RE: [cayugabirds-l] Angry birds (Am robins!)

2019-10-27 Thread Deb Grantham
As this article says, it's a survival food -- poor people learned to eat it and 
like it. Lots of good food and cooking originates that way.

Deb


-Original Message-
From: bounce-124056804-83565...@list.cornell.edu 
 On Behalf Of Magnus Fiskesjo
Sent: Sunday, October 27, 2019 10:30 AM
To: Stanley Scharf ; Regi Teasley 

Cc: darlingtonbets ; Maryfaith Miller 
; anneb.cl...@gmail.com; 
bluewing-gr...@googlegroups.com; CAYUGABIRDS-L 
Subject: RE: [cayugabirds-l] Angry birds (Am robins!)


Looking up a picture of American pokeweed, I am surprised to see on Wikipedia 
it is the same as poke sallet, a k a poke salad, which is a food, that has even 
been described as a "Long-Standing Staple" food for humans, esp. in the US 
South, https://www.saveur.com/poke-sallet
... and Tony Joe White's song “Polk Salad Annie,” covered by Elvis, turns on 
the gathering, cooking, eating, and sucking on leftovers, of this same "poke 
salad." (The song seems to suggest it grows in places where alligators thrive). 

--
Magnus Fiskesjö, PhD
Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, Cornell University McGraw 
Hall, Room 201. Ithaca, NY 14853, USA
E-mail: magnus.fiske...@cornell.edu, or: n...@cornell.edu

Affiliations at Cornell University, WWW:
Anthropology Department, anthropology.cornell.edu/faculty/ Southeast Asia 
Program (SEAP), seap.einaudi.cornell.edu/faculty_directory
East Asia Program (EAP), eap.einaudi.cornell.edu/faculty_directory
CIAMS (Archaeology), ciams.cornell.edu/people/ Cornell Institute for Public 
Affairs (CIPA), cipa.cornell.edu/academics/fieldfaculty.cfm

From: bounce-124056725-84019...@list.cornell.edu 
[bounce-124056725-84019...@list.cornell.edu] on behalf of Stanley Scharf 
[stanley.sch...@gmail.com]
Sent: Sunday, October 27, 2019 9:09 AM
To: Regi Teasley
Cc: darlingtonbets; Maryfaith Miller; anneb.cl...@gmail.com; 
bluewing-gr...@googlegroups.com; CAYUGABIRDS-L
Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Angry birds (Am robins!)

The most notable act occurred in Burlington, New Jersey, at the 1738 
Philadelphia Yearly Meeting of Quakers. Dressed as a soldier, he concluded a 
diatribe against slavery, quoting the Bible saying that all men should be equal 
under God, by plunging a sword into a Bible containing a bladder of blood-red  
'Pokeberry juice', which spattered over those nearby.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Benjamin_Lay


On 10/26/19, Regi Teasley  wrote:
> Thank you for this information.
>
> Regi
>
>
> What good is a house if you don’t have a tolerable planet to put it in?
> Henry David Thoreau
>
>> On Oct 26, 2019, at 12:53 PM, darlingtonbets 
>> 
>> wrote:
>>
>> 
>> A number of years ago, I asked poisonous plant expert, John 
>> Kingsbury, about pokeweed. He's a retired professor of botany from 
>> Cornell and was lecturer in phytotoxicology at Cornell's Vet. 
>> College. And author of "Deadly Harvest," an excellent book on poisonous 
>> plants.
>>
>> He told me that a group of medical researchers who were studying 
>> pokeweed, and handling the plant, all developed leukemia-like 
>> symptoms. (I don't know what happened after that. Did they recover, 
>> once they stopped handling it?)
>>
>> He recommended wearing gloves, if handling the plant. I think he said 
>> that the berries were the least toxic part of the plant.
>>
>> Just because a plant is toxic to humans, of course, doesn't mean it 
>> should be destroyed, just that people should be cautious in using, 
>> handling or eating it.  And many plants that are toxic to humans are 
>> fine for birds and other animals.  Pokeweed is a beautiful, 
>> interesting plant. Just don't eat it or handle it without gloves.
>> Betsy
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
>>
>> ---- Original message 
>> From: Maryfaith Miller 
>> Date: 10/26/19 12:08 PM (GMT-05:00)
>> To: anneb.cl...@gmail.com
>> Cc: Regi Teasley , 
>> bluewing-gr...@googlegroups.com, CAYUGABIRDS-L 
>> 
>> Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Angry birds (Am robins!)
>>
>> I have used pokeweed berries in my forest kindergarten class to dye 
>> wool an intensely beautiful shade of purple. 5-6-7 year olds, 
>> harvested, crushed, boiled over a campfire and stirred the pot full 
>> of wool roving and pokeweed berries. My students love knowing which 
>> plants are deadly poisonous. I have taught them a lot about 
>> mushrooms, and all of them can identify a destroying angel, jack 
>> o'lanterns, etc. Knowledge is power, and children love having this 
>> knowledge. They know where all the pokeweed plants are at Lime Hollow and 
>> love to inform people about them.
>>
>

