Re: [cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard: Worm-eating Warbler

2022-05-12 Thread Brad Walker
For anyone interested in trying for the bird, it seems to be sticking to
the north "ravine" area right on the trail. I walked towards the rec way
and didn't have luck, but on my way back to the car the bird was right over
the trail foraging very low and singing sporadically. It was mostly giving
complex song and calls, with some typical songs every so often. Very
cooperative when it was close.

Here's my recording for reference:
https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/447484191

--Brad


On Thu, May 12, 2022 at 11:40 AM Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes <
c...@cornell.edu> wrote:

> From Brad Walker:
>
> "The worm-eating is now singing and foraging very low over the path near
> where it was originally reported. Foraging and singing an alternate song
> low in a Hawthorn.”
>
> Sincerely,
> Chris T-H
>
>
> On May 12, 2022, at 10:06 AM, Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes <
> c...@cornell.edu> wrote:
>
> I haven’t yet seen this posted here, and I’ve not had time to go birding
> much at the Hawthorn Orchard, but today a WORM-EATING WARBLER was found by
> Jasdev. The bird was seen foraging in the Northeast corner/area and singing
> periodically. This was posted to the GroupMe CayugaRBA by Jay McGowan.
>
> "Worm-eating Warbler found by Jasdev continues at NE corner of Hawthorn
> Orchard. Singing in bursts and foraging.
> https://maps.app.goo.gl/ng8MpyqE73bc2VDP8;
>
> Don’t expect it to stick around beyond today…
>
> If people find good birds there, please post to the Cayugabirds-L eList
> ASAP, too.
>
> Sincerely,
> Chris T-H
>
> --
> Chris Tessaglia-Hymes
> PO Box 488
> 8 Etna Lane
> Etna, NY 13062
> 607-351-5740
>
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> Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes — Field Applications Engineer
> K. Lisa Yang Center for Conservation Bioacoustics, Cornell Lab of
> Ornithology
> Cornell University, 159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850, USA
> Work: +1 607-254-2418  Mobile: +1 607-351-5740  FAX: +1 607-254-1132
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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard: Worm-eating Warbler

2022-05-12 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
From Brad Walker:

"The worm-eating is now singing and foraging very low over the path near where 
it was originally reported. Foraging and singing an alternate song low in a 
Hawthorn.”

Sincerely,
Chris T-H


On May 12, 2022, at 10:06 AM, Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes 
mailto:c...@cornell.edu>> wrote:

I haven’t yet seen this posted here, and I’ve not had time to go birding much 
at the Hawthorn Orchard, but today a WORM-EATING WARBLER was found by Jasdev. 
The bird was seen foraging in the Northeast corner/area and singing 
periodically. This was posted to the GroupMe CayugaRBA by Jay McGowan.

"Worm-eating Warbler found by Jasdev continues at NE corner of Hawthorn 
Orchard. Singing in bursts and foraging.  
https://maps.app.goo.gl/ng8MpyqE73bc2VDP8;

Don’t expect it to stick around beyond today…

If people find good birds there, please post to the Cayugabirds-L eList ASAP, 
too.

Sincerely,
Chris T-H

--
Chris Tessaglia-Hymes
PO Box 488
8 Etna Lane
Etna, NY 13062
607-351-5740

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Cornell University, 159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850, USA
Work: +1 607-254-2418  Mobile: +1 607-351-5740  FAX: +1 607-254-1132
https://bioacoustics.cornell.edu


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[cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard: Worm-eating Warbler

2022-05-12 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
I haven’t yet seen this posted here, and I’ve not had time to go birding much 
at the Hawthorn Orchard, but today a WORM-EATING WARBLER was found by Jasdev. 
The bird was seen foraging in the Northeast corner/area and singing 
periodically. This was posted to the GroupMe CayugaRBA by Jay McGowan.

"Worm-eating Warbler found by Jasdev continues at NE corner of Hawthorn 
Orchard. Singing in bursts and foraging.  
https://maps.app.goo.gl/ng8MpyqE73bc2VDP8;

Don’t expect it to stick around beyond today…

If people find good birds there, please post to the Cayugabirds-L eList ASAP, 
too.

Sincerely,
Chris T-H

--
Chris Tessaglia-Hymes
PO Box 488
8 Etna Lane
Etna, NY 13062
607-351-5740


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[cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard: Monday Morning

2021-05-24 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
This morning, I birded for a short while with Melissa Groo, before doing more 
exploration of the area alone. I ran into Jay McGowan for a bit, plus another 
individual whose name I didn’t get.

Early on, there was a single Veery near the entrance by the softball field, and 
part-way into the Northeast corner, our ears picked up on a nearby, but not 
visible, calling Yellow-bellied Flycatcher. Today, this particular individual 
was calling with short, soft “chu-wee” calls from deep in the dense mid-story 
brush.

Later, a single Swainson’s Thrush was seen actively foraging among the upper 
canopy of a basswood tree, a single Tennessee Warbler sang half-heartedly from 
the Northeast corner, and a Pine Warbler sang weakly from Pines in the 
direction of Mitchell Street.

Other birds present included a single Blackpoll Warbler, a “pipping” Alder 
Flycatcher, an Eastern Wood-Pewee, and a single “che-becking” Least Flycatcher, 
all while a recently-fledged flock of European Starlings begged incessantly 
nearby.

Other than that, it was relatively quiet and it seems that most of migration 
has come to a close. I would expect a Wilson’s Warbler or two, perhaps another 
day or two with Yellow-bellied Flycatcher(s), and maybe a lucky individual will 
encounter an Olive-sided Flycatcher.

Good birding and here’s my eBird checklist which includes the audio recording 
of the Yellow-bellied Flycatcher:

https://ebird.org/checklist/S88890770

Sincerely,
Chris T-H


--
Chris Tessaglia-Hymes
PO Box 488
8 Etna Lane
Etna, NY 13062
607-351-5740


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[cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard: Sunday Morning

2021-05-23 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Late yesterday, Todd Bittner (Director of the Cornell Botanical Gardens Natural 
Areas) and I made a last-minute decision to meet up for birding at the Hawthorn 
Orchard this morning. We birded the area for about 3-1/2 hours this morning.

Best birds, but not terribly rewarding, were two Yellow-bellied Flycatchers 
(one seen, one singing) in the Northeast corner area in the Hawthorn Orchard. I 
managed a weak audio recording of the more distant softly-singing bird and 
included that in the eBird checklist with notes. The singer was doing the soft 
“che-bunk” song instead of the “chew-wee” song/calls I’m used to hearing.

Also, an extremely cooperative male Scarlet Tanager was singing persistently 
from the oaks near the tall white pines in the north ravine. We heard this bird 
singing almost throughout the entire duration there.

Early in the morning, a very excited Great Crested Flycatcher was frequenting 
the tallest oak tree along the easternmost edge. From our vantage point, we 
initially thought there were two birds counter-singing, but we quickly realized 
that the second bird was an echo of the single loud bird, bouncing off the 
tennis building behind us.

Another nice find was a male Canada Warbler that was singing persistently from 
one of the olive bush thickets (I forget the specific name) in the northeast 
clearing. Despite being in such a small thicket, and walking all around it, we 
only briefly saw the bird a couple of times. The Canada Warbler was mostly 
whisper-singing the entire time. It was odd, because I usually encounter this 
either down in dense ravine bushes or in the denser section of the Hawthorn 
Orchard near the north ravine edge.

All in all it was a good morning to be outdoors!

Here’s our complete eBird checklist with the audio of the Yellow-bellied 
Flycatcher:

https://ebird.org/checklist/S88837491

Sincerely,
Chris T-H

--
Chris Tessaglia-Hymes
PO Box 488
8 Etna Lane
Etna, NY 13062
607-351-5740


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[cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard: Saturday Morning

2021-05-23 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Saturday morning (5/22), Scott Anthony and I birded the Hawthorn Orchard for 
about 2-1/2 hours.

The best bird was probably the worst seen: an extremely distant Great Egret in 
flight over the valley, headed South. It turns out this was a new species seen 
from this location, which brings the total species recorded for the Hawthorn 
Orchard and East Ithaca Rec. Way eBird hotspot to 177 cumulatively reported 
over the years by many eBirders since 2000; and 149 for me, here, spanning the 
same 21/22 years/seasons.

Other birds of interest included a pretty scrappy-looking Broad-winged Hawk 
(photos), a couple of Eastern Wood-Pewees (photos), a possible Yellow-bellied 
Flycatcher (head-only view, briefly, Northeast corner), a single Swainson’s 
Thrush (ravine edge, mid-canopy), several flyby Cedar Waxwing flocks, three 
Tennessee Warblers (including one female), and a fairly cooperative bunch of 
about four Blackpoll Warblers (audio).

We missed Stephanie Herrick’s Blackburnian Warbler, though, which was helpfully 
identified using the BirdNet App.

Here’s the complete checklist with some media:

https://ebird.org/checklist/S88728858

Good birding!

Sincerely,
Chris T-H



--
Chris Tessaglia-Hymes
PO Box 488
8 Etna Lane
Etna, NY 13062
607-351-5740


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[cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard: Bay-breasted, Blackpoll, Canada, Tennessee

2021-05-20 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
This morning, I made my second trip to the Hawthorn Orchard, from around 9am to 
11am. It was getting pretty warm in there by late morning and things were 
quieting down.

It was nice running into and chatting with Ken Kemphues and Stuart Krasnoff 
along the trails there, where most of the activity was, in the Northeast corner 
and along that whole North edge.

Highlights included a single Blackpoll Warbler, up to four vocally-active and 
fairly cooperative Bay-breasted Warblers, a couple of Tennessee Warblers (male, 
female), and a single singing Canada Warbler. Other birds included a heard-only 
Alder Flycatcher, a couple of Magnolia Warblers, and a couple of vocal 
Chestnut-sided Warblers (singing alternate songs), among other expected species.

I’ve included some bad photos of some of the birds that I saw, as well as some 
audio recordings in my eBird checklist, here: 
https://ebird.org/checklist/S88592115

Good birding!

Sincerely,
Chris T-H

--
Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Field Applications Engineer
Center for Conservation Bioacoustics, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 
607-254-1132
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/ccb


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[cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard: Black-billed Cuckoos

2021-05-19 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
In a very last-minute decision this morning, I managed to get out today for my 
first springtime birding, after having been occupied with work-related 
obligations these past few weeks.

I spent about 1h 45m at the very quiet Hawthorn Orchard on this warm and very 
clear/sunny day, starting around 9:15am.

Highlights for me were two different Black-billed Cuckoos that were actively 
foraging, singing, and gurgle calling. One bird was in the Southwest corner and 
one bird was in the Northwest corner. At one point, I was watching the bird in 
the Northwest corner as I simultaneously heard a bird singing from the 
direction of the Southwest corner.

Other birds included a singing Indigo Bunting in the NW clearing, a Blackpoll 
Warbler singing from the oaks in the Northwest corner, a couple of singing 
Magnolia Warblers, and two Tennessee Warblers.

Some media have been added to my eBird checklist, here: 
https://ebird.org/checklist/S88524711

Good birding!

Sincerely,
Chris T-H

--
Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Field Applications Engineer
Center for Conservation Bioacoustics, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 
607-254-1132
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/ccb


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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard and East Ithaca Rec. Way, May 19, 2019

2019-05-19 Thread David Nicosia
Chris,

Hopefully it is a cyclical thing. One of our best spots in Broome Co King
Street Town of Barker has had more migrants than I have seen in several
years. Diversity and numbers are up for most warblers and other neotropical
migrants this year. I also have noticed in a few other spots in the county
that there seems to be more neotropical migrants. I went to Cascade Valley
SF and pretty much everywhere there were ovenbirds and red-eyed vireos. The
numbers of blackburnian and magnolia warblers are up and so are black
throated green and canada warblers. I  had 12 least flycatchers along this
road which is well above previous years.  Our Hawthorne area in Upper Lisle
also has been fairly quiet. But the breeders in that area are in decent
numbers. Its been a great year down here for Bay-breasted and Cape May
Warblers.

Dave

Dave

On Sun, May 19, 2019 at 10:40 AM Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes <
c...@cornell.edu> wrote:

> Thanks to Diane Morton, Ken Kemphues, and Paul Anderson for co-leading the
> Cayuga Bird Club field trip to the Hawthorn Orchard this morning. Another
> relatively quiet morning, despite favorable overnight conditions. There
> were many high flying migrating warblers throughout the morning.
>
> Please see my thoughts on Tortricidae moth larvae, below.
>
> Good birding!
>
> Sincerely,
> Chris T-H
>
> > Hawthorn Orchard and East Ithaca Rec. Way, Tompkins, New York, US
> > May 19, 2019 6:15 AM - 10:23 AM
> > Protocol: Traveling
> > 1.0 mile(s)
> > Comments: Repeat of Cayuga Bird Club field trip to the Hawthorn
> Orchard, in the hopes of better migrants stopping in to forage.
> >
> > There is very little evidence of leafroller moth larvae (Tortricidae)
> being pervasive throughout the Hawthorn Orchard this year. Most hawthorn
> trees and leaves appear quite healthy and undamaged.
> >
> > The significantly reduced findings of many warblers or vireos actively
> foraging in or making use of the hawthorns as a good food source, supports
> the idea and observation that the neotropical migrants are primarily
> targeting this location for the periodic abundance of food. The occurrence
> of leafroller moth larvae may be a biennial event or at least having some
> cyclical nature—hopefully the notable lack of larvae this year is not
> another example of the mass die-off of our insects.
> >
> > 56 species (+1 other taxa)
> >
> > Canada Goose  2
> > Mallard  1
> > Mourning Dove  5
> > Black-billed Cuckoo  1 Seen poorly by most, and in flight, in trees
> near large square retention pond to West of South rugby ball field.
> > Chimney Swift  1
> > Killdeer  1
> > Ring-billed Gull  1
> > Turkey Vulture  2
> > Osprey  1
> > Cooper's Hawk  1 Imm.
> > Red-bellied Woodpecker  2
> > Downy Woodpecker  1
> > Hairy Woodpecker  1
> > Eastern Wood-Pewee  1
> > Alder Flycatcher  1 Heard Pip and Reer notes heard well, near large
> square retention pond, West of South rugby ball field.
> > Least Flycatcher  2
> > Great Crested Flycatcher  1
> > Eastern Kingbird  1
> > Warbling Vireo  2
> > Red-eyed Vireo  7 Mostly foraging and singing in oaks along ravine,
> especially in NW corner clearing.
> > Blue Jay  54 Mostly low flying migrating flocks.
> > American Crow  1
> > Tree Swallow  2
> > Barn Swallow  7
> > Black-capped Chickadee  4
> > White-breasted Nuthatch  1
> > House Wren  2
> > Carolina Wren  2
> > Veery  1
> > Wood Thrush  4
> > American Robin  13
> > Gray Catbird  15
> > European Starling  12
> > Cedar Waxwing  4
> > House Finch  1
> > Purple Finch  2
> > American Goldfinch  5
> > Savannah Sparrow  1
> > Song Sparrow  10
> > Eastern Meadowlark  1
> > Baltimore Oriole  11
> > Red-winged Blackbird  12
> > Brown-headed Cowbird  8
> > Common Grackle  4
> > Tennessee Warbler  4
> > Nashville Warbler  1 Singing in oaks just South of the NW corner
> clearing.
> > Common Yellowthroat  2
> > American Redstart  2
> > Cape May Warbler  1 Heard flight notes only
> > Bay-breasted Warbler  2 Two different adults. Migrating/foraging
> through oaks and maples along North ravine.
> > Yellow Warbler  2
> > Blackpoll Warbler  1 One bird singing early AM from inside Hawthorn
> Orchard.
> > warbler sp. (Parulidae sp.)  15 Continuous high flyover migrants and
> a couple of fast moving warbler flocks, through tops of oaks.
> > Scarlet Tanager  6 Daytime migrating birds. Perch-sing-fly,
> continuing in general ENE direction.
> > Northern Cardinal  5
> > Indigo Bunting  3 Adult male seen in Northwest corner clearing;
> several buzzy flight notes heard from other migrants.
> > House Sparrow  6
> >
> > View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S56485576
> >
> > This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (
> https://ebird.org/home)
>
> --
>
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>
> 

[cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard and East Ithaca Rec. Way, May 19, 2019

2019-05-19 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Thanks to Diane Morton, Ken Kemphues, and Paul Anderson for co-leading the 
Cayuga Bird Club field trip to the Hawthorn Orchard this morning. Another 
relatively quiet morning, despite favorable overnight conditions. There were 
many high flying migrating warblers throughout the morning.

Please see my thoughts on Tortricidae moth larvae, below.

Good birding!

Sincerely,
Chris T-H

> Hawthorn Orchard and East Ithaca Rec. Way, Tompkins, New York, US
> May 19, 2019 6:15 AM - 10:23 AM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 1.0 mile(s)
> Comments: Repeat of Cayuga Bird Club field trip to the Hawthorn Orchard, 
> in the hopes of better migrants stopping in to forage.
> 
> There is very little evidence of leafroller moth larvae (Tortricidae) being 
> pervasive throughout the Hawthorn Orchard this year. Most hawthorn trees and 
> leaves appear quite healthy and undamaged.
> 
> The significantly reduced findings of many warblers or vireos actively 
> foraging in or making use of the hawthorns as a good food source, supports 
> the idea and observation that the neotropical migrants are primarily 
> targeting this location for the periodic abundance of food. The occurrence of 
> leafroller moth larvae may be a biennial event or at least having some 
> cyclical nature—hopefully the notable lack of larvae this year is not another 
> example of the mass die-off of our insects.
> 
> 56 species (+1 other taxa)
> 
> Canada Goose  2
> Mallard  1
> Mourning Dove  5
> Black-billed Cuckoo  1 Seen poorly by most, and in flight, in trees near 
> large square retention pond to West of South rugby ball field.
> Chimney Swift  1
> Killdeer  1
> Ring-billed Gull  1
> Turkey Vulture  2
> Osprey  1
> Cooper's Hawk  1 Imm.
> Red-bellied Woodpecker  2
> Downy Woodpecker  1
> Hairy Woodpecker  1
> Eastern Wood-Pewee  1
> Alder Flycatcher  1 Heard Pip and Reer notes heard well, near large 
> square retention pond, West of South rugby ball field.
> Least Flycatcher  2
> Great Crested Flycatcher  1
> Eastern Kingbird  1
> Warbling Vireo  2
> Red-eyed Vireo  7 Mostly foraging and singing in oaks along ravine, 
> especially in NW corner clearing.
> Blue Jay  54 Mostly low flying migrating flocks.
> American Crow  1
> Tree Swallow  2
> Barn Swallow  7
> Black-capped Chickadee  4
> White-breasted Nuthatch  1
> House Wren  2
> Carolina Wren  2
> Veery  1
> Wood Thrush  4
> American Robin  13
> Gray Catbird  15
> European Starling  12
> Cedar Waxwing  4
> House Finch  1
> Purple Finch  2
> American Goldfinch  5
> Savannah Sparrow  1
> Song Sparrow  10
> Eastern Meadowlark  1
> Baltimore Oriole  11
> Red-winged Blackbird  12
> Brown-headed Cowbird  8
> Common Grackle  4
> Tennessee Warbler  4
> Nashville Warbler  1 Singing in oaks just South of the NW corner clearing.
> Common Yellowthroat  2
> American Redstart  2
> Cape May Warbler  1 Heard flight notes only
> Bay-breasted Warbler  2 Two different adults. Migrating/foraging through 
> oaks and maples along North ravine.
> Yellow Warbler  2
> Blackpoll Warbler  1 One bird singing early AM from inside Hawthorn 
> Orchard.
> warbler sp. (Parulidae sp.)  15 Continuous high flyover migrants and a 
> couple of fast moving warbler flocks, through tops of oaks.
> Scarlet Tanager  6 Daytime migrating birds. Perch-sing-fly, continuing in 
> general ENE direction.
> Northern Cardinal  5
> Indigo Bunting  3 Adult male seen in Northwest corner clearing; several 
> buzzy flight notes heard from other migrants.
> House Sparrow  6
> 
> View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S56485576
> 
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (https://ebird.org/home)

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[cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard Trails Info and Map

2019-05-14 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Good afternoon, birders!

I was having an offline conversation about the Hawthorn Orchard trails, 
descriptions, the desire for a map, etc. and thought it would be helpful to 
share the following trail descriptions and “map” of the Hawthorn Orchard with 
the greater birding community.

First, a note on parking. Park in the right rear dirt trailer parking lot of 
the Oxley Equestrian Center (220 Pine Tree Road, Ithaca, NY). You may also 
continue along the dirt road at the right rear corner of the Oxley Equestrian 
Center trailer parking lot and park near the corner of the outdoor tennis 
courts. Parking in the main Reis Tennis Center parking lot is discouraged.

Link to the map and more completed trail color descriptions are below. Please 
note, there are no trail or color markings within the actual Hawthorn Orchard.

I think it’s important to understand the geography when visiting. The main 
Hawthorn Orchard is a large, roughly 13-acre, rectangular parcel, running 
lengthwise in a North-South direction. There’s the steep ravine as the North 
boundary, an old horse pasture as the South boundary, a large 
soccer/rugby/intramural sports ball field and the Reis Tennis Center as the 
East boundary, and the East Ithaca Recreation Way as the West boundary. The 
Hawthorn Orchard land slopes in an overall Southwest direction.

It’s easy to get disoriented in there, but you cannot get lost. You can use 
your hearing to identify where you are within the Hawthorn Orchard. Listen for 
trail walkers along the East Ithaca Recreation Way. Listen for people playing 
tennis at the outdoor tennis courts. Listen for the road noise from Mitchell 
Street traffic just beyond the North Ravine. I often forget to mention that I 
use these helpful auditory cues to keep myself oriented when birding over there.

As for trails and entrances, there is a well defined East-West trail (Map: teal 
colored trail) that connects the Northwest corner clearing, by the East Ithaca 
Recreation Way in view of the Black Oak Lane Townhouses, to the Northeast 
corner where there are a couple of defined entrances.

One of the Northeast corner defined entrances is just Northwest of a small 
equipment shed on the North side of the ball field located behind and on the 
West side of the Reis Tennis Center outdoor tennis courts. The other Northeast 
corner entrance is located to the Northeast of and just beyond the previously 
mentioned shed, and is adjacent to the outfield boundary fence of the softball 
field (located on the North side of the Reis Tennis Center). This latter 
entrance (Map: orange colored trail) brings you into a very open maple forest 
that slopes down into the North-side ravine. The trail here follows along the 
uphill side of the ravine and connects near the previously-mentioned Northeast 
entrance area (Map: teal colored trail).

There is another trail one can navigate (Map: red colored trail) which runs 
from the Northeast entrance (to the Northwest of the shed) along an inside 
track all the way along the Easternmost edge of the Hawthorn Orchard, that 
brings you out to the very Southeast entrance. There’s also the various wide 
passages along the Southern interior section of the Hawthorn Orchard (Map: 
purple colored trail); those were previously used by equestrians years ago, but 
are no longer maintained for that purpose. Those wide paths meander along the 
Southern section and bring you from the Southeast corner to the Southwest 
corner.

Some historical aerial images may be accessed by visiting this link here:

http://bit.ly/HawthornHistAerials

The latter historical aerial image was taken in 2006 for me by Bill Hecht. I’ve 
used that flyover image to create a PDF map with color-indicated trails for 
descriptive purposes. Again, please note, there are no trail or color markings 
within the actual Hawthorn Orchard.

The trail map PDF may be accessed by visiting this link here:

http://bit.ly/HawthornTrails

  *   The teal colored trail is the main East-West trail near and along the 
North ravine edge.
  *   The orange colored trail is the one that goes into the open section of 
maples closest to the softball field and connects to the teal colored trail.
  *   The red colored trail is the main North-South trail along the Easternmost 
edge of the Hawthorn Orchard.
  *   The purple colored trail is the one that meanders along the old 
equestrian trails on the South side of the Hawthorn Orchard.
  *   The white colored trails are purely deer paths. Only navigate if you feel 
confident or adventurous.
  *   The gray colored trail is a poorly-defined deer path as well, but is nice 
to poke along for warblers and especially for Yellow-bellied Flycatcher in late 
May and early June.

A final reminder that it is often extremely muddy here. Wear muck boots and be 
prepared to get wet and muddy, especially following recent rainfall.

Hope these resources are useful for birders visiting the Hawthorn Orchard for 
the first time, or if 

[cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard Trails

2019-05-10 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Just a note about the Hawthorn Orchard Trails:

Tonight, I went back to the Hawthorn Orchard and re-opened the North-South 
passage along the Eastern edge of the Hawthorn Orchard. This route connects the 
Northeast corner entrance to the Southeast corner entrance. At the muddy 
Northeast corner entrance, you will bear left (through the muddy pool…) to 
access this passage.

Be forewarned, it is extremely muddy. The North-South passage trail is very wet 
and muddy and requires at least calf-high muck boots. If you wear regular 
hiking boots, your shoes will become wet and muddy. There’s just no avoiding it 
this year, as wet as this spring has been.

The North Ravine trail that connects the Northeast corner to the Northwest 
corner is not that muddy. To avoid most of the mud, you can enter the 
previously hidden trailhead close to the softball outfield fence (the Cornell 
Botanic Garden installed a trailhead sign at this location, and others). For 
those familiar, you will find that I made this entrance (and the entire North 
Ravine trail section) safer and more navigable Thursday night.

Hope this helps make your visits to the Hawthorn Orchard a little more 
enjoyable.

Good birding!

Sincerely,
Chris T-H

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PO Box 488
8 Etna Lane
Etna, NY 13062
607-351-5740


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[cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard: May 10th

2019-05-10 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
This morning, I made a quick run through the Hawthorn Orchard in-between the 
rain showers.

Not too much, but a male HOODED WARBLER was very cooperative for me. The Hooded 
Warbler was located near the Northwest entrance to the Hawthorn Orchard, right 
off the East Ithaca Recreation Way, along the hillside that slopes down on the 
West side of the pond below the Black Oak Lane townhouses. The bird was singing 
periodically and foraging on or near the ground.

Last night I did some trail clearing at the Hawthorn Orchard along the entire 
North Ravine trail and at the two Northeast trailhead entrances into the 
Hawthorn Orchard. Makes for a little easier navigation. Definitely wear muck 
boots when birding here, it’s pretty wet and muddy.

Below is my complete list from this morning.

Sincerely,
Chris T-H


Hawthorn Orchard and East Ithaca Rec. Way
May 10, 2019
08:56
Traveling
0.50 miles
65 Minutes
All birds reported? Yes
Comments: Submitted from eBird for iOS, version 1.6.5 Build 36

2 Canada Goose
3 Turkey Vulture
1 Merlin
1 Great Crested Flycatcher
1 Yellow-throated Vireo
1 Blue-headed Vireo
2 Red-eyed Vireo
9 Blue Jay
3 American Crow
2 Black-capped Chickadee
3 Tufted Titmouse
2 White-breasted Nuthatch
3 House Wren
1 Carolina Wren
5 Wood Thrush
2 American Robin
7 Gray Catbird
2 European Starling
5 American Goldfinch
1 Chipping Sparrow
16 White-throated Sparrow
4 Song Sparrow
2 Baltimore Oriole
2 Red-winged Blackbird
3 Brown-headed Cowbird
2 Nashville Warbler
3 Common Yellowthroat
1 Hooded Warbler
1 American Redstart
1 Northern Parula
1 Magnolia Warbler
2 Yellow Warbler
2 Chestnut-sided Warbler
7 Northern Cardinal

Number of Taxa: 34


--
Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Field Applications Engineer
Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 
607-254-1132
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[cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard: WHIP-POOR-WILL

2018-05-03 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
I just received word through the eBird alert system for Tompkins County, that a 
WHIP-POOR-WILL was flushed by a group of birders bushwhacking through the 
Hawthorn Orchard around 6:00AM this morning. The bird flushed up, perched, and 
was seen well by the group. Approximate location was here: 
N42.4357931,W76.4687685

No further information is available.

