basin record immature WHITE IBIS, immature LAUGHING GULL and
AMERICAN WHITE PELICAN. I saw some lists with 92 species! Water levels are
down so mudflats and shorebird numbers were up. Big thanks to Josh
Snodgrass for leading today's walk and to all those who helped others get
on and ID birds. Also thanks to Linda Ziemba for doing such a great job
with the water levels at KM marsh which is attracting a lot of shorebirds.

Next Sunday September 8th 7 am is the last of these guided shorebird walks
on the dike at Knox Marsellus marsh for 2019. This year, by far, has had
the most attendance and we have see so many awesome birds. Thanks to the
folks at Montezuma who allow access to this birding gem. We had a large
diverse group of birders from professional down to folks who just
appreciate birds and nature. Everyone helped each other get on birds and
enjoyed the walk. Again, a great success that seems to be building more and
more each year!

Details for next week...meet at Montezuma Visitor's Center Sun Sept 8  7 am
(or at East Rd Overlook at 715 am). Bring water, snacks, sunscreen, bug
spray and your energy as we spend 4 to 6 hours on the dike. I will send
another reminder email out next week.

My list is here: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S59405265   I imagine
others will chime in as I really only touched upon the great birds we had
today.

Best
Dave Nicosia

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[cayugabirds-l] Shorebird Walk Today August 25th, 2019 Montezuma NWR

2019-08-25 Thread David Nicosia
All,

We had another very successful shorebird walk today Sunday August 25th along
the dike between Knox-Marsellus Marsh and Puddler’s marsh. Between 715 am
and 200 pm, we had a total of 70 people from different bird clubs around
the area. I began with the group mostly  from the Cayuga Bird Club. The
Rochester Birding Association and Rochester Young Birder’s club met up with
us around 9-10 am. I birded with these groups until around 2 pm as the
Cayuga Group left around noon.  This was the highest attendance I have ever
experienced with these shorebird walks. I would like to thank all those who
brought their expertise and assisted.  We were lucky to have some "world
class" birding talent with us from the Lab of O as Dave Nutter mentioned in
his email.  We also had many scopes which helped get people on birds. The
success was because of the cooperative effort of all. Thank you!

Now onto the birds…Rarities included continuing AMERICAN WHITE PELICAN in
the morning which took off before 10 am. LAUGHING GULL dropped back in with
the gulls in KM marsh during the early afternoon. As for shorebirds there
were more than I saw Friday. The habitat is getting better with more
mudflats than Friday. Thanks to Linda Ziemba who has worked to prepare the
habitat for shorebirds. Its working!

Ann Mitchell got on a BAIRD’S SANDPIPER, Dr. Shawn Billerman got on a
molting AMERICAN GOLDEN-PLOVER, and Dave Nutter found the first of several
STILT SANDPIPERS. There were many SHORT-BILLED DOWITCHERS, a few possible
LONG-BILLED candidates that no one could confirm. There were many
yellowlegs of both species with the GREATER outnumbering the LESSER. LEAST
and SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPERS were all over. We also had several PECTORAL
SANDPIPERS. Pat Martin and I got on a WHITE-RUMPED SANDPIPER that flew
fairly close to the dike near some dowitchers. The white rump in flight was
a give away. The bird was slate gray, longer than nearby SESAs, and primary
projection past tail.  This bird didn’t last long as it disappeared among a
bunch peeps that flew by. The BAIRD’S was re-found by Jay McGowan later in
the morning. Unfortunately we didn’t refind the White-rumped. There were
also 2 SPOTTED SANDPIPERS at the beginning of the canal and 1 BLACK-BELLIED
PLOVER in transitional plumage. Jay found a WILSON’S SNIPE in flight and we
had both KILLDEER and SEMIPALMATED PLOVERS. This makes 15 species of
shorebirds! Later with the Rochester Birding Group many of the shorebirds
came closer to the dike including the AMERICAN GOLDEN-PLOVER. This bird was
joined by another golden-plover. We had great views of these birds and
other of the above species. Unfortunately the BAIRD’S SANDPIPER was not
re-found this time.

Jay McGowan put together a comprehensive list that totaled 91 species which
can be found here…

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S59248832

I did my own list because I stayed later with the Rochester group until
about 2 pm. I totaled 75 species but had 4 additional species that were not
seen on Jay’s list. That makes at least 95 species!

My list is here…  https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S59252385

the birds I had in addition to the 91 species were the LAUGHING GULL(landed
on mudflat early afternoon), HAIRY WOODPECKER , BLUE JAY and NORTHERN
FLICKER  (woods by beginning of trail on way out early afternoon).  These
birds were heard only.

I was wondering if we could ever get to 100 species collectively and in the
coming weeks with passerine migration picking up, shorebirds still coming
through and of course waterfowl and waders I bet it will happen. There is
tremendous diversity in this marsh and these walks are so great in getting
people to learn about and appreciate our birds. Thanks again to Andrea and
Linda from Montezuma!

Best,

Dave Nicosia

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[nysbirds-l] Guided Shorebird Walk Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge Sunday Aug 25th 7 am

2019-08-23 Thread David Nicosia
All,

We will be doing another guided shorebird walk at Montezuma KM marsh this
coming Sunday August 25th. We will meet at the visitor's center at 7 am.
The dike between K-M marsh and Puddler's Marsh will be open to us. If folks
want to meet at the East Rd parking area that is fine too. The group will
arrive there by 715 am.

I got permission to scout KM marsh today and again there are a lot of
birds. There really isn't that many shorebirds, but AMERICAN WHITE PELICAN,
LAUGHING GULL and SNOWY EGRET rarities were a highlight. Diversity is high
as I totaled 81 species!
I also was able to get photos of both short and long billed dowitchers
together and you can easily see the difference in the tertials since the
birds were juveniles. I also got photos of the snowy egret next to the
great egret which illustrated the size difference. I also got decent photos
of the LAUGHING GULL and Pelican. See
https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S59198143 for my ebird list with photos.

As always bring water, snacks, insect repellent and sunscreen. The weather
is looking decent. Sunday looks like high pressure and fair weather.

Any questions let me or Andrea Van Beusichem know (I cc'ed her on this
email).  Thanks to both Andrea and Linda Ziemba from Montezuma for
continuing this popular program.

Best,
Dave Nicosia

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[cayugabirds-l] Major Diurnal Migration in the South Central U.S again

2019-08-15 Thread David Nicosia
All,

I wonder what is moving and how common this is. I will have to look at some
archive data but I bet this is a normal occurrence.  I wonder what types of
birds:  swallows, swifts, nighthawks, icterids, waterfowl, cranes???

see https://radar.weather.gov/ridge/Conus/full_lite_loop.php

Dave Nicosia

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Re:[cayugabirds-l] [nysbirds-l] Diurnal Migration on This Morning's Radar

2019-08-14 Thread David Nicosia
If you look at the national radar loop there is massive diurnal migration
going on from the central and southern Plains to the deep south. It is
impressive.  Echoes are especially heavy in the central Plains and mid
Mississippi Valley.   see:
https://radar.weather.gov/ridge/Conus/full_lite_loop.php

On Wed, Aug 14, 2019 at 10:24 AM Peter Reisfeld  wrote:

> Looking at the loop from last night, the reflectivities just about totally
> petered out at 6 AM, but then picked up again.  That would seem to favor
> diurnal migration rather than a continuation of that from overnight.
>
> Peter
>
> On Aug 14, 2019, at 10:05 AM, David Nicosia  wrote:
>
> The radar imagery from NWS Binghamton continues to show what looks to be
> bird migration well after sunrise. As of this writing it is 1000 am and we
> are still picking up biological targets. Since the lower atmosphere's
> thermals haven't begun, it is likely these targets are not insects. Could
> this be shorebird migration continuing past sunrise? Or maybe songbirds
> just continuing from the night? I  wish I didn't have to work today...
>
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Re:[cayugabirds-l] [nysbirds-l] Diurnal Migration on This Morning's Radar

2019-08-14 Thread David Nicosia
Yes I did a long loop and noticed that too. The heights of the echoes are
roughly between 1000 and 4000 feet above ground level. Swallows, icterids,
and what else?

On Wed, Aug 14, 2019 at 10:24 AM Peter Reisfeld  wrote:

> Looking at the loop from last night, the reflectivities just about totally
> petered out at 6 AM, but then picked up again.  That would seem to favor
> diurnal migration rather than a continuation of that from overnight.
>
> Peter
>
> On Aug 14, 2019, at 10:05 AM, David Nicosia  wrote:
>
> The radar imagery from NWS Binghamton continues to show what looks to be
> bird migration well after sunrise. As of this writing it is 1000 am and we
> are still picking up biological targets. Since the lower atmosphere's
> thermals haven't begun, it is likely these targets are not insects. Could
> this be shorebird migration continuing past sunrise? Or maybe songbirds
> just continuing from the night? I  wish I didn't have to work today...
>
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[cayugabirds-l] Diurnal Migration on This Morning's Radar

2019-08-14 Thread David Nicosia
The radar imagery from NWS Binghamton continues to show what looks to be
bird migration well after sunrise. As of this writing it is 1000 am and we
are still picking up biological targets. Since the lower atmosphere's
thermals haven't begun, it is likely these targets are not insects. Could
this be shorebird migration continuing past sunrise? Or maybe songbirds
just continuing from the night? I  wish I didn't have to work today...

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[cayugabirds-l] Montezuma NWR Shorebird Walk This Morning Sun August 11th - 71 species, 12 species of shorebirds

2019-08-11 Thread David Nicosia
All,

We had nice group of birders this morning Sunday August 11th for the first
of several shorebird walks at Montezuma along the dike between
Knox-Marsellus and Puddler's Marsh.  We had between 20 and 25 people. The
weather was perfect: low humidity, a light breeze and few insect issues.
The habitat is improving for shorebirds near the dike but farther out there
is a lot of low vegetation and shallow water with only a few muddy areas
within low vegetation. Water levels are still a bit high but continue to
slowly fall. I suspect the next 2-3 weeks there were be even more habitat
which times nice with peak shorebird migration for our area.

My ebird list is here:  https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S58911735  If you
want me to share this list with you, send me your email.  Also if you have
photos and accept this list, feel free to upload them.   I have quite a few
species on this list that I heard in the woods by Towpath and also in the
woods by the beginning. This list likely is not all inclusive either.  More
details are below.

Right off the bat we got lucky as a whole flock of shorebirds landed right
in front of us on the muddy areas at the very beginning of the canal. Among
this flock were 7 WHITE-RUMPED SANDPIPERS, PECTORAL, LEAST, SEMIPALMATED,
SPOTTED and SOLITARY SANDPIPERS. Both species of yellowlegs were present
along with KILLDEER and SEMIPALMATED PLOVERS. A WILSON'S SNIPE was also
nearby making 11 species!  Many with close views.

These birds lasted long enough for most to get on but then took off. Later
the group was re-found farther out within muddy areas in the vegetation. I
saw them in flight and was more certain on the number of white-rumps I also
had a flyover DOWITCHER that I couldn't ID to the species level. This bird
flew toward Puddler's Marsh and dropped out of sight. That made 12 species
of shorebirds. But there was many other birds which made the trip special
today.

The shear number of waders was impressive. Over 100 GREAT BLUE HERONS and
over 100 GREAT EGRETS were counted. We also had at least 10 GREEN HERONS.
There were 2 LEAST BITTERNS seen, and 2 AMERICAN BITTERNS as well as many
BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT HERONS.  One of the LEAST BITTERNs was in a lone patch
of reeds not far from the dike giving many excellent views.

Also impressive was the number and diversity of waterfowl. MALLARDS, BLACK
DUCK, NORTHERN PINTAIL, GADWALL, WOOD DUCK, AMERICAN WIGEON, BLUE and GREEN
WINGED TEAL, RUDDY DUCK, REDHEADS, CANVASBACK, HOODED MERGANSERS, CANADA
GEESE and TRUMPETER SWANS rounds out the waterfowl.

SANDHILL CRANES also put on a show flying by and croaking several times. We
had 12 of this species. We had a close encounter with a NORTHERN HARRIER
which was coarsing very low over the dike close to us. There were brief
views of a VIRGINIA RAIL. We also had impressive numbers of PIED BILLED
GREBES with 117 counted!

I would like to thank all who participated this morning and for sharing
your scopes and expertise with everyone. Also thanks to Andrea Van
Beusichem and Linda Ziemba at the Montezuma Wildlife Refuge for allowing
these walks.

As the other Dave N just emailed, the next shorebird walk will be this
coming Saturday August 17th. Dave Nutter and Bob McGuire will be leading.
Meeting time is 7 am at the Montezuma Visitors center.  See Dave Nutter's
email for more details.

Best,
Dave Nicosia

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[nysbirds-l] Guided Shorebird Walk Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge Sunday Aug 11th 7 am

2019-08-04 Thread David Nicosia
All,

We will be doing the first guided shorebird walk at Montezuma this coming
Sunday August 11th. We will meet at the visitor's center at 7 am. The dike
between K-M marsh and Puddler Marsh will be open to us. I suggest we all
meet at the visitor's center at 7 am because I want to go where the birds
are first. If wildlfe drive is active (which it has been lately) we will go
there first, then over to the dike. If the K-M Marsh starts picking up with
shorebirds this week, we will go there first and then potentially do
wildlife drive. I want to be flexible so we can see the most birds
possible.  Also, if you have field leader experience and/or are an expert
in bird ID/shorebirds and want to assist I would really appreciate it. In
the past contributions from others have made the field trips more
successful.

As always bring water, snacks, insect repellent and sunscreen. The weather
is looking decent this far out. A nice cold front will be passing by
Thursday night/Friday so this should crank up migration. Sunday looks like
high pressure and fair weather. Keep your fingers crossed it stays this way
because it could be pretty decent weather and migration wise.

Any questions let me or Andrea Van Beusichem know (I cc'ed her on this
email).  Thanks to both Andrea and Linda Ziemba from Montezuma for
continuing this popular program. I have received multiple inquiries over
the past few weeks.

Best,
Dave Nicosia

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[nysbirds-l] Shorebird Walks Montezuma NWR

2019-08-01 Thread David Nicosia
To all those who have been inquiring, there will be at least 3 shorebird
walks at Montezuma which will include the dike walks at Knox-Marcellus and
Puddlers Marsh.
Details will be coming soon, but I can share with you the dates that I am
leading:  Sunday August 11th, Sunday August 25th and Sunday September 8th,.
All these walks will take place in the morning and will include not only
the dike between K-M Marsh and Puddlers but also wildlife drive and frankly
any other part of the Montezuma wetlands complex where the shorebirds are.
More details on times, meeting places etc will be coming soon. There also
may be more walks from different leaders as well. Stay tuned.