RE: [cayugabirds-l] Angry birds (Am robins!)

2019-10-27 Thread Deb Grantham
Fascinating!


-Original Message-
From: bounce-124056725-83565...@list.cornell.edu 
 On Behalf Of Stanley Scharf
Sent: Sunday, October 27, 2019 9:09 AM
To: Regi Teasley 
Cc: darlingtonbets ; Maryfaith Miller 
; anneb.cl...@gmail.com; 
bluewing-gr...@googlegroups.com; CAYUGABIRDS-L 
Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Angry birds (Am robins!)

The most notable act occurred in Burlington, New Jersey, at the 1738 
Philadelphia Yearly Meeting of Quakers. Dressed as a soldier, he concluded a 
diatribe against slavery, quoting the Bible saying that all men should be equal 
under God, by plunging a sword into a Bible containing a bladder of blood-red  
'Pokeberry juice', which spattered over those nearby.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Benjamin_Lay









On 10/26/19, Regi Teasley  wrote:
> Thank you for this information.
>
> Regi
>
>
> What good is a house if you don’t have a tolerable planet to put it in?
> Henry David Thoreau
>
>> On Oct 26, 2019, at 12:53 PM, darlingtonbets 
>> 
>> wrote:
>>
>> 
>> A number of years ago, I asked poisonous plant expert, John 
>> Kingsbury, about pokeweed. He's a retired professor of botany from 
>> Cornell and was lecturer in phytotoxicology at Cornell's Vet. 
>> College. And author of "Deadly Harvest," an excellent book on poisonous 
>> plants.
>>
>> He told me that a group of medical researchers who were studying 
>> pokeweed, and handling the plant, all developed leukemia-like 
>> symptoms. (I don't know what happened after that. Did they recover, 
>> once they stopped handling it?)
>>
>> He recommended wearing gloves, if handling the plant. I think he said 
>> that the berries were the least toxic part of the plant.
>>
>> Just because a plant is toxic to humans, of course, doesn't mean it 
>> should be destroyed, just that people should be cautious in using, 
>> handling or eating it.  And many plants that are toxic to humans are 
>> fine for birds and other animals.  Pokeweed is a beautiful, 
>> interesting plant. Just don't eat it or handle it without gloves.
>> Betsy
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
>>
>>  Original message ----
>> From: Maryfaith Miller 
>> Date: 10/26/19 12:08 PM (GMT-05:00)
>> To: anneb.cl...@gmail.com
>> Cc: Regi Teasley , 
>> bluewing-gr...@googlegroups.com, CAYUGABIRDS-L 
>> 
>> Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Angry birds (Am robins!)
>>
>> I have used pokeweed berries in my forest kindergarten class to dye 
>> wool an intensely beautiful shade of purple. 5-6-7 year olds, 
>> harvested, crushed, boiled over a campfire and stirred the pot full 
>> of wool roving and pokeweed berries. My students love knowing which 
>> plants are deadly poisonous. I have taught them a lot about 
>> mushrooms, and all of them can identify a destroying angel, jack 
>> o'lanterns, etc. Knowledge is power, and children love having this 
>> knowledge. They know where all the pokeweed plants are at Lime Hollow and 
>> love to inform people about them.
>>
>>  But this is a bird list, and the question is about bird 
>> behavior...I'd love to hear about the OP's question re American Robin 
>> aggression if anyone knows more about that.
>> Maryfaith Decker Miller
>>
>> On Sat, Oct 26, 2019 at 11:38 AM  wrote:
>>> And I am living proof that eating young pokeweed is not deadly. We 
>>> didn’t use 3 waters either, although drained it.
>>> But I am NOT suggesting everyone try it. Young spinach causes less panic.
>>> Or try lambs quarters.
>>> Anne
>>> Sent from my iPhone
>>>
>>> On Oct 26, 2019, at 9:56 AM, Regi Teasley  wrote:
>>>
>>>> I understand Pokeweed is poisonous to humans.  Your thoughts on 
>>>> keeping these plants?
>>>>
>>>> Regi
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> What good is a house if you don’t have a tolerable planet to put it in?
>>>> Henry David Thoreau
>>>>
>>>>> On Oct 26, 2019, at 9:01 AM, anneb.cl...@gmail.com wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>> 
>>>>> This morning I have a large number of robins all age/sexes 
>>>>> foraging on my productive pokeweed berries and scratching leaves 
>>>>> AND chasing each other hard and long.  More athletic long chases 
>>>>> than I am used to associating with robins.
>>>>>
>>>>> They are not just chasing around the berries although I watched 
>>>>> some head lowered face offs ( before a chase) on the fence near pokeweed