Sincerely,
Chris

--
Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Field Applications Engineer
Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 
607-254-1132
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp


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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard

2017-05-09 Thread Suan Hsi Yong
> On Tue, May 9, 2017 at 10:30 AM, Peter  wrote:
> I was wondering if anyone can tell me how the warblers have been over at 
> Hawthorn Orchard. I've read in the Basin Birding Book that it's a good spot 
> for them. Has anyone birded it yet this year?
> 
> And how would that location compare with Shindagin Hollow?

The Hawthorn Orchard is a migrant trap, so bird density is subject to migrant 
movement (which is subject to wind and weather patterns, etc.). On the good 
days it's downright magical, but otherwise it can sometimes be quiet. This is 
the time of year for it, and I'm sure people are birding it every day; the 
relative dearth of reports suggests to me that there hasn't been any "magical" 
days yet, though already there has been golden-winged and orange-crowned found; 
and a lackluster day there could still be considered good by other standards.

And it's also very muddy this year, I hear.

Shindagin and other surrounding forests are good for breeding birds. Being 
larger tracts of taller trees, the density of migrants tend to be lower, and 
they also tend to stay higher in the trees.

Suan


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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard

2017-05-09 Thread bob mcguire
Just returned from there. Lots going on. Multiple warbler species plus Wood 
Thrush. 

Bob McGuire
On May 9, 2017, at 10:30 AM, Peter  wrote:

> I was wondering if anyone can tell me how the warblers have been over at 
> Hawthorn Orchard. I've read in the Basin Birding Book that it's a good spot 
> for them. Has anyone birded it yet this year?
> 
> And how would that location compare with Shindagin Hollow?
> 
> Thanks much.
> 
> Pete Saracino
> 
> 
> 
> 
> --
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[cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard

2017-05-09 Thread Peter
I was wondering if anyone can tell me how the warblers have been over at 
Hawthorn Orchard. I've read in the Basin Birding Book that it's a good 
spot for them. Has anyone birded it yet this year?


And how would that location compare with Shindagin Hollow?

Thanks much.

Pete Saracino




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[cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard: 2 May 2017 - Golden-winged Warbler

2017-05-02 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
This morning, while birding the Hawthorn Orchard, I came upon a silently 
foraging adult male GOLDEN-WINGED WARBLER. This bird was located in the 
Southwest portion of the Hawthorn Orchard, about 100 yards to the East of the 
single shagbark hickory tree in the SW area. After messaging the Cayuga RBA 
GroupMe, Jay McGowan relocated the bird in the same general area as before. 
While Jay was there, it was joined by a singing Blue-winged Warbler. Soon 
after, the Golden-winged Warbler also sang. Jay got pictures and some audio 
documentation of this bird. Later, I ran into Ann Mitchell, Gary Kohlenberg, 
and Ken Kemphues, who all came from successfully seeing and hearing the 
Golden-winged Warbler, all in the same spot.

Just a heads-up that the hawthorns and other plants are leaving out nicely and 
the birds are harvesting Tortricid moth larvae from the hawthorn leaf clusters. 
This could turn out to be a banner year at the Hawthorn Orchard. The plants and 
insects are about a good 10+ days ahead of schedule at this spot.

Good birding!

Sincerely,
Chris T-H

--
Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Field Applications Engineer
Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 
607-254-1132
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp


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[cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard: May 20, 2016

2016-05-20 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Just a really quick note. The Hawthorn Orchard was initiatilaly devoid of 
migrants. Eventually, by about 7:20, birds started arriving via the SW corner 
from the West (from wherever they roost). Wood Thrushes have become much more 
territorial IN the Hawthorn Orchard, which is nice. First time in a few years.

Good birding!

Sincerely,
Chris T-H

Hawthorn Orchard
May 20, 2016
06:45
Traveling
1.50 miles
75 Minutes
All birds reported? Yes
Comments: Extremely quiet start to the morning. Eventually encountered a flock 
of six Tennessee warblers in a hawthorn tree in the southwest corner, then the 
Tennessee warblers began to appear in the Hawthorn Orchard, along with others. 
This was around 7:15am. Cool, quiet, sunny.
Submitted from eBird for iOS, version 1.2.1 Build 65

2 Canada Goose
1 Killdeer
2 Mourning Dove
1 Red-bellied Woodpecker
1 Downy Woodpecker
1 Hairy Woodpecker
1 Northern Flicker
1 Eastern Phoebe
1 Red-eyed Vireo (Northeast corner, seen/heard)
3 Blue Jay
1 Tree Swallow
2 Barn Swallow
2 Black-capped Chickadee
1 Veery
4 Wood Thrush (now seeming strongly territorial IN the Hawthorn Orchard)
8 American Robin
8 Gray Catbird
1 Brown Thrasher (visibly singing very loudly from the top of the oak tree just 
South of the Northeast corner)
5 European Starling

8 Tennessee Warbler (May be more, but I didn’t have time to stick around)
1 Nashville Warbler (NE corner)
5 Common Yellowthroat (including two observed copulating)
1 American Redstart
1 Magnolia Warbler
1 Yellow-rumped Warbler
3 Wilson's Warbler (1 NE corner, 1 East side, 1 SW corner, all distinctly 
different birds, based upon repeated observations from those locations)

1 Song Sparrow
1 Eastern Towhee (This was a new bird this year for me, this was singing loudly 
from the meadow at the Northwest corner)
6 Northern Cardinal
1 Rose-breasted Grosbeak
1 Indigo Bunting (Southwest corner)
5 Red-winged Blackbird
1 Eastern Meadowlark
2 Common Grackle
2 Brown-headed Cowbird
3 Baltimore Oriole
1 Purple Finch
3 American Goldfinch
3 House Sparrow

Number of Taxa: 39


Sent from my iPhone



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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard: May 17, 2016 - 16 Warbler Species

2016-05-17 Thread Kenneth J. Kemphues
I can add to Chris’s Hawthorn list  2 Wilson’s warblers and 2 bay breasted 
warblers.  One of the Wilson’s warblers was called in by Chris’s spishing in 
the brush in the Southwest section (at least I assume it was Chris - I didn’t 
actually see him); the other was in the ravine in the northwest corner.  The 
bay breasted warblers were along the main path that parallels the ravine.


Kenneth J. Kemphues
Professor
Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics
435  Biotechnology Building
Cornell University
Ithaca NY 14853

voice:  607-254-4805
fax: 607-255-6249
k...@cornell.edu






On May 17, 2016, at 10:03 AM, Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes 
> wrote:

Hawthorn Orchard
May 17, 2016
07:25
Traveling
1.50 miles
90 Minutes
All birds reported? Yes
Comments: I didn't expect to encounter much this morning, so was pleasantly 
surprised with the abundance of birds foraging throughout the Hawthorn Orchard. 
There appears to be plenty of food now throughout for the birds to gorge 
themselves with.
Submitted from eBird for iOS, version 1.2.0 Build 62

1 Chimney Swift
1 Downy Woodpecker
1 Hairy Woodpecker
1 Willow Flycatcher -- Single bird observed giving "whit" notes, no noticeable 
eyering.
7 Least Flycatcher -- These birds were scattered throughout; this number may be 
low.
1 Eastern Phoebe
1 Blue-headed Vireo
1 Warbling Vireo
1 Philadelphia Vireo -- Observed singing northeast corner
2 Red-eyed Vireo
2 Blue Jay
1 American Crow
6 Barn Swallow
3 Black-capped Chickadee
1 Tufted Titmouse
1 White-breasted Nuthatch
2 Veery -- One bird was in the same area as the Indigo Bunting, just southwest 
of the northeast corner; the other bird was in the same area as the Ovenbird, 
in the central southern area.
1 Swainson's Thrush -- Easily visible bird foraging in the upper treetops of 
the hawthorns, just west of the northeast corner.
4 Wood Thrush
11 American Robin
14 Gray Catbird
6 European Starling

1 Ovenbird -- Single song burst in the central southern portion.
1 Blue-winged Warbler -- One singing male in the northeast corner
25 Tennessee Warbler -- Mostly males, a few females have moved in. Evenly 
distributed throughout the Hawthorn Orchard.
4 Nashville Warbler -- All in the southwest corner
7 Common Yellowthroat
6 American Redstart -- Males and females scattered throughout
3 Cape May Warbler -- All females in the top of the oak trees at the northeast 
corner.
2 Northern Parula -- Softly singing males. One in the northeast corner, one in 
the southwest corner
6 Magnolia Warbler -- Several singing males and at least one female mostly in 
the northeast corner and also in the southwest corner
1 Blackburnian Warbler -- Singing male in the northeast corner
8 Yellow Warbler -- Males and females scattered throughout
1 Chestnut-sided Warbler -- Singing male northeast corner
1 Black-throated Blue Warbler -- Singing male in the northeast corner
7 Yellow-rumped Warbler
1 Black-throated Green Warbler -- Foraging female along the east edge
1 Canada Warbler -- Singing in the northeast corner

6 White-throated Sparrow -- Along the gravel path from the East Ithaca 
Recreation Way to the ballfields.
3 Song Sparrow
1 Scarlet Tanager -- Calling, Northeast corner
5 Northern Cardinal
1 Rose-breasted Grosbeak -- Calling, Northeast corner
1 Indigo Bunting -- Bright blue male silently foraging just Southwest of the 
northeast corner
4 Red-winged Blackbird
2 Common Grackle
2 Brown-headed Cowbird
6 Baltimore Oriole
2 American Goldfinch
6 House Sparrow

Number of Taxa: 50

--
Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Field Applications Engineer
Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 
607-254-1132
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[cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard: May 17, 2016 - 16 Warbler Species

2016-05-17 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Hawthorn Orchard
May 17, 2016
07:25
Traveling
1.50 miles
90 Minutes
All birds reported? Yes
Comments: I didn't expect to encounter much this morning, so was pleasantly 
surprised with the abundance of birds foraging throughout the Hawthorn Orchard. 
There appears to be plenty of food now throughout for the birds to gorge 
themselves with.
Submitted from eBird for iOS, version 1.2.0 Build 62

1 Chimney Swift
1 Downy Woodpecker
1 Hairy Woodpecker
1 Willow Flycatcher -- Single bird observed giving "whit" notes, no noticeable 
eyering.
7 Least Flycatcher -- These birds were scattered throughout; this number may be 
low.
1 Eastern Phoebe
1 Blue-headed Vireo
1 Warbling Vireo
1 Philadelphia Vireo -- Observed singing northeast corner
2 Red-eyed Vireo
2 Blue Jay
1 American Crow
6 Barn Swallow
3 Black-capped Chickadee
1 Tufted Titmouse
1 White-breasted Nuthatch
2 Veery -- One bird was in the same area as the Indigo Bunting, just southwest 
of the northeast corner; the other bird was in the same area as the Ovenbird, 
in the central southern area.
1 Swainson's Thrush -- Easily visible bird foraging in the upper treetops of 
the hawthorns, just west of the northeast corner.
4 Wood Thrush
11 American Robin
14 Gray Catbird
6 European Starling

1 Ovenbird -- Single song burst in the central southern portion.
1 Blue-winged Warbler -- One singing male in the northeast corner
25 Tennessee Warbler -- Mostly males, a few females have moved in. Evenly 
distributed throughout the Hawthorn Orchard.
4 Nashville Warbler -- All in the southwest corner
7 Common Yellowthroat
6 American Redstart -- Males and females scattered throughout
3 Cape May Warbler -- All females in the top of the oak trees at the northeast 
corner.
2 Northern Parula -- Softly singing males. One in the northeast corner, one in 
the southwest corner
6 Magnolia Warbler -- Several singing males and at least one female mostly in 
the northeast corner and also in the southwest corner
1 Blackburnian Warbler -- Singing male in the northeast corner
8 Yellow Warbler -- Males and females scattered throughout
1 Chestnut-sided Warbler -- Singing male northeast corner
1 Black-throated Blue Warbler -- Singing male in the northeast corner
7 Yellow-rumped Warbler
1 Black-throated Green Warbler -- Foraging female along the east edge
1 Canada Warbler -- Singing in the northeast corner

6 White-throated Sparrow -- Along the gravel path from the East Ithaca 
Recreation Way to the ballfields.
3 Song Sparrow
1 Scarlet Tanager -- Calling, Northeast corner
5 Northern Cardinal
1 Rose-breasted Grosbeak -- Calling, Northeast corner
1 Indigo Bunting -- Bright blue male silently foraging just Southwest of the 
northeast corner
4 Red-winged Blackbird
2 Common Grackle
2 Brown-headed Cowbird
6 Baltimore Oriole
2 American Goldfinch
6 House Sparrow

Number of Taxa: 50

--
Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Field Applications Engineer
Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 
607-254-1132
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp


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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard Friday

2016-05-13 Thread Gary Kohlenberg
In addition to the birds Bob and Chris saw this morning I can add Indigo 
Buntings, Common Yellowthroats, Magnolia, Blue-winged Warbler and one 
Lawrence's Warbler singing a blue-winged song.

Gary 

On May 13, 2016, at 11:36 AM, bob mcguire  wrote:

The area was fairly quiet when I entered from Mitchell Street around 6 this 
morning. Several LEAST and a GREAT-CRESTED FLYCATCHER were calling close to the 
E.I. Rec-way. As I progressed east I was surrounded by four singing WOOD 
THRUSHES and then at least six GRAY CATBIRDS. A YELLOW WARBLER was the only 
warbler I encountered in the NE corner. Then it began to rain thinly, and I ran 
into Chris T-Hymes. He pointed out a distant TENNESSEE WARBLER that I was 
unable to hear at first. Moving closer we found a second TENNESSEE. Chris 
headed into the middle of the thicket, and I worked my way back towards 
Mitchell Street. Just before emerging from the trees I ran into a foraging 
group of CHESTNUT-SIDED, BAY-BREASTED, and TENNESSEE WARBLERS. Apparently there 
was no major fallout last night - but there were still a few good birds around.

Bob McGuire
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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard Friday

2016-05-13 Thread David Nicosia
I noticed on radar that the bird echoes dropped of after sunrise (which is
typical) and THEN the rain came. So there was no major grounding of
birds that occurred overnight.


On Fri, May 13, 2016 at 11:34 AM, bob mcguire 
wrote:

> The area was fairly quiet when I entered from Mitchell Street around 6
> this morning. Several LEAST and a GREAT-CRESTED FLYCATCHER were calling
> close to the E.I. Rec-way. As I progressed east I was surrounded by four
> singing WOOD THRUSHES and then at least six GRAY CATBIRDS. A YELLOW WARBLER
> was the only warbler I encountered in the NE corner. Then it began to rain
> thinly, and I ran into Chris T-Hymes. He pointed out a distant TENNESSEE
> WARBLER that I was unable to hear at first. Moving closer we found a second
> TENNESSEE. Chris headed into the middle of the thicket, and I worked my way
> back towards Mitchell Street. Just before emerging from the trees I ran
> into a foraging group of CHESTNUT-SIDED, BAY-BREASTED, and TENNESSEE
> WARBLERS. Apparently there was no major fallout last night - but there were
> still a few good birds around.
>
> Bob McGuire
> --
>
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[cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard Friday

2016-05-13 Thread bob mcguire
The area was fairly quiet when I entered from Mitchell Street around 6 this 
morning. Several LEAST and a GREAT-CRESTED FLYCATCHER were calling close to the 
E.I. Rec-way. As I progressed east I was surrounded by four singing WOOD 
THRUSHES and then at least six GRAY CATBIRDS. A YELLOW WARBLER was the only 
warbler I encountered in the NE corner. Then it began to rain thinly, and I ran 
into Chris T-Hymes. He pointed out a distant TENNESSEE WARBLER that I was 
unable to hear at first. Moving closer we found a second TENNESSEE. Chris 
headed into the middle of the thicket, and I worked my way back towards 
Mitchell Street. Just before emerging from the trees I ran into a foraging 
group of CHESTNUT-SIDED, BAY-BREASTED, and TENNESSEE WARBLERS. Apparently there 
was no major fallout last night - but there were still a few good birds around.

Bob McGuire
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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard: May 10, 2016

2016-05-10 Thread Marc Devokaitis
Cool observation of the White-crowned Sparrows.

Below is the BNA excerpt describing something similar. Since these birds
aren't on their breeding grounds, this must be practice? Maybe the two
males you saw are actually good buddies travelling together and its kind of
like a sparring match at the gym...

Agonistic Behavior

Territorial male flies toward conspecific intruder, erects crown feathers,
puffs chest, and sings loudly. Aggressor may then adopt a threatening
posture, sleeking its body feathers, orienting its body to the horizontal,
and pointing its open bill toward the intruder. This may be accompanied by
a Wing-flutter Display in which male crouches, lowers and flutters its
wings, and raises its head and tail slightly (Moore 1984

, Baptista 1989
),
reminiscent of female’s Copulation-solicitation Display. Fighting is most
common early in territory establishment. Birds in a territorial dispute fly
at each other with feet pointed toward opponent. In prolonged combat, they
fall to the ground, grappling with their feet (Baptista 1989

).


Thanks for sharing,

Marc





Marc Devokaitis

Public Information Specialist
Cornell Lab of Ornithology



On Tue, May 10, 2016 at 10:12 AM, Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes <
c...@cornell.edu> wrote:

> This morning, it was significantly colder than yesterday morning at the
> same time. Fewer birds in general (except for White-throated Sparrows) and
> fewer warbler species. A single Blue-winged Warbler was singing incessantly
> from near the middle of the Hawthorn Orchard throughout much of my time
> there.
>
> Highlight was the huge flock of about 62 White-throated Sparrows which are
> frequenting the hedgerow near the softball field. I got a fairly accurate
> count of that flock as they passed me from the East to the West along the
> hedgerow. They were headed to the grassy field beyond the softball field to
> feed on dandelion seeds. There was at least one White-crowned Sparrow here
> as well.
>
> On my way back to the truck, I encountered another three White-crowned
> Sparrows – two apparent males and an apparent female. They were just inside
> the fencing on the green of the outside tennis courts. The two males were
> in an apparent singing and displaying duel – something I’ve never observed
> before. The two males took turns singing. As one male sang upright, the
> other male would crouch down with back in horizontal and bill down with cap
> pointed at the singing male, subtly jerking its head back and forth and
> gently hopping side to side. Then, they would switch, with the previously
> singing male now taking a horizontal pose with bright black-and-white
> striped cap facing the now upright and singing opponent. They repeated this
> for at least a couple of minutes, each bird singing one song before getting
> into the horizontal pose again; this all happening while the non-vocal,
> apparent female, was hopping around nearby, watching from the sidelines.
> This was almost rapid-fire, like a tennis ball being hit back-and-forth
> across the net during a match.
>
> I think we need a few good days of warm weather to bring out the hawthorn
> flowers…
>
> Good birding!
>
> Sincerely,
> Chris T-H
>
>
> Hawthorn Orchard
> May 10, 2016
> 06:30
> Traveling
> 1.00 miles
> 149 Minutes
> All birds reported? Yes
> Comments: Cold start to the morning. ~ 30°
> Submitted from eBird for iOS, version 1.2.0 Build 62
>
> 9 Canada Goose
> 1 Great Blue Heron
> 2 Killdeer
> 2 Ring-billed Gull
> 3 Mourning Dove
> 2 Red-bellied Woodpecker
> 2 Downy Woodpecker
> 1 Hairy Woodpecker
> 2 Least Flycatcher
> 1 Eastern Phoebe
> 23 Blue Jay
> 2 American Crow
> 11 Tree Swallow
> 1 Barn Swallow
> 7 Black-capped Chickadee
> 2 Tufted Titmouse
> 1 White-breasted Nuthatch
> 2 House Wren
> 6 Ruby-crowned Kinglet
> 3 Wood Thrush
> 14 American Robin
> 12 Gray Catbird
> 1 Brown Thrasher
> 8 European Starling
> 2 Cedar Waxwing
> 1 Ovenbird
> 2 Blue-winged Warbler
> 1 Black-and-white Warbler
> 9 Nashville Warbler
> 2 Common Yellowthroat
> 2 American Redstart
> 4 Magnolia Warbler
> 1 Yellow Warbler
> 1 Black-throated Blue Warbler
> 6 Yellow-rumped Warbler
> 1 Chipping Sparrow
> 4 White-crowned Sparrow
> 78 White-throated Sparrow
> 3 Song Sparrow
> 1 Scarlet Tanager
> 11 Northern Cardinal
> 1 Rose-breasted Grosbeak
> 8 Red-winged Blackbird
> 1 Eastern Meadowlark
> 6 Common Grackle
> 5 Brown-headed Cowbird
> 4 Baltimore Oriole
> 1 Purple Finch
> 1 Pine Siskin
> 10 American Goldfinch
>
> Number of Taxa: 50
>
> --
> Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
> Field Applications Engineer
> Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
> 159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
> W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 607-254-1132
> 

[cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard: May 10, 2016

2016-05-10 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
This morning, it was significantly colder than yesterday morning at the same 
time. Fewer birds in general (except for White-throated Sparrows) and fewer 
warbler species. A single Blue-winged Warbler was singing incessantly from near 
the middle of the Hawthorn Orchard throughout much of my time there.

Highlight was the huge flock of about 62 White-throated Sparrows which are 
frequenting the hedgerow near the softball field. I got a fairly accurate count 
of that flock as they passed me from the East to the West along the hedgerow. 
They were headed to the grassy field beyond the softball field to feed on 
dandelion seeds. There was at least one White-crowned Sparrow here as well.

On my way back to the truck, I encountered another three White-crowned Sparrows 
– two apparent males and an apparent female. They were just inside the fencing 
on the green of the outside tennis courts. The two males were in an apparent 
singing and displaying duel – something I’ve never observed before. The two 
males took turns singing. As one male sang upright, the other male would crouch 
down with back in horizontal and bill down with cap pointed at the singing 
male, subtly jerking its head back and forth and gently hopping side to side. 
Then, they would switch, with the previously singing male now taking a 
horizontal pose with bright black-and-white striped cap facing the now upright 
and singing opponent. They repeated this for at least a couple of minutes, each 
bird singing one song before getting into the horizontal pose again; this all 
happening while the non-vocal, apparent female, was hopping around nearby, 
watching from the sidelines. This was almost rapid-fire, like a tennis ball 
being hit back-and-forth across the net during a match.

I think we need a few good days of warm weather to bring out the hawthorn 
flowers…

Good birding!

Sincerely,
Chris T-H

Hawthorn Orchard
May 10, 2016
06:30
Traveling
1.00 miles
149 Minutes
All birds reported? Yes
Comments: Cold start to the morning. ~ 30°
Submitted from eBird for iOS, version 1.2.0 Build 62

9 Canada Goose
1 Great Blue Heron
2 Killdeer
2 Ring-billed Gull
3 Mourning Dove
2 Red-bellied Woodpecker
2 Downy Woodpecker
1 Hairy Woodpecker
2 Least Flycatcher
1 Eastern Phoebe
23 Blue Jay
2 American Crow
11 Tree Swallow
1 Barn Swallow
7 Black-capped Chickadee
2 Tufted Titmouse
1 White-breasted Nuthatch
2 House Wren
6 Ruby-crowned Kinglet
3 Wood Thrush
14 American Robin
12 Gray Catbird
1 Brown Thrasher
8 European Starling
2 Cedar Waxwing
1 Ovenbird
2 Blue-winged Warbler
1 Black-and-white Warbler
9 Nashville Warbler
2 Common Yellowthroat
2 American Redstart
4 Magnolia Warbler
1 Yellow Warbler
1 Black-throated Blue Warbler
6 Yellow-rumped Warbler
1 Chipping Sparrow
4 White-crowned Sparrow
78 White-throated Sparrow
3 Song Sparrow
1 Scarlet Tanager
11 Northern Cardinal
1 Rose-breasted Grosbeak
8 Red-winged Blackbird
1 Eastern Meadowlark
6 Common Grackle
5 Brown-headed Cowbird
4 Baltimore Oriole
1 Purple Finch
1 Pine Siskin
10 American Goldfinch

Number of Taxa: 50

--
Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Field Applications Engineer
Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 
607-254-1132
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp


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[cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard: May 9, 2016

2016-05-09 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Today was a cold but nice morning to be at the Hawthorn Orchard. I was 
pleasantly surprised by the appearance of many neotropical migrants in at least 
a few different flocks.

Highlights include: 12 species of warblers, 21 Ruby-crowned Kinglets 
(everywhere), and at least 42 White-throated Sparrows (several large rolling 
flocks through different spots in the Hawthorn Orchard), a male and female 
Brown Thrasher at the SW corner, and at least 5 Scarlet Tanagers (two females 
and one male in one tree, plus other singers passing through).

Many of the warblers were quietly probing the newly-formed leaf clusters in the 
Hawthorn Orchard for hopeful finds of Tortricid (leaf-roller) moth larvae. It’s 
a little early, but it should be a good year for the leaf-rollers, due to the 
relatively mild winter.

Good birding!

Sincerely,
Chris T-H


Hawthorn Orchard
May 9, 2016
06:29
Traveling
1.00 miles
119 Minutes
All birds reported? Yes
Comments: Submitted from eBird for iOS, version 1.2.0 Build 62

1 Double-crested Cormorant
1 Turkey Vulture
1 Cooper's Hawk
2 Killdeer
2 Mourning Dove
1 Red-bellied Woodpecker
2 Downy Woodpecker
1 Hairy Woodpecker
1 Northern Flicker
5 Least Flycatcher
1 Eastern Phoebe
2 Great Crested Flycatcher
1 Yellow-throated Vireo
1 Warbling Vireo
7 Blue Jay
5 American Crow
6 Black-capped Chickadee
4 Tufted Titmouse
4 White-breasted Nuthatch
3 House Wren
1 Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
21 Ruby-crowned Kinglet
3 Wood Thrush
16 American Robin
9 Gray Catbird
2 Brown Thrasher
1 Northern Mockingbird
11 European Starling
2 Ovenbird
2 Blue-winged Warbler
2 Black-and-white Warbler
8 Nashville Warbler
2 Common Yellowthroat
1 American Redstart
3 Northern Parula
6 Magnolia Warbler
3 Yellow Warbler
3 Chestnut-sided Warbler
7 Yellow-rumped Warbler
2 Black-throated Green Warbler
2 Chipping Sparrow
42 White-throated Sparrow
6 Song Sparrow
6 Scarlet Tanager
7 Northern Cardinal
2 Rose-breasted Grosbeak
4 Red-winged Blackbird
2 Common Grackle
5 Brown-headed Cowbird
2 Baltimore Oriole
16 American Goldfinch

Number of Taxa: 51


Sent from my iPhone



--
Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Field Applications Engineer
Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 
607-254-1132
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp


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[cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard: May 16, 2015

2015-05-16 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
I apologize for the brevity, but I wanted to at least share this morning's 
list. Excellent morning with highlight being singing Gray-cheeked Thrush, 
Swainson's Thrush, and Black-billed Cuckoo; and a non-vocal Mourning Warbler. 
I'll add details to my eBird list later.