Best,
Dave Nicosia

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[cayugabirds-l] Montezuma Wildlife Drive and East Rd Today 7/26/19

2019-07-26 Thread David Nicosia
All,

Took a quick trip up to wildlife drive today since it has been quite some
time for me.
I saw nothing unusual. Shorebirds are increasing and seem to be
concentrated in the channel before Larue's, Eaton Marsh (some) and
especially Benning Marsh.

Benning had a lot of peeps, mostly LEAST SANDPIPERS but there were several
SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPERS as well. I also had 3 WILSON'S SNIPE here among
many yellowlegs of both species. I am pretty sure I had a pectoral
sandpiper but it slipped away behind some reeds before I could be 100%
sure. I also noticed a few least sandpipers that looked very colorful and
then others that were much duller. Could juveniles already be showing up?
Seems a bit early... I also had one semipalmated sandpiper that was lighter
and really looked like a juvie but it is almost certain that this was just
a lighter adult.

I also checked on the snowy egret report of yesterday on the thruway ponds
and only came up with great egrets and great blue herons. It could easily
be somewhere in the massive areas up there.  The shorebird habitat looks
decent at the thruway ponds too and there were some least sandpipers,
yellowlegs and a spottie  too.

My list is here  https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S58469114

I also did a quick stop at East Rd and the water level still looks a bit
too high at K-M Marsh for shorebirds but with continued warm weather it
should dry out nicely in time for increasing shorebird migration. I am
going to inquire about possible dike walks and let everyone know. Of note
there was one male REDHEAD here which is not that unusual  but neat to see
this time of year.

List is herehttps://ebird.org/view/checklist/S58469456

Best,

Dave Nicosia

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Re: [cayugabirds-l] anyone love trying to identify bird nests from photos?

2019-07-21 Thread david nicosia

What? They shot into your yard? Even if they didn't wound a bird that's highly 
illegal to shoot a firearm into another person's property. Report it again call 
the sherriffs office DEC police etc.  This person should do some jail time.  
Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android 
 
  On Sat, Jul 20, 2019 at 5:40 PM, Glenn Wilson wrote:   My 
neighbor shot and wounded a downy off our feeders. No cop would help. They have 
their list of pet laws to enforce and that is it. 

Glenn WilsonEndicott, NYwww.WilsonsWarbler.com
On Jul 20, 2019, at 5:28 PM,   wrote:


Laurie, please advise them that the collection of bird parts including nests 
and feathers is prohibited by law unless you have state and federal permits. 
John

---
John and Sue Gregoire
 Field Ornithologists
 Kestrel Haven Migration Observatory
 5373 Fitzgerald Rd
 Burdett, NY 14818
 42.443508000, -76.758202000 
 "Create and Conserve Habitat"

On 2019-07-20 19:11, Laurie Roe wrote:

Hi, someone showed me a hanging nest they had collected..and if anyone sends me 
their email address I will send them a photo of it for id purposes! Thank you! 
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[cayugabirds-l] Mississippi Kite Town of Binghamton Broome Co. May 31st, 2019

2019-07-12 Thread David Nicosia
Received this late ebird report of a MISSISSIPPI KITE from Town of
Binghamton,.the other day from May 31st. Bird hasn't been seen since
unfortunately. This is a first ebird report of this species in Broome Co,
not sure if it is a first record though

Here is the report and photos. https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S58097227

Dave Nicosia

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[nysbirds-l] Wilson's Snipe near Cincinnatus, NY Cortland Co.

2019-07-01 Thread David Nicosia
On my way to Chenango Co this morning I noticed an odd looking bird on a
power pole over a wet meadow. My impression was a Wilson's Snipe. So I
stopped my car turned around and went back. On one pole indeed there was a
Wilson's Snipe. I took some photos and then drove a little way down Rte 26
to turn around and found a second one again on a power pole. Both birds
were calling at times and the habitat looked great for WISN, so they are
probably breeders. This is at the southern edge of their expansive breeding
range in the eastern 1/2 of North America. E-bird list with photos is
herehttps://ebird.org/view/checklist/S57836210

Dave Nicosia

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[cayugabirds-l] New Michigan SF North Rd Chenango Co. NY- Swainson's Thrush YES!

2019-07-01 Thread David Nicosia
I went back to New Michigan SF in Pharsalia, NY with the focus of finding
Swainson's thrush. I did a survey of singing birds last week and failed to
locate this species which is among my favorites. So, I started on North
road coming from the south where I have had these birds in years past.
After you pass Swartz Road, I saw a broad-winged hawk soaring overhead and
calling. I got out to take a look and I heard a familiar call... the "whit"
call of Swainson's Thrush. I eventually located the bird since it seemed to
be upset over the broadie overhead. I don't believe this Broad-winged hawk
had any interest in the swainson's.  After finding the bird which was
flying back and forth between a sugar maple and a large norway spruce I
noticed another swainson's thrush on the same maple branch! Both birds were
clearly not happy about the broad-winged hawk and likely a pair suggesting
probable breeding. Then farther up North road before the tornado cut, I
heard another whit call and again I was able to phish this bird into view,
another swainson's! This bird, based on google earth, was about 400 yards
away from the pair as the crow flies so it likely was another one.

So I had 3 SWTH along North road before the tornado cut. The exact location
of the pair of SWTH was  42.578680° N and -75.719517° W or 360 yards north
of Swartz Road on North Rd. Then, the third Swainson's Thrush was
at  42.581763° N and -75.721425°W or 780 yards north of Swartz Road. Jeremy
Collison had one SWTH on CCC road on June 22nd this year which likely was
another bird suggesting at least 4 SWTH persisting at New Michigan SF. I
was unable to find any other SWTH.  Of note, none of the birds I found were
singing, instead just calling. The rest of the thrush species were not
singing much either. This is probably because it was late morning. Given
the 2011 tornado destroying so much norway spruce and DEC logging to manage
the forests, the habitat at New Michigan SF is diminished for SWTH. So
having 4 still present is awesome. Before the 2011 tornado I once counted
12 and 9 SWTH in these general areas. Now 3 or 4 is decent given loss of
habitat.  I wonder if there are other reliable places in Chenango Co for
SWTH? The 2000-2005 Breeding Bird Atlas had this species over several
blocks around New Michigan SF. So for the next Birding Bird Atlas
2020-2025,  I hope we can find this species in other nearby locations as
there are still many plots of mature norway spruce that look good for SWTH
and other northern breeders.

I was unable to find or hear any Red Crossbills again. But like my previous
trip to this forest, warblers were abundant. Blackburnian and Magnolia
warblers were all over as usual along with Ovenbirds. I did get an
excellent view of a mourning warbler as it sang right by the road in the
tornado cut on CCC road. The bird responded to phishing and literally was
several feet away from my car!  I didn't do an extensive count this time of
most species and estimated many numbers.

My list is here...https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S57844652

Best,

Dave Nicosia

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Re: [cayugabirds-l] [nysbirds-l] Dryden, NY - Hammond Hill State Forest Birding: Few Birds

2019-06-26 Thread David Nicosia
s
> that are standard year to year.
>
> Thanks for your input.
> John
> ---
> John and Sue Gregoire
> Field Ornithologists
> Kestrel Haven Migration Observatory
> 5373 Fitzgerald Rd
> Burdett, NY 14818
> 42.443508000, -76.758202000
> "Create and Conserve Habitat"
>
> On 2019-06-23 20:13, David Nicosia wrote:
>
> Chris,
>
> Fortunately, I have found the opposite for the most part
>
> I did two trips this past week one to Triangle State Forest and Hawkins
> Pond State Forest  in Broome County and neotropical migrants were quite
> common especially Red-Eyed Vireos, Ovenbirds.
>
> see: Triangle State Forest: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S57456491
>  Most of the warblers were found in a small stretch of about 1 mile in the
> spruce, hemlock, pine, northern hardwood forests.
>
> and  Hawkins Pond State Forest: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S57564971
> Most of the birds were in the stretch of spruce, hemlock, pine and maple,
> oak about 1.5 miles.
>
> I lost count of ovenbirds at Hawkins!  Red-eyed vireos were all over.
> Blackburnian warblers too were the most I have had at this location.  Now
> this is just my observations in one county.
>
> In the western Adirondacks, at Star Lake, Red-Eyed Vireos seemed
> everywhere along with ovenbirds. Blackburnian warblers were quite common
> too.
>
> see: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S57189909  for my Star lake walk.
>
> In my yard, there also seems to be more bird activity this year. I have at
> least 2 maybe 3 pairs of Gray Catbirds this year vs just one pair most
> years. I also have 2 pairs of red-eyed vireos vs one pair or in some years
> none!
>
> Anyway, what is the cause of the drastic declines that you are observing?
> That is the bigger question. Could it be disease?  Does west nile virus
> kill songbirds?  Have insect populations crashed?  Habitat loss, increase
> in towers, wind farms etc are happening gradually so the declines should be
> slow. Or maybe there is a natural cycle and some areas are seeing the
> minimum in numbers which is lower than  any other minimum in the past?
>
> Concerned too (but optimistic),
> Dave
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> On Sat, Jun 22, 2019 at 9:01 PM Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes <
> c...@cornell.edu> wrote:
>
>> Good evening,
>>
>> This morning I was joined by Bartels Science Illustrator, Jessica French,
>> for a birding trip to Hammond Hill State Forest. It was disconcertingly
>> quiet up there. I probably should not have had such high expectations,
>> given how quiet this spring has been (a handful of very quiet trips to the
>> Hawthorn Orchard) and how few night flight calls were recorded over our
>> house in Etna. I'm still analyzing my night flight call data, but those
>> data from May 3 through May 24 are concerning, to say the least. I have
>> also read postings from VINS and notable Bicknell's Thrush researcher,
>> Chris Rimmer, making similar observations about his Mount Mansfield, VT,
>> field site this spring ("disquietingly low" vocal activity and mist net
>> captures).
>>
>> Here are two checklists completed from our two, approximate four-mile,
>> bushwhack walks this morning. Nice habitat. Few insects. Few birds. No
>> ticks (but not complaining).
>>
>> Loop to SE of Star Stanton and Canaan Rd Intersection:
>>
>> https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S57605395
>>
>> Notably absent or low numbers of birds --
>> Barred Owl
>> Red-bellied Woodpecker
>> Pileated Woodpecker
>> Least Flycatcher
>> Great Crested Flycatcher
>> Red-eyed Vireo (very low numbers)
>> Winter Wren
>> Wood Thrush
>> Baltimore Oriole
>> Mourning Warbler
>> Hooded Warbler
>> American Redstart
>> Chestnut-sided Warbler
>> Black-throated Blue Warbler
>> Black-throated Green Warbler
>> Canada Warbler
>> Scarlet Tanager (very low numbers)
>> Rose-breasted Grosbeak
>>
>> Loop between Hammond Hill and Canaan Rd:
>>
>> https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S57605776
>>
>> Notably absent or low numbers of birds --
>> Barred Owl
>> Red-bellied Woodpecker
>> Pileated Woodpecker
>> Least Flycatcher
>> Great Crested Flycatcher
>> Red-eyed Vireo (very low numbers)
>> Winter Wren
>> Wood Thrush
>> Baltimore Oriole
>> Mourning Warbler
>> Hooded Warbler
>> American Redstart
>> Chestnut-sided Warbler
>> Black-throated Blue Warbler
>> Black-throated Green Warbler
>> Canada Warbler
>> Scarlet Tanager (very low numbers)
>> Rose-breast

[cayugabirds-l] New Michigan State Forest Today 6/24/2019 vs 2016 and 2013

2019-06-24 Thread David Nicosia
I spent over 4 hours and a total of 9.3 miles driving the roads in New
Michigan State Forest counting singing male birds like I do every few years
or so. This year was excellent. However, they are lumbering some of the big
spruces in "stripcuts" to help regenerate young spruce. Apparently, the
spruce needlecast fungus is seriously affecting the young norway spruces
and they want to make sure there are plenty for regeneration in the future.
I did speak with folks the NYDEC who are involved in this effort. In any
event, there are areas where there was once closed canopy norway spruce
that is now in strips. Plus, the 2011 tornado took out I would say about
25% of the norway spruces too. So this unique habitat is declining.  I did
not find any swainson's thrushes. I also dipped on the red crossbills.
Fortunately, Jeremy Collinson reported both species a couple days ago.

As for numbers: 90 ovenbirds!  Exact count.   61 Red-eyed vireos, 58
Blackburnian warblers, 24 Magnolia Warblers, 8 Mourning Warblers and
several Canada and 15 Black throated blue warblers. Good numbers. I have
noticed that birds that like openings in the forest are increasing.

Here is my 2019 list  https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S57655975


Here is my list in late June 2016
https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S30317959 for
comparison.

Here is a list from 2013:https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S14257563
(covered less area this year 5 miles instead of 9).