RE: [cayugabirds-l] Angry birds (Am robins!)

2019-10-27 Thread Magnus Fiskesjo

Looking up a picture of American pokeweed, I am surprised to see on Wikipedia 
it is the same as poke sallet, a k a poke salad, which is a food, that has even 
been described as a "Long-Standing Staple" food for humans, esp. in the US 
South, https://www.saveur.com/poke-sallet
... and Tony Joe White's song “Polk Salad Annie,” covered by Elvis, turns on 
the gathering, cooking, eating, and sucking on leftovers, of this same "poke 
salad." (The song seems to suggest it grows in places where alligators thrive). 

--
Magnus Fiskesjö, PhD
Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, Cornell University
McGraw Hall, Room 201. Ithaca, NY 14853, USA
E-mail: magnus.fiske...@cornell.edu, or: n...@cornell.edu

Affiliations at Cornell University, WWW:
Anthropology Department, anthropology.cornell.edu/faculty/
Southeast Asia Program (SEAP), seap.einaudi.cornell.edu/faculty_directory
East Asia Program (EAP), eap.einaudi.cornell.edu/faculty_directory
CIAMS (Archaeology), ciams.cornell.edu/people/
Cornell Institute for Public Affairs (CIPA), 
cipa.cornell.edu/academics/fieldfaculty.cfm

From: bounce-124056725-84019...@list.cornell.edu 
[bounce-124056725-84019...@list.cornell.edu] on behalf of Stanley Scharf 
[stanley.sch...@gmail.com]
Sent: Sunday, October 27, 2019 9:09 AM
To: Regi Teasley
Cc: darlingtonbets; Maryfaith Miller; anneb.cl...@gmail.com; 
bluewing-gr...@googlegroups.com; CAYUGABIRDS-L
Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Angry birds (Am robins!)

The most notable act occurred in Burlington, New Jersey, at the 1738
Philadelphia Yearly Meeting of Quakers. Dressed as a soldier, he
concluded a diatribe against slavery, quoting the Bible saying that
all men should be equal under God, by plunging a sword into a Bible
containing a bladder of blood-red  'Pokeberry juice', which spattered
over those nearby.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Benjamin_Lay