Good birding!

Sincerely,
Chris T-H

cth4th
May 16, 2015
Hawthorn Orchard
Traveling
3 miles
128 Minutes
Observers: 1
All birds reported? Yes
Comments:  Fantastic morning!!! Additional notes to be added later.
2 Canada Goose
2 Mourning Dove
1 Black-billed Cuckoo
1 Yellow-bellied Sapsucker
1 Northern Flicker
1 Great Crested Flycatcher
1 Warbling Vireo
5 Red-eyed Vireo
6 Blue Jay
4 American Crow
5 Black-capped Chickadee
1 Tufted Titmouse
1 House Wren
1 Ruby-crowned Kinglet
1 Gray-cheeked Thrush
2 Swainson's Thrush
2 Wood Thrush
7 American Robin
15 Gray Catbird
1 Brown Thrasher
1 European Starling
16 Tennessee Warbler
2 Northern Parula
6 Yellow Warbler
1 Chestnut-sided Warbler
10 Magnolia Warbler
2 Cape May Warbler
1 Black-throated Blue Warbler
7 Bay-breasted Warbler
5 Blackpoll Warbler
4 American Redstart
1 Northern Waterthrush
1 Mourning Warbler
6 Common Yellowthroat
2 Canada Warbler
3 Song Sparrow
1 White-throated Sparrow
3 Scarlet Tanager
7 Northern Cardinal
1 Rose-breasted Grosbeak
3 Indigo Bunting
2 Red-winged Blackbird
4 Brown-headed Cowbird
3 Baltimore Oriole
1 Purple Finch
2 American Goldfinch


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RE:[cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard: 15 May 2015

2015-05-15 Thread Meena Madhav Haribal
My counts were different from Chris's I will type in only those which I saw 
more than Chris observed. I walk from southwest-end of the orchard so I may see 
somethings differently than others.


Tennessee 10+ individuals
Cape May 3 females and 2 males at least
Chestnut sided at least 3
Blackpolls 10+
Philadelphia Vireos 2
Scarlet Tanager 1

Also yesterday there was a Raven flying over the orchard that was chased by a 
Fish Crow! This is the second time I am hearing and seeing Fish Crow in this 
area. I wonder if it has taken residence in Six Mile Creek. And the raven was 
seen for the first time this year, but a colleague of mine told that she has  
been seeing and hearing the Raven on Eastern Heights road often this year.

Cheers
Meena

From: bounce-119239803-3493...@list.cornell.edu 
[mailto:bounce-119239803-3493...@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Christopher T. 
Tessaglia-Hymes
Sent: Friday, May 15, 2015 11:35 AM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard: 15 May 2015

Just a quick note from today's visit. I didn't devote as much time actively 
birding today as I have on past days. But, it was a nice morning nonetheless. 
Others may post additional birds which I did not see or hear.

Again, if you visit the Hawthorn Orchard, please submit your sightings into 
eBird.orghttp://eBird.org for the Hawthorn Orchard hotspot - even if you 
only report a handful of birds seen or heard, every checklist is valuable 
toward preservation of this site.

Hawthorn Orchard, Tompkins, US-NY
May 15, 2015 8:25 AM - 9:45 AM
Protocol: Traveling
1.0 mile(s)

Comments: I didn't spend as much time searching and quantifying birds this 
morning as in past; Tennessee Warblers and Blackpoll Warblers seemed reduced in 
numbers, or just not singing as much today as yesterday. Others heard at least 
two Mourning Warblers earlier, as well as a flock of Swainson's Thrushes.
27 species

Merlin  1 Heard calling one of the two individual breeding birds which 
continue to be present opposite Mitchell Street from Hawthorn Orchard. If you 
drive up Mitchell Street from the City of Ithaca, look at the row of (blue?) 
spruce trees on the left side of the road immediately after the white house 
adjacent to the East Lawn Cemetery. A couple of spruces in along that row has 
an obvious dead branch sticking out. This is their preferred perch. I've seen 
the birds perched there while driving by in the afternoon and have seen them 
copulate on that branch a few times during AM birding (as visible from a couple 
spots in the Hawthorn Orchard).
Red-eyed Vireo  2
American Crow  1
House Wren  1
Gray-cheeked Thrush  1 Likely individual heard giving repeated soft NFC's 
in dense undergrowth at top of slope just North of the NE corner; in area 
nearby where others observed several (a flock of) Swainson's Thrushes earlier 
in the morning. This happened shortly after another birder had been reviewing 
the calls of Gray-cheeked Thrush; I suspect this unintentional playback may 
have triggered a response from this bird. My initial reaction was: is that 
your audio playing? When the response was no, I realized that I was hearing 
a softly calling GCTH. The bird repeated at least 10-12 times, then ceased 
altogether. An attempt for visual confirmation was not made.
Swainson's Thrush  1 One individual actively calling drip notes in top of 
hawthorns, just SW of NE corner.
Wood Thrush  1
Gray Catbird  5
Tennessee Warbler  6 fewer Tennessee Warblers today.
Common Yellowthroat  3
American Redstart  3 adult males
Cape May Warbler  1 female
Northern Parula  2 This is new for me this year. Two adult males singing 
and foraging together just SW of the NE corner.
Magnolia Warbler  12 Evenly distributed and actively vocal today.
Bay-breasted Warbler  5 3 adult males and at least 2 females; mostly in the 
general NE corner area and to SW of NE corner.
Yellow Warbler  2
Chestnut-sided Warbler  2
Blackpoll Warbler  3 Definitely seemed to be fewer birds today.
Black-throated Blue Warbler  2 Likely two individuals. One singing 
repeatedly at length in area just North of NE corner; one singing farther to 
the SW of the NE corner.
Canada Warbler  1 male singing to SW of NE corner.
Song Sparrow  2
Northern Cardinal  4
Indigo Bunting  1 Singing in area just SW of NE corner.
Brown-headed Cowbird  1
Baltimore Oriole  2
House Finch  1
House Sparrow  3

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23453355
This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)

--
Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Field Applications Engineer
Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 607-254-1132
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp

--
Cayugabirds-L List Info:
Welcome and Basicshttp://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
Rules and Informationhttp://www.northeastbirding.com

[cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard: 15 May 2015

2015-05-15 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Just a quick note from today’s visit. I didn’t devote as much time actively 
birding today as I have on past days. But, it was a nice morning nonetheless. 
Others may post additional birds which I did not see or hear.

Again, if you visit the Hawthorn Orchard, please submit your sightings into 
eBird.orghttp://eBird.org for the “Hawthorn Orchard” hotspot – even if you 
only report a handful of birds seen or heard, every checklist is valuable 
toward preservation of this site.

Hawthorn Orchard, Tompkins, US-NY
May 15, 2015 8:25 AM - 9:45 AM
Protocol: Traveling
1.0 mile(s)

Comments: I didn't spend as much time searching and quantifying birds this 
morning as in past; Tennessee Warblers and Blackpoll Warblers seemed reduced in 
numbers, or just not singing as much today as yesterday. Others heard at least 
two Mourning Warblers earlier, as well as a flock of Swainson's Thrushes.

27 species

Merlin  1 Heard calling one of the two individual breeding birds which 
continue to be present opposite Mitchell Street from Hawthorn Orchard. If you 
drive up Mitchell Street from the City of Ithaca, look at the row of (blue?) 
spruce trees on the left side of the road immediately after the white house 
adjacent to the East Lawn Cemetery. A couple of spruces in along that row has 
an obvious dead branch sticking out. This is their preferred perch. I've seen 
the birds perched there while driving by in the afternoon and have seen them 
copulate on that branch a few times during AM birding (as visible from a couple 
spots in the Hawthorn Orchard).

Red-eyed Vireo  2
American Crow  1
House Wren  1

Gray-cheeked Thrush  1 Likely individual heard giving repeated soft NFC's 
in dense undergrowth at top of slope just North of the NE corner; in area 
nearby where others observed several (a flock of) Swainson's Thrushes earlier 
in the morning. This happened shortly after another birder had been reviewing 
the calls of Gray-cheeked Thrush; I suspect this unintentional playback may 
have triggered a response from this bird. My initial reaction was: is that 
your audio playing? When the response was no, I realized that I was hearing 
a softly calling GCTH. The bird repeated at least 10-12 times, then ceased 
altogether. An attempt for visual confirmation was not made.

Swainson's Thrush  1 One individual actively calling drip notes in top of 
hawthorns, just SW of NE corner.
Wood Thrush  1
Gray Catbird  5

Tennessee Warbler  6 fewer Tennessee Warblers today.
Common Yellowthroat  3
American Redstart  3 adult males
Cape May Warbler  1 female
Northern Parula  2 This is new for me this year. Two adult males singing 
and foraging together just SW of the NE corner.
Magnolia Warbler  12 Evenly distributed and actively vocal today.
Bay-breasted Warbler  5 3 adult males and at least 2 females; mostly in the 
general NE corner area and to SW of NE corner.
Yellow Warbler  2
Chestnut-sided Warbler  2
Blackpoll Warbler  3 Definitely seemed to be fewer birds today.
Black-throated Blue Warbler  2 Likely two individuals. One singing 
repeatedly at length in area just North of NE corner; one singing farther to 
the SW of the NE corner.
Canada Warbler  1 male singing to SW of NE corner.

Song Sparrow  2
Northern Cardinal  4
Indigo Bunting  1 Singing in area just SW of NE corner.
Brown-headed Cowbird  1
Baltimore Oriole  2
House Finch  1
House Sparrow  3

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23453355

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)

--
Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Field Applications Engineer
Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 607-254-1132
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp


--

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Please submit your observations to eBird:
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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Re: [cayugabirds-l] Re: [cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard: 12 May 2015 - Fantastic!

2015-05-13 Thread Asher Hockett
That it was close to the ground is another pretty typical Mourning clue.

On Tue, May 12, 2015 at 7:31 PM, Dave Nutter nutter.d...@me.com wrote:

 It sounded like typical Mourning Warbler to me, a low-pitched, burry
 chorry-chorry-che-che-chew repeatedly sung. I kept looking for the bird
 as it moved around, but apparently it stayed within 2 feet of the ground in
 thick vegetation. I briefly glimpsed the bird as it crossed the path, but
 got no details other than that it was large, dark, and plain for a warbler,
 very unlike Chestnut-sided. I did hear an odd-to-me rambling Chestnut-sided
 Warbler song several times and was able to repeatedly verify that singer.

 --Dave Nutter


 On May 12, 2015, at 07:00 PM, Brad Walker bm...@cornell.edu wrote:

 Dave, was the Mourning Warbler singing a typical song? Scott and I had a
 Chestnut-sided we would have sworn was a Mourning until we got a look at it
 in that same area.

 - Brad

 On Tue, May 12, 2015 at 6:50 PM Nancy Cusumano nancycusuman...@gmail.com
 wrote:

 WE are going to try tomorrow morning before work. Will the cooler temp
 (45) slow them down early?

 Cayuga Dog Rescue has saved more than 500! dogs since 2005!
 Learn more at cayugadogrescue.org

 On Tue, May 12, 2015 at 6:47 PM, Dave Nutter nutter.d...@me.com wrote:

 I stayed longer than other birders and got drenched by the shower, but
 afterward I heard a persistently singing (but hiding) MOURNING WARBLER low
 in the vegetation in the north central area. Earlier I may have also heard
 a NASHVILLE WARBLER north of the ravine, which others reported. Here's my
 warbler list:

 TENNESSEE WARBLER - many encounters  songs
 MOURNING WARBLER - 1 heard in north central area
 COMMON YELLOWTHROAT - several heard, none seen
 CAPE MAY WARBLER - many encounters with males, females  songs
 MAGNOLIA WARBLER - 3 encounters with a singing male
 BAY-BREASTED WARBLER - many encounters with males, females  songs
 BLACKBURNIAN WARBLER - 1 female
 YELLOW WARBLER - several heard  seen
 CHESTNUT-SIDED WARBLER - 3 encounters with a singing male - a rambling
 song lacking the emphatic tag
 BLACKPOLL WARBLER - several heard  males seen
 BLACK-THROATED BLUE WARBLER - 1 male heard  seen
 YELLOW-RUMPED (MYRTLE) WARBLER - 1 female  2 males, separate
 CANADA WARBLER - heard  seen in central area

 There were many RED-EYED VIREOS, but I missed the multiply-reported
 PHILADELPHIA VIREO. Over the large field to the SE a pair of EASTERN
 MEADOWLARKS had an extended pursuit, the lead bird being slightly smaller,
 which I interpreted as courtship. I had 2 silent EMPIDONAX encounters.

 --Dave Nutter


 On May 12, 2015, at 01:40 PM, Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes 
 c...@cornell.edu wrote:

 I was delayed arriving here on such a great morning, but managed to bird
 here for a short while before needing to leave. I know I missed many good
 birds and numbers of birds that others have already posted about, or will
 be posting about. Most notable for me was the amazing quantity of CAPE MAY
 WARBLERS!!! I tallied at least 13 birds, but I suspect I was missing more.
 Of the 13+ there were 4+ females and 9+ males. There were also a solid 12+
 TENNESSEE WARBLERS singing in almost every section of habitat available.

 Here’s my eBird list:

 Comments: This was a fantastic morning, though I only wish I had
 been able to get here sooner and spend much longer here on such a great
 day. Today may possibly have yielded one of the highest number of Cape May
 Warblers I've tallied at this location. It was difficult, due to their
 silence at times. Many observed foraging on the same branches together at
 the same time. Due to my late arrival time, I know I missed lots of good
 birds. Others reported having seen a roving flock of Bay-breasted Warblers
 and Blackburnian Warbler, Canada Warblers, Yellow-bellied Flycatcher, among
 others. Great day, following overnight rain storms. Given general
 North-type winds in the forecast, these guys may be returning to the
 Hawthorn Orchard to continue foraging over the next couple of days.

 br /Submitted from BirdLog NA for iOS, version 1.8

 37 species (+1 other taxa)

 Turkey Vulture  2
 Killdeer  1
 Mourning Dove  2
 Alder/Willow Flycatcher (Traill's Flycatcher)  1 SE Corner; non-vocal
 Eastern Kingbird  4 Calling flyover group of four birds.
 Red-eyed Vireo  2
 Blue Jay  4
 American Crow  2
 Black-capped Chickadee  2
 House Wren  1
 Swainson's Thrush  1 Singing, middle North section
 Wood Thrush  1
 American Robin  2
 Gray Catbird  17 Several, actively foraging everywhere; I'm sure I'm
 underestimating.
 European Starling  2

 Black-and-white Warbler  2 1 male, 1 female (SE corner, NE corner)
 Tennessee Warbler  12 This may be an underestimate; actively singing
 from every spot. Males.
 Common Yellowthroat  2
 Cape May Warbler  13 This may be an underestimate; Most prevalent
 just inside SE edge; middle Western section; Northeast area; 4+ females, 9+
 males; males singing variety 

[cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard: 12 May 2015 - Fantastic!

2015-05-12 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
I was delayed arriving here on such a great morning, but managed to bird here 
for a short while before needing to leave. I know I missed many good birds and 
numbers of birds that others have already posted about, or will be posting 
about. Most notable for me was the amazing quantity of CAPE MAY WARBLERS!!! I 
tallied at least 13 birds, but I suspect I was missing more. Of the 13+ there 
were 4+ females and 9+ males. There were also a solid 12+ TENNESSEE WARBLERS 
singing in almost every section of habitat available.

Here’s my eBird list:

Comments: This was a fantastic morning, though I only wish I had been able 
to get here sooner and spend much longer here on such a great day. Today may 
possibly have yielded one of the highest number of Cape May Warblers I've 
tallied at this location. It was difficult, due to their silence at times. Many 
observed foraging on the same branches together at the same time. Due to my 
late arrival time, I know I missed lots of good birds. Others reported having 
seen a roving flock of Bay-breasted Warblers and Blackburnian Warbler, Canada 
Warblers, Yellow-bellied Flycatcher, among others. Great day, following 
overnight rain storms. Given general North-type winds in the forecast, these 
guys may be returning to the Hawthorn Orchard to continue foraging over the 
next couple of days.

br /Submitted from BirdLog NA for iOS, version 1.8

37 species (+1 other taxa)

Turkey Vulture  2
Killdeer  1
Mourning Dove  2
Alder/Willow Flycatcher (Traill's Flycatcher)  1 SE Corner; non-vocal
Eastern Kingbird  4 Calling flyover group of four birds.
Red-eyed Vireo  2
Blue Jay  4
American Crow  2
Black-capped Chickadee  2
House Wren  1
Swainson's Thrush  1 Singing, middle North section
Wood Thrush  1
American Robin  2
Gray Catbird  17 Several, actively foraging everywhere; I'm sure I'm 
underestimating.
European Starling  2

Black-and-white Warbler  2 1 male, 1 female (SE corner, NE corner)
Tennessee Warbler  12 This may be an underestimate; actively singing from 
every spot. Males.
Common Yellowthroat  2
Cape May Warbler  13 This may be an underestimate; Most prevalent just 
inside SE edge; middle Western section; Northeast area; 4+ females, 9+ males; 
males singing variety of songs-types; lots of regular flight notes given 
(seet)
Magnolia Warbler  6 All males; singing.
Yellow Warbler  3
Chestnut-sided Warbler  5 Singing variety of songs.
Blackpoll Warbler  2 Singing and silent.
Black-throated Blue Warbler  1 singing; middle Northern section
Yellow-rumped Warbler  2

Song Sparrow  2
White-throated Sparrow  1 Middle Western section
White-crowned Sparrow  1 SE corner
Scarlet Tanager  1
Northern Cardinal  6
Rose-breasted Grosbeak  1
Indigo Bunting  2
Red-winged Blackbird  2
Common Grackle  2
Brown-headed Cowbird  1
Baltimore Oriole  6
House Finch  2
American Goldfinch  4

Sincerely,
Chris T-H

--
Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Field Applications Engineer
Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 607-254-1132
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
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http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
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ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
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[cayugabirds-l] Re: [cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard: 12 May 2015 - Fantastic!

2015-05-12 Thread Dave Nutter
I stayed longer than other birders and got drenched by the shower, but 
afterward I heard a persistently singing (but hiding) MOURNING WARBLER low in 
the vegetation in the north central area. Earlier I may have also heard a 
NASHVILLE WARBLER north of the ravine, which others reported. Here's my warbler 
list:

TENNESSEE WARBLER - many encounters  songs
MOURNING WARBLER - 1 heard in north central area
COMMON YELLOWTHROAT - several heard, none seen
CAPE MAY WARBLER - many encounters with males, females  songs
MAGNOLIA WARBLER - 3 encounters with a singing male
BAY-BREASTED WARBLER - many encounters with males, females  songs
BLACKBURNIAN WARBLER - 1 female
YELLOW WARBLER - several heard  seen
CHESTNUT-SIDED WARBLER - 3 encounters with a singing male - a rambling song 
lacking the emphatic tag
BLACKPOLL WARBLER - several heard  males seen
BLACK-THROATED BLUE WARBLER - 1 male heard  seen
YELLOW-RUMPED (MYRTLE) WARBLER - 1 female  2 males, separate
CANADA WARBLER - heard  seen in central area

There were many RED-EYED VIREOS, but I missed the multiply-reported 
PHILADELPHIA VIREO. Over the large field to the SE a pair of EASTERN 
MEADOWLARKS had an extended pursuit, the lead bird being slightly smaller, 
which I interpreted as courtship. I had 2 silent EMPIDONAX encounters.

--Dave Nutter


On May 12, 2015, at 01:40 PM, Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes 
c...@cornell.edu wrote:

 I was delayed arriving here on such a great morning, but managed to bird here 
 for a short while before needing to leave. I know I missed many good birds 
 and numbers of birds that others have already posted about, or will be 
 posting about. Most notable for me was the amazing quantity of CAPE MAY 
 WARBLERS!!! I tallied at least 13 birds, but I suspect I was missing more. Of 
 the 13+ there were 4+ females and 9+ males. There were also a solid 12+ 
 TENNESSEE WARBLERS singing in almost every section of habitat available.

 Here’s my eBird list:

 Comments: This was a fantastic morning, though I only wish I had been 
 able to get here sooner and spend much longer here on such a great day. Today 
 may possibly have yielded one of the highest number of Cape May Warblers I've 
 tallied at this location. It was difficult, due to their silence at times. 
 Many observed foraging on the same branches together at the same time. Due to 
 my late arrival time, I know I missed lots of good birds. Others reported 
 having seen a roving flock of Bay-breasted Warblers and Blackburnian Warbler, 
 Canada Warblers, Yellow-bellied Flycatcher, among others. Great day, 
 following overnight rain storms. Given general North-type winds in the 
 forecast, these guys may be returning to the Hawthorn Orchard to continue 
 foraging over the next couple of days.

 br /Submitted from BirdLog NA for iOS, version 1.8

 37 species (+1 other taxa)

 Turkey Vulture  2
 Killdeer  1
 Mourning Dove  2
 Alder/Willow Flycatcher (Traill's Flycatcher)  1 SE Corner; non-vocal
 Eastern Kingbird  4 Calling flyover group of four birds.
 Red-eyed Vireo  2
 Blue Jay  4
 American Crow  2
 Black-capped Chickadee  2
 House Wren  1
 Swainson's Thrush  1 Singing, middle North section
 Wood Thrush  1
 American Robin  2
 Gray Catbird  17 Several, actively foraging everywhere; I'm sure I'm 
 underestimating.
 European Starling  2

 Black-and-white Warbler  2 1 male, 1 female (SE corner, NE corner)
 Tennessee Warbler  12 This may be an underestimate; actively singing from 
 every spot. Males.
 Common Yellowthroat  2
 Cape May Warbler  13 This may be an underestimate; Most prevalent just 
 inside SE edge; middle Western section; Northeast area; 4+ females, 9+ males; 
 males singing variety of songs-types; lots of regular flight notes given 
 (seet)
 Magnolia Warbler  6 All males; singing.
 Yellow Warbler  3
 Chestnut-sided Warbler  5 Singing variety of songs.
 Blackpoll Warbler  2 Singing and silent.
 Black-throated Blue Warbler  1 singing; middle Northern section
 Yellow-rumped Warbler  2

 Song Sparrow  2
 White-throated Sparrow  1 Middle Western section
 White-crowned Sparrow  1 SE corner
 Scarlet Tanager  1
 Northern Cardinal  6
 Rose-breasted Grosbeak  1
 Indigo Bunting  2
 Red-winged Blackbird  2
 Common Grackle  2
 Brown-headed Cowbird  1
 Baltimore Oriole  6
 House Finch  2
 American Goldfinch  4

 Sincerely,
 Chris T-H

 --
 Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
 Field Applications Engineer
 Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
 159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
 W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 607-254-1132
 http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp

 -- 
 Cayugabirds-L List Info:
 Welcome and Basics
  
 Rules and Information
  
 Subscribe, Configuration and Leave
  
 Archives:
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[cayugabirds-l] Re: [cayugabirds-l] Re: [cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard: 12 May 2015 - Fantastic!

2015-05-12 Thread Dave Nutter
It sounded like typical Mourning Warbler to me, a low-pitched, burry 
chorry-chorry-che-che-chew repeatedly sung. I kept looking for the bird as it 
moved around, but apparently it stayed within 2 feet of the ground in thick 
vegetation. I briefly glimpsed the bird as it crossed the path, but got no 
details other than that it was large, dark, and plain for a warbler, very 
unlike Chestnut-sided. I did hear an odd-to-me rambling Chestnut-sided Warbler 
song several times and was able to repeatedly verify that singer. 

--Dave Nutter


On May 12, 2015, at 07:00 PM, Brad Walker bm...@cornell.edu wrote:

 Dave, was the Mourning Warbler singing a typical song? Scott and I had a 
 Chestnut-sided we would have sworn was a Mourning until we got a look at it 
 in that same area.

 - Brad

 On Tue, May 12, 2015 at 6:50 PM Nancy Cusumano nancycusuman...@gmail.com 
 wrote:

 WE are going to try tomorrow morning before work. Will the cooler temp 
 (45) slow them down early?

 Cayuga Dog Rescue has saved more than 500! dogs since 2005!
 Learn more at cayugadogrescue.org

 On Tue, May 12, 2015 at 6:47 PM, Dave Nutter nutter.d...@me.com wrote:

 I stayed longer than other birders and got drenched by the shower, 
 but afterward I heard a persistently singing (but hiding) MOURNING WARBLER 
 low in the vegetation in the north central area. Earlier I may have also 
 heard a NASHVILLE WARBLER north of the ravine, which others reported. Here's 
 my warbler list:

 TENNESSEE WARBLER - many encounters  songs
 MOURNING WARBLER - 1 heard in north central area
 COMMON YELLOWTHROAT - several heard, none seen
 CAPE MAY WARBLER - many encounters with males, females  songs
 MAGNOLIA WARBLER - 3 encounters with a singing male
 BAY-BREASTED WARBLER - many encounters with males, females  songs
 BLACKBURNIAN WARBLER - 1 female
 YELLOW WARBLER - several heard  seen
 CHESTNUT-SIDED WARBLER - 3 encounters with a singing male - a 
 rambling song lacking the emphatic tag
 BLACKPOLL WARBLER - several heard  males seen
 BLACK-THROATED BLUE WARBLER - 1 male heard  seen
 YELLOW-RUMPED (MYRTLE) WARBLER - 1 female  2 males, separate
 CANADA WARBLER - heard  seen in central area

 There were many RED-EYED VIREOS, but I missed the multiply-reported 
 PHILADELPHIA VIREO. Over the large field to the SE a pair of EASTERN 
 MEADOWLARKS had an extended pursuit, the lead bird being slightly smaller, 
 which I interpreted as courtship. I had 2 silent EMPIDONAX encounters.

 --Dave Nutter


 On May 12, 2015, at 01:40 PM, Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes 
 c...@cornell.edu wrote:

 I was delayed arriving here on such a great morning, but managed to 
 bird here for a short while before needing to leave. I know I missed many 
 good birds and numbers of birds that others have already posted about, or 
 will be posting about. Most notable for me was the amazing quantity of CAPE 
 MAY WARBLERS!!! I tallied at least 13 birds, but I suspect I was missing 
 more. Of the 13+ there were 4+ females and 9+ males. There were also a solid 
 12+ TENNESSEE WARBLERS singing in almost every section of habitat available.