Seems like there is still a lot of songbirds here

Best,
Dave

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[nysbirds-l] Fw: eBird Report - New Michigan SF--North Rd., Jun 24, 2019

2019-06-24 Thread david nicosia


Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android 
 
   - Forwarded Message - From: "ebird-checkl...@cornell.edu" 
 To: "daven1...@yahoo.com"  
Cc:  Sent: Mon, Jun 24, 2019 at 2:59 PM Subject: eBird Report - New Michigan 
SF--North Rd., Jun 24, 2019  New Michigan SF--North Rd., Chenango, New York, US
Jun 24, 2019 8:41 AM - 12:56 PM
Protocol: Traveling
9.33 mile(s)
51 species

Wild Turkey (Meleagris gallopavo)  1    North rd
Chimney Swift (Chaetura pelagica)  1    By rte 23 and center rd 
Red-shouldered Hawk (lineatus Group) (Buteo lineatus [lineatus Group])  1    
Calling
Broad-winged Hawk (Buteo platypterus)  1    Calling
Barred Owl (Northern) (Strix varia [varia Group])  1    Calling
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker (Sphyrapicus varius)  9
Northern Flicker (Yellow-shafted) (Colaptes auratus auratus/luteus)  1
Eastern Wood-Pewee (Contopus virens)  4    Exact count singing males
Least Flycatcher (Empidonax minimus)  1
Blue-headed Vireo (Vireo solitarius)  18    Exact count singing males
Red-eyed Vireo (Vireo olivaceus)  61    Exact count singing males
Blue Jay (Cyanocitta cristata)  13    Exact count 
American Crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos)  2
Common Raven (Corvus corax)  4
Black-capped Chickadee (Poecile atricapillus)  13
Red-breasted Nuthatch (Sitta canadensis)  6    Exact count 
Brown Creeper (Certhia americana)  7
House Wren (Northern) (Troglodytes aedon [aedon Group])  1
Winter Wren (Troglodytes hiemalis)  10    Exact count singing males
Golden-crowned Kinglet (Regulus satrapa)  16    Exact count singing males
Veery (Catharus fuscescens)  16    Exact count singing males
Hermit Thrush (faxoni/crymophilus) (Catharus guttatus faxoni/crymophilus)  9    
Exact count singing males
Wood Thrush (Hylocichla mustelina)  6    Exact count singing males
American Robin (Turdus migratorius)  11
Gray Catbird (Dumetella carolinensis)  6
European Starling (Sturnus vulgaris)  2
Cedar Waxwing (Bombycilla cedrorum)  8
Purple Finch (Eastern) (Haemorhous purpureus purpureus)  1
American Goldfinch (Spinus tristis)  2
Chipping Sparrow (Spizella passerina)  1
Dark-eyed Junco (Slate-colored) (Junco hyemalis hyemalis/carolinensis)  23    
Exact count singing males
White-throated Sparrow (Zonotrichia albicollis)  8    Exact count singing males
Song Sparrow (melodia/atlantica) (Melospiza melodia melodia/atlantica)  2
Swamp Sparrow (Melospiza georgiana)  1
Eastern Towhee (Pipilo erythrophthalmus)  5
Red-winged Blackbird (Red-winged) (Agelaius phoeniceus [phoeniceus Group])  3
Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater)  1
Common Grackle (Bronzed) (Quiscalus quiscula versicolor)  1
Ovenbird (Seiurus aurocapilla)  90    Exact count singing males
Northern Waterthrush (Parkesia noveboracensis)  2
Nashville Warbler (Oreothlypis ruficapilla)  1
Mourning Warbler (Geothlypis philadelphia)  8    Exact count singing males
Common Yellowthroat (Geothlypis trichas)  17    Exact count singing males
Magnolia Warbler (Setophaga magnolia)  24    Exact count singing males
Blackburnian Warbler (Setophaga fusca)  58    Exact count singing males
Chestnut-sided Warbler (Setophaga pensylvanica)  31    Exact count singing males
Black-throated Blue Warbler (Setophaga caerulescens)  15    Exact count singing 
males
Yellow-rumped Warbler (Myrtle) (Setophaga coronata coronata)  3    Exact count 
singing males
Black-throated Green Warbler (Setophaga virens)  5    Exact count singing males
Canada Warbler (Cardellina canadensis)  6    Exact count singing males
Rose-breasted Grosbeak (Pheucticus ludovicianus)  1

View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S57655975

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (https://ebird.org/home)
  

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Re: [nysbirds-l] Dryden, NY - Hammond Hill State Forest Birding: Few Birds

2019-06-23 Thread David Nicosia
Chris,

Fortunately, I have found the opposite for the most part

I did two trips this past week one to Triangle State Forest and Hawkins
Pond State Forest  in Broome County and neotropical migrants were quite
common especially Red-Eyed Vireos, Ovenbirds.

see: Triangle State Forest: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S57456491
 Most of the warblers were found in a small stretch of about 1 mile in the
spruce, hemlock, pine, northern hardwood forests.

and  Hawkins Pond State Forest: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S57564971
Most of the birds were in the stretch of spruce, hemlock, pine and maple,
oak about 1.5 miles.

I lost count of ovenbirds at Hawkins!  Red-eyed vireos were all over.
Blackburnian warblers too were the most I have had at this location.  Now
this is just my observations in one county.

In the western Adirondacks, at Star Lake, Red-Eyed Vireos seemed everywhere
along with ovenbirds. Blackburnian warblers were quite common too.

see: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S57189909  for my Star lake walk.

In my yard, there also seems to be more bird activity this year. I have at
least 2 maybe 3 pairs of Gray Catbirds this year vs just one pair most
years. I also have 2 pairs of red-eyed vireos vs one pair or in some years
none!

Anyway, what is the cause of the drastic declines that you are observing?
That is the bigger question. Could it be disease?  Does west nile virus
kill songbirds?  Have insect populations crashed?  Habitat loss, increase
in towers, wind farms etc are happening gradually so the declines should be
slow. Or maybe there is a natural cycle and some areas are seeing the
minimum in numbers which is lower than  any other minimum in the past?

Concerned too (but optimistic),
Dave















On Sat, Jun 22, 2019 at 9:01 PM Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes <
c...@cornell.edu> wrote:

> Good evening,
>
> This morning I was joined by Bartels Science Illustrator, Jessica French,
> for a birding trip to Hammond Hill State Forest. It was disconcertingly
> quiet up there. I probably should not have had such high expectations,
> given how quiet this spring has been (a handful of very quiet trips to the
> Hawthorn Orchard) and how few night flight calls were recorded over our
> house in Etna. I’m still analyzing my night flight call data, but those
> data from May 3 through May 24 are concerning, to say the least. I have
> also read postings from VINS and notable Bicknell’s Thrush researcher,
> Chris Rimmer, making similar observations about his Mount Mansfield, VT,
> field site this spring (“disquietingly low” vocal activity and mist net
> captures).
>
> Here are two checklists completed from our two, approximate four-mile,
> bushwhack walks this morning. Nice habitat. Few insects. Few birds. No
> ticks (but not complaining).
>
> Loop to SE of Star Stanton and Canaan Rd Intersection:
>
> https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S57605395
>
> Notably absent or low numbers of birds --
> Barred Owl
> Red-bellied Woodpecker
> Pileated Woodpecker
> Least Flycatcher
> Great Crested Flycatcher
> Red-eyed Vireo (very low numbers)
> Winter Wren
> Wood Thrush
> Baltimore Oriole
> Mourning Warbler
> Hooded Warbler
> American Redstart
> Chestnut-sided Warbler
> Black-throated Blue Warbler
> Black-throated Green Warbler
> Canada Warbler
> Scarlet Tanager (very low numbers)
> Rose-breasted Grosbeak
>
> Loop between Hammond Hill and Canaan Rd:
>
> https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S57605776
>
> Notably absent or low numbers of birds --
> Barred Owl
> Red-bellied Woodpecker
> Pileated Woodpecker
> Least Flycatcher
> Great Crested Flycatcher
> Red-eyed Vireo (very low numbers)
> Winter Wren
> Wood Thrush
> Baltimore Oriole
> Mourning Warbler
> Hooded Warbler
> American Redstart
> Chestnut-sided Warbler
> Black-throated Blue Warbler
> Black-throated Green Warbler
> Canada Warbler
> Scarlet Tanager (very low numbers)
> Rose-breasted Grosbeak
>
> Concerned,
> Chris T-H
>
> --
> Chris Tessaglia-Hymes
> PO Box 488
> 8 Etna Lane
> Etna, NY 13062
> 607-351-5740
>
> --
> *NYSbirds-L List Info:*
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[cayugabirds-l] Junco habitat: a question.

2019-06-09 Thread David Nicosia
I have a question about junco habitat.  Maybe no one will know but I
figured these email lists might have some answers.  So at my home in
Johnson City along the southern tier, I live on the edge of town on a hill
in a suburban setting.  Lots of yards and lots of scattered mainly Norway
spruces.  Also lots of blue and Colorado spruces along with balsam and
Fraser firs scattered about. No areas of canopy just yards with grass and a
plethora of bushes. I have noticed over the last several years quite a good
number of dark eyed juncos nesting. I have had a pair at my house for
several years. They are all over in my neighborhood.  I live at 1300 feet
so not a particularly high elevation.

I am spending a few days at Star Lake in the western Adirondacks with
family.  The cottage we are in  is among many sprinkled by the lake. No
closed canopy, a lot of large white pine, some balsam fir, some Eastern
hemlock and a lot of sugar maple.  I have 2 blackburnian and 2 pine
warblers within earshot of the cottage. Red eyed vireos all over, Robins,
song sparrows, chipping sparrows etc, but no juncos!  I have had only one
since I have been here on a hike and that's it.  Seems like similar
habitats as the southern tier except more conifers. What gives?  Curious.
Thanks.

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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Montezuma Wildlife Drive - Red Necked Ph

2019-06-01 Thread david nicosia

Thanks Dave for clarifying this.  
Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android 
 
  On Sat, Jun 1, 2019 at 9:26 AM, Dave Nutter wrote:   
Credit where credit is due: 

As far as I know, the first report of the Red-necked Phalarope on the Wildlife 
Drive at Montezuma NWR was to eBird on the afternoon of 30 May by Carol Ingram, 
and I have credited her on the Cayuga Lake Basin First 2019 Records list. I do 
not know Carol, nor the names of the other 3 members of her party. If anyone 
has this information, or knows of some earlier or independent sighting on the 
30th, please let me know, so I can add that. 

Some people have submitted eBird reports which credit later reporters as the 
finder, and I urge you folks to correct those.  

This is not to detract from Scott Peterson & others who saw and publicized it 
on the 31st, helping others see it. Well done!

I also thank Dave Nicosia, Mark Miller, Michael Gullo, and Deborah Dohne, who 
went to the trouble of photographing under adverse conditions, and including 
photos in an eBird report even though the photos aren’t “pretty”. And I thank 
Scott Peterson and Deborah Dohne for describing this oddly patterned bird in 
eBird reports. 

To my way of thinking, simply asserting that there is a rare bird should not be 
enough to consider it confirmed, no matter how well known or highly reputed the 
observer. It was the lack of description in Carol’s original eBird report which 
made me wait until there was corroboration by other observers the next day 
before accepting her report. 

Please describe and/or photograph rare birds to establish a solid record. 
Thanks. 

Cool bird! I’m glad so many people got to see it.

- - Dave Nutter

> On May 31, 2019, at 10:20 PM, David Nicosia  wrote:
> 
> A large number of shorebirds continue in main pool which has been drained. 
> The diversity could be down some as I didn't find any red knots, ruddy 
> turnstone or whimbrels of days past. But there was one female RED-NECKED 
> PHALAROPE I think initially spotted by Dave Kennedy and then re-found by 
> Scott Peterson. I was working my way up wildlife drive when Scott sent the 
> RBA on this great bird. Thanks Scott!. 


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[nysbirds-l] Montezuma Wildlife Drive - Red Necked Phalarope and other shorebirds

2019-05-31 Thread David Nicosia
A large number of shorebirds continue in main pool which has been drained.
The diversity could be down some as I didn't find any red knots, ruddy
turnstone or whimbrels of days past. But there was one female RED-NECKED
PHALAROPE I think initially spotted by Dave Kennedy and then re-found by
Scott Peterson. I was working my way up wildlife drive when Scott sent the
RBA on this great bird. Thanks Scott!. There were also loads of
semipalmated sandpipers and breeding plumage dunlin. A few white-rumped
sandpipers were mixed in too. There certainly could have been more as the
heat shimmer was bad. The ones I got were closer w/ little shimmer. There
were 5 lingering BLACK BELLIED PLOVERS. Additionally, there were many
semipalmated plovers and about 5 least sandpipers as well as some killdeer
and a few spotted sandpipers. Bald eagles were all over along with Great
Blue Herons and Great Egrets. They were feeding on the dead or dying fish
from the draining of the pool. If you go this weekend, I suggest getting
there very early to avoid the heat shimmer. I could have easily missed
species especially since there were more distant flocks. All I could make
out in these flocks were dunlin and semipalmated sandpipers.

Other birds of note: Orchard oriole singing near the first channel (where
the solitary sandpipers usually are) just before Larues. Cerulean Warblers
were singing by the bathroom at the beginning and also in the woods past
the first bend. There were also lingering Blackpoll warblers both spots as
well.

My list is here: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S56931387

An awesome day!

Good birding to all,

Dave Nicosia

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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Chemung County Black Vulture

2019-05-29 Thread David Nicosia
This is a good report. We are getting them occasionally now in Broome
County. As far as I know, there is limited ebird use in Chemung Co and no
email list serve so any reports of good birds is welcome. Its only a 45
minutes drive for us and we would love to hear more about their rarities.

On Wed, May 29, 2019 at 10:59 AM  wrote:

> Not sure how unusual this is, but at 10:35 this morning I was driving east
> on I-86 between Lowman and Chemung.  North of the highway was a cloud of
> 20-25 Turkey Vultures about half a mile east of the Lowman exit.  With them
> was at least one Black Vulture.  Traffic was busy so I didn’t have a chance
> to pull over to see if there were more BLVUs in the group.
>
> Bill Howe
> whhow...@gmail.com
> --
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[cayugabirds-l] Red Knots NJ Delaware Bay Good News

2019-05-26 Thread David Nicosia
I have been in south NJ past couple days for the annual spring shorebird
migration and I had a conversation with one of the folks who works with the
Red Knots and other shorebirds. He told me that the preliminary numbers
from last night's aerial survey is 30,000 Red Knots which is way above the
10 to 13 thousand that they have seen for many years. Of course, he
cautioned it is a preliminary number but it falls in line with the
horseshoe crab moratorium put into place 11 years ago in NJ. It takes 10
years for the crab to mature and they are seeing a rebound in horsecrabs as
well. There is a long way to go but it is encouraging. There are also many
more RUDDY TURNSTONES, and DUNLIN. SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPERS.

Dave Nicosia

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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard and East Ithaca Rec. Way, May 19, 2019

2019-05-19 Thread David Nicosia
Chris,

Hopefully it is a cyclical thing. One of our best spots in Broome Co King
Street Town of Barker has had more migrants than I have seen in several
years. Diversity and numbers are up for most warblers and other neotropical
migrants this year. I also have noticed in a few other spots in the county
that there seems to be more neotropical migrants. I went to Cascade Valley
SF and pretty much everywhere there were ovenbirds and red-eyed vireos. The
numbers of blackburnian and magnolia warblers are up and so are black
throated green and canada warblers. I  had 12 least flycatchers along this
road which is well above previous years.  Our Hawthorne area in Upper Lisle
also has been fairly quiet. But the breeders in that area are in decent
numbers. Its been a great year down here for Bay-breasted and Cape May
Warblers.