On 10/26/19, Regi Teasley  wrote:
> Thank you for this information.
>
> Regi
>
>
> What good is a house if you don’t have a tolerable planet to put it in?
> Henry David Thoreau
>
>> On Oct 26, 2019, at 12:53 PM, darlingtonbets 
>> wrote:
>>
>> 
>> A number of years ago, I asked poisonous plant expert, John Kingsbury,
>> about pokeweed. He's a retired professor of botany from Cornell and was
>> lecturer in phytotoxicology at Cornell's Vet. College. And author of
>> "Deadly Harvest," an excellent book on poisonous plants.
>>
>> He told me that a group of medical researchers who were studying pokeweed,
>> and handling the plant, all developed leukemia-like symptoms. (I don't
>> know what happened after that. Did they recover, once they stopped
>> handling it?)
>>
>> He recommended wearing gloves, if handling the plant. I think he said that
>> the berries were the least toxic part of the plant.
>>
>> Just because a plant is toxic to humans, of course, doesn't mean it should
>> be destroyed, just that people should be cautious in using, handling or
>> eating it.  And many plants that are toxic to humans are fine for birds
>> and other animals.  Pokeweed is a beautiful, interesting plant. Just don't
>> eat it or handle it without gloves.
>> Betsy
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
>>
>> ---- Original message 
>> From: Maryfaith Miller 
>> Date: 10/26/19 12:08 PM (GMT-05:00)
>> To: anneb.cl...@gmail.com
>> Cc: Regi Teasley , bluewing-gr...@googlegroups.com,
>> CAYUGABIRDS-L 
>> Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Angry birds (Am robins!)
>>
>> I have used pokeweed berries in my forest kindergarten class to dye wool
>> an intensely beautiful shade of purple. 5-6-7 year olds, harvested,
>> crushed, boiled over a campfire and stirred the pot full of wool roving
>> and pokeweed berries. My students love knowing which plants are deadly
>> poisonous. I have taught them a lot about mushrooms, and all of them can
>> identify a destroying angel, jack o'lanterns, etc. Knowledge is power, and
>> children love having this knowledge. They know where all the pokeweed
>> plants are at Lime Hollow and love to inform people about them.
>>
>>  But this is a bird list, and the question is about bird behavior...I'd
>> love to hear about the OP's question re American Robin aggression if
>> anyone knows more about that.
>> Maryfaith Decker Miller
>>
>> On Sat, Oct 26, 2019 at 11:38 AM  wrote:
>>> And I am living proof that eating young pokeweed is not deadly. We didn’t
>>> use 3 waters either, although drained it.
>>> But I am NOT suggesting everyone try it. Young spinach causes less panic.
>>> Or try lambs quarters.
>>> Anne
&

Re: [cayugabirds-l] Angry birds (Am robins!)

2019-10-27 Thread Stanley Scharf
The most notable act occurred in Burlington, New Jersey, at the 1738
Philadelphia Yearly Meeting of Quakers. Dressed as a soldier, he
concluded a diatribe against slavery, quoting the Bible saying that
all men should be equal under God, by plunging a sword into a Bible
containing a bladder of blood-red  'Pokeberry juice', which spattered
over those nearby.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Benjamin_Lay









On 10/26/19, Regi Teasley  wrote:
> Thank you for this information.
>
> Regi
>
>
> What good is a house if you don’t have a tolerable planet to put it in?
> Henry David Thoreau
>
>> On Oct 26, 2019, at 12:53 PM, darlingtonbets 
>> wrote:
>>
>> 
>> A number of years ago, I asked poisonous plant expert, John Kingsbury,
>> about pokeweed. He's a retired professor of botany from Cornell and was
>> lecturer in phytotoxicology at Cornell's Vet. College. And author of
>> "Deadly Harvest," an excellent book on poisonous plants.
>>
>> He told me that a group of medical researchers who were studying pokeweed,
>> and handling the plant, all developed leukemia-like symptoms. (I don't
>> know what happened after that. Did they recover, once they stopped
>> handling it?)
>>
>> He recommended wearing gloves, if handling the plant. I think he said that
>> the berries were the least toxic part of the plant.
>>
>> Just because a plant is toxic to humans, of course, doesn't mean it should
>> be destroyed, just that people should be cautious in using, handling or
>> eating it.  And many plants that are toxic to humans are fine for birds
>> and other animals.  Pokeweed is a beautiful, interesting plant. Just don't
>> eat it or handle it without gloves.
>> Betsy
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
>>
>> ---- Original message ----
>> From: Maryfaith Miller 
>> Date: 10/26/19 12:08 PM (GMT-05:00)
>> To: anneb.cl...@gmail.com
>> Cc: Regi Teasley , bluewing-gr...@googlegroups.com,
>> CAYUGABIRDS-L 
>> Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Angry birds (Am robins!)
>>
>> I have used pokeweed berries in my forest kindergarten class to dye wool
>> an intensely beautiful shade of purple. 5-6-7 year olds, harvested,
>> crushed, boiled over a campfire and stirred the pot full of wool roving
>> and pokeweed berries. My students love knowing which plants are deadly
>> poisonous. I have taught them a lot about mushrooms, and all of them can
>> identify a destroying angel, jack o'lanterns, etc. Knowledge is power, and
>> children love having this knowledge. They know where all the pokeweed
>> plants are at Lime Hollow and love to inform people about them.
>>
>>  But this is a bird list, and the question is about bird behavior...I'd
>> love to hear about the OP's question re American Robin aggression if
>> anyone knows more about that.
>> Maryfaith Decker Miller
>>
>> On Sat, Oct 26, 2019 at 11:38 AM  wrote:
>>> And I am living proof that eating young pokeweed is not deadly. We didn’t
>>> use 3 waters either, although drained it.
>>> But I am NOT suggesting everyone try it. Young spinach causes less panic.
>>> Or try lambs quarters.
>>> Anne
>>> Sent from my iPhone
>>>
>>> On Oct 26, 2019, at 9:56 AM, Regi Teasley  wrote:
>>>
>>>> I understand Pokeweed is poisonous to humans.  Your thoughts on keeping
>>>> these plants?
>>>>
>>>> Regi
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> What good is a house if you don’t have a tolerable planet to put it in?
>>>> Henry David Thoreau
>>>>
>>>>> On Oct 26, 2019, at 9:01 AM, anneb.cl...@gmail.com wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>> 
>>>>> This morning I have a large number of robins all age/sexes foraging on
>>>>> my productive pokeweed berries and scratching leaves AND chasing each
>>>>> other hard and long.  More athletic long chases than I am used to
>>>>> associating with robins.
>>>>>
>>>>> They are not just chasing around the berries although I watched some
>>>>> head lowered face offs ( before a chase) on the fence near pokeweed.
>>>>>
>>>>> Anne
>>>>> Sent from my iPhone
>>>>> --
>>>>>
>>>>> Cayugabirds-L List Info:
>>>>> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
>>>>> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
>>>>> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeav

Re: [cayugabirds-l] Angry birds (Am robins!)

2019-10-26 Thread Regi Teasley
Thank you for this information.  

Regi


What good is a house if you don’t have a tolerable planet to put it in?  Henry 
David Thoreau

> On Oct 26, 2019, at 12:53 PM, darlingtonbets  wrote:
> 
> 
> A number of years ago, I asked poisonous plant expert, John Kingsbury, about 
> pokeweed. He's a retired professor of botany from Cornell and was lecturer in 
> phytotoxicology at Cornell's Vet. College. And author of "Deadly Harvest," an 
> excellent book on poisonous plants. 
> 
> He told me that a group of medical researchers who were studying pokeweed, 
> and handling the plant, all developed leukemia-like symptoms. (I don't know 
> what happened after that. Did they recover, once they stopped handling it?)  
> 
> He recommended wearing gloves, if handling the plant. I think he said that 
> the berries were the least toxic part of the plant. 
> 
> Just because a plant is toxic to humans, of course, doesn't mean it should be 
> destroyed, just that people should be cautious in using, handling or eating 
> it.  And many plants that are toxic to humans are fine for birds and other 
> animals.  Pokeweed is a beautiful, interesting plant. Just don't eat it or 
> handle it without gloves.
> Betsy
> 
> 
> 
> 
> Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
> 
>  Original message 
> From: Maryfaith Miller 
> Date: 10/26/19 12:08 PM (GMT-05:00)
> To: anneb.cl...@gmail.com
> Cc: Regi Teasley , bluewing-gr...@googlegroups.com, 
> CAYUGABIRDS-L 
> Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Angry birds (Am robins!)
> 
> I have used pokeweed berries in my forest kindergarten class to dye wool an 
> intensely beautiful shade of purple. 5-6-7 year olds, harvested, crushed, 
> boiled over a campfire and stirred the pot full of wool roving and pokeweed 
> berries. My students love knowing which plants are deadly poisonous. I have 
> taught them a lot about mushrooms, and all of them can identify a destroying 
> angel, jack o'lanterns, etc. Knowledge is power, and children love having 
> this knowledge. They know where all the pokeweed plants are at Lime Hollow 
> and love to inform people about them.
> 
>  But this is a bird list, and the question is about bird behavior...I'd love 
> to hear about the OP's question re American Robin aggression if anyone knows 
> more about that.
> Maryfaith Decker Miller
> 
> On Sat, Oct 26, 2019 at 11:38 AM  wrote:
>> And I am living proof that eating young pokeweed is not deadly. We didn’t 
>> use 3 waters either, although drained it. 
>> But I am NOT suggesting everyone try it. Young spinach causes less panic. Or 
>> try lambs quarters. 
>> Anne 
>> Sent from my iPhone
>> 
>> On Oct 26, 2019, at 9:56 AM, Regi Teasley  wrote:
>> 
>>> I understand Pokeweed is poisonous to humans.  Your thoughts on keeping 
>>> these plants?
>>> 
>>> Regi
>>> 
>>> 
>>> What good is a house if you don’t have a tolerable planet to put it in?  
>>> Henry David Thoreau
>>> 
>>>> On Oct 26, 2019, at 9:01 AM, anneb.cl...@gmail.com wrote:
>>>> 
>>>> 
>>>> This morning I have a large number of robins all age/sexes foraging on my 
>>>> productive pokeweed berries and scratching leaves AND chasing each other 
>>>> hard and long.  More athletic long chases than I am used to associating 
>>>> with robins. 
>>>> 
>>>> They are not just chasing around the berries although I watched some head 
>>>> lowered face offs ( before a chase) on the fence near pokeweed. 
>>>> 
>>>> Anne 
>>>> Sent from my iPhone
>>>> --
>>>> 
>>>> Cayugabirds-L List Info:
>>>> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
>>>> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
>>>> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm
>>>> 
>>>> ARCHIVES:
>>>> 1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
>>>> 2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
>>>> 3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html
>>>> 
>>>> Please submit your observations to eBird:
>>>> http://ebird.org/content/ebird/
>>>> 
>>>> --
>>>> 
>> 
>> --
>> Cayugabirds-L List Info:
>> Welcome and Basics
>> Rules and Information
>> Subscribe, Configuration and Leave
>> Archives:
>> The Mail Archive
>> Surfbirds
>> BirdingOnThe.Net
>> Please submit your observations to eBird!
>> --
> 
> --
> Cayugabirds-L List Info:
> Welcome and Basics
> Rules and Information
> Subscribe, Configuration and Leave
> Archives:
> The Mail Archive
> Surfbirds
> BirdingOnThe.Net
> Please submit your observations to eBird!
> --