 Here’s my eBird list:

 Comments: This was a fantastic morning, though I only wish I had 
 been able to get here sooner and spend much longer here on such a great day. 
 Today may possibly have yielded one of the highest number of Cape May 
 Warblers I've tallied at this location. It was difficult, due to their 
 silence at times. Many observed foraging on the same branches together at 
 the same time. Due to my late arrival time, I know I missed lots of good 
 birds. Others reported having seen a roving flock of Bay-breasted Warblers 
 and Blackburnian Warbler, Canada Warblers, Yellow-bellied Flycatcher, among 
 others. Great day, following overnight rain storms. Given general North-type 
 winds in the forecast, these guys may be returning to the Hawthorn Orchard 
 to continue foraging over the next couple of days.

 br /Submitted from BirdLog NA for iOS, version 1.8

 37 species (+1 other taxa)

 Turkey Vulture  2
 Killdeer  1
 Mourning Dove  2
 Alder/Willow Flycatcher (Traill's Flycatcher)  1 SE Corner; 
 non-vocal
 Eastern Kingbird  4 Calling flyover group of four birds.
 Red-eyed Vireo  2
 Blue Jay  4
 American Crow  2
 Black-capped Chickadee  2
 House Wren  1
 Swainson's Thrush  1 Singing, middle North section
 Wood Thrush  1
 American Robin  2
 Gray Catbird  17 Several, actively foraging everywhere; I'm sure 
 I'm underestimating.
 European Starling  2

 Black-and-white Warbler  2 1 male, 1 female (SE corner, NE 
 corner)
 Tennessee Warbler  12 This may be an underestimate; actively 
 singing from every 

Re: [cayugabirds-l] Re: [cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard: 12 May 2015 - Fantastic!

2015-05-12 Thread Nancy Cusumano
WE are going to try tomorrow morning before work. Will the cooler temp (45)
slow them down early?

Cayuga Dog Rescue has saved more than 500! dogs since 2005!
Learn more at cayugadogrescue.org

On Tue, May 12, 2015 at 6:47 PM, Dave Nutter nutter.d...@me.com wrote:

 I stayed longer than other birders and got drenched by the shower, but
 afterward I heard a persistently singing (but hiding) MOURNING WARBLER low
 in the vegetation in the north central area. Earlier I may have also heard
 a NASHVILLE WARBLER north of the ravine, which others reported. Here's my
 warbler list:

 TENNESSEE WARBLER - many encounters  songs
 MOURNING WARBLER - 1 heard in north central area
 COMMON YELLOWTHROAT - several heard, none seen
 CAPE MAY WARBLER - many encounters with males, females  songs
 MAGNOLIA WARBLER - 3 encounters with a singing male
 BAY-BREASTED WARBLER - many encounters with males, females  songs
 BLACKBURNIAN WARBLER - 1 female
 YELLOW WARBLER - several heard  seen
 CHESTNUT-SIDED WARBLER - 3 encounters with a singing male - a rambling
 song lacking the emphatic tag
 BLACKPOLL WARBLER - several heard  males seen
 BLACK-THROATED BLUE WARBLER - 1 male heard  seen
 YELLOW-RUMPED (MYRTLE) WARBLER - 1 female  2 males, separate
 CANADA WARBLER - heard  seen in central area

 There were many RED-EYED VIREOS, but I missed the multiply-reported
 PHILADELPHIA VIREO. Over the large field to the SE a pair of EASTERN
 MEADOWLARKS had an extended pursuit, the lead bird being slightly smaller,
 which I interpreted as courtship. I had 2 silent EMPIDONAX encounters.

 --Dave Nutter


 On May 12, 2015, at 01:40 PM, Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes 
 c...@cornell.edu wrote:

 I was delayed arriving here on such a great morning, but managed to bird
 here for a short while before needing to leave. I know I missed many good
 birds and numbers of birds that others have already posted about, or will
 be posting about. Most notable for me was the amazing quantity of CAPE MAY
 WARBLERS!!! I tallied at least 13 birds, but I suspect I was missing more.
 Of the 13+ there were 4+ females and 9+ males. There were also a solid 12+
 TENNESSEE WARBLERS singing in almost every section of habitat available.

 Here’s my eBird list:

 Comments: This was a fantastic morning, though I only wish I had been
 able to get here sooner and spend much longer here on such a great day.
 Today may possibly have yielded one of the highest number of Cape May
 Warblers I've tallied at this location. It was difficult, due to their
 silence at times. Many observed foraging on the same branches together at
 the same time. Due to my late arrival time, I know I missed lots of good
 birds. Others reported having seen a roving flock of Bay-breasted Warblers
 and Blackburnian Warbler, Canada Warblers, Yellow-bellied Flycatcher, among
 others. Great day, following overnight rain storms. Given general
 North-type winds in the forecast, these guys may be returning to the
 Hawthorn Orchard to continue foraging over the next couple of days.

 br /Submitted from BirdLog NA for iOS, version 1.8

 37 species (+1 other taxa)

 Turkey Vulture  2
 Killdeer  1
 Mourning Dove  2
 Alder/Willow Flycatcher (Traill's Flycatcher)  1 SE Corner; non-vocal
 Eastern Kingbird  4 Calling flyover group of four birds.
 Red-eyed Vireo  2
 Blue Jay  4
 American Crow  2
 Black-capped Chickadee  2
 House Wren  1
 Swainson's Thrush  1 Singing, middle North section
 Wood Thrush  1
 American Robin  2
 Gray Catbird  17 Several, actively foraging everywhere; I'm sure I'm
 underestimating.
 European Starling  2

 Black-and-white Warbler  2 1 male, 1 female (SE corner, NE corner)
 Tennessee Warbler  12 This may be an underestimate; actively singing
 from every spot. Males.
 Common Yellowthroat  2
 Cape May Warbler  13 This may be an underestimate; Most prevalent just
 inside SE edge; middle Western section; Northeast area; 4+ females, 9+
 males; males singing variety of songs-types; lots of regular flight notes
 given (seet)
 Magnolia Warbler  6 All males; singing.
 Yellow Warbler  3
 Chestnut-sided Warbler  5 Singing variety of songs.
 Blackpoll Warbler  2 Singing and silent.
 Black-throated Blue Warbler  1 singing; middle Northern section
 Yellow-rumped Warbler  2

 Song Sparrow  2
 White-throated Sparrow  1 Middle Western section
 White-crowned Sparrow  1 SE corner
 Scarlet Tanager  1
 Northern Cardinal  6
 Rose-breasted Grosbeak  1
 Indigo Bunting  2
 Red-winged Blackbird  2
 Common Grackle  2
 Brown-headed Cowbird  1
 Baltimore Oriole  6
 House Finch  2
 American Goldfinch  4

 Sincerely,
 Chris T-H

 --
 Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
 Field Applications Engineer
 Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
 159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
 W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 607-254-1132
 http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp

 --
  * Cayugabirds-L List Info: *
  Welcome and Basics  

Re: [cayugabirds-l] Re: [cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard: 12 May 2015 - Fantastic!

2015-05-12 Thread Brad Walker
Dave, was the Mourning Warbler singing a typical song? Scott and I had a
Chestnut-sided we would have sworn was a Mourning until we got a look at it
in that same area.

- Brad

On Tue, May 12, 2015 at 6:50 PM Nancy Cusumano nancycusuman...@gmail.com
wrote:

 WE are going to try tomorrow morning before work. Will the cooler temp
 (45) slow them down early?

 Cayuga Dog Rescue has saved more than 500! dogs since 2005!
 Learn more at cayugadogrescue.org

 On Tue, May 12, 2015 at 6:47 PM, Dave Nutter nutter.d...@me.com wrote:

 I stayed longer than other birders and got drenched by the shower, but
 afterward I heard a persistently singing (but hiding) MOURNING WARBLER low
 in the vegetation in the north central area. Earlier I may have also heard
 a NASHVILLE WARBLER north of the ravine, which others reported. Here's my
 warbler list:

 TENNESSEE WARBLER - many encounters  songs
 MOURNING WARBLER - 1 heard in north central area
 COMMON YELLOWTHROAT - several heard, none seen
 CAPE MAY WARBLER - many encounters with males, females  songs
 MAGNOLIA WARBLER - 3 encounters with a singing male
 BAY-BREASTED WARBLER - many encounters with males, females  songs
 BLACKBURNIAN WARBLER - 1 female
 YELLOW WARBLER - several heard  seen
 CHESTNUT-SIDED WARBLER - 3 encounters with a singing male - a rambling
 song lacking the emphatic tag
 BLACKPOLL WARBLER - several heard  males seen
 BLACK-THROATED BLUE WARBLER - 1 male heard  seen
 YELLOW-RUMPED (MYRTLE) WARBLER - 1 female  2 males, separate
 CANADA WARBLER - heard  seen in central area

 There were many RED-EYED VIREOS, but I missed the multiply-reported
 PHILADELPHIA VIREO. Over the large field to the SE a pair of EASTERN
 MEADOWLARKS had an extended pursuit, the lead bird being slightly smaller,
 which I interpreted as courtship. I had 2 silent EMPIDONAX encounters.

 --Dave Nutter


 On May 12, 2015, at 01:40 PM, Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes 
 c...@cornell.edu wrote:

 I was delayed arriving here on such a great morning, but managed to bird
 here for a short while before needing to leave. I know I missed many good
 birds and numbers of birds that others have already posted about, or will
 be posting about. Most notable for me was the amazing quantity of CAPE MAY
 WARBLERS!!! I tallied at least 13 birds, but I suspect I was missing more.
 Of the 13+ there were 4+ females and 9+ males. There were also a solid 12+
 TENNESSEE WARBLERS singing in almost every section of habitat available.

 Here’s my eBird list:

 Comments: This was a fantastic morning, though I only wish I had been
 able to get here sooner and spend much longer here on such a great day.
 Today may possibly have yielded one of the highest number of Cape May
 Warblers I've tallied at this location. It was difficult, due to their
 silence at times. Many observed foraging on the same branches together at
 the same time. Due to my late arrival time, I know I missed lots of good
 birds. Others reported having seen a roving flock of Bay-breasted Warblers
 and Blackburnian Warbler, Canada Warblers, Yellow-bellied Flycatcher, among
 others. Great day, following overnight rain storms. Given general
 North-type winds in the forecast, these guys may be returning to the
 Hawthorn Orchard to continue foraging over the next couple of days.

 br /Submitted from BirdLog NA for iOS, version 1.8

 37 species (+1 other taxa)

 Turkey Vulture  2
 Killdeer  1
 Mourning Dove  2
 Alder/Willow Flycatcher (Traill's Flycatcher)  1 SE Corner; non-vocal
 Eastern Kingbird  4 Calling flyover group of four birds.
 Red-eyed Vireo  2
 Blue Jay  4
 American Crow  2
 Black-capped Chickadee  2
 House Wren  1
 Swainson's Thrush  1 Singing, middle North section
 Wood Thrush  1
 American Robin  2
 Gray Catbird  17 Several, actively foraging everywhere; I'm sure I'm
 underestimating.
 European Starling  2

 Black-and-white Warbler  2 1 male, 1 female (SE corner, NE corner)
 Tennessee Warbler  12 This may be an underestimate; actively singing
 from every spot. Males.
 Common Yellowthroat  2
 Cape May Warbler  13 This may be an underestimate; Most prevalent
 just inside SE edge; middle Western section; Northeast area; 4+ females, 9+
 males; males singing variety of songs-types; lots of regular flight notes
 given (seet)
 Magnolia Warbler  6 All males; singing.
 Yellow Warbler  3
 Chestnut-sided Warbler  5 Singing variety of songs.
 Blackpoll Warbler  2 Singing and silent.
 Black-throated Blue Warbler  1 singing; middle Northern section
 Yellow-rumped Warbler  2

 Song Sparrow  2
 White-throated Sparrow  1 Middle Western section
 White-crowned Sparrow  1 SE corner
 Scarlet Tanager  1
 Northern Cardinal  6
 Rose-breasted Grosbeak  1
 Indigo Bunting  2
 Red-winged Blackbird  2
 Common Grackle  2
 Brown-headed Cowbird  1
 Baltimore Oriole  6
 House Finch  2
 American Goldfinch  4

 Sincerely,
 Chris T-H

 --
 Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
 Field Applications Engineer
 Bioacoustics Research 

[cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard Monday

2015-05-11 Thread bob mcguire
I got there a bit before 7 this morning, immediately ran into Stu Krasnoff and 
shortly thereafter Sudan Danskin, Laura  Ton, and Marjolein (sp?). Together we 
observed and listened to a wonderful variety of migrants: multiple Tennessee 
Warblers, 3 Bay-breasted Warblers foraging in a group, 2 Bay-breasted Warblers 
doing the same, plus 2 Northern Parulas, several Nashville and Magnolia 
Warblers, several Common Yellowthroats and Yellow Warblers, as well as a single 
American Redstart. A male Scarlet tanager flew off to the south, and here were 
Baltimore Orioles singing and chattering. And a few of us got a quick glimpse 
of a Swainson’s Thrush when it perched up momentarily before disappearing deep 
into the thicket.

The Tennessee Warblers clearly dominated the soundscape with their loud two and 
three-part songs. The hawthorns are in full bloom with the cherries just a bit 
behind. I almost forgot - we got good looks at a single Blackpoll Warbler. This 
normally signals the end of spring migration. How many days do we have left??

Bob McGuire
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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard Monday

2015-05-11 Thread Geo Kloppel
Hi Bob, you wrote:

 I almost forgot - we got good looks at a single Blackpoll Warbler. This 
 normally signals the end of spring migration. How many days do we have left??

The trouble with the Blackpoll benchmark is that at least a few Blackpolls pass 
through here early (10th of May!), though the main wave is still 2 or 3 weeks 
away (I hope!)  

Blue-winged Warbler only arrived at my place a couple of days ago, and just now 
I had a FOY Blue-gray Gnatcatcher in my yard. So I'm counting on spring 
migration to continue for a while yet.

I'm just starting to watch for Common Nighthawks, which passed over West Danby 
on the 19th last year.

Yesterday I encountered Broad-winged Hawks twice (sorry, Jay!)
The first hawk was being chased by a Baltimore Oriole at the Sweedler Preserve. 
The second was incubating eggs in its nest in the woods about 100 yards from my 
house. A few days ago it was possible to view the nest from quite a respectful 
distance, but this heat wave has encouraged leaf-out, and now the hawks have 
much more privacy.

-Geo


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[cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard: 10 May 2015

2015-05-10 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Very pleasant morning with nice views of good birds. Met up with Jay McGowan 
and we slowly worked our way around the Hawthorn Orchard; later, I made another 
quick pass through, adding some individuals. This may yet become another 
memorable year at the Hawthorn Orchard, depending upon what happens over the 
next couple of nights. Tuesday morning has the potential to get really 
interesting, if the weather forecast holds true (stationary front across 
central NY), or it could be a dud…gotta love weather and migration forecasting.

Best birds were the BAY-BREASTED WARBLERS and CAPE MAY WARBLERS, as well as a 
single silently foraging PHILADELPHIA VIREO.

Hawthorn Orchard, Tompkins, US-NY
May 10, 2015 7:55 AM - 9:54 AM
Protocol: Traveling
2.0 mile(s)
Comments: Mostly w/ Jay McGowan, then one more solo pass through. br 
/Submitted from BirdLog NA for iOS, version 1.8
52 species (+1 other taxa)

Osprey  1
Red-tailed Hawk  1
Mourning Dove  2
Red-bellied Woodpecker  1
Downy Woodpecker  1
Merlin  2 Copulating (visible from NE corner, looking North to spruce-tops; 
they really like perching on the one spruce that has a dead branch extending 
out to the right)
Alder/Willow Flycatcher (Traill's Flycatcher)  1 SW corner, non-vocal.
Great Crested Flycatcher  1
Eastern Kingbird  1
Blue-headed Vireo  1
PHILADELPHIA VIREO  1 NE Corner. Non-vocal.
Red-eyed Vireo  2
Blue Jay  9
American Crow  3
Barn Swallow  1
Black-capped Chickadee  3
Tufted Titmouse  2
White-breasted Nuthatch  1
House Wren  2
Wood Thrush  2
American Robin  6
Gray Catbird  7
European Starling  8
Cedar Waxwing  2

Blue-winged Warbler  1 NE Corner
Tennessee Warbler  8 Throughout, singing loudly (7 ad male, 1 female)
Common Yellowthroat  2
Cape May Warbler  5 SE part of Hawthorn Orchard for the most part (1 ad 
male, 4 female)
Magnolia Warbler  4
Bay-breasted Warbler  6 NE and SE corners (5 ad male, 1 female)
Blackburnian Warbler  2
Yellow Warbler  4
Chestnut-sided Warbler  3
Blackpoll Warbler  2 South-Southeast region (2 ad males)
Yellow-rumped Warbler  1
Wilson's Warbler  2 One in NE ravine area, one in SE area (2 ad males)

Chipping Sparrow  2
Song Sparrow  6
White-throated Sparrow  2
Scarlet Tanager  2
Northern Cardinal  6
Rose-breasted Grosbeak  2
Indigo Bunting  2
Bobolink  2
Red-winged Blackbird  4
Eastern Meadowlark  1
Common Grackle  2
Brown-headed Cowbird  3
Baltimore Oriole  3
House Finch  1
Pine Siskin  1
American Goldfinch  9
House Sparrow  5
--
Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Field Applications Engineer
Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
W: 607-254-2418tel:607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740tel:607-351-5740   F: 
607-254-1132tel:607-254-1132
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp


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Please submit your observations to eBird:
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[cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard: 8 May 2015

2015-05-08 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Good morning!

I stopped by the Hawthorn Orchard this morning a tad later than yesterday.

Ran into Nancy, Holly and Tom, and Jackie and Phil.

Dynamic, relatively quiet, got quieter as the sun got higher and the heat began 
to intensify. Northeast corner around maple treetops seemed most active.

As noted in my comment below, the hawthorn flowers are about to pop, which is 
probably the earliest I’ve ever observed. As a result, this could make for some 
very interesting birding there in the coming week or two, as food resources 
intensify. We could use some rain, though.

Best birds were the CAPE MAY WARBLERS (early, there were two adult males in the 
top of the maple at the NE corner, which flew to the South; later, there were 
two adult males and a female which flew from the NE corner black walnut tree 
(?) into the maple treetops (in a South to Northeast direction) then all took 
flight and headed East toward East Hill Plaza), 1 NORTHERN PARULA (foraging in 
the Northeast corner), the 2 MERLINS in the spruces and white pines across 
Mitchell Street from the Hawthorn Orchard (perched and calling), and a single 
flyover COMMON LOON (for some reason, I always enjoy seeing high migrating 
Common Loons, with their distinctively direct and rubbery-winged flight).

Good birding!

Sincerely,
Chris T-H




Hawthorn Orchard, Tompkins, US-NY
May 8, 2015 8:15 AM - 9:29 AM
Protocol: Traveling
1.0 mile(s)
Comments: Hawthorns flowers about to pop. Near unprecedentedly early. 85-90 
degrees today. br /Submitted from BirdLog NA for iOS, version 1.8
45 species

Common Loon  1
Turkey Vulture  2
Killdeer  1
Red-bellied Woodpecker  1
Downy Woodpecker  2
Northern Flicker  1
Merlin  2
Warbling Vireo  1
Red-eyed Vireo  1
Blue Jay  19
American Crow  2
Barn Swallow  1
Black-capped Chickadee  5
Tufted Titmouse  2
House Wren  1
Wood Thrush  2
American Robin  5
Gray Catbird  8
Brown Thrasher  1
European Starling  6
Cedar Waxwing  1
Nashville Warbler  3
Common Yellowthroat  3
American Redstart  1
Cape May Warbler  3 2 ad males, 1 female
Northern Parula  1
Yellow Warbler  3
Chestnut-sided Warbler  1
Yellow-rumped Warbler  1
Chipping Sparrow  2
Song Sparrow  5
White-throated Sparrow  2
Scarlet Tanager  1
Northern Cardinal  2
Rose-breasted Grosbeak  1
Indigo Bunting  1
Bobolink  1
Red-winged Blackbird  6
Eastern Meadowlark  1
Common Grackle  3
Brown-headed Cowbird  3
Baltimore Oriole  1
House Finch  2
American Goldfinch  4
House Sparrow  3
--
Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Field Applications Engineer
Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 607-254-1132
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp


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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard: 8 May 2015

2015-05-08 Thread Tom Hoebbel
It was our first trip to Hawthorn this year and very worthwhile.  In
addition to Chris' list we heard a BLUE-WINGED WARBLER repeatedly in the NE
corner of the orchard before he arrived.  Also we say a GREEN HERON as we
arrived around 7AM.



...Time is the friend of the wonderful company, the enemy of the mediocre.
  ~Warren Buffett


 Thomas Hoebbel Photo~Video
 www.TH-Photo.com http://www.th-photo.com/
  607-539-6121




On Fri, May 8, 2015 at 10:49 AM, Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes 
c...@cornell.edu wrote:

  Good morning!

  I stopped by the Hawthorn Orchard this morning a tad later than
 yesterday.

  Ran into Nancy, Holly and Tom, and Jackie and Phil.

  Dynamic, relatively quiet, got quieter as the sun got higher and the
 heat began to intensify. Northeast corner around maple treetops seemed most
 active.

  As noted in my comment below, the hawthorn flowers are about to pop,
 which is probably the earliest I’ve ever observed. As a result, this could
 make for some very interesting birding there in the coming week or two, as
 food resources intensify. We could use some rain, though.

  Best birds were the CAPE MAY WARBLERS (early, there were two adult males
 in the top of the maple at the NE corner, which flew to the South; later,
 there were two adult males and a female which flew from the NE corner black
 walnut tree (?) into the maple treetops (in a South to Northeast direction)
 then all took flight and headed East toward East Hill Plaza), 1 NORTHERN
 PARULA (foraging in the Northeast corner), the 2 MERLINS in the spruces and
 white pines across Mitchell Street from the Hawthorn Orchard (perched and
 calling), and a single flyover COMMON LOON (for some reason, I always enjoy
 seeing high migrating Common Loons, with their distinctively direct and
 rubbery-winged flight).

  Good birding!

  Sincerely,
 Chris T-H




  Hawthorn Orchard, Tompkins, US-NY
 May 8, 2015 8:15 AM - 9:29 AM
 Protocol: Traveling
 1.0 mile(s)
 Comments: Hawthorns flowers about to pop. Near unprecedentedly early.
 85-90 degrees today. br /Submitted from BirdLog NA for iOS, version 1.8
 45 species

 Common Loon  1
 Turkey Vulture  2
 Killdeer  1
 Red-bellied Woodpecker  1
 Downy Woodpecker  2
 Northern Flicker  1
 Merlin  2
 Warbling Vireo  1
 Red-eyed Vireo  1
 Blue Jay  19
 American Crow  2
 Barn Swallow  1
 Black-capped Chickadee  5
 Tufted Titmouse  2
 House Wren  1
 Wood Thrush  2
 American Robin  5
 Gray Catbird  8
 Brown Thrasher  1
 European Starling  6
 Cedar Waxwing  1
 Nashville Warbler  3
 Common Yellowthroat  3
 American Redstart  1
 Cape May Warbler  3 2 ad males, 1 female
 Northern Parula  1
 Yellow Warbler  3
 Chestnut-sided Warbler  1
 Yellow-rumped Warbler  1
 Chipping Sparrow  2
 Song Sparrow  5
 White-throated Sparrow  2
 Scarlet Tanager  1
 Northern Cardinal  2
 Rose-breasted Grosbeak  1
 Indigo Bunting  1
 Bobolink  1
 Red-winged Blackbird  6
 Eastern Meadowlark  1
 Common Grackle  3
 Brown-headed Cowbird  3
 Baltimore Oriole  1
 House Finch  2
 American Goldfinch  4
 House Sparrow  3
   --
  Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
  Field Applications Engineer
  Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
  159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
  W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 607-254-1132
  http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp

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[cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard

2014-05-18 Thread Meena Madhav Haribal
Hi all,

Today I spent a couple of hours at Hawthorn in the morning. Mostly it was quiet 
except for the singing Tennessee warblers.

My counts were as follows;

Through out the orchard at various locations Tennessee at 7



Most of the other warblers I found in an oak tree near the North west corner. 
It was very hard to see them as they were hiding in the oak leaves. At one 
point everyone was quiet without movement for 10 minutes at least. I was 
wondering where they went as nobody was flitting. After waiting some time they 
became active again. May be there was a predator at that point.



Bay Breasted Warbler (1 male and 1 female)

Cape May Warbler (1 female)

Black-throated Green (1 male and 1 female)

Philadelphia Vireo (2)

Red-eyed Vireo (several)

There were many more warblers but could not get definite ID, one looked like a 
female Yellow-rumped but could have been a female Cape May as I never got wing 
pattern detail.



Later I also found a singing Magnolia and a silent female/ or young Redstart.

There were several Yellow Warblers and Common Yellowthroat.

Other common birds but unusual birds were scarce.



Meena





Meena Haribal
Ithaca NY 14850
42.429007,-76.47111
http://haribal.org/
http://meenaharibal.blogspot.com/



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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard

2014-05-18 Thread bob mcguire
Susan Danskin and I had a similar experience in the Hawthorns this morning. 
When we walked in along the north trail, everything was quiet (except for the 
ever-present Catbirds).  All of a sudden we began to hear TENNESSEE WARBLERS 
from some 100' south of the trail. When we got to them, we found ourselves 
under a vocal feeding flock that included at least 5 Tennessees, single 
CHESTNUT-SIDED and MAGNOLIA WARBLERS, both male and female BAY-BREASTED 
WARBLERS, 2 BLACKPOLLS and a Warbling Vireo. We tracked them for about 15 
minutes until they all fell silent together and, seemingly, disappeared. We 
spent the next 15 minutes trying to re-find them and finally worked our way 
back to the north trail. Whereupon we began hearing the Tennessees again, went 
back into the jungle, and again hit the same flock. 

After following the flock for another 10 minutes, we headed back out, on the 
way encountering a singing CANADA WARBLER. Meanwhile Susan picked out a distant 
perched MERLIN across the creek in the cemetery. It called once as we were 
making our way out.

Bob McGuire
On May 18, 2014, at 10:45 AM, Meena Madhav Haribal wrote:

 Hi all,
 Today I spent a couple of hours at Hawthorn in the morning. Mostly it was 
 quiet except for the singing Tennessee warblers.
 My counts were as follows;
 Through out the orchard at various locations Tennessee at 7
  
 Most of the other warblers I found in an oak tree near the North west corner. 
 It was very hard to see them as they were hiding in the oak leaves. At one 
 point everyone was quiet without movement for 10 minutes at least. I was 
 wondering where they went as nobody was flitting. After waiting some time 
 they became active again. May be there was a predator at that point.
  
 Bay Breasted Warbler (1 male and 1 female)
 Cape May Warbler (1 female)
 Black-throated Green (1 male and 1 female)
 Philadelphia Vireo (2)
 Red-eyed Vireo (several)
 There were many more warblers but could not get definite ID, one looked like 
 a female Yellow-rumped but could have been a female Cape May as I never got 
 wing pattern detail.
  
 Later I also found a singing Magnolia and a silent female/ or young Redstart.
 There were several Yellow Warblers and Common Yellowthroat. 
 Other common birds but unusual birds were scarce.
  
 Meena 
  
  
 Meena Haribal
 Ithaca NY 14850
 42.429007,-76.47111
 http://haribal.org/
 http://meenaharibal.blogspot.com/
  
  
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[cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard, May 18, 2014

2014-05-18 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes

I had pretty much the same experience and impression as others this morning. 
Most birds were in an extremely tight flock in the Northwest corner. As soon as 
you found them, you had maybe 5 minutes before they were gone. With some work, 
you could relocate the flock. This flock held two Philadelphia Vireos, each 
with yellowish wash and dark smudge in front of and behind each eye. Still not 
the numbers I've been hoping for, but there certainly are a goodly average 
number of Tennessee Warblers using the Hawthorn Orchard (around 8).