Dave

Dave

On Sun, May 19, 2019 at 10:40 AM Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes <
c...@cornell.edu> wrote:

> Thanks to Diane Morton, Ken Kemphues, and Paul Anderson for co-leading the
> Cayuga Bird Club field trip to the Hawthorn Orchard this morning. Another
> relatively quiet morning, despite favorable overnight conditions. There
> were many high flying migrating warblers throughout the morning.
>
> Please see my thoughts on Tortricidae moth larvae, below.
>
> Good birding!
>
> Sincerely,
> Chris T-H
>
> > Hawthorn Orchard and East Ithaca Rec. Way, Tompkins, New York, US
> > May 19, 2019 6:15 AM - 10:23 AM
> > Protocol: Traveling
> > 1.0 mile(s)
> > Comments: Repeat of Cayuga Bird Club field trip to the Hawthorn
> Orchard, in the hopes of better migrants stopping in to forage.
> >
> > There is very little evidence of leafroller moth larvae (Tortricidae)
> being pervasive throughout the Hawthorn Orchard this year. Most hawthorn
> trees and leaves appear quite healthy and undamaged.
> >
> > The significantly reduced findings of many warblers or vireos actively
> foraging in or making use of the hawthorns as a good food source, supports
> the idea and observation that the neotropical migrants are primarily
> targeting this location for the periodic abundance of food. The occurrence
> of leafroller moth larvae may be a biennial event or at least having some
> cyclical nature—hopefully the notable lack of larvae this year is not
> another example of the mass die-off of our insects.
> >
> > 56 species (+1 other taxa)
> >
> > Canada Goose  2
> > Mallard  1
> > Mourning Dove  5
> > Black-billed Cuckoo  1 Seen poorly by most, and in flight, in trees
> near large square retention pond to West of South rugby ball field.
> > Chimney Swift  1
> > Killdeer  1
> > Ring-billed Gull  1
> > Turkey Vulture  2
> > Osprey  1
> > Cooper's Hawk  1 Imm.
> > Red-bellied Woodpecker  2
> > Downy Woodpecker  1
> > Hairy Woodpecker  1
> > Eastern Wood-Pewee  1
> > Alder Flycatcher  1 Heard Pip and Reer notes heard well, near large
> square retention pond, West of South rugby ball field.
> > Least Flycatcher  2
> > Great Crested Flycatcher  1
> > Eastern Kingbird  1
> > Warbling Vireo  2
> > Red-eyed Vireo  7 Mostly foraging and singing in oaks along ravine,
> especially in NW corner clearing.
> > Blue Jay  54 Mostly low flying migrating flocks.
> > American Crow  1
> > Tree Swallow  2
> > Barn Swallow  7
> > Black-capped Chickadee  4
> > White-breasted Nuthatch  1
> > House Wren  2
> > Carolina Wren  2
> > Veery  1
> > Wood Thrush  4
> > American Robin  13
> > Gray Catbird  15
> > European Starling  12
> > Cedar Waxwing  4
> > House Finch  1
> > Purple Finch  2
> > American Goldfinch  5
> > Savannah Sparrow  1
> > Song Sparrow  10
> > Eastern Meadowlark  1
> > Baltimore Oriole  11
> > Red-winged Blackbird  12
> > Brown-headed Cowbird  8
> > Common Grackle  4
> > Tennessee Warbler  4
> > Nashville Warbler  1 Singing in oaks just South of the NW corner
> clearing.
> > Common Yellowthroat  2
> > American Redstart  2
> > Cape May Warbler  1 Heard flight notes only
> > Bay-breasted Warbler  2 Two different adults. Migrating/foraging
> through oaks and maples along North ravine.
> > Yellow Warbler  2
> > Blackpoll Warbler  1 One bird singing early AM from inside Hawthorn
> Orchard.
> > warbler sp. (Parulidae sp.)  15 Continuous high flyover migrants and
> a couple of fast moving warbler flocks, through tops of oaks.
> > Scarlet Tanager  6 Daytime migrating birds. Perch-sing-fly,
> continuing in general ENE direction.
> > Northern Cardinal  5
> > Indigo Bunting  3 Adult male seen in Northwest corner clearing;
> several buzzy flight notes heard from other migrants.
> > House Sparrow  6
> >
> > View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S56485576
> >
> > This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (
> https://ebird.org/home)
>
> --
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[cayugabirds-l] Birds are moving via radar

2019-05-17 Thread David Nicosia
Even with north winds aloft the birds are coming. Its getting to that point
where they just need to get where they are going. see

https://radar.weather.gov/ridge/radar_lite.php?rid=bgm=N0R=1110=yes


Its not the heaviest migration but it is a sign that the birds are going
regardless now.
Tomorrow night should be even more. I suspect a lot of our later migrants
will arrive en mass. Blackpoll, wilson's warblers, Canada warbler,
willow/alder flycatchers, and the first push of semipalmated sandpipers,
maybe even a few white-rumped, ruddy turnstones, etc.
I know I left out a bunch.

Good Birding,
Dave

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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Weather Forecasting Tools

2019-05-16 Thread David Nicosia
One note of caution with this: it is only the surface winds. Birds, as you
know, migrate from a few thousand feet up to probably over 10,000 feet in
some cases and species.

I find this website most helpful for winds aloft forecasts...

https://weather.cod.edu/forecast/  
Pick the model of choice. I usually go with the NAM for the next 3 days and
then the GFS out beyond that (but use with caution).  Pick 925 mb for 1-3
feet above ground level winds, 850 mb for around 5000 feet AGL, 700 mb for
around 1 feet AGL and 500 mb for 2 feet AGL (roughly).  After you
choose the level, pick wind speed. It will give you the wind speed and
direction and you can use the slide bar to project out into the future. You
can easily set jet streaks  (areas of enhanced winds). The site also has
the surface winds too.

Good birding

Best,
Dave




On Tue, May 14, 2019 at 11:31 AM Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes <
c...@cornell.edu> wrote:

> I was having an offline conversation with Laura Stenzler and Ton Schat
> about what days might be the best in the forecast for their personal
> 24-hour bird-a-thon. Laura thought it would be helpful to share some of the
> information below with the broader Cayugabirds-l group!
>
> =
>
> Upon initial review of the forecasts yesterday, the weekend was looking
> good. Now, upon review, the forecasts have changed. The warming trend that
> was shaping up looks like instead it will be blocked by a northern flow of
> air coming down from Canada and the Great Lakes starting Saturday morning.
> One forecast model shows the warm air hitting a hard brick wall by Sunday
> as far south as a line stretching from around Indianapolis through Columbus
> and southeast to Washington DC. *That being said, both models show a
> southern airflow from Thursday night through Friday morning; albeit chilly,
> the air will be from the correct direction to assist migrants attempting to
> leap-frog their way north.*
>
> I use a combination of weather sites to make inferences (constantly
> changing…).
>
> Magic Seaweed is one such site. Making sure the time zone is correctly set
> (top left option), I choose my region (bottom left menu) and alternate
> between wind and pressure (bottom right options; toggle on/off multiple
> panes at a time, or just one pane).
>
> Try this link for Great Lakes region, wind, EDT:
>
>
> https://magicseaweed.com/Great-Lakes-Surf-Chart/76/?type=wind=America%2FNew_York
>
> 
> Great Lakes Charts - Magicseaweed.com
> 
> magicseaweed.com
> Global surf forecasting charts. With various chart types including swell,
> surf, pressure, wind, MSLP, ECM and sea surface temperature -
> Magicseaweed.com 
>
>
> Try this link for Northeastern seaboard region, wind, EDT:
>
>
> https://magicseaweed.com/US-Northeastern-Seaboard-Surf-Chart/20/?type=wind=America%2FNew_York
>
>
> Move your mouse across the bottom from left to right to move through the
> forecast dates at the bottom. The closer you are to the current date, the
> more accurate the forecast.
>
> Another site is Windy.com .
>
> Lots of custom configuration and tools available, probably the most
> versatile site.
>
> The following link has a pin drop positioned approximately over Ithaca
> with Temperature selected. Slide the bottom bar across to view the
> forecast. Different models can be selected at bottom right (NAM is most
> accurate and short-term, ECMWF and GFS are two longer-term models). Top
> right allows you to select different element views (wind, temperature,
> rain, etc.).
>
> https://www.windy.com/-Temperature-temp?temp,38.013,-79.739,6,m:ePOad1V
>
>
> I found it most interesting to view Temperature element view for the
> particular interest of bird migration. The wind always shows as moving
> white lines. As you slide the forecast bar across the bottom, you can see
> how there is a strong line of demarcation that develops by Saturday
> morning, the one I described above. That may hinder migration coming in
> from the South.
>
> Based upon the current forecast models, it looks like there could be good
> fallout conditions* along the Lake Erie and Lake Ontario shorelines, or
> even here in Ithaca as well. We shall see—forecasts are dynamically
> changing by the minute.*
>
> Hope this helps!
>
> Sincerely,
> Chris
>
> --
> Chris Tessaglia-Hymes
> PO Box 488
> 8 Etna Lane
> Etna, NY 13062
> 607-351-5740
>
> --
> *Cayugabirds-L List Info:*
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> 

Re: [cayugabirds-l] Weather Forecasting Tools

2019-05-16 Thread david nicosia
 One note of caution with this: it is only the surface winds. Birds, as you 
know, migrate from a few thousand feet up to probably over 10,000 feet in some 
cases and species. 
I find this website most helpful for winds aloft forecasts...
https://weather.cod.edu/forecast/    Pick the model of choice. I usually go 
with the NAM for the next 3 days and then the GFS out beyond that (but use with 
caution).  Pick 925 mb for 1-3 feet above ground level winds, 850 mb for around 
5000 feet AGL, 700 mb for around 1 feet AGL and 500 mb for 2 feet AGL 
(roughly).  After you choose the level, pick wind speed. It will give you the 
wind speed and direction and you can use the slide bar to project out into the 
future. You can easily set jet streaks  (areas of enhanced winds). The site 
also has the surface winds too. 

Good birding
Best,Dave 


On Tuesday, May 14, 2019, 11:31:06 AM EDT, Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes 
 wrote:  
 
  I was having an offline conversation with Laura Stenzler and Ton Schat about 
what days might be the best in the forecast for their personal 24-hour 
bird-a-thon. Laura thought it would be helpful to share some of the information 
below with the broader Cayugabirds-l group!
=
Upon initial review of the forecasts yesterday, the weekend was looking good. 
Now, upon review, the forecasts have changed. The warming trend that was 
shaping up looks like instead it will be blocked by a northern flow of air 
coming down from Canada and the Great Lakes starting Saturday morning. One 
forecast model shows the warm air hitting a hard brick wall by Sunday as far 
south as a line stretching from around Indianapolis through Columbus and 
southeast to Washington DC. That being said, both models show a southern 
airflow from Thursday night through Friday morning; albeit chilly, the air will 
be from the correct direction to assist migrants attempting to leap-frog their 
way north.
I use a combination of weather sites to make inferences (constantly changing…).
Magic Seaweed is one such site. Making sure the time zone is correctly set (top 
left option), I choose my region (bottom left menu) and alternate between wind 
and pressure (bottom right options; toggle on/off multiple panes at a time, or 
just one pane).
Try this link for Great Lakes region, wind, EDT:

https://magicseaweed.com/Great-Lakes-Surf-Chart/76/?type=wind=America%2FNew_York
|  | Great Lakes Charts - Magicseaweed.commagicseaweed.comGlobal surf 
forecasting charts. With various chart types including swell, surf, pressure, 
wind, MSLP, ECM and sea surface temperature - Magicseaweed.com |



Try this link for Northeastern seaboard region, wind, EDT:

https://magicseaweed.com/US-Northeastern-Seaboard-Surf-Chart/20/?type=wind=America%2FNew_York

Move your mouse across the bottom from left to right to move through the 
forecast dates at the bottom. The closer you are to the current date, the more 
accurate the forecast.
Another site is Windy.com.
Lots of custom configuration and tools available, probably the most versatile 
site.
The following link has a pin drop positioned approximately over Ithaca with 
Temperature selected. Slide the bottom bar across to view the forecast. 
Different models can be selected at bottom right (NAM is most accurate and 
short-term, ECMWF and GFS are two longer-term models). Top right allows you to 
select different element views (wind, temperature, rain, etc.).

https://www.windy.com/-Temperature-temp?temp,38.013,-79.739,6,m:ePOad1V

I found it most interesting to view Temperature element view for the particular 
interest of bird migration. The wind always shows as moving white lines. As you 
slide the forecast bar across the bottom, you can see how there is a strong 
line of demarcation that develops by Saturday morning, the one I described 
above. That may hinder migration coming in from the South.
Based upon the current forecast models, it looks like there could be good 
fallout conditions along the Lake Erie and Lake Ontario shorelines, or even 
here in Ithaca as well. We shall see—forecasts are dynamically changing by the 
minute.
Hope this helps!
Sincerely,Chris -- Chris Tessaglia-Hymes PO Box 488 8 Etna Lane Etna, NY 13062 
607-351-5740
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[nysbirds-l] 23 Red-Throated Loons Whitney Point Reservoir Broome County 4/6/19

2019-04-06 Thread David Nicosia
Adrian Burke and I found an amazing concentration (for Broome Co.) of
Red-Throated Loons on the upper end of the Whitney Point reservoir this
morning. We were observing from Upper Lisle County Park and counted at
least 21 RT Loons all together. Later, Dan Watkins drove up Kiebal Rd
Whitney Point for a better look and confirmed the number at 23. This breaks
our ebird county high count record for this species of 4. This species is
an uncommon but regular migrant through Broome Co but from our experience
never in such concentrations.

We also had several FOYs, 2 AMERICAN COOTS which is uncommon in Broome and
a total 51 species for Upper Lisle County Park.

Spring finally made an arrival in the southern tier as temperatures climbed
out of the 40s as well!
Bring it on!

Dave Nicosia

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[cayugabirds-l] Radar showing nice early migratory flight in much of central NY.

2019-03-30 Thread David Nicosia
BGM radar is lighting up nicely with migratory birds at this hour. With a
strong cold front crossing the region between 5 am and 7 am Sunday, there
will be many new arrivals around and numbers should be up.  Sunday could be
a great day. Bundle up though as much colder air will be upon us.

Dave Nicosia

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[nysbirds-l] Black Vulture Vestal, NY Broome Co. 3/22/19 - they keep spreading north!

2019-03-22 Thread David Nicosia
Today I had one BLACK VULTURE slowly heading north over Murphy's Pits
Vestal NY.  This is the third year in a row that we have had at least 1 BV
in Broome Co. I wonder how long it will be when it is not that big of a
deal to see this species in the southern tier?  We still flag it as a rare
species in Broome on e-bird. We will keep that for now, but for how many
more years?

Dave Nicosia

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[nysbirds-l] 2 Eurasian Wigeons Vestal, NY Broome County Today 3/19/2019!!

2019-03-19 Thread David Nicosia
We had two EURASIAN WIGEONS at Murphy's Pits today. The birds were found
this morning by Victor Lamoureux. These birds are very rare in Broome Co.
and to have two to of them is amazing.

Here is my ebird list with some poor photos...