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
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http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
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--

Re: [cayugabirds-l] Angry birds (Am robins!)

2019-10-26 Thread Chris R. Pelkie
Agreed! I have some pokeweed growing behind the shed, no intention of removing 
(or tasting) it. I went to wiki initially to see if the toxins were 
intoxicating Anne’s robins but there’s no obvious support for that from this 
plant. I have seen robins et al get ripped on late season “raisins” from wild 
cherry so wondered if that was similar.

[Btw, I worked for Dr John many moons ago as a barely passable cook and 
carpenter assistant building the lab on Appledore Island when he was director 
of Isles of Shoals.]

___
Chris Pelkie
Data Manager; IT Support
Center for Conservation Bioacoustics
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road
Ithaca, NY 14850
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp/

On Oct 26, 2019, at 12:54, darlingtonbets 
mailto:darlingtonb...@gmail.com>> wrote:

just that people should be cautious in using, handling or eating it.  And many 
plants that are toxic to humans are fine for birds and other animals.  Pokeweed 
is a beautiful, interesting plant. Just don't eat it or handle it without 
gloves.
Betsy

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


Re: [cayugabirds-l] Angry birds (Am robins!)

2019-10-26 Thread darlingtonbets
A number of years ago, I asked poisonous plant expert, John Kingsbury, about 
pokeweed. He's a retired professor of botany from Cornell and was lecturer in 
phytotoxicology at Cornell's Vet. College. And author of "Deadly Harvest," an 
excellent book on poisonous plants. He told me that a group of medical 
researchers who were studying pokeweed, and handling the plant, all developed 
leukemia-like symptoms. (I don't know what happened after that. Did they 
recover, once they stopped handling it?)  He recommended wearing gloves, if 
handling the plant. I think he said that the berries were the least toxic part 
of the plant. Just because a plant is toxic to humans, of course, doesn't mean 
it should be destroyed, just that people should be cautious in using, handling 
or eating it.  And many plants that are toxic to humans are fine for birds and 
other animals.  Pokeweed is a beautiful, interesting plant. Just don't eat it 
or handle it without gloves.BetsySent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
 Original message From: Maryfaith Miller 
 Date: 10/26/19  12:08 PM  (GMT-05:00) To: 
anneb.cl...@gmail.com Cc: Regi Teasley , 
bluewing-gr...@googlegroups.com, CAYUGABIRDS-L  
Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Angry birds (Am robins!) I have used pokeweed 
berries in my forest kindergarten class to dye wool an intensely beautiful 
shade of purple. 5-6-7 year olds, harvested, crushed, boiled over a campfire 
and stirred the pot full of wool roving and pokeweed berries. My students love 
knowing which plants are deadly poisonous. I have taught them a lot about 
mushrooms, and all of them can identify a destroying angel, jack o'lanterns, 
etc. Knowledge is power, and children love having this knowledge. They know 
where all the pokeweed plants are at Lime Hollow and love to inform people 
about them. But this is a bird list, and the question is about bird 
behavior...I'd love to hear about the OP's question re American Robin 
aggression if anyone knows more about that.Maryfaith Decker MillerOn Sat, Oct 
26, 2019 at 11:38 AM  wrote:And I am living proof that 
eating young pokeweed is not deadly. We didn’t use 3 waters either, although 
drained it. But I am NOT suggesting everyone try it. Young spinach causes less 
panic. Or try lambs quarters. Anne Sent from my iPhoneOn Oct 26, 2019, at 9:56 
AM, Regi Teasley  wrote:I understand Pokeweed is poisonous 
to humans.  Your thoughts on keeping these plants?RegiWhat good is a house if 
you don’t have a tolerable planet to put it in?  Henry David ThoreauOn Oct 26, 
2019, at 9:01 AM, anneb.cl...@gmail.com wrote:This morning I have a large 
number of robins all age/sexes foraging on my productive pokeweed berries and 
scratching leaves AND chasing each other hard and long.  More athletic long 
chases than I am used to associating with robins. They are not just chasing 
around the berries although I watched some head lowered face offs ( before a 
chase) on the fence near pokeweed. Anne Sent from my iPhone--Cayugabirds-L List 
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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Angry birds (Am robins!)