Good birding!

Sincerely,
Chris T-H

Hawthorn Orchard, Tompkins, US-NY
May 18, 2014 10:45 AM - 11:33 AM
Protocol: Traveling
1.5 mile(s)
Comments: Most birds in NW corner. br /Submitted from BirdLog NA for iOS, 
version 1.7.1
30 species

Ruby-throated Hummingbird  1
Downy Woodpecker  1
Hairy Woodpecker  1
Alder Flycatcher  2 Actively counter-vocalizing pip notes and occasional 
chatter. Visual observation of both.
Least Flycatcher  1
Philadelphia Vireo  2 Silent foragers, middle Northern side
Blue Jay  1
American Crow  1
Black-capped Chickadee  4
Tufted Titmouse  1
American Robin  1
Gray Catbird  8
European Starling  6

Tennessee Warbler  8 2 female, 6 male; mostly in Northwest corner, but in 
other areas as well.
Common Yellowthroat  2
American Redstart  2
Magnolia Warbler  4
Bay-breasted Warbler  2 Female and first year type male, NW corner.
Yellow Warbler  3
Chestnut-sided Warbler  1
Blackpoll Warbler  1 Singing, NW corner.
Canada Warbler  1 Singing, NW corner.

Song Sparrow  2
Northern Cardinal  5
Indigo Bunting  4 Males, calling, also observed female foraging.
Red-winged Blackbird  2
Eastern Meadowlark  1
Brown-headed Cowbird  1
Baltimore Oriole  3
American Goldfinch  2

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S18445896

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)

--
Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Field Applications Engineer
Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
W: 607-254-2418tel:607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740tel:607-351-5740   F: 
607-254-1132tel:607-254-1132
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp


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[cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard this morning

2014-05-17 Thread Anne Marie Johnson
Things were fairly quiet, but when I arrived at 8:15, the sun was out and 
there were at least 6 TENNESSEE WARBLERS singing in the vicinity of the 
northeast corner. Shortly after that, it clouded up and the Tennessees fell 
silent for the most part.


In the middle of the orchard toward the northwest side, I found a singing 
WILSON'S WARBLER and a MAGNOLIA WARBLER. I also found a SWAINSON'S THRUSH 
in this general area. Later the WILSON'S had moved further north and was 
joined by a female-type REDSTART and a silent BAY-BREASTED WARBLER.


When I was leaving, I ran into someone who had seen CANADA WARBLER and 
another Magnolia Warbler and Wilson's Warbler along the shrubbery beside 
the softball field and the northeast corner of the orchard viewed from 
outside the orchard.


Anne Marie Johnson

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RE: [cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard this morning

2014-05-17 Thread Karen Steffy
:)  That was me. I was at that corner from 8:15 until close to 10.  It was just 
too fun to leave.  At one point, I had both the Wilson's and a Tennessee in my 
binocs (which bird to watch first?).   I kept thinking about leaving, but 
something would pop up.  Even if I had seen it before, it was just fun.  My 
total species count for the day at the Hawthorns was 28, including a brown 
thrasher and a female RTH, which I watched preening.  For warblers, I had black 
and white, Tennessee, Canada, Magnolia (either the same bird multiple times or 
several of them), Wilson's, chestnut-sided, yellow and common yellowthroat.  

At around 10, I went towards the pond, but it was pretty quiet there.  On the 
way back, I found another Tennessee, and a hermit thrush.  I was surprised that 
I didn't see the number of redstarts that were there last weekend, and no 
yellow-rumps.

Karen

From: bounce-115588025-25410...@list.cornell.edu 
bounce-115588025-25410...@list.cornell.edu on behalf of Anne Marie Johnson 
annemariejohn...@frontiernet.net
Sent: Saturday, May 17, 2014 11:58 AM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard this morning

Things were fairly quiet, but when I arrived at 8:15, the sun was out and
there were at least 6 TENNESSEE WARBLERS singing in the vicinity of the
northeast corner. Shortly after that, it clouded up and the Tennessees fell
silent for the most part.

In the middle of the orchard toward the northwest side, I found a singing
WILSON'S WARBLER and a MAGNOLIA WARBLER. I also found a SWAINSON'S THRUSH
in this general area. Later the WILSON'S had moved further north and was
joined by a female-type REDSTART and a silent BAY-BREASTED WARBLER.

When I was leaving, I ran into someone who had seen CANADA WARBLER and
another Magnolia Warbler and Wilson's Warbler along the shrubbery beside
the softball field and the northeast corner of the orchard viewed from
outside the orchard.

Anne Marie Johnson

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[cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard, May 17, 2014

2014-05-17 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes

I didn't get over to the Hawthorn Orchard until later this afternoon. 
Pleasantly cooperative mixed flock found with some effort. Minimal singers, 
with the exception of the Tennessee Warblers. Alder Flycatcher was about on 
time, first of the season for me.

Good birding!

Sincerely,
Chris T-H


Hawthorn Orchard, Tompkins, US-NY
May 17, 2014 3:45 PM - 6:01 PM
Protocol: Traveling
2.0 mile(s)
Comments: Relatively quiet afternoon, most birds were silently foraging in 
a very pleasant mixed flock. Most birds were cooperative, affording some 
pictures. Submitted from BirdLog NA for iOS, version 1.7.1
46 species

Turkey Vulture  1
Chimney Swift  1
Ruby-throated Hummingbird  1
Belted Kingfisher  1
Red-bellied Woodpecker  1
Downy Woodpecker  1
Hairy Woodpecker  1
Northern Flicker  1
Pileated Woodpecker  1
Merlin  1 Heard one calling; there is a probable territorial pair in East 
Hill Cemetery.
Alder Flycatcher  1 First of the year at this location. Distinctive short 
quick 'pip' notes. Same habitat preference as in past years: South side of 
Hawthorn Orchard; more open areas.
Least Flycatcher  1
Great Crested Flycatcher  1
Red-eyed Vireo  1
Blue Jay  5
American Crow  1
Barn Swallow  1
Black-capped Chickadee  7
Tufted Titmouse  3
White-breasted Nuthatch  1
Swainson's Thrush  2 NW corner, periodically singing. One in hedgerow East 
of NE corner.
American Robin  3
Gray Catbird  11

Blue-winged Warbler  1 Territorial male, just South of NE corner.
Black-and-white Warbler  1 Foraging, middle North side. (female)
Tennessee Warbler  6 Vociferous singers at several locations, mostly 
Northern side.
Common Yellowthroat  1
American Redstart  5 Foraging, middle North side; territorial males in 
North ravine.
Cape May Warbler  1 Foraging, middle North side. (female)
Northern Parula  1 Foraging, middle North side. (female)
Magnolia Warbler  4 Foraging, middle North side.
Bay-breasted Warbler  2 Foraging, middle North side. (females)
Yellow Warbler  3 Foraging, middle North side.
Chestnut-sided Warbler  2 Foraging, middle North side.
Blackpoll Warbler  2 Foraging, middle North side.
Black-throated Green Warbler  1 Foraging, middle North side. (female)
Canada Warbler  1 Silent foraging male, middle North side.

Chipping Sparrow  1
Song Sparrow  2
Northern Cardinal  3
Indigo Bunting  1
Red-winged Blackbird  1
Common Grackle  1
Baltimore Oriole  4
House Finch  2
American Goldfinch  2

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S18435020

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)

--
Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Field Applications Engineer
Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
W: 607-254-2418tel:607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740tel:607-351-5740   F: 
607-254-1132tel:607-254-1132
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp


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[cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard, May 16, 2014

2014-05-16 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Very wet and cool morning…but, I cannot complain about the rain. Bring mud 
boots and rain pants if you intend to walk in and around the Hawthorn Orchard 
in the coming days.

Sincerely,
Chris T-H

Hawthorn Orchard, Tompkins, US-NY
May 16, 2014 7:45 AM - 9:15 AM
Protocol: Traveling
1.0 mile(s)
Comments: Very rainy morning. Constant heavy drizzle. 1 of rainfall this 
morning, with temperatures starting around 54 degrees and falling to 47 degrees 
by the time I finished. Massive stands of water throughout the Hawthorn 
Orchard, as well as creeks of flowing water through the middle sections. North 
ravine was heavily flooded with significant ambient rushing water noise. Very 
few birds early on, then birds began appearing by around 8:45am. Birds seemed 
to favor foraging in hawthorns along very East edge just South of Northeast 
corner.
23 species

Great Blue Heron  1
Belted Kingfisher  1 Flyover
Great Crested Flycatcher  1
Blue-headed Vireo  1 Seen only, middle North section
Blue Jay  1
Black-capped Chickadee  2
Tufted Titmouse  1
American Robin  2
Gray Catbird  4
European Starling  6

Blue-winged Warbler  1 Territorial male singing in open dead-wood section 
of hawthorns along East edge, just South of the Northeast corner.
Tennessee Warbler  6 1 singing male in ravine just North of the Northeast 
corner; soon after, 5 in one tree, all silently foraging in a very tight flock 
together, at one point all within 4-6 feet of each other – East side, just 
South of Northeast corner.
Common Yellowthroat  1
Magnolia Warbler  3 2 males, 1 female: 1 male in North ravine; 1 male and 1 
female in Northeast corner.
Bay-breasted Warbler  1 female quietly foraging in Northeast corner
Blackburnian Warbler  1 non-vocal male, Northeast corner
Yellow Warbler  1
Chestnut-sided Warbler  1 1 singer, near Blue-winged Warbler (East side, 
just South of Northeast Corner
Yellow-rumped Warbler  2 Northeast corner
Wilson's Warbler  1 Silently foraging male, very wet looking. Working East 
edge of Northeast corner, eventually with Tennessee Warblers.

Scarlet Tanager  1 Heard singing once, West side.
Northern Cardinal  1
Baltimore Oriole  1 male foraging in close proximity to Blackburnian 
Warbler, Northeast corner. Flew up from ground.

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S18415593

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)

--
Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Field Applications Engineer
Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 607-254-1132
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp


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[cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard, May 15, 2014

2014-05-15 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes

Tennessee Warblers have certainly arrived. Only male Tennessee Warblers were 
seen/heard today, singing vociferously throughout the Hawthorn Orchard. I did 
not locate any definitive females.

Hawthorn Orchard, Tompkins, US-NY
May 15, 2014 7:32 AM - 8:48 AM
Protocol: Traveling
2.0 mile(s)
Comments: Overcast, some sun. Blustery Southeast winds. Most hawthorn crown 
flowers have opened. As a result, birds have become more evenly distributed and 
not so much concentrated in the ravine as they were earlier this week. 
Submitted from BirdLog NA for iOS, version 1.7.1

33 species

Turkey Vulture  2
Downy Woodpecker  1
Hairy Woodpecker  1
Pileated Woodpecker  1
Philadelphia Vireo  1 Quietly and sporadically singing, seen, West edge of 
Hawthorn Orchard
Blue Jay  8
American Crow  1
Barn Swallow  1
Black-capped Chickadee  4
Swainson's Thrush  2 Two counter-calling: 'drip!' notes, 1 seen, both in 
West edge of Hawthorn Orchard
American Robin  6
Gray Catbird  7
European Starling  3

Ovenbird  1
Northern Waterthrush  1 Singing along West edge, close to bike path
Blue-winged Warbler  1 Singing, mid-East side, seen. Behaving *very* 
territorial.
Tennessee Warbler  7 Male singers evenly distributed throughout Hawthorn 
Orchard
Common Yellowthroat  5
American Redstart  1
Magnolia Warbler  4
Yellow Warbler  2
Chestnut-sided Warbler  1
Yellow-rumped Warbler  1

Song Sparrow  3
White-throated Sparrow  3
Scarlet Tanager  1 Paused to sing, SW corner, then moved on heading East.
Northern Cardinal  4
Red-winged Blackbird  3
Brown-headed Cowbird  2
Baltimore Oriole  1
House Finch  1
American Goldfinch  2
House Sparrow  4

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S18398583

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)

--
Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Field Applications Engineer
Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 607-254-1132
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp


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[cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard, May 14, 2014

2014-05-14 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Went to the Hawthorn Orchard early this morning and didn't expect much, given 
the cool temps and blustery winds from the SE. As it turns out, things picked 
up by about the time I needed to leave, probably as a result of the sun coming 
out.

The first highlight was hearing and then observing two MERLINS copulating in a 
spruce treetop across Mitchell Street, as visible from the Northeast corner of 
the Hawthorn Orchard. I'm guessing they will be nesting somewhere over in the 
East Hill Cemetery.

Then came my final highlight. As I was getting ready to head out, I met two 
undergrad students, Eric and Taylor (apologies for misspellings), who tipped me 
off to a male BAY-BREASTED WARBLER which they had seen minutes earlier in the 
Northeast corner. Fortunately, I came across the male BAY-BREASTED WARBLER 
silently foraging in a hawthorn tree right near the muddy Northeast Corner 
entrance.

As I was observing this bird, I kept hearing high frequency, short, thin seet 
flight notes, but couldn't quite localize where they were coming from. Finally, 
I honed in on their source, up in the top of the tallest Maple tree immediately 
adjacent to the Northeast corner. I got onto a warbler which turned out to be a 
nice male CAPE MAY WARBLER. Then, I saw movement of another bird, and another 
bird, and another bird, and another bird, and finally another bird. They were 
ALL CAPE MAY WARBLERS foraging in the treetop of this maple and giving constant 
contact flight notes. In total, five males and one female.

Then, as soon as I got on them, they rapidly flew down into the sunlit hedgerow 
of hawthorns adjacent to the one the Bay-breasted Warbler was in and began 
probing leaves and gorging themselves on extricated Tortricidae larvae (Tortrix 
or Leafroller Moths). This flock was feverishly moving around the hawthorn 
edges and were soon joined by both male and female MAGNOLIA WARBLERS, two male 
TENNESSEE WARBLERS and two AMERICAN REDSTARTS. I eventually moved myself around 
to the outside of the hedgerow to get better views of the Cape May Warblers, 
but by the time I had gotten to a location where the sun was to my back, the 
only Cape May Warbler remaining was a female. I suspect the rest of the males 
must have either moved along down the hedgerow or took flight and headed into 
the Hawthorn Orchard.

On my way out, I ran into Stuart Krasnoff and Bob McGuire who were just 
arriving. Hopefully, they will have similar success to report from today.

Overnight last night, following the thunderstorm-associated rain showers, the 
dominant canopy hawthorn flowers have resultantly totally popped open. If this 
small flock of Cape May Warblers is any indication, along with the arrival of 
at least four male Tennessee Warblers, and the Bay-breasted Warbler, this may 
be the beginning of full forage use of the Hawthorn Orchard by neotropical 
migrants this spring. Keep an eye out over the coming days, the potential is 
now there.

Thank you to Eric and Taylor for the Bay-breasted Warbler tip. Had I not 
stopped to look for that bird, I almost certainly would have missed those Cape 
May Warblers!

Good birding!

Sincerely,
Chris T-H

Hawthorn Orchard, Tompkins, US-NY
May 14, 2014 7:25 AM - 8:52 AM
Protocol: Traveling
1.5 mile(s)
Comments: Really nice showing of Cape May Warblers in NE corner, later in 
AM walk.
Submitted from BirdLog NA for iOS, version 1.7.1
32 species (+1 other taxa)

Osprey  1
Hairy Woodpecker  2
Northern Flicker  1
Pileated Woodpecker  1
Merlin  2 Heard calling, observed copulating in top of spruce tree across 
Mitchell Street in East Hill Cemetery.
Least Flycatcher  2
Blue Jay  4
Barn Swallow  1
Black-capped Chickadee  2
Tufted Titmouse  1
American Robin  1
Gray Catbird  8
Northern Mockingbird  1

Blue-winged Warbler  1 Heard singing, North ravine
Tennessee Warbler  4 Singing NW corner, NE corner, 3 males at one time in 
NE corner
Nashville Warbler  2 Singing NE corner
Common Yellowthroat  5
American Redstart  5 North ravine and NE corner
Cape May Warbler  6 1 female, at least 5 males; 4 in one binocular view at 
one point. In tall maple tree at NE corner, then descended into Hawthorn 
hedgerow just East of NE corner. Lots of short, thin flight notes. Rapidly 
moving flock.
Magnolia Warbler  11 Mostly in North ravine and NE corner
Bay-breasted Warbler  1 Silently foraging male in corner hawthorn, NE 
corner. Thanks to tip from Eric and Taylor!
Yellow Warbler  2
Chestnut-sided Warbler  1 NE corner
Yellow-rumped Warbler  1
Black-throated Green Warbler  1 Singing, maples, East of NE corner
warbler sp.  5 Flyovers

Chipping Sparrow  2
White-throated Sparrow  2
Northern Cardinal  2
Rose-breasted Grosbeak  1
Indigo Bunting  1 NE corner
Eastern Meadowlark  1
Baltimore Oriole  1

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S18383961

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)

--
Christopher T. 

[cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard, Tuesday, May 13, 2014

2014-05-14 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes

This is a little delayed, but is an interesting comparison to today.

Best bird yesterday was a softly singing and scolding, brightly-colored, male 
PHILADELPHIA VIREO in the very Northeast corner of the Hawthorn Orchard. Jay 
McGowan and Livia Santana were already observing it as I was walking toward the 
source of the softly singing Red-eyed Vireo sound-alike, suspecting Philly 
Vireo.

It is fairly common to have general daily turnover of migrants at the Hawthorn 
Orchard, especially with low food resources there. Now that the Tortricidae 
larvae have hatched, there may be more birds arriving and staying for longer 
durations…I hope.

Tuesday, there was only one hawthorn tree that I observed with flowers open on 
the crown…compared to most of the crowns open today.

Good birding!

Sincerely,
Chris T-H

Hawthorn Orchard, Tompkins, US-NY
May 13, 2014 7:00 AM - 8:39 AM
Protocol: Traveling
1.7 mile(s)
Comments: Submitted from BirdLog NA for iOS, version 1.7.1
37 species (+1 other taxa)

Osprey  1 Flying with fish in direction of Game Farm Rd
Mourning Dove  1
Hairy Woodpecker  1
Least Flycatcher  2
Great Crested Flycatcher  1
Eastern Kingbird  1
Philadelphia Vireo  1 Bright male singing and scolding softly at NE corner.
Red-eyed Vireo  1 Singing in oaks, NW corner
Blue Jay  5
American Crow  2
Black-capped Chickadee  4
Tufted Titmouse  1
White-breasted Nuthatch  1
Wood Thrush  1 Male singing NE corner in ravine
American Robin  6
Gray Catbird  8
Brown Thrasher  1 Male singing from various tall perches in middle Northern 
side
European Starling  6

Northern Waterthrush  1 Singing near West edge of South creek.
Blue-winged Warbler  1 Female
Black-and-white Warbler  1 Female
Tennessee Warbler  1 Male singing quietly in NW corner
Common Yellowthroat  4
American Redstart  2
Magnolia Warbler  1 Male singing middle West side
Yellow Warbler  6
Chestnut-sided Warbler  1
warbler sp.  6 Flyovers

Song Sparrow  4
Scarlet Tanager  1 Male singing, passing through NE of Hawthorn Orchard
Northern Cardinal  4
Indigo Bunting  2 Flyover
Red-winged Blackbird  4
Common Grackle  3
Brown-headed Cowbird  4
Baltimore Oriole  1
House Finch  2
American Goldfinch  2

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S18368828

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)

--
Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Field Applications Engineer
Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 607-254-1132
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp


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[cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard

2014-05-12 Thread Kenneth J. Kemphues
Hawthorn Orchard between 8-9AM was fairly quiet.  1 NORTHERN WATERTHRUSH on the 
South side gravel trail; 1 MAGNOLIA WARBLER in the brush where the trail opens 
up into the field, and  BAY BREASTED, BLACKBURNIAN and NASHVILLE on the 
Northwest end in the open area just off the recreation trail.  Also another 
NORTHERN WATERTHRUSH in the ravine.

Also, on Friday I lost my wallet somewhere.  Since I spent about 2 hours in the 
Orchard and environs that day, it may be in the grass or on one of the trails 
on the South side.  If you are visiting the orchard in the next couple of days, 
please check  out any any brown leather objects you might see  in the grass.

Thanks,

Ken

Kenneth J. Kemphues
Professor
Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics
107A  Biotechnology Building
Cornell University
Ithaca NY 14853

voice:  607-254-4805
fax: 607-255-6249
k...@cornell.edumailto:k...@cornell.edu





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RE:[cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard in the morning

2014-05-11 Thread Meena Madhav Haribal
Yesterday in my email  I forgot to note two more warblers in the HO 
BLACK-THROATED GREEN (2) and an OVENBIRD singing in the middle of the orchard.  
So that makes  it to 13 species of warblers!



Meena

Meena Haribal
Ithaca NY 14850
42.429007,-76.47111
http://haribal.org/
http://meenaharibal.blogspot.com/



From: bounce-115350036-3493...@list.cornell.edu 
bounce-115350036-3493...@list.cornell.edu on behalf of Meena Madhav Haribal 
m...@cornell.edu
Sent: Saturday, May 10, 2014 3:56 PM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Hathorn Orchard in the morning


I spent about 2.5 hours in the HO. Main orchard itself did not have many birds, 
but both ends I encountered some warblers.

Right on strawberry circle, I found two NAHSVILLE WARBLERS feeding on crab 
apples. I go a photo of one with its beak open containing a tiny caterpillar.  
Later I encountered another 10 or so. Most of them were to the Southwest side 
in the willows. Here I also saw several CHESTNUT-SIDEDS, MAGNOLIA, 
YELLOW-RUMPED, COMMON YELLOWTHROATS, YELLOW WARBLERS, REDSTARTS AND RED-EYED 
VIREO, A PHILADELPHIA VIREO AND two WARBLING VIREO.

Further in the middle of the orchard one NORTHERN PARULA, a few more Nashvilles 
and Common Yellowthroats and LEAST FYCATHCHERS (at least five) were heard or 
seen.

Then in its usual location was the BLUE-WINGED WARBLER singing at the end of 
the orchard in the  ravine. Then I met Sara Jane and she told me about the 
Chat, but I went to a wrong location, but it was worth going there. Here I 
encountered another pocket of warblers consisting of several CHESTNUT- SIDEDS, 
TWO BLACK AND WHITE, ONE BAY BREASTED, ONE CAPE MAY, ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAK, 
FILED SPARROW, GREAT CRESTED FLYCATHCER and other usual birds.

Also I saw three different BROWN THRASHER. One of the thrashers when it started 
calling in the NE corner, I was excited thinking I may be listening to a CHAT, 
but on locating the bird I found out it was a thrasher, still it was worth 
looking at the bird.  Overall it was very slow in the orchard.



Cheers

Meena



Meena Haribal
Ithaca NY 14850
42.429007,-76.47111
http://haribal.org/
http://meenaharibal.blogspot.com/


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[cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard - 16 Warblers; 5 Vireos

2014-05-09 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes

Hawthorn Orchard, Tompkins, US-NY
May 9, 2014 7:27 AM - 9:41 AM
Protocol: Traveling
0.5 mile(s)

Comments: Really good morning and enjoyable to witness the continued 
daytime stream of nocturnally migrating warblers, calling as they flew 
overhead. Early on, most birds were in willows and ravine just North-Northeast 
of the softball field. Later, birds were along North ravine edge and at 
scattered points throughout the Hawthorn Orchard. The Hawthorns are not 
anywhere near blooming yet, but some apple trees were in full bloom. Shaping up 
to be a nice spring.

Submitted from BirdLog NA for iOS, version 1.7.1

62 species (+1 other taxa)

Turkey Vulture  1
Osprey  2
Killdeer  1
Mourning Dove  1
Red-bellied Woodpecker  1
Downy Woodpecker  1
Hairy Woodpecker  1
Northern Flicker  1
Least Flycatcher  10
Great Crested Flycatcher  2
Eastern Kingbird  1

Yellow-throated Vireo  1
Blue-headed Vireo  3
Warbling Vireo  3
Philadelphia Vireo  1 In willows NE of softball field
Red-eyed Vireo  1

Blue Jay  17
American Crow  6
Common Raven  1 In flight being chased by two American Crows. East of Polo 
Barn, headed South.
Barn Swallow  2
Black-capped Chickadee  12
Tufted Titmouse  1
Ruby-crowned Kinglet  2
Wood Thrush  1 NW corner, into ravine.
American Robin  10
Gray Catbird  15
Brown Thrasher  1 Middle of Hawthorn Orchard, then South side.
Northern Mockingbird  2 Chasing each other around…at intersection of Judd 
Falls, Mitchell St., Ellis Hollow Rd., Pine Tree Rd.
European Starling  10

Ovenbird  2
Blue-winged Warbler  2
Black-and-white Warbler  4
Nashville Warbler  8
Common Yellowthroat  4
American Redstart  7
Cape May Warbler  2 First thing in AM, 1 Adult male, low in bushes NE 
corner of Hawthorn Orchard, moving East. Later, 1 adult female in treetops NW 
corner, flew East.
Northern Parula  3
Magnolia Warbler  8
Blackburnian Warbler  4
Yellow Warbler  10
Chestnut-sided Warbler  8
Black-throated Blue Warbler  1 Singing in ravine.
Yellow-rumped Warbler  4
Black-throated Green Warbler  6
Wilson's Warbler  1 Originally singing from shrubbery near willows NE of 
softball field; later down in North ravine near Mitchell St.

warbler sp.  27 All as night migrants continuing overhead well into the 
morning daylight hours. There were many more overhead that I am sure I missed 
(I could hear them). Those which were seen were low to mid-height. Even after 
10am, I heard and saw some individuals migrating mid-height while I was walking 
through a parking lot. Many of these had very short seet flight notes, 
suggesting Nashville, Parula, Cape May, etc. All visible birds were generally 
flying in an Easterly direction, with South-Southeast winds this AM.

Chipping Sparrow  5
Song Sparrow  9
White-throated Sparrow  14
White-crowned Sparrow  1
Scarlet Tanager  1
Northern Cardinal  8
Rose-breasted Grosbeak  5
Indigo Bunting  3
Red-winged Blackbird  8
Eastern Meadowlark  1
Common Grackle  9
Brown-headed Cowbird  4
Baltimore Oriole  5
House Finch  2
Purple Finch  1
American Goldfinch  4
House Sparrow  9

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S18298308

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)

Good birding!

Sincerely,
Chris T-H

--
Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Field Applications Engineer
Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 607-254-1132
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp


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[cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn orchard south-west end

2013-09-28 Thread Meena Madhav Haribal
Hi all,

I spent a couple of hours in the morning (10.30 to 12.30 hr) in the Hawthorn 
Orchard, but saw most of the birds in the poplars and ashes grove of south west.



The group consisted of

several Magnolia

several  Yellow-rumps

3 Black-throated greens

1 Pine Warbler

1 Nashville feeding on goldenrod flowers/fruits or insects on the flowers/fruits

1 Blackpoll

1 Blackburnian

2 Common yellowthroats (elsewhere in the Hawthorn)

1 Carolina Wren

3 Catbirds

several Am. Robins

3 or 4 Cedar waxwings

3 or 4 Tufted Titmouse

1 Juvenile Yellow-bellied Sapsucker

1 Red-bellied

1 Downy

and several Chickadees

After watching them for an hour, I spent sometime in other parts of the 
Hawthorn Orchard finding nothing I came back to the original spot. Birds were 
still going round and round of the poplar grove.