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S54019715

Best,
Dave Nicosia

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Re: Re:[cayugabirds-l] RWBB /other spring signs

2019-03-13 Thread david nicosia
 We had a big "goose" flight down here too.  skies were filled, birds were 
quite high up so you had to really look. Many snows at least from my home. All 
birds were heading northwest toward Finger Lakes
On Wednesday, March 13, 2019, 6:26:05 PM EDT, Kevin J. McGowan 
 wrote:  
 
 A few lunch-time observers at the Cornell Lab today saw hundreds of Red-winged 
Blackbirds and Grackles migrating past, but the big deal was the number of 
geese going over. For the almost hour I was out there on "Mt Sapsucker," the 
hill by the parking lots, one of our enthusiasts counted 22,600 Canada Geese, a 
few hundred Snow Geese, and 22 Cackling Geese. Before we came out, my son, Jay, 
had a small group of greater White-fronted Geese, and at least one Ross's Goose.
Few raptors, though. We were all hoping for Golden Eagles, but had to make do 
with a few Red-tailed Hawks, and singles of Red-shouldered Hawk and Northern 
Harrier.
Essentially every minute of my hour, we had skeins of Canada Geese in view. It 
was almost exhausting trying to look at every flock. During the brief moments 
when we didn't have geese overhead, if you looked with your binoculars into the 
distance, you could always find dozens of distant flocks.
An impressive migration day. Too bad I had to spend most of it inside behind a 
computer!
Kevin



From: bounce-123424683-3493...@list.cornell.edu 
 on behalf of Donna Lee Scott 

Sent: Wednesday, March 13, 2019 6:12 PM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] RWBB /other spring signs FOY Red Winged Blackbird on 
Algerine Rd, Lansing. Male on top of lone tree near frozen pond. 
26 Wild Turkeys on Davis Rd up the hill southeast of Algerine. None displaying. 
A few days ago neighbor at 581 Lansing Station Rd reported 2 mature Bald Eagles 
exhibiting courting behavior over lake & in tree in their yard. "Two eagles "in 
love" they called it. 
Donna ScottLansingSent from my iPhone--Cayugabirds-L List Info:Welcome and 
BasicsRules and InformationSubscribe, Configuration and LeaveArchives:The Mail 
ArchiveSurfbirdsBirdingOnThe.NetPlease submit your observations toeBird! 
Cayugabirds-L List Info: Welcome and Basics Rules and Information Subscribe, 
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[nysbirds-l] Sabine's Gull Broome County September 25th, 2018

2018-09-25 Thread David Nicosia
All,

Ace birder Jon Weeks found a SABINE'S GULL at Dorchester Park Whitney
Point, NY late this morning in the middle of a driving rain. The bird
initially was on the water and then eventually flew, showing off its
distinct wing pattern. The bird was an adult. Unfortunately, the bird
didn't stay long and after an extensive search into the afternoon, the bird
was not re-located. This is a first e-bird record of a Sabine's in Broome
County, and possibly a first county record.

see  https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S48740445 for Jon's checklist and
some photos of the bird on the water.

Best,
Dave Nicosia

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Re: [cayugabirds-l] odd radar at mid-morning - migrating raptors?

2018-09-23 Thread David Nicosia
I looked over the radar this morning and I didn't see anything obvious
around 938 am. Thermals are just beginning to rise at this time plus all
the fog that was around was lifting. Not sure from the data I have at home.
I will check from work tomorrow where I have higher resolution data.

On Sun, Sep 23, 2018 at 9:49 AM Dave Nutter  wrote:

> I just refreshed the Binghamton weather radar map at 9:38am, which removed
> the obvious flower of night migration which I looked at before dawn this
> morning. But it looks like there are wispy remnants of the migration map
> mainly to our east, which could be raptors moving due south from the east
> end of Lake Ontario, but also some around southern Tompkins County in the
> highlands which might be kettles on updrafts from wind against hills or
> perhaps Broad-wingeds initiating thermal flight after a night of rest and
> an evening and morning hunting in the forests. Anyone with more knowledge
> of weather, radar, & migration care to consider these hypotheses?
>
> - - Dave Nutter
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[nysbirds-l] Montezuma NWR Shorebird Walk This Saturday 1 September 7 am

2018-08-28 Thread David Nicosia
All,

This coming Saturday morning, 1 September, there will be another shorebird
walk into normally restricted areas at the Montezuma National Wildlife
Refuge.

At 7am we will caravan from the Montezuma NWR Visitor Center to the East Rd
overlook. Folks can meet us at the East Road overlook at 715 am if they
want.

Directions:
The Montezuma NWR Visitor Center address is 3395 U.S. Route 20 East, Seneca
Falls, a road also known as NY-5/US-20 or simply “5 & 20”. The refuge
entrance is between intersections with NY-90 and with NY-89 and located
just west of the bridge over the Seneca River which forms the border
between the Cayuga County Town of Montezuma in and the Seneca County Town
of Tyre.
>From that driveway:

Turn right/west on NY-5/US-20, and go 1.6 miles to the traffic light,
Turn right/north on NY-89, and go 3.9 miles,
Just after crossing the big bridge over the Clyde River and Erie Canal,
turn right/east onto North Mays Point Rd, and go 1/10 mile,
Turn left/north onto unmarked East Rd, and go 7/10 mile to the gravel
parking area for the Knox-Marsellus Marsh overlook.

Assemble about 7:15am at the parking area overlook on East Rd, joining
people who have gone there directly.

After a brief introduction & scan of the marsh from the overlook, we will
walk down to the north dike of Knox-Marsellus Marsh, probably continuing to
the northeast dike of Puddler Marsh, and possibly along the dike in between
the two impoundments as well.

Our primary goal is to observe shorebirds on their southbound migration who
stop here to feed and rest in the shallow water, on the mud, and in the
nearby short vegetation within the impoundments. Other birds and wildlife
are also of interest.

Bring binoculars and a field guide. If you have a spotting scope, please
bring it.
The trip is open to the public and there is no fee, but I ask that people
participate in these ways:
If you have ID expertise, please share it.
If you have ID questions, please ask them.
If you notice birds or behaviors that other folks seem not to have yet
noticed, please point them out.
Although shorebirds are fairly tolerant of people, other birds may move
away from us, such as herons, ducks, and songbirds. Please try to stay with
the group enough that we can communicate and enable the most people to
observe any birds before or when they flush.
I will be compiling a list of the birds we observe to share with
CayugaBirds-L and refuge staff, so please tell me what you find.
These trips are a great opportunity to learn about shorebirds, and with
luck we will see and compare several species.

This will be a slow walk with much stopping and standing on grass & weeds
which have been mowed awhile back and also driven upon by refuge vehicles.
Most of it is level, but East Rd is atop a drumlin above the impoundments,
so there is a substantial hill at the beginning and the end of the walk.
The round trip distance is only a couple miles, but we could be out until
noon, although certainly anyone can leave early. Dress for the weather, as
there is no shelter. Bring water & a snack. Insects have not been much of a
problem, but you should probably make some effort to deter ticks and check
for them afterward.

Thank-you to the refuge staff for maintaining the habitat for shorebirds.
It’s actually not easy to have expanses of mud and shallow fresh water on
demand for several months in a place where vegetation can quickly overgrow
it, or evaporation can dry it out, or rains can flood it. Thanks
particularly to Biologist Linda Ziemba and Visitor Services Manager Andrea
Van Beusichem for arranging these trips to happen.

Dave Nicosia

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[nysbirds-l] Today's Guided Montezuma Shorebird Walk Knox-Marcellus Marsh

2018-08-25 Thread David Nicosia
All,

We had an awesome day, people were very nice, weather was perfect, habitat
excellent and there were good numbers and variety of shorebirds and other
birds too.  We had great views of BAIRD'S, WHITE-RUMPED, SEMIPALMATED,
LEAST, PECTORAL and STILT SANDPIPERS. Also present were both species of
yellowlegs, BLACK-BELLIED PLOVERS, SEMIPALMATED PLOVERS and of course
KILLDEER. Some of us also got on a LONG-BILLED DOWITCHER which was among
SHORT-BILLED DOWITCHERS.
A BUFF-BREASTED SANDPIPER was also spotted by Chris Wood from East Road but
we weren't able to relocate it. A PEREGRINE FALCON was really stirring up
the shorebirds by this time.  The immature YELLOW-CROWNED NIGHT HERON was
still present. All in all, a great day. Special thanks to Dave Nutter, Bob
McGuire, Jay McGowan and Tim Lenz would assisted me in finding birds and
helping make sure people got on many of these birds. Ebird list is below.
Please email me if you want me to share this ebird list with you. I already
have received a couple emails and shared this list.

Montezuma NWR--Knox-Marsellus Marsh, Seneca, New York, US
Aug 25, 2018 7:16 AM - 11:01 AM
Protocol: Traveling
3.0 mile(s)
Comments:Montezuma NWR Guided Shorebird walk. 28 people in attendance.
Partly Sunny, temperatures in the 60s and 70s, nice breeze, low humidity,
water levels and habitat excellent for shorebirds.
61 species (+1 other taxa)

Canada Goose (Branta canadensis)  35Estimated. probably many more.
Trumpeter Swan (Cygnus buccinator)  6
Wood Duck (Aix sponsa)  2
Blue-winged Teal (Spatula discors)  14
Northern Shoveler (Spatula clypeata)  2
Gadwall (Mareca strepera)  1
American Wigeon (Mareca americana)  2
Mallard (Anas platyrhynchos)  250Estimated
American Black Duck (Anas rubripes)  2
Northern Pintail (Anas acuta)  16
Green-winged Teal (American) (Anas crecca carolinensis)  100Estimated
Mourning Dove (Zenaida macroura)  4
Common Gallinule (Gallinula galeata)  6
Sandhill Crane (tabida/rowani) (Antigone canadensis tabida/rowani)  9
Black-bellied Plover (Pluvialis squatarola)  5Adults in worn breeding
plumage.
Semipalmated Plover (Charadrius semipalmatus)  45Estimated
Killdeer (Charadrius vociferus)  40Estimated
Stilt Sandpiper (Calidris himantopus)  2adults almost molted to basic
plumage. some hints of barring on the belly.
Baird's Sandpiper (Calidris bairdii)  1
Least Sandpiper (Calidris minutilla)  150Estimated. Mostly juveniles
White-rumped Sandpiper (Calidris fuscicollis)  12adults varying from
worn breeding plumage with still fairly "neat" striping on the upper breast
to the more slate-gray plumage closer to basic plumage. Most individuals
were well into molt.
Pectoral Sandpiper (Calidris melanotos)  50Estimated
Semipalmated Sandpiper (Calidris pusilla)  75Estimated. many juveniles.
Short-billed Dowitcher (Limnodromus griseus)  11Juveniles. birds showed
rich coloration still, with patterning on tertials evident.
Long-billed Dowitcher (Limnodromus scolopaceus)  1Bird was similar in
size to the SBDOs but had more grayish plumage on the upper breast and
sides, and no patterning evident on the tertials.
Greater Yellowlegs (Tringa melanoleuca)  8
Lesser Yellowlegs (Tringa flavipes)  250Estimated
Ring-billed Gull (Larus delawarensis)  28
Herring Gull (American) (Larus argentatus smithsonianus)  2adults.
Caspian Tern (Hydroprogne caspia)  13several juveniles being fed by
adults.
Double-crested Cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus)  5
Great Blue Heron (Blue form) (Ardea herodias [herodias Group])  50
Estimated
Great Egret (Ardea alba)  25Estimated
Black-crowned Night-Heron (Nycticorax nycticorax)  1immature.
Yellow-crowned Night-Heron (Nyctanassa violacea)  1Continuing immature.
Osprey (Pandion haliaetus)  1
Northern Harrier (Circus hudsonius)  2
Bald Eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus)  31 adults and 2 immatures.
Red-tailed Hawk (borealis) (Buteo jamaicensis borealis)  1
Great Horned Owl (Great Horned) (Bubo virginianus [virginianus Group])  1
  Calling beginning
Downy Woodpecker (Eastern) (Dryobates pubescens pubescens/medianus)  1
Peregrine Falcon (North American) (Falco peregrinus anatum)  1chasing
shorebirds.
Blue Jay (Cyanocitta cristata)  1
American Crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos)  4
Northern Rough-winged Swallow (Stelgidopteryx serripennis)  3
Tree Swallow (Tachycineta bicolor)  55
Bank Swallow (Riparia riparia)  1
Barn Swallow (American) (Hirundo rustica erythrogaster)  100
swallow sp. (Hirundinidae sp.)  750estimated
American Robin (Turdus migratorius)  2
Gray Catbird (Dumetella carolinensis)  1
European Starling (Sturnus vulgaris)  8
Cedar Waxwing (Bombycilla cedrorum)  4
House Finch (Haemorhous mexicanus)  1Flyover, heard distinct call.
American Goldfinch (Spinus tristis)  12
Savannah Sparrow (Savannah) (Passerculus sandwichensis [sandwichensis
Group])  1
Song Sparrow (melodia/atlantica) (Melospiza melodia melodia/atlantica)  2
Bobolink (Dolichonyx oryzivorus)  100Estimated. 

Re:[cayugabirds-l] Swallows

2018-08-25 Thread David Nicosia
There was a massive take off of swallows at sunrise this morning seen from
the Montezuma visitor's center. I just estimated 2 but I bet it was
more like 20+our radar detected a big take off ring this morning.
Birds reached up to 8000 feet 10 minutes or so after take off!!!

On Sat, Aug 25, 2018, 11:34 AM Meena Madhav Haribal 
wrote:

> Hi Dave,
>
> I am interested in your 2 swallow sightings. Where did you see them
> from. From the marsh or in flight. I am interested in taking videos of the
> same for a documentary I am making. And you were there at what time. I
> might go tomorrow before sunrise.
>
>
> Thanks in advance.
>
> Cheers
>
> Meena
>
>
>
>
>
>
> Meena Haribal
> Ithaca NY 14850
> 42.429007,-76.47111
>
> http://meenaharibal.blogspot.com/
> Ithaca area moths: https://plus.google.com/118047473426099383469/posts
> Dragonfly book sample pages:
> https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B1ngrZelDNo5QnFDMl9BdVNlLXc
>
>
>
>

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Re:[nysbirds-l] Montezuma NWR Shorebird Walk This Saturday 25 August 7 am

2018-08-24 Thread David Nicosia
In case it didn't go throughI sent this two days ago.