2019-10-26 Thread Maryfaith Miller
I have used pokeweed berries in my forest kindergarten class to dye wool an
intensely beautiful shade of purple. 5-6-7 year olds, harvested, crushed,
boiled over a campfire and stirred the pot full of wool roving and pokeweed
berries. My students love knowing which plants are deadly poisonous. I have
taught them a lot about mushrooms, and all of them can identify a
destroying angel, jack o'lanterns, etc. Knowledge is power, and children
love having this knowledge. They know where all the pokeweed plants are at
Lime Hollow and love to inform people about them.

 But this is a bird list, and the question is about bird behavior...I'd
love to hear about the OP's question re American Robin aggression if anyone
knows more about that.
Maryfaith Decker Miller

On Sat, Oct 26, 2019 at 11:38 AM  wrote:

> And I am living proof that eating young pokeweed is not deadly. We didn’t
> use 3 waters either, although drained it.
> But I am NOT suggesting everyone try it. Young spinach causes less panic.
> Or try lambs quarters.
> Anne
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> On Oct 26, 2019, at 9:56 AM, Regi Teasley  wrote:
>
> I understand Pokeweed is poisonous to humans.  Your thoughts on keeping
> these plants?
>
> Regi
>
>
> *What good is a house if you don’t have a tolerable planet to put it in?
> Henry David Thoreau*
>
> On Oct 26, 2019, at 9:01 AM, anneb.cl...@gmail.com wrote:
>
> 
> This morning I have a large number of robins all age/sexes foraging on my
> productive pokeweed berries and scratching leaves AND chasing each other
> hard and long.  More athletic long chases than I am used to associating
> with robins.
>
> They are not just chasing around the berries although I watched some head
> lowered face offs ( before a chase) on the fence near pokeweed.
>
> Anne
> Sent from my iPhone
> --
>
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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Angry birds (Am robins!)

2019-10-26 Thread anneb . clark
And I am living proof that eating young pokeweed is not deadly. We didn’t use 3 
waters either, although drained it. 
But I am NOT suggesting everyone try it. Young spinach causes less panic. Or 
try lambs quarters. 
Anne 
Sent from my iPhone

> On Oct 26, 2019, at 9:56 AM, Regi Teasley  wrote:
> 
> I understand Pokeweed is poisonous to humans.  Your thoughts on keeping these 
> plants?
> 
> Regi
> 
> 
> What good is a house if you don’t have a tolerable planet to put it in?  
> Henry David Thoreau
> 
>> On Oct 26, 2019, at 9:01 AM, anneb.cl...@gmail.com wrote:
>> 
>> 
>> This morning I have a large number of robins all age/sexes foraging on my 
>> productive pokeweed berries and scratching leaves AND chasing each other 
>> hard and long.  More athletic long chases than I am used to associating with 
>> robins. 
>> 
>> They are not just chasing around the berries although I watched some head 
>> lowered face offs ( before a chase) on the fence near pokeweed. 
>> 
>> Anne 
>> Sent from my iPhone
>> --
>> 
>> Cayugabirds-L List Info:
>> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
>> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
>> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm
>> 
>> ARCHIVES:
>> 1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
>> 2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
>> 3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html
>> 
>> Please submit your observations to eBird:
>> http://ebird.org/content/ebird/
>> 
>> --
>> 

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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Angry birds (Am robins!)