Overall, it was a pleasant fall walk in the morning.



Cheers

Meena













Meena Haribal
Ithaca NY 14850
http://haribal.org/
http://meenaharibal.blogspot.com/


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RE:[cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn orchard south-west end

2013-09-28 Thread Meena Madhav Haribal
I forgot to add sparrows to the list

1 White Crowned sparrow

several White-throated sparrows

2 Song Sparrows

were also see in the same vicinity.





Meena Haribal
Ithaca NY 14850
http://haribal.org/
http://meenaharibal.blogspot.com/


From: bounce-108076890-3493...@list.cornell.edu 
[bounce-108076890-3493...@list.cornell.edu] on behalf of Meena Madhav Haribal 
[m...@cornell.edu]
Sent: Saturday, September 28, 2013 1:19 PM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn orchard south-west end


Hi all,

I spent a couple of hours in the morning (10.30 to 12.30 hr) in the Hawthorn 
Orchard, but saw most of the birds in the poplars and ashes grove of south west.



The group consisted of

several Magnolia

several  Yellow-rumps

3 Black-throated greens

1 Pine Warbler

1 Nashville feeding on goldenrod flowers/fruits or insects on the flowers/fruits

1 Blackpoll

1 Blackburnian

2 Common yellowthroats (elsewhere in the Hawthorn)

1 Carolina Wren

3 Catbirds

several Am. Robins

3 or 4 Cedar waxwings

3 or 4 Tufted Titmouse

1 Juvenile Yellow-bellied Sapsucker

1 Red-bellied

1 Downy

and several Chickadees

After watching them for an hour, I spent sometime in other parts of the 
Hawthorn Orchard finding nothing I came back to the original spot. Birds were 
still going round and round of the poplar grove.





Overall, it was a pleasant fall walk in the morning.



Cheers

Meena













Meena Haribal
Ithaca NY 14850
http://haribal.org/
http://meenaharibal.blogspot.com/

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[cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard Park Preserve

2013-05-02 Thread Christopher Wood
We spent about an hour migration watching from between the Hawthorn Orchard and 
tennis courts on the east side this morning and had a few birds. Highlights 
included Eastern Kingbird, Rose-breasted Grosbeak and some nice patch birds 
like Purple Martin, Chimney Swift, Red-brested Nuthatch and Pine Siskins. A 
complete list is here:
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S13962187

Grant and I also went to the Park Preserve earlier in the day. Highlights 
included NINE species of warblers including Magnolia, Prairie, Black-throated 
Blue, Nashville, Black-and-white and parula. A complete list is here:
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S13961726

Cheers,
Chris

Christopher Wood
eBird Project Leader
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
http://ebird.org
http://birds.cornell.edu

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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard Park Preserve

2013-05-02 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
I can add to this list a single Great Crested Flycatcher calling to the NW of 
the Hawthorns and a single quiet skulking Brown Thrasher just at the SW corner. 
There was a flock of 4-6 White-throated Sparrows working the bushes along the 
stream to the South of the Hawthorns and a single Swamp Sparrow upstream from 
them, near the main path which crosses the stream in line with the East edge of 
the Hawthorn Orchard. I heard a single Yellow-rumped flyover when I was there 
earlier and saw a single probable Yellow-rump flyover while chatting with 
Chris, Jessie and Grant.

Good birding!

Sincerely,
Chris T-H


On May 2, 2013, at 10:54 AM, Christopher Wood wrote:

We spent about an hour migration watching from between the Hawthorn Orchard and 
tennis courts on the east side this morning and had a few birds. Highlights 
included Eastern Kingbird, Rose-breasted Grosbeak and some nice patch birds 
like Purple Martin, Chimney Swift, Red-brested Nuthatch and Pine Siskins. A 
complete list is here:
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S13962187

Grant and I also went to the Park Preserve earlier in the day. Highlights 
included NINE species of warblers including Magnolia, Prairie, Black-throated 
Blue, Nashville, Black-and-white and parula. A complete list is here:
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S13961726

Cheers,
Chris

Christopher Wood
eBird Project Leader
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
http://ebird.orghttp://ebird.org/
http://birds.cornell.eduhttp://birds.cornell.edu/
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Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
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Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 607-254-1132
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp


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[cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard: *Thursday* AM

2013-04-19 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
I realize this is a bit late, but wanted to get this out there anyway, in case 
anyone wanted to go see some Fox Sparrows that may still be in the area.

Yesterday morning from about 7:30am to 8:30am, there were still 5+ FOX SPARROWS 
in the brambles section down in the North ravine from the Northeast corner of 
the Hawthorn Orchard. They were singing softly, giving seeet notes, and also 
producing their harsher tshack! alarm notes in response to pishing. Several 
of them were visible simultaneously. This site is immediately down the slope 
from Mitchell Street on the North side.

Again, this was yesterday (Thursday) morning.

Also seen on Thursday was a single FIELD SPARROW foraging in the dirt road near 
the South Rugby Field behind and to the West of the Oxley Equestrian Center, 
and I heard a single PURPLE FINCH singing to the North of the Hawthorn Orchard.

Good birding!

Sincerely,
Chris T-H
--
Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Field Applications Engineer
Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 607-254-1132
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp


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[cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard: Fox Sparrows

2013-04-17 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
This morning, I birded the Hawthorn Orchard (Northeast Ithaca, up on East Hill, 
just to the Southwest of the intersection of Pine Tree Rd., Ellis Hollow Rd. 
and Mitchell Street, behind the Reis Tennis Center) from about 7:30am to 
8:30am, kind of hoping for something unusual or really interesting.

Nothing out-of-the-ordinary was found, but there were an notable six (6) FOX 
SPARROWS that were in the shrubs down the slope at the Northeast corner of the 
Hawthorn Orchard. Initially, they were quietly foraging in the undergrowth only 
giving soft seeet notes. Once they responded to pishing, they each flew up to 
near the tops of the bushes and hawthorns, then some began making their harsh 
tshuck! notes.

Other birds in the area included two EASTERN TOWHEES (1 at Northeast corner 
down the slope, 1 at Southwest corner), only one RUBY-CROWNED KINGLET, a small 
flock of GOLDEN-CROWNED KINGLETS (near White Pines on North ravine edge), two 
WHITE-THROATED SPARROWS, one DARK-EYED JUNCO, several SONG SPARROWS, a handful 
of BARN SWALLOWS, **many** BLACK-CAPPED CHICKADEES (in relatively sizable 
groups with individuals actively pursuing one another), a singing EASTERN 
MEADOWLARK (to the Southeast) and a single PILEATED WOODPECKER that flew in 
from the Northeast.

Good birding!

--
Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Field Applications Engineer
Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 607-254-1132
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp


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[cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard - 21 May 2012 - Quiet

2012-05-21 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Another quiet morning at the Hawthorn Orchard. I was there from 5:30am to 7:15am

Highlight was a single migrant Alder Flycatcher singing its re-beeer song. 
This bird was down in the Western portion of the middle of the Hawthorn 
Orchard. Also, at 5:30am, a single Cooper's Hawk came flying across the North 
soccer field, calling kek-kek-kek all the way into the woodlot in the NE 
corner.

Other than that, and a few local birds, it was very quiet.

Good birding!

Sincerely,
Chris T-H

--
Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
TARU Product Line Manager and Field Applications Engineer
Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 607-254-1132
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp


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[cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard - 18 May 2012 Very Quiet

2012-05-18 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
I birded the Hawthorn Orchard area this morning from about 7:45am to 8:30am. It 
was another quiet morning there. Only one likely migratory individual, a female 
Black-throated Blue Warbler. As evidenced by the foraging behavior of this 
individual, the food resources in the Hawthorn Orchard are pretty much depleted 
at this point. I'll keep monitoring the area for a little bit longer into this 
spring, because it is still a good resting location for migrants.

Also, a Gray Catbird in the ravine area just North of the NE corner of the 
Hawthorn Orchard was producing some interesting vocalizations. These sounds 
initially had me wondering if there was a hoarse-sounding Mourning Warbler in 
that spot. This catbird was repeatedly giving a very rough 
churry-churry-chorry-chorry vocalization, interspersed with some normal 
catbird squeaks and other sounds. Kind of makes me wonder if a Mourning Warbler 
was there yesterday and I missed it by not going...

Below is the checklist I submitted to eBird:


Hawthorn Orchard, Tompkins, US-NY

May 18, 2012 7:45 AM - 8:30 AM

Protocol: Traveling

0.5 mile(s)

Comments: Very quiet here. Food resources likely depleted.

34 species



Killdeer  2

Ring-billed Gull  1 Flyover. Immature.

Mourning Dove  X

Downy Woodpecker  X

Great Crested Flycatcher  1

Warbling Vireo  2 pair building nest

Red-eyed Vireo  1

Blue Jay  X

American Crow  X

Tree Swallow  X

Barn Swallow  X

Black-capped Chickadee  X

Tufted Titmouse  X

House Wren  X

Wood Thrush  0

American Robin  X

Gray Catbird  X

European Starling  X

Cedar Waxwing  X

Common Yellowthroat  4

American Redstart  2 One singing from North ravine, one female in Hawthorn 
Orchard middle Northern area.

Yellow Warbler  2

Black-throated Blue Warbler  1 This female was silently attempting to 
forage for food in buckthorns and hawthorns in area of large oak tree at NW 
corner. Despite observing her forage for several minutes, actively looking and 
plucking through leaves, she was not seen consuming anything; but she was 
visibly actively looking.

Chipping Sparrow  1

Song Sparrow  X

Northern Cardinal  X

Red-winged Blackbird  X

Eastern Meadowlark  1

Common Grackle  X

Brown-headed Cowbird  X

Baltimore Oriole  0

House Finch  2

American Goldfinch  X

House Sparrow  X



This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)

Good birding!

Sincerely,
Chris T-H

--
Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
TARU Product Line Manager and Field Applications Engineer
Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 607-254-1132
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp



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[cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard - 16 May 2012 - Quiet - Ad. Male Orchard Oriole

2012-05-16 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
This morning, I was at the Hawthorn Orchard, giving it a little more time, from 
7:30am to 8:45am.

It was dreadfully quiet; however, a single singing adult male ORCHARD ORIOLE 
made up for that. This bird was frequenting the trees and bushes along the West 
side of the South Rugby Field (West of the Oxley Equestrian Center on Pine Tree 
Road).

My thought is that the first hatching of the food resource (Tortricid sp. 
Leaf-roller larvae) may have become depleted early on this year, or perhaps 
were affected by the early warming followed by some hard freezes. Though, lots 
of spiders now.

Other birds included:

1 high flying Great Blue Heron
1 Green Heron (on nest, SW area of Hawthorn Orchard)
1 Ruby-throated Hummingbird flyby

2 Warbling Vireos (near peeper pond, in vicinity of Orchard Oriole)
1 Red-eyed Vireo (singing in tall oak tree at NW corner of Hawthorn Orchard)

1 SWAINSON'S THRUSH (silently foraging up in hawthorns about middle-Northern 
portion of Hawthorn Orchard)
ZERO Wood Thrush

1 TENNESSEE WARBLER (singing in immediate vicinity of Orchard Oriole)
2 Yellow Warblers (near stream that runs along South edge of the pasture, South 
of H.O.)
1 Yellow-rumped Warbler (calling from top of tall oak tree along East edge of 
H.O.)
1 BLACKPOLL WARBLER (foraging and singing from treetops of little wooded knoll 
area just South of same stream where Yellow Warblers were)
1 American Redstart (adult male, singing near tall oak tree along East edge of 
H.O.)
1 HOODED WARBLER (heard producing repeated chink notes in SW area of H.O., 
evaded me and did not respond to pishing)

1 Scarlet Tanager (female, flyover)
1 White-throated Sparrow (single song, middle of H.O.)
1 Indigo Bunting (flight note, high flyover)
1 Eastern Meadowlark
1 Baltimore Oriole
1 ORCHARD ORIOLE (see above notes)

Good birding!

Sincerely,
Chris T-H


--
Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
TARU Product Line Manager and Field Applications Engineer
Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 607-254-1132
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp



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[cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard - 15 May 2012 - Very Quiet

2012-05-15 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
This morning, from about 7:30 to 8:00am, there was very little activity, except 
from local birds. Possible migrant arrival Common Yellowthroats.

I'm fairly certain that the Wood Thrush has departed from the site. Female and 
male American Redstarts were in the North ravine. At least five Common 
Yellowthroats (including one female) throughout. One Pileated Woodpecker was 
perched on and calling from the dead tree in the field near the Northeast 
corner.

A new push of migrants is possible tonight, between the approaching cold front 
to our West and the rains and stationary front to our East. Calm winds becoming 
South overnight. Any birds will either push on through or possibly stop over at 
various sites throughout our region.

Good birding!

Sincerely,
Chris T-H


--
Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
TARU Product Line Manager and Field Applications Engineer
Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 607-254-1132
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp



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[cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard - 13 and 14 May 2012 - Devoid of Migrants

2012-05-14 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
The past couple of mornings, the Hawthorn Orchard has been devoid of migrants. 
It was unnervingly quiet today and yesterday. It certainly appears that most 
migrants in the area have moved on and have not been replaced by anything new 
coming in from the South. The Wood Thrush that was holding an apparent 
territory at the Northeast corner may have departed, since I've not heard that 
bird since Saturday morning.

Only bird as a possible migrant today was a single Least Flycatcher, and that 
was actually to the South of the horse-jumping pasture, South of the Hawthorn 
Orchard. Sunday morning, I did hear and partially see a single probable migrant 
warbler (Nashville/Tennessee-like) giving a few seet notes from some 
buckthorn just West of the South rugby field. I couldn't get a good-enough look 
at that bird, though.

Presumably this lack of migration is all weather-related. It is mid-May, is it 
not?

Good birding, at any rate!

Sincerely,
Chris T-H

--
Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
TARU Product Line Manager and Field Applications Engineer
Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 607-254-1132
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp



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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard - 13 and 14 May 2012 - Devoid of Migrants

2012-05-14 Thread Suan Hsi Yong
Yesterday (Sunday, 5/13) our SFO group made a quick stop at the
Hawthord Orchards at ~7:20am, where we heard a CANADA WARBLER singing
in the NE corner (near the white house), saw a female BLACK-AND-WHITE
WABLER, near the NE entrances, and saw/heard a BLUE-HEADED VIREO in
that NE forest/ravine. We didn't explore the orchards beyond just a
small NE loop, and didn't see/hear any other migrants.

Suan


On Mon, May 14, 2012 at 11:50 AM, Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
c...@cornell.edu wrote:
 The past couple of mornings, the Hawthorn Orchard has been devoid of
 migrants. It was unnervingly quiet today and yesterday. It certainly appears
 that most migrants in the area have moved on and have not been replaced by
 anything new coming in from the South. The Wood Thrush that was holding an
 apparent territory at the Northeast corner may have departed, since I’ve not
 heard that bird since Saturday morning.



 Only bird as a possible migrant today was a single Least Flycatcher, and
 that was actually to the South of the horse-jumping pasture, South of the
 Hawthorn Orchard. Sunday morning, I did hear and partially see a single
 probable migrant warbler (Nashville/Tennessee-like) giving a few “seet”
 notes from some buckthorn just West of the South rugby field. I couldn’t get
 a good-enough look at that bird, though.



 Presumably this lack of migration is all weather-related. It is mid-May, is
 it not?



 Good birding, at any rate!



 Sincerely,
 Chris T-H



 --

 Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes

 TARU Product Line Manager and Field Applications Engineer

 Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology

 159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850

 W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 607-254-1132

 http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp





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[cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard - 12 May 2012 (Orchard Oriole adult male)

2012-05-12 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
This morning, I met up with Katy Payne, who joined me for a couple of early 
morning hours of birding. We birded the relatively quiet but peaceful Hawthorn 
Orchard from about 5:45am to 7:45am.

Best bird was a single adult male ORCHARD ORIOLE that sang one explosive song 
just as we were getting ready to leave, while standing at our cars, adjacent to 
the outdoor tennis courts. This bird sang from the top of the tall tree at the 
SE corner of the Hawthorn Orchard. Immediately after it sang once, it took 
flight to the Northeast, directly over the soccer field and then over the Reis 
Tennis Center and out of sight - clearly on continued diurnal migration - 
giving us both awesome views of this chestnut-colored oriole as it flew over.

Below is a checklist submitted to eBird. Probably due to the early start and 
early departure, we missed several of the birds that were seen/heard by Anne 
Marie and Tim.

Hawthorn Orchard, Tompkins, US-NY
May 12, 2012 5:45 AM - 7:45 AM
Protocol: Traveling
0.5 mile(s)
Comments: Birded with Katy Payne. Quiet morning. Best bird was an adult 
male Orchard Oriole that perched, sang and passed through, continuing on 
migration to the NE at 7:45am.
41 species

Wood Duck  2
Mallard  2
Killdeer  1
Rock Pigeon  1
Mourning Dove  X
Red-bellied Woodpecker  1
Hairy Woodpecker  1
Northern Flicker  1
Least Flycatcher  3
Great Crested Flycatcher  1
Red-eyed Vireo  1
Blue Jay  X
American Crow  X
Barn Swallow  X
Black-capped Chickadee  X
Tufted Titmouse  X
House Wren  X
Wood Thrush  1
American Robin  X
Gray Catbird  X
European Starling  X
Northern Waterthrush  1 Heard singing from small stream to the South of the 
horse jumping pasture.
Nashville Warbler  4
Common Yellowthroat  3
Northern Parula  1
Magnolia Warbler  4
Yellow Warbler  1
Chestnut-sided Warbler  2
Song Sparrow  X
Scarlet Tanager  1
Northern Cardinal  X
Rose-breasted Grosbeak  1
Indigo Bunting  1
Bobolink  2
Red-winged Blackbird  X
Common Grackle  X
Brown-headed Cowbird  X
Orchard Oriole  1 This adult male landed in the top of the tall tree in the 
very Southeast corner of the Hawthorn Orchard. It sang a full explosive song, 
then took flight heading due Northeast, over the soccer field and over the Reis 
Tennis Center, clearly on a continued diurnal migration. Both Katy and I got 
excellent views as this bird flew in front of us over the soccer field and out 
of sight. Dark chestnut colored body with black hood.
Baltimore Oriole  2
House Finch  2
American Goldfinch  X

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 
(http://ebird.orghttp://ebird.org/)

Good birding!

Sincerely,
Chris T-H


--
Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
TARU Product Line Manager and Field Applications Engineer
Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 607-254-1132
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp


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[cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard - 11 May 2012 - Beautiful AM, Relatively Quiet (8 Warbler sp.)

2012-05-11 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
This morning, I birded the Hawthorn Orchard on East Hill in Ithaca, NY from 
about 8:15am until about 9:15am.

It was a very nice morning to be out and about, but it was relatively quiet 
bird-wise. The sunshine definitely brought out some song by some birds early 
on, but it got quiet as the time progressed.

Here are the highlights:

1 Solitary Sandpiper (flyover, non-vocal)
1 Least Flycatcher (che-BECK NE corner)
1 Ruby-crowned Kinglet (NW corner, near big oak tree)
1 Wood Thrush (still holding territory near NE corner)

1 Tennessee Warbler (loud singer early on, from near tops of maples in ravine 
near NE corner)
1 Northern Parula (singing a few songs toward end of visit, NE corner)
1 Yellow Warbler (distant singer)
1 Chestnut-sided Warbler (singing alternate type song at NW corner near big oak 
and down into ravine)
2-3 Magnolia Warblers (occasional singers along Northern section and down into 
ravine)
(Missed Stuart Krasnoff's Black-throated Green Warbler)
1 Black-and-white Warbler (singing persistently from a perch, while preening, 
for a good five minutes; NW corner near big oak tree)
1-2 American Redstarts (down in ravine area to North of the Hawthorn Orchard)
2-3 Common Yellowthroats (territories)

2 Indigo Buntings (heard producing chink notes; observed foraging in top of 
Hawthorns at NE corner, then flew West, over Hawthorn Orchard)
2-3 Baltimore Orioles

I suspect that tomorrow there will be a minor mix of new arrivals and another 
departure of existing birds, but it doesn't look like any kind of super 
fall-out conditions can be expected - I'll post if anything good shows up.

Good birding!

Sincerely,
Chris T-H

--
Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
TARU Product Line Manager and Field Applications Engineer
Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 607-254-1132
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp



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[cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard - 10 May 2012 - Fall-like Birding - 9 Warbler sp., Philly Vireo

2012-05-10 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Today was like birding after a late September cold front. It was overcast. It 
was cold. It was dark. It was breezy. Initially, it was very quiet. Birds were 
primarily giving flight notes and were foraging in very tight groups.

I was at the Hawthorn Orchard from about 7:15am to 8:30am.

By about 7:45am, after very little activity, a small aggregate of birds 
appeared up from the ravine area in the Northeast corner. After foraging the 
trees for 10-15 minutes, the birds began to rapidly move around. I later 
encountered what was likely the same flock, but now larger, moving rapidly from 
NE to West across the middle southern portion of the Hawthorn Orchard, in the 
direction of the East Ithaca Recreation Way. I presume they eventually circled 
back around to the North portion of the Hawthorn Orchard along the ravine edge, 
but I did not follow them.

Highlights from today include:

1 Cooper's Hawk (adult, probable female, fairly large individual, came in to my 
pishing, flew off shortly after and gave a harsh chicken-like kek note)
1 Pileated Woodpecker (in the Hawthorn Orchard, NE corner, originally called 
from within the H.O.; while pishing for the warblers, it flew at me and over my 
head, then turned and headed off to the ENE of the NE corner)
3-4 Least Flycatcher (only producing whit notes)
1 Great Crested Flycatcher (territorial bird, well NW of the Hawthorn Orchard)

1 Blue-headed Vireo (in warbler flock, uttered song only a couple of times)
1 PHILADELPHIA VIREO (in warbler flock, saw multiple times at three different 
locations, with the same group)
1 Red-eyed Vireo (in warbler flock)

5-6 Blue Jays (came in when the Cooper's Hawk appeared)
3-4 Black-capped Chickadees
2 Tufted Titmice
2-3 House Wrens
1 Ruby-crowned Kinglet (possibly same individual that has been observed here 
over the past week; NE corner)
1 WOOD THRUSH (still vocally displaying territory at NE corner)
4-5 Gray Catbirds

2 Tennessee Warblers (most vocal with seet flight notes, uttered partial 
songs only twice; NE corner)
4-5 Nashville Warblers (seet and tink notes)
2-3 Northern Parulas (males and female)
1 Yellow Warbler (probably on territory, South of Hawthorn Orchard)
2-3 Chestnut-sided Warblers (males and female)
3-4 Magnolia Warblers (males)
1-2 Black-throated Green Warblers (only tick notes)
1 American Redstart (territorial male in ravine on North side of Hawthorn 
Orchard)
3 Common Yellowthroats (on territories)

NO White-throated Sparrows (departed?)
1 Rose-breasted Grosbeak (squeak notes near NE corner)
1 Indigo Bunting (visual, flew over H.O. as I was crossing North soccer field)
6-7 Baltimore Orioles (5 birds visible at one time in Hawthorns in NE corner)

Good birding!

Sincerely,
Chris T-H




--
Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
TARU Product Line Manager and Field Applications Engineer
Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 607-254-1132
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[cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard - 9 May 2012 (New Wave, but not a fall-out - 14 Warbler sp.)

2012-05-09 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes

This morning, I was at the Hawthorn Orchard (on the East Hill of Ithaca, NY) 
from about 7:30am to 9:00am. Ran into several birders, including Chris Wood and 
Jessie Barry with visitors from the British Trust for Ornithology (BTO) – Andy 
Clements (Director of BTO), Andy Musgrove (Director of Monitoring at BTO), and 
Karen Wright (co-leader of Director of Information Technologies at BTO), who 
were all excited to see some American warblers this morning!

There were certainly many more birds there today, since the departure of birds 
from the fallout last week, including female migrants. Most of the birds 
observed today were new migrants, with the exception of birds on territory or 
local birds. Most birds were located in NE corner of Hawthorn Orchard.

Highlights:

1 Green Heron (still in the area of the Shagbark Hickory at the SW corner of 
the Hawthorn Orchard, growling)
4-5 Least Flycatchers
1 Great Crested Flycatcher
1 Blue-headed Vireo
1-2 Red-eyed Vireos
3-4 House Wrens
1 SWAINSON'S THRUSH (in the hedgerow East of the NE corner, near the softball 
field)
5-6 Gray Catbirds

1-2 Tennessee Warblers (not very vocal at all)
4-5 Nashville Warblers
3-4 Northern Parulas (including 1 female)
2 Yellow Warblers
5-6 Chestnut-sided Warblers (including 2 females)
5-6 Magnolia Warblers
1-2 Black-throated Blue Warblers (one heard by Mark from California in Hawthorn 
Orchard; later, one heard singing by me outside of Hawthorn Orchard to NW near 
Black Oak Lane pond)
2 Yellow-rumped Warblers (before fog burn-off, landed in top of Cottonwood Tree 
to NW of Hawthorn Orchard at East Ithaca Recreation Way; departed down into 
Ravine, not heard or seen again later - moved to nearby cemetery?)
3-4 Black-throated Green Warblers (including 1 female)
1 Blackburnian Warbler (NW Hawthorn Orchard in oak tree)
1 Black-and-white Warbler (1 female, near tall oak tree at center East side of 
Hawthorn Orchard)
6-7 American Redstarts (a couple of residents)
3 Ovenbirds (1 near tall oak tree along East side, one at NE corner, one down 
hedgerow near softball field, all within minutes of each other, with repeat 
singers heard)
3-4 Common Yellowthroats (resident birds)

3-4 White-throated Sparrows
1-2 Rose-breasted Grosbeaks (ravine area)
1 Bobolink (flyover R2-D2 singer)
2-3 Baltimore Orioles

It was wet and muddy in there today, following the nice rains of the past 
couple of days.

It just occurred to me that it is only 9 May - that's NINE of MAY! This is the 
time when migrant birds only begin to arrive at the Hawthorn Orchard. 
Hopefully, we will see several more waves of migrants over the next 15-20+ days!

Good birding!

Sincerely,
Chris T-H





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Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
TARU Product Line Manager and Field Applications Engineer
Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 607-254-1132
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[cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard - 8 May 2012 - Rainy and Quiet

2012-05-08 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
This morning, I decided to check out the Hawthorn Orchard, in the event of a 
potential fallout, despite the drizzle and wind. I birded there from about 
8:00am to 8:45am.

Highlights are below:

1 GREEN HERON (likely built a nest, growls heard and bird later seen in 
flight, SW corner near Shagbark Hickory)
3 House Wrens
1 SWAINSON'S THRUSH (middle of Northern side, about 150' South of the North 
ravine edge; foraging up in trees, mid-height; likely new overnight arrival)
1 WOOD THRUSH (singing just NE of NE corner)
6 Gray Catbirds

2 Nashville Warblers (no song, just giving pink notes - different from seet 
notes)
1 YELLOW WARBLER (likely a new arrival overnight, first in several days)
3 Magnolia Warblers
2 American Redstarts
3 Common Yellowthroats
(missed the Wilson's Warbler, which was seen again today by Jay and Livia)

1 SWAMP SPARROW (just SSE of the fire hydrant field, this is likely an arrival 
from overnight, it has not been seen prior this season)
(Zero White-throated Sparrows)
2 Baltimore Orioles
1 Purple Finch (flight song, over East Ithaca Recreation Way near NW entrance 
to Hawthorn Orchard)

Meager list, but not bad considering the condtions.