On Wed, Aug 22, 2018, 2:21 PM David Nicosia  wrote:

> This coming Saturday morning, 25 August, there will be another shorebird
> walk into normally restricted areas at the Montezuma National Wildlife
> Refuge.
>
> At 7am we will caravan from the Montezuma NWR Visitor Center to the East
> Rd overlook. Folks can meet us at the East Road overlook at 715 am if they
> want.
>
> Directions:
> The Montezuma NWR Visitor Center address is 3395 U.S. Route 20 East,
> Seneca Falls, a road also known as NY-5/US-20 or simply “5 & 20”. The
> refuge entrance is between intersections with NY-90 and with NY-89 and
> located just west of the bridge over the Seneca River which forms the
> border between the Cayuga County Town of Montezuma in and the Seneca County
> Town of Tyre.
> From that driveway:
>
> Turn right/west on NY-5/US-20, and go 1.6 miles to the traffic light,
> Turn right/north on NY-89, and go 3.9 miles,
> Just after crossing the big bridge over the Clyde River and Erie Canal,
> turn right/east onto North Mays Point Rd, and go 1/10 mile,
> Turn left/north onto unmarked East Rd, and go 7/10 mile to the gravel
> parking area for the Knox-Marsellus Marsh overlook.
>
> Assemble about 7:15am at the parking area overlook on East Rd, joining
> people who have gone there directly.
>
> After a brief introduction & scan of the marsh from the overlook, we will
> walk down to the north dike of Knox-Marsellus Marsh, probably continuing to
> the northeast dike of Puddler Marsh, and possibly along the dike in between
> the two impoundments as well.
>
> Our primary goal is to observe shorebirds on their southbound migration
> who stop here to feed and rest in the shallow water, on the mud, and in the
> nearby short vegetation within the impoundments. Other birds and wildlife
> are also of interest.
>
> Bring binoculars and a field guide. If you have a spotting scope, please
> bring it.
> The trip is open to the public and there is no fee, but I ask that people
> participate in these ways:
> If you have ID expertise, please share it.
> If you have ID questions, please ask them.
> If you notice birds or behaviors that other folks seem not to have yet
> noticed, please point them out.
> Although shorebirds are fairly tolerant of people, other birds may move
> away from us, such as herons, ducks, and songbirds. Please try to stay with
> the group enough that we can communicate and enable the most people to
> observe any birds before or when they flush.
> I will be compiling a list of the birds we observe to share with
> CayugaBirds-L and refuge staff, so please tell me what you find.
> These trips are a great opportunity to learn about shorebirds, and with
> luck we will see and compare several species.
>
> This will be a slow walk with much stopping and standing on grass & weeds
> which have been mowed awhile back and also driven upon by refuge vehicles.
> Most of it is level, but East Rd is atop a drumlin above the impoundments,
> so there is a substantial hill at the beginning and the end of the walk.
> The round trip distance is only a couple miles, but we could be out until
> noon, although certainly anyone can leave early. Dress for the weather, as
> there is no shelter. Bring water & a snack. Insects have not been much of a
> problem, but you should probably make some effort to deter ticks and check
> for them afterward.
>
> Thank-you to the refuge staff for maintaining the habitat for shorebirds.
> It’s actually not easy to have expanses of mud and shallow fresh water on
> demand for several months in a place where vegetation can quickly overgrow
> it, or evaporation can dry it out, or rains can flood it. Thanks
> particularly to Biologist Linda Ziemba and Visitor Services Manager Andrea
> Van Beusichem for arranging these trips to happen.
>
> Dave Nicosia
>
> P.S Thanks to Dave Nutter for leading last week and providing such a nice
> template email for me to use!!
>

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[cayugabirds-l] Montezuma NWR Shorebird Walk This Saturday 25 August 7 am

2018-08-22 Thread David Nicosia
This coming Saturday morning, 25 August, there will be another shorebird
walk into normally restricted areas at the Montezuma National Wildlife
Refuge.

At 7am we will caravan from the Montezuma NWR Visitor Center to the East Rd
overlook. Folks can meet us at the East Road overlook at 715 am if they
want.

Directions:
The Montezuma NWR Visitor Center address is 3395 U.S. Route 20 East, Seneca
Falls, a road also known as NY-5/US-20 or simply “5 & 20”. The refuge
entrance is between intersections with NY-90 and with NY-89 and located
just west of the bridge over the Seneca River which forms the border
between the Cayuga County Town of Montezuma in and the Seneca County Town
of Tyre.
>From that driveway:

Turn right/west on NY-5/US-20, and go 1.6 miles to the traffic light,
Turn right/north on NY-89, and go 3.9 miles,
Just after crossing the big bridge over the Clyde River and Erie Canal,
turn right/east onto North Mays Point Rd, and go 1/10 mile,
Turn left/north onto unmarked East Rd, and go 7/10 mile to the gravel
parking area for the Knox-Marsellus Marsh overlook.

Assemble about 7:15am at the parking area overlook on East Rd, joining
people who have gone there directly.

After a brief introduction & scan of the marsh from the overlook, we will
walk down to the north dike of Knox-Marsellus Marsh, probably continuing to
the northeast dike of Puddler Marsh, and possibly along the dike in between
the two impoundments as well.

Our primary goal is to observe shorebirds on their southbound migration who
stop here to feed and rest in the shallow water, on the mud, and in the
nearby short vegetation within the impoundments. Other birds and wildlife
are also of interest.

Bring binoculars and a field guide. If you have a spotting scope, please
bring it.
The trip is open to the public and there is no fee, but I ask that people
participate in these ways:
If you have ID expertise, please share it.
If you have ID questions, please ask them.
If you notice birds or behaviors that other folks seem not to have yet
noticed, please point them out.
Although shorebirds are fairly tolerant of people, other birds may move
away from us, such as herons, ducks, and songbirds. Please try to stay with
the group enough that we can communicate and enable the most people to
observe any birds before or when they flush.
I will be compiling a list of the birds we observe to share with
CayugaBirds-L and refuge staff, so please tell me what you find.
These trips are a great opportunity to learn about shorebirds, and with
luck we will see and compare several species.

This will be a slow walk with much stopping and standing on grass & weeds
which have been mowed awhile back and also driven upon by refuge vehicles.
Most of it is level, but East Rd is atop a drumlin above the impoundments,
so there is a substantial hill at the beginning and the end of the walk.
The round trip distance is only a couple miles, but we could be out until
noon, although certainly anyone can leave early. Dress for the weather, as
there is no shelter. Bring water & a snack. Insects have not been much of a
problem, but you should probably make some effort to deter ticks and check
for them afterward.

Thank-you to the refuge staff for maintaining the habitat for shorebirds.
It’s actually not easy to have expanses of mud and shallow fresh water on
demand for several months in a place where vegetation can quickly overgrow
it, or evaporation can dry it out, or rains can flood it. Thanks
particularly to Biologist Linda Ziemba and Visitor Services Manager Andrea
Van Beusichem for arranging these trips to happen.

Dave Nicosia

P.S Thanks to Dave Nutter for leading last week and providing such a nice
template email for me to use!!

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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Myers Sanderlings

2018-08-21 Thread David Nicosia
Just had 3 sanderlings Dorchester plus a Ruddy turnstone. Must have been
another small wave like a few weeks back.

On Tue, Aug 21, 2018, 7:07 PM John Greenly  wrote:

> 5 Sanderlings at Myers point, 7 pm,  (juvenile plumage).
>
> John Greenly
> Ludlowville
>
> --
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>
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> 3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html
>
> Please submit your observations to eBird:
> http://ebird.org/content/ebird/
>
> --
>

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Re: ADMIN: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Scouting party or wrecking crew?

2018-08-11 Thread David Nicosia
I would also add a MERLIN flushed a lot of shorebirds out of KM marsh on
Friday and that is why the RUFF ended up at Benning. Plus we had a
PEREGRINE FALCON today also flushing a lot of birds of which many returned
back to their original places.

On Sat, Aug 11, 2018 at 7:09 PM Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes <
c...@cornell.edu> wrote:

> Dave K, et. al.,
>
> First, let me state that I was not a participant of either of these trips,
> and am only responding with my eList administrator hat on. While I don’t
> doubt some frustration that may have been felt by you or others in having
> missed the Ruff on Friday or Saturday, it is not uncommon for field leaders
> to have authorized or planned scouting trips ahead of schedule field trips.
> That being said, it is not okay to publicly call out people in this way,
> especially as identified by *religion*. Please be respectful of your
> fellow birders on this eList!
>
> If you were to take a moment to review the eBird checklists from the
> morning of the scouting trip as compared to morning of the planned field
> trip, you will see very little variation in the species and abundance, with
> the exception of the following (Species Name #Friday AM vs #Saturday AM):
>
> Wood Duck 50 vs 5
> Gadwall 0 vs 5
> Mallard 150 vs 100 (estimated)
> American Black Duck 1 vs 0
> Green-winged Teal 20 vs 12
> Great Egret 35 vs 1
> Green Heron 1 vs 45
> Black-crowned Night-Heron 4 vs 25
> Common Gallinule 6 vs 1
> Sandhill Crane 3 vs 11
> Semipalmated Plover 50 vs 55
> Killdeer 25 vs 15
> RUFF 1 vs 0
> Stilt Sandpiper 1 vs 2
> Least Sandpiper 100 vs 75
> White-rumped Sandpiper 2 vs 1
> Pectoral Sandpiper 50 vs 25 (estimated)
> Peep sp. 0 vs 100 (estimated)
> Greater Yellowlegs 3 vs 6
> Lesser Yellowlegs 75 vs 150 (estimated)
> Ring-billed Gull 28 vs 45 (estimated)
>
> Here are the two eBird checklists these numbers were pulled from:
>
> Friday morning: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S47759874
>
> Saturday morning: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S47787278
>
>
> If one were to look at the other aspect affecting species mix and numbers,
> i.e., *the* *weather*, you will see that there was the passage of a cold
> front producing favorable migration conditions on the morning of the 10th
> (the day of the scouting trip) through the late evening of the 10th (the
> night before the field trip). It would not be unexpected to see the species
> mix and numbers become affected by the passage of this cold front. Given
> the time of year and the turnover of numbers of species, I’m not surprised,
> and daily variation is to be expected. It is highly unlikely that the
> scouting trip on the morning of the 10th caused this kind of turnover.
>
> It has been claimed that repeated human traffic near mudflat habitat would
> cause fewer shorebirds to use or return to that space; however, it has been
> arguably demonstrated that once mudflat-using shorebirds are exposed to
> daily routines of humans and nearby cars traveling on dikes, those
> mudflat-using shorebirds will become accustomed to and less skittish of
> humans or cars near them. Please note, this is not the same thing as the
> impact that humans can have upon coastal beachfront-using migratory
> shorebirds—that’s a completely different habitat type and scenario.
>
> In the future, if there are any concerns or complaints associated with
> other birders or their activities, please either contact them directly
> off-list, or reach out to me in private first, and not to the entire
> Cayugabirds-L eList community of 930 subscribers.
>
> Thank you!
>
> Sincerely,
> Chris T-H
>
> Listowner, Cayugabirds-L
> Ithaca, NY
>
>
>
> On Aug 11, 2018, at 5:17 PM, Dave K  wrote:
>
> A group of the usuals (minus one plus an Amish guy) went on a 'scouting
> trip' at Knox-Marcellus on Friday preceding Saturdays 'Public Walk'.
> Of course, they flushed many of the birds, pushing them away from the
> dikes and some, including the Ruff, out of the area.
> How could any right minded person think this scouting adventure would have
> a positive impact on so many who waited until the scheduled time Saturday
> morning.
> I've only seen reports from one scout so I don't know if any of the others
> even bothered to show up today. But hey., they got theirs, right?
> Today's participants deserved better.
> So elitist and exclusionary.
> --
> *Cayugabirds-L List Info:*
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> Subscribe, Configuration and Leave
> 
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> --
>
>
> --
> Chris 

[cayugabirds-l] eBird -- Montezuma NWR--Knox-Marsellus Marsh -- Aug 11, 2018

2018-08-11 Thread David Nicosia
Montezuma NWR--Knox-Marsellus Marsh
Aug 11, 2018
7:21 AM
Traveling
2.00 miles
266 minutes
All birds reported? Yes


71 species.

Comments:
Had 20 people on this weekend's shorebird walk. Weather was mostly
cloudy. Temperatures in the 60s. Light breeze.

50 Canada Goose -- Estimated
1 Trumpeter Swan
5 Wood Duck
7 Blue-winged Teal
5 Gadwall
100 Mallard (Northern) -- Estimated
4 Northern Pintail
12 Green-winged Teal (American)
1 Pied-billed Grebe
6 Double-crested Cormorant - FO
50 Great Blue Heron (Blue form) -- Estimated
1 Great Egret
45 Green Heron -- Estimated
25 Black-crowned Night-Heron -- Estimated. Mostly Puddler Marsh in trees
1 Yellow-crowned Night-Heron -- *Rare. Continuing. In trees by Puddler
Marsh with BCNH.
1 Turkey Vulture - FO
1 Osprey (carolinensis) - FO
1 Northern Harrier -- Low over Puddler
1 Bald Eagle
1 Common Gallinule
11 Sandhill Crane (tabida/rowani) -- Both KM and Puddler Marsh
55 Semipalmated Plover -- Estimated. Several juveniles
15 Killdeer -- Estimated
2 Stilt Sandpiper -- Both molting from breeding/alternate plumage.
Barring still present to under tail.
75 Least Sandpiper -- Estimated. At least 10 juveniles
1 White-rumped Sandpiper
25 Pectoral Sandpiper -- Estimated
75 Semipalmated Sandpiper -- Estimated. Several juveniles
100 peep sp. -- Estimated
1 Short-billed Dowitcher -- Juvenile
1 Wilson's Snipe
1 Spotted Sandpiper
6 Greater Yellowlegs
150 Lesser Yellowlegs -- Estimated
45 Ring-billed Gull -- Estimated
27 Caspian Tern -- Mostly KM Marsh
1 Black Tern (American) -- Basic plumage. Likely a juvenile
2 Chimney Swift - FO
1 Ruby-throated Hummingbird
1 Belted Kingfisher
1 Downy Woodpecker (Eastern)
1 Northern Flicker (Yellow-shafted)
1 Pileated Woodpecker -- Heard toward towpath.
1 Peregrine Falcon -- Flyover. Scared shorebirds, ducks, terns and gulls.
1 Willow Flycatcher -- Calling.
1 Blue Jay
3 American Crow
3 Northern Rough-winged Swallow
3 Purple Martin
150 Tree Swallow -- Estimated
100 Bank Swallow -- Estimated
45 Barn Swallow (American) -- Estimated
100 swallow sp. -- Estimated
3 Black-capped Chickadee -- Woods by parking area east rd
1 Tufted Titmouse
1 White-breasted Nuthatch (Eastern) -- Woods by parking area east rd
3 Marsh Wren
1 Carolina Wren -- Woods by parking area east rd
2 American Robin
4 Gray Catbird
300 European Starling
15 Cedar Waxwing
3 Common Yellowthroat
7 Yellow Warbler (Northern) -- Several flyby birds
4 Savannah Sparrow (Savannah) -- Along trail puddler Marsh
11 Song Sparrow (melodia/atlantica)
5 Swamp Sparrow
1 Northern Cardinal -- Woods by parking area east rd
3 Indigo Bunting -- Singing in a few spots. Seen by many.
50 Bobolink -- Constant flyover birds
5000 Red-winged Blackbird (Red-winged) -- Estimated. Large flock in
and above cornfield adjacey to Puddler Marsh
2 Common Grackle (Bronzed)
25 American Goldfinch -- Estimated

Number of Taxa: 73

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[nysbirds-l] Guided Shorebird Walk Knox-Marcellus Marsh Sat August 11th 7 am

2018-08-05 Thread David Nicosia
All,

We will be doing another guided shorebird walk to K-M and Puddler's Marshes
Montezuma this coming Saturday August 11th. We will meet at the visitor's
center at 7 am or if you desire you can go to the East Road overlook by 715
am.

There have been some great birds reported recently here including a basic
plumage RUFF and a continuing juvenile YELLOW-CROWNED NIGHT HERON. Plus a
nice assortment of shorebirds.