2019-10-26 Thread anneb . clark
Yup everyone, I am fully aware of the toxicity of pokeweed and allow a nice big 
plant to grow up where I can see it fruit every year without any problems. 

There are many berries toxic to humans out there. And toxic plants. But they 
feed birds and other wildlife. Pokeweed berries are especially used by birds 
around this time. 

Sent from my iPhone

> On Oct 26, 2019, at 9:56 AM, Regi Teasley  wrote:
> 
> I understand Pokeweed is poisonous to humans.  Your thoughts on keeping these 
> plants?
> 
> Regi
> 
> 
> What good is a house if you don’t have a tolerable planet to put it in?  
> Henry David Thoreau
> 
>> On Oct 26, 2019, at 9:01 AM, anneb.cl...@gmail.com wrote:
>> 
>> 
>> This morning I have a large number of robins all age/sexes foraging on my 
>> productive pokeweed berries and scratching leaves AND chasing each other 
>> hard and long.  More athletic long chases than I am used to associating with 
>> robins. 
>> 
>> They are not just chasing around the berries although I watched some head 
>> lowered face offs ( before a chase) on the fence near pokeweed. 
>> 
>> Anne 
>> Sent from my iPhone
>> --
>> 
>> Cayugabirds-L List Info:
>> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
>> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
>> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm
>> 
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>> 1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
>> 2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
>> 3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html
>> 
>> Please submit your observations to eBird:
>> http://ebird.org/content/ebird/
>> 
>> --
>> 

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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Angry birds (Am robins!)

2019-10-26 Thread Regi Teasley
I understand Pokeweed is poisonous to humans.  Your thoughts on keeping these 
plants?

Regi


What good is a house if you don’t have a tolerable planet to put it in?  Henry 
David Thoreau

> On Oct 26, 2019, at 9:01 AM, anneb.cl...@gmail.com wrote:
> 
> 
> This morning I have a large number of robins all age/sexes foraging on my 
> productive pokeweed berries and scratching leaves AND chasing each other hard 
> and long.  More athletic long chases than I am used to associating with 
> robins. 
> 
> They are not just chasing around the berries although I watched some head 
> lowered face offs ( before a chase) on the fence near pokeweed. 
> 
> Anne 
> Sent from my iPhone
> --
> 
> Cayugabirds-L List Info:
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm
> 
> ARCHIVES:
> 1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
> 2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
> 3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html
> 
> Please submit your observations to eBird:
> http://ebird.org/content/ebird/
> 
> --
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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Angry birds (Am robins!)

2019-10-26 Thread Chris R. Pelkie
For the record, don’t try this at home! Poke berries are very toxic to humans 
and many other mammals though some foxes, mice,etc are resistant, as are many 
songbirds that distribute the seeds after ingestion. Make sure your kids do NOT 
ingest these.
Poke leaves are made edible only after three separate boilings in fresh water. 
See wiki for details.

___
Chris Pelkie
Data Manager; IT Support
Center for Conservation Bioacoustics
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road
Ithaca, NY 14850
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp/

On Oct 26, 2019, at 09:00, 
"anneb.cl...@gmail.com" 
mailto:anneb.cl...@gmail.com>> wrote:


This morning I have a large number of robins all age/sexes foraging on my 
productive pokeweed berries and scratching leaves AND chasing each other hard 
and long.  More athletic long chases than I am used to associating with robins.

They are not just chasing around the berries although I watched some head 
lowered face offs ( before a chase) on the fence near pokeweed.

Anne
Sent from my iPhone
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[cayugabirds-l] Angry birds (Am robins!)

2019-10-26 Thread anneb . clark


This morning I have a large number of robins all age/sexes foraging on my 
productive pokeweed berries and scratching leaves AND chasing each other hard 
and long.  More athletic long chases than I am used to associating with robins. 

They are not just chasing around the berries although I watched some head 
lowered face offs ( before a chase) on the fence near pokeweed. 

Anne 
Sent from my iPhone
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