Good birding!

Sincerely,
Chris T-H



--
Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
TARU Product Line Manager and Field Applications Engineer
Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 607-254-1132
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[cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard - 7 May 2012 (Quieter, 9 Warbler sp. - Wilson's Warbler)

2012-05-07 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Today, I was at the Hawthorn Orchard from about 7:45 to 8:45am.

Very quiet start to the hour I was there. In part due to the cloud cover. Seems 
birds are less vocal when it's really cloudy in the morning. Birds seemed to 
become most active in the final 15 minutes of my time there. The most diversity 
of warblers seemed to arrive up from the ravine/slope area to the North of the 
NE corner.

Highlights:

1 Great Crested Flycatcher
NO Empidonax sp. flycatchers
NO Vireos
2-3 House Wrens
1 Ruby-crowned Kinglet (non-vocal, NE corner)
2-3 Gray Catbirds

2 Tennessee Warblers (non-vocal, one SW and one NE corner)
5-6 Nashville Warblers (Generally quiet, but these were the most vocal singers 
of all warblers today; SW, SE, and NE corners)
1 Northern Parula (singing just North of NE corner)
NO Yellow Warblers
1 Chestnut-sided Warbler (non-vocal, NE corner)
2 Magnolia Warblers (non-vocal, one NE, one SW)
2 Black-throated Green Warblers (mostly non-vocal, sang once, NE corner)
1 American Redstart (non-vocal, male, NE corner)
2 Common Yellowthroats (singing)
1 WILSON'S WARBLER (new arrival, singing actively and easily seen in NE corner, 
near top of slope)

3-4 White-throated Sparrows (NE corner, in hedgerow near Softball Field)
1 INDIGO BUNTING (flyover, buzzy ringing flight note)
2 Eastern Meadowlarks (in grass around retention pond on South side of the 
North soccer field; SW of Reis Tennis Center)
2 Baltimore Orioles (NE corner of Hawthorn Orchard)

I am curious to know what this next weather system will bring in, despite the 
forecast rain overnight tonight. A Low Pressure System is approaching to the SW 
of our area and is forecast to be centered over Detroit, MI by 2AM tomorrow. 
This may create a slight SW to NE push for more migrants into our region.

Good birding!

Sincerely,
Chris T-H



--
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TARU Product Line Manager and Field Applications Engineer
Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 607-254-1132
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[cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard - 6 May 2012 (10 Warbler Species)

2012-05-06 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
I got a late start to the Hawthorn Orchard today...was there from about 10:45am 
to about 1:15pm. Much of my birding was done with Rick Lightbod, while 
remaining stationary at one spot just South of the Northeast corner, and later 
a little bit with Kristin Hodge.

Upon arrival, the warblers were singing, including Tennessee Warblers; however, 
within about 45 minutes, the singing dropped off to the point where the only 
occasional singers were Nashville Warbler, Northern Parula, and Black-throated 
Green Warbler. Later, it became dead silent in there, sans for the occasional 
quick and soft seet or sst! flight notes being produced by Nashville and 
Tennessee Warblers - the same note they produce in night migration.

The most surprising find was non-avian. While discussing with Rick the foraging 
of these migrant birds upon the Tortricid larvae and the birds' use of the 
Hawthorn Orchard as a migratory stop-over site, I accidentally stepped on part 
of an Eastern Cottontail nest. I've never encountered one of these before. 
The shrieking of one of the young immediately drew our attention to the ground 
and the fur-lined nest, containing at least four young Cottontails - all with 
their eyes still closed - all of which appeared to be fine, despite my stepping 
on part of the nest. I think I may have simply startled one of the young awake 
into the primordial reaction similar to if a predator were attacking.

Overall, the remnant flock of what was there from the original fallout of last 
week was still there today, just fewer birds.

Here's the basic run-down of highlights with estimates:

2 Warbling Vireos
1 Blue-headed Vireo
3-4 House Wrens
1-2 Ruby-crowned Kinglets
1 WOOD THRUSH (NE Corner, switch-witch-witch! alarm notes)

1 Blue-winged Warbler (just South of NE corner)
6-8 TENNESSEE WARBLERS
15-20 NASHVILLE WARBLERS
4-5 NORTHERN PARULAS
Zero Yellow Warblers
(Missed the two Chestnut-sided Warblers just West of the NE corner)
6-8 Magnolia Warblers
2-3 Yellow-rumped Warblers
5-6 Black-throated Green Warblers
1-2 American Redstarts
1 Northern Waterthrush (heard South of the South horse-jumping pasture)
2-3 Common Yellowthroats

3-4 White-throated Sparrows
1 Eastern Meadowlark (distant singer to SE)
2-3 Baltimore Orioles

I know I'm probably missing others, simply because of my very late arrival this 
morning.

Good birding until the next warm front dumps more migrants!

Sincerely,
Chris T-H




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Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
TARU Product Line Manager and Field Applications Engineer
Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 607-254-1132
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[cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard - 5 May 2012 (11 Warbler Species, plus 1 hybrid)

2012-05-05 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Today, I birded the Hawthorn Orchard (East Hill of Ithaca) from about 8:45am to 
11:45am. For most of the time there, I was birding along with Matt Medler and 
his girlfriend Diane. Due to the relatively cold temperatures, it was fairly 
quiet until it warmed up and the warblers began to arrive. It wasn't until the 
last hour of the morning that things picked up in a similar capacity to that of 
yesterday morning.

Here's a basic run-down of what highlights were there and in the vicinity:

2 Least Flycatchers
1 Warbling Vireo
1 PHILADELPHIA VIREO (NE corner)
1 Blue Jay on a nest
3-4 House Wrens
1-2 Ruby-crowned Kinglets
8-10 Gray Catbirds
1 Brown Thrasher

1 BREWSTER'S WARBLER (Golden-winged X Blue-winged hybrid) singing a 
Golden-winged type song.
6-8+ TENNESSEE WARBLERS
6-8+ Nashville Warblers
2-3 Northern Parulas
Zero Yellow Warblers - did I just totally miss them?
2 Chestnut-sided Warblers
3-4 Magnolia Warblers
5-6 Yellow-rumped Warblers (mostly flyovers)
8-10 Black-throated Green Warblers
1 Blackburnian Warbler
2 American Redstarts
1 Ovenbird
2 Common Yellowthroats

4-6 White-throated Sparrows
6-8 Baltimore Orioles

Most of the activity, once it picked up, was limited to the Northeast corner of 
the Hawthorn Orchard. Tennessee Warbler, Black-throated Green Warbler, 
Nashville Warbler, and Northern Parulas were the most vociferous singers.

Perhaps others can add to this list.

Thanks and good birding!

Sincerely,
Chris T-H


--
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TARU Product Line Manager and Field Applications Engineer
Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 607-254-1132
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp


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[cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard - 4 May 2012 (16+ Warbler Species)

2012-05-04 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Today, I birded at the Hawthorn Orchard from about 8:45am to 11:15am. It was a 
really nice day there! This was my first visit with migration in full swing. I 
was out of town Tuesday through very early this morning, so missed the big 
fallout over the prior days.

Here's a run-down of what I observed:

1 Red-shouldered Hawk (migrant, low overhead)
1 Northern Flicker
1 Pileated Woodpecker (audible, chopping away on a tree to the West of the East 
Ithaca Recreation Way)

6-8 Least Flycatchers
1 Great Crested Flycatcher
3 Blue-headed Vireos
3 Warbling Vireos
3 Red-eyed Vireos
(I missed the Yellow-throated Vireo seen by others)
5-6 House Wrens
2-3 Ruby-crowned Kinglets
6-8+ Gray Catbirds
1 Brown Thrasher
(1 Northern Mockingbird at the East Hill Plaza)
10-12 Cedar Waxwings

1 Blue-winged Warbler
3 TENNESSEE WARBLERS (two singing near NE corner, one drab plumaged bird near 
SE portion)
(I missed an Orange-crowned Warbler seen near the NE entrance)
20+ (20-25?) NASHVILLE WARBLERS (everywhere)
6+ NORTHERN PARULAS
8-10 Yellow Warblers
2-3 Chestnut-sided Warblers
8-10+ Magnolia Warblers
1-2 Black-throated Blue Warblers
20-25+ YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLERS
8-10 BLACK-THROATED GREEN WARBLERS
8-10 BLACKBURNIAN WARBLERS
(I missed the Prairie Warbler)
3-4+ Black-and-white Warblers
1-2 American Redstarts
1 Ovenbird (at NE corner)
2-3 Common Yellowthroats
1 CANADA WARBLER (singing in North ravine, North of the NE corner)

1-2 Scarlet Tanagers
1 Eastern Towhee
4-6+ Song Sparrows
6-8 White-throated Sparrows
4-6 Northern Cardinals
1 Rose-breasted Grosbeak
1 Eastern Meadowlark (distantly heard singing to SW)
(1 banded female Brown-headed Cowbird)
8-10 Baltimore Orioles

Regrettably, I wasn't very focused this morning and know I ignored or blocked 
out several local birds, seen or heard, from my memory.

Good birding!

Sincerely,
Chris T-H


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159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
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[cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard revisited

2012-05-04 Thread Ann Mitchell
It was another fantastic day at the orchard. I was there from 10:00 - 12:00
A.M. I tried to count numbers of each species, but it didn't quite
work.(sorry Chris) They were moving around too much. Anyway, there seemed
to be a number of birds in just about every tree.  It was a real treat! As
Gary put it yesterday I love the Hawthorn Orchard.  The following is my
list. Also, I only birded the Northeast and Northwest areas.
Many Black-throated Green Warblers
Many Black-throated Blue Warblers
Common Yellowthroat
One Orange-crowned Warbler on the northeast side of the orchard. It was
skulking in the low bushes at that entrance.
Yellow Warblers
Yellow-rumps galore
Many Blackburnian Warblers
Many Northern Parulas
Nashville Warblers 4 at least
Tennessee Warbler
4 + Chestnut-sided Warblers
Magnolia Warblers 3+
Many Black and White Warblers
American Redstart
Scarlet Tanagers were there
Rose-breasted Grosbeaks - I saw a male and female together.
Great Crested Flycatcher
There were also Baltimore Orioles, Blue-Gray Catbird, Northern Cardinal,
Tufted Titmouse, flyover Mallard.
A fellow birder saw an Indigo Bunting that I missed. It was around the
ravine.  Also, a Canada Warbler was reported around that area.

After the Hawthorn Orchard, I did stop by Park Preserve to hear a Prairie
Warbler. There were a number there.  Lastly, I stopped by Sandbank Road and
saw 8+ Bobolinks.  They are back.
Good birding,
Ann

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[cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard Today

2012-05-03 Thread Evan Barrientos
37 Species, 12 warblers. 2 PINE WARBLERS. 
Evan B

Begin forwarded message:

 From: do-not-re...@ebird.org
 Date: May 3, 2012 12:27:11 PM EDT
 To: emb...@cornell.edu
 Subject: eBird Report - Hawthorn Orchard, May 3, 2012
 
 Hawthorn Orchard, Tompkins, US-NY
 May 3, 2012 10:20 AM - 11:50 AM
 Protocol: Traveling
 1.0 mile(s)
 Comments: Sunny, TA~70F, Wind calm. 3 Eastern garter snakes.
 37 species
 
 Mourning Dove  1
 Red-bellied Woodpecker  1
 Yellow-bellied Sapsucker  2
 Downy Woodpecker  1
 Hairy Woodpecker  3
 Northern Flicker  1
 Least Flycatcher  2
 Blue-headed Vireo  2
 Blue Jay  6
 American Crow  1
 Black-capped Chickadee  2
 Tufted Titmouse  4
 White-breasted Nuthatch  2
 House Wren  2
 Ruby-crowned Kinglet  3
 American Robin  3
 Gray Catbird  5
 Brown Thrasher  1
 Blue-winged Warbler  1
 Tennessee Warbler  1 Heard singing clearly, not seen.
 Nashville Warbler  17
 Common Yellowthroat  1
 Northern Parula  1
 Magnolia Warbler  6
 Yellow Warbler  4
 Chestnut-sided Warbler  1
 Pine Warbler  2 Male singing. Female/immature male foraging low and on 
 ground.
 Yellow-rumped Warbler  17
 Prairie Warbler  1 Heard singing
 Black-throated Green Warbler  6
 Song Sparrow  1
 White-throated Sparrow  2
 Northern Cardinal  3
 Red-winged Blackbird  2
 Eastern Meadowlark  1
 Baltimore Oriole  2
 American Goldfinch  2
 
 This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)


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[cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard, May 3:

2012-05-03 Thread Dave Nutter
My dozen warbler species were different from Evan's, so add Ovenbird, Orange-crowned Warbler and Blackburnian Warbler to today's Hawthorn Orchard list.--Dave NutterBegin forwarded message:From: do-not-re...@ebird.orgDate: May 03, 2012 1:40:37 PMTo: nutter.d...@mac.comSubject: eBird Report - Hawthorn Orchard, May 3, 2012Hawthorn Orchard, Tompkins, US-NY
May 3, 2012 8:15 AM - 12:00 PM
Protocol: Traveling
1.0 mile(s)
Comments: Entered from northeast, basically stayed in north, much of the time with Stuart Krasnoff; many other birders seen. Warm  sunny.
46 species

Canada Goose  2
American Kestrel  1
Mourning Dove  X
Red-bellied Woodpecker  X
Downy Woodpecker  X
Hairy Woodpecker  X
Northern Flicker  X
Least Flycatcher  X heard only
Eastern Phoebe  1 heard only
Great Crested Flycatcher  1 seen  heard in large oaks in northwest part of Hawthorn Orchard
Blue-headed Vireo  X seen several times, once heard singing
Warbling Vireo  1 silent, in fading blooming ornamental apple-like trees in parking lot
Blue Jay  X
Black-capped Chickadee  X several heard and seen
Tufted Titmouse  X several heard and seen
White-breasted Nuthatch  X heard only
House Wren  1 seen singing
Ruby-crowned Kinglet  X seen several times, some song
American Robin  X
Gray Catbird  X several heard and seen
Brown Thrasher  1 seen  heard singing on east side of Hawthorn Orchard
European Starling  X
Ovenbird  1 silent, along east edge of Hawthorn Orchard
Blue-winged Warbler  2 one in northeast, one in northwest; relatively sedentary for this species, song heard, too.
Tennessee Warbler  1 seen singing at northwest edge of Hawthorn Orchard
Orange-crowned Warbler  1 heard several times in ravine north of softball field; chattery trill with varied portions
Nashville Warbler  X many singing and seen
Common Yellowthroat  1 heard only
Magnolia Warbler  1 seen singing near northwest corner of Hawthorn Orchard
Blackburnian Warbler  1 silent male foraging in ravine
Chestnut-sided Warbler  X several
Yellow-rumped Warbler  X many seen; several heard singing
Prairie Warbler  1 seen singing in northwest corner of Hawthorn Orchard
Black-throated Green Warbler  X several seen singing in northeast corner of Hawthorn Orchard
Chipping Sparrow  1 singing near parking lot
Song Sparrow  1 heard only
White-throated Sparrow  X several call notes, a few sightings, a few songs
Northern Cardinal  X singing
Red-winged Blackbird  X males seen  heard
Eastern Meadowlark  1 singing from hedgerow below Oxley
Common Grackle  X several flying, north of parking lot
Brown-headed Cowbird  X several calls heard
Baltimore Oriole  X males seen and heard, probably several
House Finch  X singing near parking lot
American Goldfinch  X male  female seen foraging; singing
House Sparrow  X male  female by parking lot

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)

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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard, May 3:

2012-05-03 Thread Gary Kohlenberg
I'm confessing that I officially love the Hawthorn Orchard during migration ! 

I've only been able to get there in late  afternoon yesterday and today, but 
still had 46 and 51 total species with 15 different Warblers. I missed some 
warblers, like Orange-crowned and Ovenbird, so 20+ warbler species are possible 
on one walk around. What's cool is that on every loop around you can see and 
hear different birds.

Evan, Dave and Jay have pretty much summed up what's there. The only birds I 
can add today are Green Heron, Broad-winged Hawk, Bald Eagle and Osprey. 

Gary 



On May 3, 2012, at 1:46 PM, Dave Nutter wrote:

My dozen warbler species were different from Evan's, so add Ovenbird, 
Orange-crowned Warbler and Blackburnian Warbler to today's Hawthorn Orchard 
list.
--Dave Nutter

Begin forwarded message:


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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard, May 3:

2012-05-03 Thread geokloppel
Not to detract in any way from the spectacularly magnetic Hawthorn Orchard, but 
I too found 15 warbler species today, without moving more than 1000 feet from 
my house, and probably could have made it 20 without leaving the greater West 
Danby area. There are lots of birds around!

-Geo
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[cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard Checklist Today

2012-05-02 Thread Evan Barrientos
45 species total, 15 warbler species, excellent day. 
Evan B

Begin forwarded message:

 From: do-not-re...@ebird.org
 Date: May 2, 2012 3:37:20 PM EDT
 To: emb...@cornell.edu
 Subject: eBird Report - Hawthorn Orchard, May 2, 2012
 
 Hawthorn Orchard, Tompkins, US-NY
 May 2, 2012 7:40 AM - 8:50 AM
 Protocol: Traveling
 2.0 mile(s)
 Comments: Excellent migration. Started overcast with clouds clearing at 
 end. Temp started near 50F and ended close to 60F. Low wind.
 45 species
 
 Turkey Vulture  1
 Cooper's Hawk  1
 Red-bellied Woodpecker  2
 Downy Woodpecker  1
 Hairy Woodpecker  1
 Northern Flicker  3
 Least Flycatcher  2
 Eastern Phoebe  1 Heard off orchards grounds.
 Blue-headed Vireo  3
 Blue Jay  15
 American Crow  3
 Tree Swallow  1
 Black-capped Chickadee  9
 Tufted Titmouse  6
 White-breasted Nuthatch  2
 House Wren  7
 Ruby-crowned Kinglet  9
 Hermit Thrush  2
 Wood Thrush  2 Heard calling in woods south of orchards
 American Robin  6
 Gray Catbird  8
 Cedar Waxwing  2
 Blue-winged Warbler  4
 Black-and-white Warbler  6
 Nashville Warbler  6
 Common Yellowthroat  1
 Hooded Warbler  1
 American Redstart  2
 Northern Parula  2
 Magnolia Warbler  3
 Yellow Warbler  25
 Chestnut-sided Warbler  2
 Black-throated Blue Warbler  5
 Palm Warbler  7
 Yellow-rumped Warbler  50 Probably a conservative estimate.
 Prairie Warbler  2
 Black-throated Green Warbler  1
 Song Sparrow  3
 White-throated Sparrow  28
 Northern Cardinal  6
 Rose-breasted Grosbeak  1
 Common Grackle  3
 Brown-headed Cowbird  1
 Baltimore Oriole  4
 American Goldfinch  3
 
 This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)


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[cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard - Sunday 4/22/2012

2012-04-22 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
After returning from the Savannah Mucklands area this morning, I birded the 
Hawthorn Orchard on East Hill in Ithaca (located between Pine Tree Road, 
Mitchell Street, and the East Ithaca Recreation Way) from about 9:45 to 
11:00am. It was fairly quiet, in part due to the cold, windy, damp conditions. 
I was extremely surprised to see that many of the hawthorn trees (Crataegus 
sp.) were in bloom. This could make for an interesting spring, because they 
usually don't bloom until mid-May.

Bird-wise, I heard/saw the following:

19 Yellow-rumped Warblers (6 in NE corner, 12 in SW corner, 1 in SE corner)
1 Palm Warbler (heard singing and moving rapidly along East edge)
1 Blue-headed Vireo (NE corner)
1 Ruby-crowned Kinglet
~15 White-throated Sparrows
2 Brown Thrashers (male and female, along gravel pathway that leads from the 
East Ithaca Recreation Way up to the southern rugby playing field)
1 Field Sparrow (flyover, flight notes)

Heard an unidentified very rich, sweet-sounding, call note a few times that was 
very reminiscent of Hooded Warbler, but just couldn't locate the bird producing 
the sound. This was along the North slope that leads down into the ravine area 
from the NE corner.

Good birding!

Sincerely,
Chris T-H

--
Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
TARU Product Line Manager and Field Applications Engineer
Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 607-254-1132
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp


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[cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard - 5/27/2011 - Yellow-bellied Flycatchers, Oil

2011-05-27 Thread Chris Tessaglia-Hymes
This morning, I birded the Hawthorn Orchard from about 7:00am to 8:45am. It
was really quiet, but I was please to find two YELLOW-BELLIED FLYCATCHERS
actively foraging and sporadically calling and chasing each other around.

 

I have placed a handful of recordings up on SoundCloud, including the
Yellow-bellied Flycatcher(s) calling. Unfortunately, I did not capture an
amazing outburst between these two birds when they were chasing each other
around; some of the sounds included a series of Acadian Flycatcher-like
we-it! calls. You can listen to these and the other recordings here:
http://soundcloud.com/cth4th

 

One item of concern from this morning's visit, is that there was a very
noticeable amount of oil slick in standing water around the perimeter of the
North intramural sports ball field and in slowly moving water well into the
middle of the Hawthorn Orchard from about ENE to SW. I had not noticed this
before and I'm not entirely sure where this is coming from, but I'm looking
into it. Some have suggested this is a result of pesticide/herbicide
application; there had been an application vehicle working the South
intramural sports ball field back around the 24th.

 

Here's a list of the notables for the day:

 

1 Red-tailed Hawk

1 American Kestrel

 

1 Eastern Wood-Pewee (NW of Hawthorn Orchard)

2 YELLOW-BELLIED FLYCATCHERS (active in mid-NW area of Hawthorn Orchard;
sporadically calling and chasing each other)

 

I did not hear the Wood Thrush singing this morning.

 

3-4 Yellow Warblers

1 Magnolia Warbler (female)

2 American Redstarts

3-4 Common Yellowthroats

 

2 Indigo Buntings

1 Bobolink (flyover)

 

Good birding!

 

Sincerely,
Chris T-H

 

 

--

Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes

TARU Product Line Manager and Field Applications Engineer

Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology

159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850

W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 607-254-1132

http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp

 

 


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[cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard - 5/23/2011 - NO Warblers

2011-05-23 Thread Chris Tessaglia-Hymes
Today, from 5:30am to 6:30am, I did not encounter any transient migrants in
the Hawthorn Orchard. It could have been that I was just there too early,
but I certainly suspect that all have picked up and migrated North with the
Southerly winds we've been having. The only potential transient migrant was
a singing EASTERN WOOD-PEWEE in the North ravine area. Other than that, only
locally breeding birds were heard or seen in and around the Hawthorn
Orchard.

 

I did succeed in locating one of this year's brood of EASTERN SCREECH-OWLS.
One of the adults and single immature bird were perched in the maple grove,
downhill from the Northeast corner. I could hear the immature Eastern
Screech-Owl occasionally producing their short alarm moan call. 

 

While moving West along the North ravine area trail, I heard a couple of
crows going berserk over something. Through the trees, I could see an
American Crow mobbing what I initially thought was probably just a Turkey
Vulture; however, upon closer inspection, this bird turned out to be a
juvenile (or even subadult I) plumaged BALD EAGLE. This bird was very low
and may have been perched in the tall oak along the East edge of the
Hawthorn Orchard, since the height, direction, and timing (of onset of
mobbing) was about right.

 

This year's arrival of Blackpoll Warblers really held true to the statement:
When the Blackpoll Warblers arrive, migration is over! Well, I know it's
not totally over for neotropical migrants, but the bulk has certainly moved
on. We'll only be getting individuals or tiny groups of birds here and there
over the next few days.

 

Good birding!

 

Sincerely,
Chris T-H

 

 

 

--

Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes

TARU Product Line Manager and Field Applications Engineer

Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology

159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850

W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 607-254-1132

http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp

 

 


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[cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard is very birdy

2011-05-21 Thread 6073515740
 Hawthorn Orchard is very birdy today. TONS Blackpolls, lots Bay-breasted, 
still Tennessees. -- Chris T-H

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[cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard 5/21

2011-05-21 Thread Gordon Bonnet
Carol  I spent a pleasant hour and a half birding at the Hawthorn Orchard this 
morning.  Highlights:

Awesome views of a singing Wood Thrush
More Blackpolls and Tennessee Warblers than I could keep track of
Great looks at a singing Bay-breasted Warbler
Many American Redstarts, Red-eyed Vireos, and other usual suspects

Also;  in the spruce trees on the corner of the Ithaca Recreation Trail and 
Honness Road were two singing male Cape May Warblers.  Got 'em finally -- a 
life bird after about ten years' looking!

cheers,

Gordon Bonnet
Trumansburg
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[cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard - 5/20/2011 - 21 Warblers - Very Active, Very Muddy

2011-05-20 Thread Chris Tessaglia-Hymes
I birded the Hawthorn Orchard today from about 6:30am to 9:30am, again,
painful to pull myself away for work. 

 

Today, many birders were there enjoying what the Hawthorn Orchard had to
offer for the day. Am I keeping a life birder list? Anyway, there was a
rare sighting today among those that I ran into: Paul Hurtado, visiting from
Ohio! Other birders included: Meena Haribal, George Chiu, Nancy Chen, Matt
Medler (another rare sighting, for me), Jay McGowan, Kevin McGowan, Larry
and Sara Jane Hymes, Paul Anderson, Tom Reimers, Mark Chao and Miyoko Chu,
and a distant sighting of Kevin Ripka. I may have missed some birders,
because they were moving all over the place in there. ;-)

 

Onto the birds!

 

The birding started out a little quiet, but I wanted to make sure I wasn't
missing anything in the far Southern parts of the area (South of the South
stream, West of the South ball field). I then entered the main portion of
the Hawthorn Orchard, via the Southwest corner, working my way East (where I
ran into Meena) and then North to the Northeast corner. Today, most of the
birds in the Hawthorn Orchard were actually spread out along the East side
and into the middle-Northern portions. The birds continued to concentrate
themselves in the middle-Northern portion as the morning progressed. In
general, it seemed that BLACKPOLL WARBLERS have now become dominant.
TENNESSEE WARBLER are still quite present there, but slightly less-so than
in recent days.

 

HIGHLIGHT: Yesterday, George Chiu had a chance encounter with a NORTHERN
SAW-WHET OWL! George isn't on the List, so I'll roughly speak for him. There
had been some mobbing activity in the middle-Northern portion of the
Hawthorn Orchard. A bird flew over him and landed up on a bent-over
hawthorn. He snapped a bunch of pictures and will get those to me. Very nice
find, George!