Here is an ebird list from last Saturday's walk led by Joshua Snodgrass.

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S47656443


As always bring water, snacks, insect repellent and sunscreen. We will walk
down the dike and basically bird where the birds are. The weather looks wet
at times this week but so far looks nice on Saturday which will hopefully
keep water levels up for shorebirds.

Any questions let me know.

Best,
Dave Nicosia

P.S If conditions are still good we will do this again the following
Saturday on the 18th at 7 am.

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[nysbirds-l] Guided Shorebird Walk Knox-Marcellus Marsh Sat August 11th 7 am

2018-08-05 Thread David Nicosia
All,

We will be doing another guided shorebird walk to K-M and Puddler's Marshes
Montezuma this coming Saturday August 11th. We will meet at the visitor's
center at 7 am or if you desire you can go to the East Road overlook by 715
am. See attached flyer

There have been some great birds reported recently here including a basic
plumage RUFF and a continuing juvenile YELLOW-CROWNED NIGHT HERON. Plus a
nice assortment of shorebirds.

Here is an ebird list from last Saturday's walk led by Joshua Snodgrass.

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S47656443


As always bring water, snacks, insect repellent and sunscreen. We will walk
down the dike and basically bird where the birds are. The weather looks wet
at times this week but so far looks nice on Saturday which will hopefully
keep water levels up for shorebirds.

Any questions let me know.

Best,
Dave Nicosia

P.S If conditions are still good we will do this again the following
Saturday on the 18th at 7 am.

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Guided Shorebird Walk_Aug11,18_2018.pdf
Description: Adobe PDF document


[cayugabirds-l] First southbound migrants Broome Co.

2018-07-07 Thread David Nicosia
Had my first "fall" LESSER YELLOWLEGS at Upper Lisle County Park last
evening Broome Co. The bird was an adult in what appeared to me as worn
breeding plumage. I also had a small group of RING-BILLED GULLS (13)
loafing at Dorchester Park. This is the first group of these birds I have
seen since Spring migration. To my knowledge these birds don't breed in
Broome Co. Most of these birds were still in breeding plumage with a couple
2nd cycle birds. Nothing unusual, but interesting how quickly birds turn to
fall migration. Yesterday there was a strong cold front and northwest winds
that likely kicked this off. I also have seen reports from Montezuma that
there is a trickle of LESSER YELLOWLEGS and a SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPER.

Dave Nicosia

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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Where are the birds?

2018-06-22 Thread david nicosia
 I look at Long Point Bird Observatory from this Canadian site 
https://www.bsc-eoc.org/birdmon/default/popindices.jsp  This banding site seems 
to have the longest record. They report a population index which I presume 
accounts for banding hours. If you look at the different species, it seems that 
most of our forest dwelling species are doing well especially warblers. This is 
probably related to the maturation of our woodlands since 1960. These increases 
come at a time when we supposedly lost a large amount of tropical wintering 
habitat. It also is time period of more cell towers and now wind farms. This 
data only goes to 2015. It doesn't account for the last few seasons. Personally 
I haven't noticed much declines in fact, veeries, rose-breasted grosbeaks, 
ovenbirds, blackburnian warblers, chestnut-sided warblers, least flycatcher 
among a few others seem up to me this year in the areas I go in June. I have 
noticed a dearth of wood thrushes. American Robins don't seem as common either 
in my neighborhood. Probably all local variations at least here 





On Wednesday, June 20, 2018, 2:47:33 PM EDT, k...@empacc.net 
 wrote:  
 
 
Not at all in banding reports which show lower numbers on average in some 
places, more in others and a healthy bunch of birds. Uniform agreement that 
weather caused a strange migration with both flyovers and late, if much at all, 
movers after a blocking front(s). All of this is localized and some happened 
around here las year as well whereas other areas are just fine. The mix of 
species here as I mentioned, tends to agree with that idea. Even here, some 
areas are reporting normal species and numbers. I doubt the disease theory as 
there is no evidence. The weather mortality reports are minimal and confined to 
birds landing in awkward place like parking lots. I have only looked at 
Saw-whet breeding and it appears its cyclic self and very dependent on prey 
populations.

John



---
John and Sue Gregoire
 Field Ornithologists
 Kestrel Haven Migration Observatory
 5373 Fitzgerald Rd
 Burdett, NY 14818
 42.443508000, -76.758202000
On 2018-06-20 16:43, David Nicosia wrote:

I remember this conversation last year. If there is a marked rapid decline in 
song birds as reported, then something has occurred in the past couple years 
that is wiping our birds out. Habitat loss is a gradual slow process that would 
not be so readily noticed on a wide scale from year to year. The weather 
patterns, I don't believe were bad enough for massive mortality events 
(although I haven't looked into this in full depth). Wind farms keep popping 
up, but again its a gradual pressure that wouldn't manifest itself in 1-2 years 
for such reported rapid declines. The only thing I can think of is if there is 
a disease (west nile?) that is affecting songbirds and other species? This 
could explain two poor breeding seasons. Does anyone know if this is being 
reported in species of songbirds???  
 Dave 
On Tue, Jun 19, 2018 at 2:10 PM  wrote:

The current "record" based on banded birds returned to the wild is 8 years 2 
months. That said, Nancy may well have been enjoying the progeny of that first 
pair as their site fidelity is high.

John



---
John and Sue Gregoire
 Field Ornithologists
 Kestrel Haven Migration Observatory
 5373 Fitzgerald Rd
 Burdett, NY 14818
 42.443508000, -76.758202000
On 2018-06-19 17:17, Asher Hockett wrote:

Likely "your" pewee was at least two different birds, as their lifespan is ~7 
years.
On Mon, Jun 18, 2018 at 7:57 PM, Nancy Cusumano  
wrote:

It really is an odd summer!  We also are missing "our" peewee, who has been 
here reliably for the 14 years I have lived in this house. Missing him!There 
are at least 2 pair of great crested flycatchers and on Friday an Indigo 
bunting showed up and is still around singing his head off from the tops of the 
black locust trees.There are sapsucker babies (that sound like they are humming 
in morse code from inside the tree) and bluebirds too.  So down one peewee, up 
a bunting? Guess I would call that OKbut I want my peewee back. thanks for 
everyone's comments on this thread. Nancy
Cayuga Dog Rescue has saved more than 578! dogs since 2005!Learn more at 
cayugadogrescue.org
On Mon, Jun 18, 2018 at 1:28 PM,  wrote:


Hi!

Over 30years of banding, migration and population study here and we experienced 
and ever increasing paucity of birds. About 15 years ago I wrote a report 
citing these losses. While many can be linked to loss of habitat mainly due to 
factory farming, that didn't account for the lack of song. We prognosticated at 
the time that populations within species were undergoing a drastic 
diminishment.That has since been shown to be even worse than we guessed ( based 
on American Bird Conservancy data sets).

A result most noticeable was in song. With fewer competitors, birds in lesser 
numbers arrive on native land and , if they find it still existent, estab

Re: [cayugabirds-l] Where are the birds?

2018-06-20 Thread David Nicosia
 I remember this conversation last year. If there is a marked rapid decline
in song birds as reported, then something has occurred in the past couple
years that is wiping our birds out. Habitat loss is a gradual slow process
that would not be so readily noticed on a wide scale from year to year. The
weather patterns, I don't believe were bad enough for massive mortality
events (although I haven't looked into this in full depth). Wind farms keep
popping up, but again its a gradual pressure that wouldn't manifest itself
in 1-2 years for such reported rapid declines. The only thing I can think
of is if there is a disease (west nile?) that is affecting songbirds and
other species? This could explain two poor breeding seasons. Does anyone
know if this is being reported in species of songbirds???

Dave



On Tue, Jun 19, 2018 at 2:10 PM  wrote:

> The current "record" based on banded birds returned to the wild is 8 years
> 2 months. That said, Nancy may well have been enjoying the progeny of that
> first pair as their site fidelity is high.
>
> John
>
>
> ---
> John and Sue Gregoire
> Field Ornithologists
> Kestrel Haven Migration Observatory
> 5373 Fitzgerald Rd
> Burdett, NY 14818
> 42.443508000, -76.758202000
>
> On 2018-06-19 17:17, Asher Hockett wrote:
>
> Likely "your" pewee was at least two different birds, as their lifespan is
> ~7 years.
>
> On Mon, Jun 18, 2018 at 7:57 PM, Nancy Cusumano  > wrote:
>
>> It really is an odd summer!  We also are missing "our" peewee, who has
>> been here reliably for the 14 years I have lived in this house. Missing him!
>> There are at least 2 pair of great crested flycatchers and on Friday an
>> Indigo bunting showed up and is still around singing his head off from the
>> tops of the black locust trees.
>> There are sapsucker babies (that sound like they are humming in morse
>> code from inside the tree) and bluebirds too.  So down one peewee, up a
>> bunting? Guess I would call that OKbut I want my peewee back.
>>
>> thanks for everyone's comments on this thread.
>>
>> Nancy
>>
>> Cayuga Dog Rescue has saved more than 578! dogs since 2005!
>> Learn more at cayugadogrescue.org
>>
>> On Mon, Jun 18, 2018 at 1:28 PM,  wrote:
>>
>>> Hi!
>>>
>>> Over 30years of banding, migration and population study here and we
>>> experienced and ever increasing paucity of birds. About 15 years ago I
>>> wrote a report citing these losses. While many can be linked to loss of
>>> habitat mainly due to factory farming, that didn't account for the lack of
>>> song. We prognosticated at the time that populations within species were
>>> undergoing a drastic diminishment.That has since been shown to be even
>>> worse than we guessed ( based on American Bird Conservancy data sets).
>>>
>>> A result most noticeable was in song. With fewer competitors, birds in
>>> lesser numbers arrive on native land and , if they find it still existent,
>>> establish a territory. With little or no competition, the territorial song
>>> is short lived -after all, why expend energy needlessly? Defense of
>>> territory is seldom needed so in season song is greatly diminished.
>>>
>>> That doesn't mean it stops entirely but certainly far less than what we
>>> new 50, 40 or 30 years ago.
>>>
>>> Fast forward to the crazy migration we experienced this spring. Expected
>>> species have still not checked in and we guess they either overflew or were
>>> content to our south. We have the same experience with Veery here and Wood
>>> Thrush has been declining steadily. Least Flycatcher, Warbling Vireo are
>>> all missing and the fancy Thrushes once a stopover certainty haven't been
>>> seen for several years. Yesterday, we finally had a single Pewee. On the
>>> positive side we are inundated with Grosbeaks, Purple Finch, Great-crested
>>> Flycatchers, cuckoos and others that are normally here in much smaller
>>> numbers.
>>>
>>> Looking South to the greater DC area, many of these species are still
>>> there and that's abnormal. Check the ADK reports and they are also having a
>>> strange year although I've not seen any thoughts on the subject from that
>>> area.
>>>
>>> The short answer is an unusual migration window with lots of weather
>>> effect, rapidly declining populations creating an environment where our old
>>> expectations are no longer valid.
>>>
>>> I liked it much better several decades ago. We have stopped banding
>>> passerines and happy we did as the disappointment would be even greater.
>>>
>>> Best,
>>>
>>> John
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> ---
>>> John and Sue Gregoire
>>> Field Ornithologists
>>> Kestrel Haven Migration Observatory
>>> 5373 Fitzgerald Rd
>>> 
>>> Burdett, NY 14818
>>> 
>>> 42.443508000, -76.758202000
>>>
>>> On 2018-06-18 15:45, W. Larry Hymes wrote:
>>>
>>> I have noticed, as have others, that the woods have not been as
>>> plentiful with bird song as 

Re: [cayugabirds-l] Where are the birds?

2018-06-20 Thread David Nicosia
 I remember this conversation last year. If there is a marked rapid decline
in song birds as reported, then something has occurred in the past couple
years that is wiping our birds out. Habitat loss is a gradual slow process
that would not be so readily noticed on a wide scale from year to year. The
weather patterns, I don't believe were bad enough for massive mortality
events (although I haven't looked into this in full depth). Wind farms keep
popping up, but again its a gradual pressure that wouldn't manifest itself
in 1-2 years for such reported rapid declines. The only thing I can think
of is if there is a disease (west nile?) that is affecting songbirds and
other species? This could explain two poor breeding seasons. Does anyone
know if this is being reported in species of songbirds???

Dave

On Tue, Jun 19, 2018 at 2:10 PM  wrote:

> The current "record" based on banded birds returned to the wild is 8 years
> 2 months. That said, Nancy may well have been enjoying the progeny of that
> first pair as their site fidelity is high.
>
> John
>
>
> ---
> John and Sue Gregoire
> Field Ornithologists
> Kestrel Haven Migration Observatory
> 5373 Fitzgerald Rd
> Burdett, NY 14818
> 42.443508000, -76.758202000
>
> On 2018-06-19 17:17, Asher Hockett wrote:
>
> Likely "your" pewee was at least two different birds, as their lifespan is
> ~7 years.
>
> On Mon, Jun 18, 2018 at 7:57 PM, Nancy Cusumano  > wrote:
>
>> It really is an odd summer!  We also are missing "our" peewee, who has
>> been here reliably for the 14 years I have lived in this house. Missing him!
>> There are at least 2 pair of great crested flycatchers and on Friday an
>> Indigo bunting showed up and is still around singing his head off from the
>> tops of the black locust trees.
>> There are sapsucker babies (that sound like they are humming in morse
>> code from inside the tree) and bluebirds too.  So down one peewee, up a
>> bunting? Guess I would call that OKbut I want my peewee back.
>>
>> thanks for everyone's comments on this thread.
>>
>> Nancy
>>
>> Cayuga Dog Rescue has saved more than 578! dogs since 2005!
>> Learn more at cayugadogrescue.org
>>
>> On Mon, Jun 18, 2018 at 1:28 PM,  wrote:
>>
>>> Hi!
>>>
>>> Over 30years of banding, migration and population study here and we
>>> experienced and ever increasing paucity of birds. About 15 years ago I
>>> wrote a report citing these losses. While many can be linked to loss of
>>> habitat mainly due to factory farming, that didn't account for the lack of
>>> song. We prognosticated at the time that populations within species were
>>> undergoing a drastic diminishment.That has since been shown to be even
>>> worse than we guessed ( based on American Bird Conservancy data sets).
>>>
>>> A result most noticeable was in song. With fewer competitors, birds in
>>> lesser numbers arrive on native land and , if they find it still existent,
>>> establish a territory. With little or no competition, the territorial song
>>> is short lived -after all, why expend energy needlessly? Defense of
>>> territory is seldom needed so in season song is greatly diminished.
>>>
>>> That doesn't mean it stops entirely but certainly far less than what we
>>> new 50, 40 or 30 years ago.
>>>
>>> Fast forward to the crazy migration we experienced this spring. Expected
>>> species have still not checked in and we guess they either overflew or were
>>> content to our south. We have the same experience with Veery here and Wood
>>> Thrush has been declining steadily. Least Flycatcher, Warbling Vireo are
>>> all missing and the fancy Thrushes once a stopover certainty haven't been
>>> seen for several years. Yesterday, we finally had a single Pewee. On the
>>> positive side we are inundated with Grosbeaks, Purple Finch, Great-crested
>>> Flycatchers, cuckoos and others that are normally here in much smaller
>>> numbers.
>>>
>>> Looking South to the greater DC area, many of these species are still
>>> there and that's abnormal. Check the ADK reports and they are also having a
>>> strange year although I've not seen any thoughts on the subject from that
>>> area.
>>>
>>> The short answer is an unusual migration window with lots of weather
>>> effect, rapidly declining populations creating an environment where our old
>>> expectations are no longer valid.
>>>
>>> I liked it much better several decades ago. We have stopped banding
>>> passerines and happy we did as the disappointment would be even greater.
>>>
>>> Best,
>>>
>>> John
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> ---
>>> John and Sue Gregoire
>>> Field Ornithologists
>>> Kestrel Haven Migration Observatory
>>> 5373 Fitzgerald Rd
>>> 
>>> Burdett, NY 14818
>>> 
>>> 42.443508000, -76.758202000
>>>
>>> On 2018-06-18 15:45, W. Larry Hymes wrote:
>>>
>>> I have noticed, as have others, that the woods have not been as
>>> plentiful with bird song as 

[nysbirds-l] Montezuma Today May 29th, 2018- Red Knot, Red-Necked Phalarope

2018-05-29 Thread David Nicosia
All,

I had a change of plans and am not going to the NJ coast for shorebirds. So
I decided to try Montezuma again for shorebirds and amazingly I had a
pretty awesome day.  Good weather usually doesn't mean rare birds for me.
That was false today!

First stop was Tschache Pool Tower and I could see a fair number of mainly
peeps very distant with one larger shorebird. It was very shimmery so I
decided to go to Rte 89 and look from there. At this time I was unaware of
Dave Kennedy's earlier report of a Red Knot here. So I looked from Rte 89
and saw the grouping of shorebirds but they were too close to the top of
the weeds on the dike so I couldn't ID much. Then an eagle flew over and
the birds took flight and I got great views of a RED KNOT in breeding
plumage with the peeps. The peeps flew around a couple more times and the
Knot stayed in with them offering great scope views in flight. Then I went
back to the tower as they appeared to be closer than earlier. Maybe I could
get a better look. But I was fortunate enough to run into  Pete Sar and  Jackie
Baker  who were doing the refuge survey at Tschache. They were gracious
enough to let me ride with them and I got much closer views of this great
bird. The irony is that is the main specie I go for to see in NJ!

The list for Tschache that I compiled can be found here with poor photos of
the knot. The shimmer was awful.  https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S46130168

Then after this, I headed over to wildlife drive and there are still 7
REDHEADS main pool, one GREATER YELLOWLEGS Seneca Flats. The Snowy Egret
was not present at Eaton at this time. Benning Marsh was fairly quiet too.

Then I hit the north side of the drive and, WOW, a large flock of
shorebirds!  Most of the birds were SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPERS.  There were
also quite a few DUNLIN including one still in basic / non-breeding
plumage. I found at least 5 WHITE-RUMPED SANDPIPERS but it was hard to keep
track of numbers as the birds were flying around from mudflat to mudflat
across from the Eagle sculpture.
Then, I got on a RED-NECKED PHALAROPE!  Jay texted me that there was one on
wildlife drive yesterday. So I assumed this was the same one. But looking
at photos of yesterday vs today, this one was duller. Not sure if it is a
male or a duller female. In any event, another great bird!!

Who needs to go to NJ!!  This was a ton of fun and it was great birding
with Ann Mitchell and Pat Martin as they joined me at the thruway ponds to
see the Phalarope! My list is below for wildlife drive with poor photos of
the RNPH and others(lighting was horrible):

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S46135318

Best,
Dave Nicosia

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[nysbirds-l] Montezuma NWR Tschache Pool Spring Shorebird Walk May 26th, 2018

2018-05-27 Thread David Nicosia
All,

We had an awesome turnout for the second spring shorebird walk along part
of the restricted area of Tschache Pool.  I estimated at least 45 people as
some came later and others left  earlier. There were 27 cars parked at the
parking area by the tower at Tschache at one point! This was the second
walk for the spring shorebird season at Tschache allowed by the Montezuma
Refuge staff. Much thanks to Andrea VanBeusichem for organizing these
walks.

The weather was very warm and humid and after a string of warm days and
south winds we did't have the numbers of shorebirds as last week as many
have moved on. However, we still had 9 species of shorebirds which offered
excellent looks including close views of BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER, DUNLIN
(breeding plumage), WHITE-RUMPED SANDPIPER (breeding plumage), SEMIPALMATED
and LEAST SANDPIPERS. There was also a nice adult breeding EURASIAN WIGEON.
We had many top-notch birders along which made a big difference in finding
birds and teaching people about shorebirds for such a large group. I
couldn't have done this alone.  A BIG thanks to these folks.  I would also
like to thank Mike DeWispelaere who came up with me all the way from
Norwich and took some nice photos and kept the checklist. We totaled 72
species many of which we heard in the woods adjacent to Tschache.

Our ebird list can be found here with photos
https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S46038624

Best,
Dave Nicosia

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[nysbirds-l] Montezuma NWR Spring Guided Shorebird Walk #2 Tschache Pool This Saturday May 26th 7:00 am

2018-05-23 Thread David Nicosia
 All,

As a reminder, *this Saturday May 26th 7 am-noon,* we are going to do
another guided shorebird walk around a part of Tschache Pool Montezuma NWR
that has extensive mudflats. This trail is normally restricted so this is
an excellent opportunity to see this part of the refuge. Last Saturday,
there were a lot of shorebirds here with rough estimates up to 2000 birds,
and 14 species at least.  The snowy egret also has been frequenting
Tschache recently as well as a red-necked phalarope.  I know that many
Whimbrels have been on the move along with other shorebirds. The weather is
expected to be warm and humid with a chance for showers and thunderstorms
in the afternoon. We should be done by noon the latest, so the weather is
looking good.

Meet at the *Montezuma Visitor's Center at 7 am* and we may quickly do
wildlife drive first before walking the trail at Tschache Pool like we did
last week.

I would like to extend much thanks to Andrea Van Beusichem and all the
staff at Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge for allowing this excellent
opportunity to see our migrating spring shorebirds!

Dave Nicosia

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[cayugabirds-l] Red-Necked Phalaropes continue Broome Co. River Road Endwell, NY

2018-05-20 Thread David Nicosia
All,

I found a lone red-necked phalarope around 7 am this morning on the mudflat
adjacent to the Susquehanna River across from River Rd Endwell, NY. The
bird flew out of sight and behind some trees that made it hard to refind. I
returned later in the morning and was happy to find 2 red-necked
phalaropes, apparently a male and female actively foraging in a puddle in
the mudflat area close to where I had it earlier this morning. These birds
were cooperative and many birders got to see them which was awesome. This
looks to be a first county record for Broome for this species. As of 400
pm, the birds were still being viewed from River Rd Endwell.

I attached some terrible quality digiscope images of both birds.
see  https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S45857153

Best,
Dave Nicosia

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[cayugabirds-l] Red-Necked Phalarope Broome Co. River Road Endwell, NY

2018-05-20 Thread David Nicosia
All,

I just had a gorgeous female RED-NECKED PHALAROPE in the mudflat area
across the Susquehanna River from the guard rail on River Rd Endwell. The
bird was on the edge of the mudflat at the river's edge with spotted
sandpipers and least sandpipers. The bird unfortunately flushed with the
other shorebirds and flew behind some trees and out of sight. The bird
either dropped into the mudflats behind these trees which are hard to see
from the River Rd Endwell side or flew a short way to another mudflat area
by a small pond on the Murphy's Pits side which has restricted access.
Hopefully this bird will come back into view today. I will be checking
again. Murphy's Pits are closed today so hopefully it will still be around
tomorrow.

I believe this is a first county record for Broome of this species.

Dave Nicosia

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Re:[nysbirds-l] [cayugabirds-l] Montezuma NWR Guided Spring Shorebird Walk around Tschache Pool This Morning May 19th

2018-05-19 Thread david nicosia
 corrected typo.  ugh. 
 All, 
I had the good fortune of leading a shorebird walk around Tschache Pool between 
7 am and noon this morning, Saturday May 19th.  This is part of Montezuma's 
Guided Shorebird Walk program of which they are allowing access to the trail 
along Tschache Pool. This allowed for close views of migrating shorebirds. It 
was windy and pouring rain at times but I still had 7 people including some 
top-notch birders who were a big help in finding many shorebird species. 
We had the following shorebirds collectively as a group... LEAST SANDPIPER  
estimated at least 1000 DUNLIN (most in breeding plumage) estimated around 150 
SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPER  estimated around 50WHITE-RUMPED SANDPIPER 4-6 birds. 
SPOTTED SANDPIPER  several SOLITARY SANDPIPER  1  seen by Jay McGowan. GREATER 
YELLOWLEGS  1LESSER YELLOWLEGS  estimated up to 20. KILLDEER  several 
SEMIPALMATED PLOVER  estimated up to 20. AMERICAN AVOCET!! The bird flew into 
Tschache briefly and then flew out (presumably back to Benning)BLACK-BELLIED 
PLOVER- about 12-14 birds.AMERICAN GOLDEN-PLOVER  2 birds seen distant by Jay 
McGowan and Tim LenzSTILT SANDPIPER- 1 bird seen by Jay / Tim again.Possible 
SANDERLING seen by Tim Lenz. 
That's 14 species of shorebirds and we estimated up to 2000 birds and possibly 
more. Many of the birds were fairly close and made for good comparisons of 
least vs semipalmated sandpipers, and white-rumped sandpipers vs the other 
peeps. It was a great learning experience. 
Here is Jay McGowan's and Tim Lenz's ebird checklist which captures all of what 
many of us saw and/or heard collectively. 
https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S45830396

As a reminder, next Saturday May 26th at 7 am we are going to do this again. 
Meet at the Montezuma Visitor's Center 7 am and we may quickly do wildlife 
drive and then walk the trail around part of Tschache Pool like today. Given 
that shorebird migration is picking up next weekend could have even more. Let's 
hope so!  

I would like to extend much thanks to Andrea Van Beusichem and all the fine 
folks at Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge for allowing this excellent 
opportunity to see our migrating spring shorebirds!  
Hope to see many of you next weekend! 
Best,Dave Nicosia 




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[nysbirds-l] Montezuma NWR Guided Spring Shorebird Walk around Tschache Pool This Morning May 19th

2018-05-19 Thread David Nicosia
All,

I had the good fortunate of leading a shorebird walk around Tschache Pool
between 7 am and noon this morning, Saturday May 19th.  This is part of
Montezuma's Guided Shorebird Walk program of which they are allowing access
to the trail along Tschache Pool. This allowed for close views of migrating
shorebirds. It was windy and pouring rain at times but I still had 7 people
including some top-notch birders who were a big help in finding many
shorebird species.

We had the following shorebirds collectively as a group...
LEAST SANDPIPER  estimated at least 1000
DUNLIN (most in breeding plumage) estimated around 150
SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPER  estimated around 50
WHITE-RUMPED SANDPIPER 4-6 birds.
SPOTTED SANDPIPER  several
SOLITARY SANDPIPER  1  seen by Jay McGowan.
GREATER YELLOWLEGS  1
LESSER YELLOWLEGS  estimated up to 20.
KILLDEER  several
SEMIPALMATED PLOVER  estimated up to 20.
AMERICAN AVOCET!! The bird flew into Tschache briefly and then flew out
(presumably back to Benning)
BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER- about 12-14 birds.
AMERICAN GOLDEN-PLOVER  2 birds seen distant by Jay McGowan and Tim Lenz
STILT SANDPIPER- 1 bird seen by Jay / Tim again.
Possible SANDERLING seen by Tim Lenz.

That's 14 species of shorebirds and we estimated up to 2000 birds and
possibly more. Many of the birds were fairly close and made for good
comparisons of least vs semipalmated sandpipers, and white-rumped
sandpipers vs the other peeps. It was a great learning experience.

Here is Jay McGowan's and Tim Lenz's ebird checklist which captures all of
what many of us saw and/or heard collectively.

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S45830396

As a reminder, *next Saturday May 26th at 7 am* we are going to do this
again. Meet at the *Montezuma Visitor's Center 7 am* and we may quickly do
wildlife drive and then walk the trail around part of Tschache Pool like
today. Given that shorebird migration is picking up next weekend could have
even more. Let's hope so!

I would like to extend much thanks to Andrea Van Beusichem and all the fine
folks at Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge
for allowing this excellent opportunity to see our migrating spring
shorebirds!

Hope to see many of you next weekend!

Best,
Dave Nicosia

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[nysbirds-l] Tschache Pool Shorebird Walk Saturday Morning May 19th 7 am

2018-05-17 Thread David Nicosia
All,

I will be leading a shorebird walk around Tschache Pool Saturday Morning.
Meet at the* Montezuma Wildlife Refuge Visitor's center at 7 am Saturday. *
We will have access to walk along the path that is normally restricted up
to the old solar panel post around  Tschache Pool.   I plan on birding
probably until noon or so with the group (or longer) if we see a lot. If
there isn't too much there, we can check out a few other spots around the
refuge.

If you come, it looks rainy, so rain gear, bug spray, water, snacks would
be a good idea. If you have a scope please bring it because some of the
birds likely will be distant.

Let me know if you have any questions.

Dave Nicosia

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[cayugabirds-l] White pelican not refound

2018-05-02 Thread David Nicosia
Fisherman on a boat spooked it and it flew south. Searched of central and
southern Park of lake and not refound. Not sure where it goes!!

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[cayugabirds-l] May 2 and 3 still looking like two big migration days.

2018-04-30 Thread David Nicosia
See birdcast.info.  They have migration maps for the nights of May 1-2 and
2-3. Looks like heavy migration for the east.  Bring it on!!!

Dave Nicosia

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[cayugabirds-l] American White Pelican has flown off Whitney Point Dam as of this afternoon.

2018-04-29 Thread David Nicosia
Bird was last seen from end of Keibal Rd Whitney Point on a gravel bar in
the middle of the upper reservoir. It was reported to have flown south.
Given the horrible weather today including northwest winds, low cloud
heights, snow and rain showers I can't see why the bird would leave. I am
hoping it will come back. I will keep people
posted if I get any word via our RBA text alerts in the event that folks
are chasing a really good county bird for Broome.  The glossy ibis that was
at Upper lisle hasn't been seen in a few days either

Dave Nicosia

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