 

Here is a basic run-down of what was there today:

 

1 SOLITARY SANDPIPER (flyover - peeet-weeet-weeet)

1 YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOO (one full song, SW corner, early)

 

2 Hairy Woodpeckers

1 Pileated Woodpecker

1 Eastern Wood-Pewee (working along edge of South horse jumping field, near
stream)

2 Least Flycatchers

1 Eastern Phoebe

1 Great Crested Flycatcher

 

1 Yellow-throated Vireo (Larry and Sara Jane Hymes - Northeast, on way in)

2 Warbling Vireos

1 PHILADELPHIA VIREO (middle-Northern portion)

6-8 Red-eyed Vireos

 

4-5 Blue Jays

3 American Crows

5-6 Barn Swallows

4-6 Black-capped Chickadees

1 White-breasted Nuthatch

2 House Wrens

1 Wood Thrush

10-12+ American Robins

10-12 Gray Catbirds (reduced numbers from yesterday)

3-4 European Starlings

10-12 Cedar Waxwings

 

1 Blue-winged Warbler (along hedgerow of stream at Southeast corner of the
horse jumping field, South of the Hawthorn Orchard)

20-25+ TENNESSEE WARBLERS

1 Nashville Warbler

2 NORTHERN PARULAS (1 male NW corner, 1 female SE corner)

12-14 Yellow Warblers

12-14+ Chestnut-sided Warblers

12-14 Magnolia Warblers

2 Black-throated Blue Warblers (1 male singing NW corner, 1 female SE
corner)

2 Black-throated Green Warblers

4-5 BLACKBURNIAN WARBLERS

5-6 BAY-BREASTED WARBLERS

25-30+ BLACKPOLL WARBLERS

1 Black-and-white Warbler (one song, middle-Southern portion)

6-8+ American Redstarts (more 1st year males, now)

1 Ovenbird (NE section)

1 Northern Waterthrush (middle)

1 MOURNING WARBLER (infrequently singing, middle-NW section)

15+ Common Yellowthroats

1 HOODED WARBLER (Jay McGowan - heard)

1 WILSON'S WARBLER (song - middle, working East)

1-2 CANADA WARBLERS (middle-Northern portion)

 

3-4 Scarlet Tanagers (singers, passing through)

1 Chipping Sparrow

1 Field Sparrow

6-8 Song Sparrows

8-10 Northern Cardinals

2-3 Rose-breasted Grosbeaks

3-4 Indigo Buntings

1 BOBOLINK (low, singing display flight between North and South ball fields,
flew South)

15+ Red-winged Blackbirds

1 Eastern Meadowlark (distant, heard, South of South ball field)

5+ Common Grackles

2-3 Brown-headed Cowbirds

6-8 Baltimore Orioles

4-6 American Goldfinches

2-3 House Sparrows

 

Good birding!

 

Sincerely,
Chris T-H

 

--

Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes

TARU Product Line Manager and Field Applications Engineer

Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology

159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850

W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 607-254-1132

http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp

 

 


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[cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard - Northern Saw-whet Owl Images - 19 May 2011

2011-05-20 Thread Chris Tessaglia-Hymes
With George's permission, I have placed two of his images of the Northern
Saw-whet Owl onto my 2011 Hawthorn Orchard Picasa Album. It turns out that
this was quite the serendipitous sighting - George was in the right spot at
the right time. The bird flew in and landed. He captured these stills. This
was a life bird for George and a new addition to the species list for the
Hawthorn Orchard. Thank you, George!

 

George's two pictures are here:

 

https://picasaweb.google.com/cth4th/2011HawthornOrchardBirds#560888979311682
5298

https://picasaweb.google.com/cth4th/2011HawthornOrchardBirds#560888979443215
3298

 

Kind of wonder if this bird is breeding nearby.

 

Good birding!

 

Sincerely,
Chris T-H

 

--

Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes

TARU Product Line Manager and Field Applications Engineer

Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology

159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850

W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 607-254-1132

http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp

 

 

From: bounce-30688422-3488...@list.cornell.edu
[mailto:bounce-30688422-3488...@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Chris
Tessaglia-Hymes
Sent: Friday, May 20, 2011 11:11 AM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard - 5/20/2011 - 21 Warblers - Very
Active, Very Muddy

 

I birded the Hawthorn Orchard today from about 6:30am to 9:30am, again,
painful to pull myself away for work. 

 

Today, many birders were there enjoying what the Hawthorn Orchard had to
offer for the day. Am I keeping a life birder list? Anyway, there was a
rare sighting today among those that I ran into: Paul Hurtado, visiting from
Ohio! Other birders included: Meena Haribal, George Chiu, Nancy Chen, Matt
Medler (another rare sighting, for me), Jay McGowan, Kevin McGowan, Larry
and Sara Jane Hymes, Paul Anderson, Tom Reimers, Mark Chao and Miyoko Chu,
and a distant sighting of Kevin Ripka. I may have missed some birders,
because they were moving all over the place in there. ;-)

 

Onto the birds!

 

The birding started out a little quiet, but I wanted to make sure I wasn't
missing anything in the far Southern parts of the area (South of the South
stream, West of the South ball field). I then entered the main portion of
the Hawthorn Orchard, via the Southwest corner, working my way East (where I
ran into Meena) and then North to the Northeast corner. Today, most of the
birds in the Hawthorn Orchard were actually spread out along the East side
and into the middle-Northern portions. The birds continued to concentrate
themselves in the middle-Northern portion as the morning progressed. In
general, it seemed that BLACKPOLL WARBLERS have now become dominant.
TENNESSEE WARBLER are still quite present there, but slightly less-so than
in recent days.

 

HIGHLIGHT: Yesterday, George Chiu had a chance encounter with a NORTHERN
SAW-WHET OWL! George isn't on the List, so I'll roughly speak for him. There
had been some mobbing activity in the middle-Northern portion of the
Hawthorn Orchard. A bird flew over him and landed up on a bent-over
hawthorn. He snapped a bunch of pictures and will get those to me. Very nice
find, George!

 

Here is a basic run-down of what was there today:

 

1 SOLITARY SANDPIPER (flyover - peeet-weeet-weeet)

1 YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOO (one full song, SW corner, early)

 

2 Hairy Woodpeckers

1 Pileated Woodpecker

1 Eastern Wood-Pewee (working along edge of South horse jumping field, near
stream)

2 Least Flycatchers

1 Eastern Phoebe

1 Great Crested Flycatcher

 

1 Yellow-throated Vireo (Larry and Sara Jane Hymes - Northeast, on way in)

2 Warbling Vireos

1 PHILADELPHIA VIREO (middle-Northern portion)

6-8 Red-eyed Vireos

 

4-5 Blue Jays

3 American Crows

5-6 Barn Swallows

4-6 Black-capped Chickadees

1 White-breasted Nuthatch

2 House Wrens

1 Wood Thrush

10-12+ American Robins

10-12 Gray Catbirds (reduced numbers from yesterday)

3-4 European Starlings

10-12 Cedar Waxwings

 

1 Blue-winged Warbler (along hedgerow of stream at Southeast corner of the
horse jumping field, South of the Hawthorn Orchard)

20-25+ TENNESSEE WARBLERS

1 Nashville Warbler

2 NORTHERN PARULAS (1 male NW corner, 1 female SE corner)

12-14 Yellow Warblers

12-14+ Chestnut-sided Warblers

12-14 Magnolia Warblers

2 Black-throated Blue Warblers (1 male singing NW corner, 1 female SE
corner)

2 Black-throated Green Warblers

4-5 BLACKBURNIAN WARBLERS

5-6 BAY-BREASTED WARBLERS

25-30+ BLACKPOLL WARBLERS

1 Black-and-white Warbler (one song, middle-Southern portion)

6-8+ American Redstarts (more 1st year males, now)

1 Ovenbird (NE section)

1 Northern Waterthrush (middle)

1 MOURNING WARBLER (infrequently singing, middle-NW section)

15+ Common Yellowthroats

1 HOODED WARBLER (Jay McGowan - heard)

1 WILSON'S WARBLER (song - middle, working East)

1-2 CANADA WARBLERS (middle-Northern portion)

 

3-4 Scarlet Tanagers (singers, passing through)

1 Chipping Sparrow

1 Field Sparrow

6-8 Song Sparrows

8-10 Northern Cardinals

2-3

[cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard - Good birds,

2011-05-19 Thread 6073515740
 Hawthorn Orchard - Good birds, better light, no rain, still muddy. MOURNING 
WARBLER NE corner. Tons of Tennessees. -- Chris T-H

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[cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard , May 19, 2011 - Golden-winged Warbler and more

2011-05-19 Thread Mike Powers
Hi all,

I made a lunch-hour run to the Hawthorn Orchard, hoping the excellent
variety of songbirds would be active in between rain showers.  I was
not disappointed (who could be?): when I arrived just after noon there
was a cacophony of warbler song as I entered the northeast section of
the orchard.  The highlight was a very vocal GOLDEN-WINGED WARBLER
which I heard almost immediately through the Tennessee, Blackpoll, and
Yellow Warbler song.  He was relatively easy to find, actively
foraging the the (low) tree tops.  When I left just after 1:00 PM he
was in the same area, softly vocalizing.

I'm not sure what happened, but shortly after I arrived (around 12:15)
the birds all got very quiet, and it remained that way through the
rest of my stay.  Songs were given periodically, many were softer than
when I arrived (like the Golden-wing), but visually the birds were
just as active.  I suspect the presence of an accipiter or other
predator given the behavior of a near-murder of crows who were mobbing
a tall conifer towards the middle of the orchard.

My full eBird list is below.

Cheers,
Mike

--
Mike Powers
Horseheads, NY


Hawthorn Orchard, Tompkins, US-NY
May 19, 2011 12:05 PM - 1:05 PM
Protocol: Traveling
0.25 mile(s)
Comments:     Lunch-hour trip between rain showers, ideally to
photograph warblers.  Conditions:  77*F, 80% cloud cover, light
South/SouthEast breeze, no precipitation though dark clouds were
approaching when I left.
40 species

Mallard  2
Red-tailed Hawk  1
Rock Pigeon  1
Mourning Dove  1
Red-bellied Woodpecker  1
Downy Woodpecker  1
Hairy Woodpecker  1
Red-eyed Vireo  2
Blue Jay  3
American Crow  11     Mobbing a tall conifer (White Pine?) standing
southwest of the Northeast section of the orchard.  Never saw what was
in that pine.
Barn Swallow  7
Black-capped Chickadee  2
Tufted Titmouse  1
Veery  1
American Robin  4
Gray Catbird  2
European Starling  5
Cedar Waxwing  2
Golden-winged Warbler  1
Tennessee Warbler  7
Nashville Warbler  1
Northern Parula  1
Yellow Warbler  3
Chestnut-sided Warbler  3
Magnolia Warbler  1
Cape May Warbler  1
Yellow-rumped Warbler (Myrtle)  2
Blackburnian Warbler  1
Bay-breasted Warbler  1
Blackpoll Warbler  4
American Redstart  1
Common Yellowthroat  4
Chipping Sparrow  1
Song Sparrow  2
Scarlet Tanager  1
Northern Cardinal  2
Indigo Bunting  2
Brown-headed Cowbird  3
Baltimore Oriole  3
American Goldfinch  2

This report was generated automatically by eBird v2 (http://ebird.org)

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[cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard - 19 May 2011 - 22 WARBLERS

2011-05-19 Thread Chris Tessaglia-Hymes
This morning, I birded the Hawthorn Orchard from about 6:15am to 9:00am. I
was joined by Pete Marchetto for a good portion of the morning. While there,
I was pleased to see several other area birders in the hawthorns enjoying
what the place has to offer. Throughout the morning, I saw or met up with:
Mark Scheel (from California), George Chiu (from Binghamton), Jay McGowan,
Bill Baker, Larry and Sara Jane Hymes, Dave Streater, Sarah Fern Striffler,
Anne Klingensmith, Lanie Wilmarth, and Mike Powers.

 

Please note that the Hawthorn Orchard is most acoustically active earlier in
the day (early- to mid-morning). The birds are still present mid- to
late-day, but, as Mike Powers noted, they are not very vocal; they produce
many contact flight notes, just not much song. If you get there early
enough, the cacophony of song is deafening in the Northeast corner, making
it almost impossible to think! The Northwest corner is also active, just not
as much as the Northeast corner.

 

OK.

 

Highlights: Continued high numbers of TENNESSEE WARBLERS (30-35), abundant
BLACKPOLL WARBLERS (15-20), MOURNING WARBLERS (2), CANADA WARBLERS (2-3),
YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOO (one calling), CAPE MAY WARBLER (single singer), and
BAY-BREASTED WARBLERS (6-8).

 

Here is a list with some numbers of birds present throughout the Hawthorn
Orchard today, focused on the migrants:

 

1 YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOO (calling, NE corner)

1 Ruby-throated Hummingbird

3+ Least Flycatchers

6-8+ Red-eyed Vireos

1 SWAINSON'S THRUSH (just West of NE corner)

1 Wood Thrush (territory, SW corner)

30-35+ GRAY CATBIRDS (huge numbers of what are clearly migrant Gray Catbirds
today)

 

1 Blue-winged Warbler (stutter song heard coming from Southern portion of
Hawthorn Orchard)

30-35 TENNESSEE WARBLERS

1 NORTHERN PARULA (NW corner)

10-12 Yellow Warblers

8-10 Chestnut-sided Warblers

8-10 Magnolia Warblers

1 CAPE MAY WARBLER (NE corner)

3 BLACK-THROATED BLUE WARBLERS (2 males and 1 female, NE corner)

1 Yellow-rumped Warbler (NE corner)

1 Black-throated Green Warbler (NW corner)

6-8 BLACKBURNIAN WARBLERS (throughout)

1 PINE WARBLER (singing from North ravine pines and oaks, highly mobile)

6-8+ BAY-BREASTED WARBLERS (throughout, but mostly NE corner)

15-20 BLACKPOLL WARBLERS (throughout, but mostly NE corner)

4-6 American Redstarts

1 NORTHERN WATERTHRUSH (middle to NE area)

2 MOURNING WARBLERS (working the Northeast area and the hedgerow just North
of the Softball field)

10-12 Common Yellowthroats

2-3 CANADA WARBLERS

 

1-2 Scarlet Tanagers (passing through)

6-8+ Rose-breasted Grosbeaks

4-6 Indigo Buntings

10-15 Baltimore Orioles (varying plumages)

 

Additions include:

1 Wilson's Warbler (per Larry Hymes)

1 GOLDEN-WINGED WARBLER (Mike Powers, previous post)

1 Nashville Warbler (Mike Powers, previous post)

 

Info about the Hawthorn Orchard is here:

http://www.birds.cornell.edu/cayugabirdclub/hawthorn.htm

 

Good birding!!

 

Sincerely,
Chris T-H

 

 

--

Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes

TARU Product Line Manager and Field Applications Engineer

Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology

159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850

W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 607-254-1132

http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp

 

 


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[cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard - WET -

2011-05-18 Thread 6073515740
 Hawthorn Orchard - WET - same birds, similar numbers, more evenly dispersed. 
MOURNING WARBLER at NE corner. -- Chris T-H

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[cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard - 5/17/2011 - 17 Warbler species and a Cacophony of Song

2011-05-17 Thread Chris Tessaglia-Hymes
This morning, I birded the Hawthorn Orchard from about 7:15am to 9:30am.
While there, I met Heidi Bardy, Beth Bannister, and Mark Scheel. Later, on
my way out, I ran into Andy Johnson and Jay McGowan.

 

Really great birding there today. There's a sizeable flock of birds that are
slowly moving around the Hawthorn Orchard; plus, there are rogue individuals
foraging on the periphery of the hawthorns. When in the midst of the
migratory flock of birds, you can barely think, it's so loud. The cacophony
of sound makes for interesting challenges hearing and identifying
everything. It was painful pulling myself away to head into work.

 

Highlights today: THE flock, 1 PHILADELPHIA VIREO (finally, as I was
leaving), 1 MOURNING WARBLER (heard once), 4 CANADA WARBLERS, 6-8
BAY-BREASTED WARBLERS, and 30+ TENNESSEE WARBLERS.

 



The biggest surprise was a single female TENNESSEE WARBLER carrying a large
wad of grassy NESTING MATERIAL near the fire hydrant (NW corner)! I cannot
believe that they will actually nest here, being as far South as they are
from typical nesting locations, but you never know. I don't have access to
the latest Breeding Bird Atlas right now, but am interested to see how those
data compare to historic data on (rare) probable breeders in NYS. I'll keep
my eyes open again in the coming days and try to get a photo of that
individual while it is exhibiting nesting behavior.

*

 

Here's the run-down of notables from today:

 

2 Ruby-throated Hummingbirds

2 Least Flycatchers

1 Eastern Kingbird

3 Warbling Vireos

1 PHILADELPHIA VIREO

8-10+ RED-EYED VIREOS

1 Wood Thrush

 

30+ TENNESSEE WARBLERS

6-8 Yellow Warblers

8-10 CHESTNUT-SIDED WARBLERS

10-12 Magnolia Warblers

ZERO Cape May Warblers (absent from the Hawthorn Orchard so far
this year)

2 Yellow-rumped Warblers

4-6 BLACK-THROATED GREEN WARBLERS

4-6 BLACKBURNIAN WARBLERS

1 PINE WARBLER (Ravine edge)

6-8+ BAY-BREASTED WARBLERS

4-5 BLACKPOLL WARBLERS

2 Black-and-white Warblers

8-10 American Redstarts

1 Ovenbird

1 NORTHERN WATERTHRUSH (middle of Hawthorn Orchard)

1 MOURNING WARBLER (heard song only once, Northeast corner towards ravine)

8-10 Common Yellowthroats

4 CANADA WARBLERS (2 males Northeast corner, 1 male and 1 female far
Southwest corner)

 

2 Scarlet Tanagers

1 Chipping Sparrow

3-4 Song Sparrows

1 White-throated Sparrow (near fire hydrant - Northwest corner)

4-6 ROSE-BREASTED GROSEBEAKS

4-6 INDIGO BUNTINGS

1 Bobolink (flyover)

10-12 BALTIMORE ORIOLES (males, females, varying plumages, everywhere)

 

Good birding!

 

Sincerely,
Chris T-H

--

Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes

TARU Product Line Manager and Field Applications Engineer

Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology

159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850

W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 607-254-1132

http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp

 

 


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[cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard 8:15

2011-05-14 Thread Alberto Lopez
Swainsons Thrush among same Warblers as yesterday minus the Golden winged. 

Alberto Lopez
Chris Dalton 
Nancy Chen


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[cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard - 5/14/11 - TENNESSEE WARBLERS

2011-05-14 Thread Chris Tessaglia-Hymes
This morning, I hit the Hawthorn Orchard in East Ithaca around 6:30am and I
birded there quite thoroughly until about 11:30am. I was joined for a period
of time by Larry and Sara Jane Hymes and Stuart Krasnoff. Had the pleasure
of meeting some fellow birders while there today. I met Dana and Mamie Weed,
Jan Hesbon, Dave Streater, and Jenny Feng, plus saw a few whose names I
didn't get. Hope you all had a good day birding there!

 

The highlight today was the phenomenal number of TENNESSEE WARBLERS present
in and around the Hawthorn Orchard. A rough estimate would place the total
number of birds (males and females) at around 30-35 individuals! Another
highlight was the discovery of a GREEN HERON pair building a nest along the
West side of the Hawthorn Orchard.

 

The Hawthorn Orchard blossoms are beginning to open at the tree crowns.
Treetops that have been exposed to ample sunlight and warmth are clearly
showing signs of excellent insect growth. Toward the end of the morning, a
very large flock of Tennessee Warblers and other species were actively
engorging themselves on little tiny insect larvae, each being expertly
removed by these warblers from each hawthorn leaf cluster. This is a great
sign for the days to come.

 

Here's my rough list of birds for the day:

 

2 GREEN HERONS (nest building, West side)

1 Ruby-throated Hummingbird

2 Least Flycatchers

1 Great Crested Flycatcher

 

1 YELLOW-THROATED VIREO (single phrase heard)

1 Warbling Vireo (South knoll area, West of South ball field)

5-6+ Red-eyed Vireos (clearly migrants foraging in the Hawthorn Orchard)

1-2 SWAINSON'S THRUSHES (one foraging in the tops of the hawthorn trees on
the North side, another whisper-singing from middle of Hawthorn Orchard,
later)

1 WOOD THRUSH (apparently holding territory near SW corner of Hawthorn
Orchard)

 

30-35+ **TENNESSEE WARBLERS** (this is an all-time high for this location,
they were audibly singing and calling and visible everywhere you looked)

2-3 Nashville Warblers

5-6 Yellow Warblers

3-4 Chestnut-sided Warblers

12-15 Magnolia Warblers

2-3 BLACKBURNIAN WARBLERS (two at one location, one earlier in the morning)

3-5 BAY-BREASTED WARBLERS (two males at one location - singing, one female
at another, two males again later)

2-3 Blackpoll Warblers (singing softly, actively foraging)

3-4 American Redstarts

5-6 Common Yellowthroats (seemed less noticeable today)

1-2 WILSON'S WARBLERS (think this could have been the same bird circling
around the perimeter)

1 CANADA WARBLER (female - in the woods near the hydrant at the NW corner;
relocated two additional times, once there and once at the SSW side; very
mobile)

 

1 FIELD SPARROW (heard singing near South knoll)

1 SAVANNAH SPARROW (heard singing South of South ball field)

1-2 Rose-breasted Grosbeaks

6-7 INDIGO BUNTINGS (multiple singing males, 1 female, plus flyovers)

2-3 Eastern Meadowlarks (heard singing from field South of South ball field)

5-6 Baltimore Orioles

10-12 American Goldfinches

 

Good birding!

 

Sincerely,
Chris T-H

 

 

--

Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes

TARU Product Line Manager and Field Applications Engineer

Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology

159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850

W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 607-254-1132

http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp

 

 


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[cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard Friday

2011-05-13 Thread bob mcguire
I spent from 6:30 until 9:00 am in the Hawthorns this morning and ran  
into at least 9 other birders! The morning began quietly, with an  
occasional Tennessee Warbler song, a few yellows and yellowthroats. By  
7 - 7:30 the pace picked up markedly. There seemed to be Tennessee  
Warblers everywhere. Here are the highlights:


GOLDEN-WINGED WARBLER	 in the NE corner, foraging with a Magnolia  
Warbler and others on the edge of the ravine
BAY-BREASTED WARBLER: at least three in one group, and I heard reports  
of another group of 4 males and 1 female. NE corner

TENNESSEE WARBLER   X
Magnolia Warbler - at least 4, likely more
Chestnut-sided Warbler - at least 5
Blackburnian Warbler1
Wilson's Warbler1
Black and White Warbler 1
Canada Warbler  1
Black-throated Blue Warbler (female)1
American Redstart   X
Yellow Warbler  X
Common Yellowthroat X
YELLOW-BELLIED FLYCATCHER 	1  There were several Least Flycatchers  
present giving the chebeck call. The Yellow-bellied never vocalized,  
but several of us got good 			enough looks at it to confirm the ID.
YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOO  It first began calling from the north section of  
the orchard around 9 AM.


Bob McGuire







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[cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard - 5/13/11 (11 Warbler species - Lots of Tennessees - 2 Philly Vireos)

2011-05-13 Thread Chris Tessaglia-Hymes
This morning, I met up with Pete Marchetto, and together we slowly made one
round through the Hawthorn Orchard. Briefly ran into Kevin Ripka (good to
meet you!).With the winds and lack of sunlight early in the AM, the behavior
of birds was very different than the previous days.

 

The diversity was low, but the numbers had changed - with drops in some
species' numbers and significant rises in other species' numbers.

 

Here's the basic run-down of highlights for us from about 5:45am to 8:00am:

 

2 Ruby-throated Hummingbirds

2 Least Flycatchers

1 Great Crested Flycatcher

 

2 Warbling Vireos

2 PHILADELPHIA VIREOS (different plumage variations, one NE corner, one NW
corner)

ZERO Red-eyed Vireos

 

8-10 TENNESSEE WARBLERS (both vocal and non-vocal individuals throughout,
but mostly concentrated in the NW corner)

1 NASHVILLE WARBLER (these birds seemed to disappear overnight, unless they
appeared later in the morning, after we had departed)

10-12 Yellow Warblers

6-8+ CHESTNUT-SIDED WARBLERS (clearly multiple individuals in the NW corner
today)

6-8 Magnolia Warblers (concentrated in NW corner, but at least 2-3 in other
locations)

1 BLACK-THROATED BLUE WARBLER (female, NE corner)

1 BLACKBURNIAN WARBLER (male moved right through the NE corner and into the
maples and gone to NE)

ZERO Bay-breasted Warblers

1 BLACKPOLL WARBLER (NW corner)

1 Black-and-white Warbler (female mid-North side)

2-3 American Redstarts

ZERO Ovenbirds

1 possible heard Mourning Warbler (along West-East hedgerow from NE corner)

10-12 Common Yellowthroats

 

1 Scarlet Tanager (mid-North)

3-4 Rose-breasted Grosbeaks

1-2 Indigo Buntings (flyovers)

3-4 Baltimore Orioles

 

Good birding!

 

Sincerely,
Chris T-H

 

 

--

Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes

TARU Product Line Manager and Field Applications Engineer

Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology

159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850

W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 607-254-1132

http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp

 

 


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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard Friday

2011-05-13 Thread bob mcguire
There are two birds I need to add to this morning's Hawthorn list. All  
of the morning's birds were in the NE corner or along the northern  
edge of the Orchard. I never got out south into the tangle.


NASHVILLE WARBLER   2
BALCK-THROATED GREEN WARBLER	This guy was foraging in the flowering  
trees at the edge of the ravine. It was notable because he was singing  
both the primary and alternate songs in rapid succession. He sang  
continuously, for over 15 minutes, while foraging. And the song was  
muted, almost like a whisper song. At first I thought it was two  
birds, one singing each song.


Bob


On May 13, 2011, at 9:55 AM, bob mcguire wrote:

I spent from 6:30 until 9:00 am in the Hawthorns this morning and  
ran into at least 9 other birders! The morning began quietly, with  
an occasional Tennessee Warbler song, a few yellows and  
yellowthroats. By 7 - 7:30 the pace picked up markedly. There seemed  
to be Tennessee Warblers everywhere. Here are the highlights:


GOLDEN-WINGED WARBLER	 in the NE corner, foraging with a Magnolia  
Warbler and others on the edge of the ravine
BAY-BREASTED WARBLER: at least three in one group, and I heard  
reports of another group of 4 males and 1 female. NE corner

TENNESSEE WARBLER   X
Magnolia Warbler - at least 4, likely more
Chestnut-sided Warbler - at least 5
Blackburnian Warbler1
Wilson's Warbler1
Black and White Warbler 1
Canada Warbler  1
Black-throated Blue Warbler (female)1
American Redstart   X
Yellow Warbler  X
Common Yellowthroat X
YELLOW-BELLIED FLYCATCHER 	1  There were several Least Flycatchers  
present giving the chebeck call. The Yellow-bellied never  
vocalized, but several of us got good 			enough looks at it to  
confirm the ID.
YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOO  It first began calling from the north section  
of the orchard around 9 AM.


Bob McGuire







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[cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard - 5/12/2011 - 16 1/2 Warblers, Philly Vireo, Pewee, Swainson's Thrush

2011-05-12 Thread Chris Tessaglia-Hymes
Since I was up early this morning, I decided to head over to the Hawthorn
Orchard earlier than expected. I was there birding from 5:30am until 8:15am.

 

Highlights include: EASTERN WOOD-PEWEE, PHILADELPHIA VIREO, SWAINSON'S
THRUSH, BREWSTER'S WARBLER, BLACKPOLL WARBLER, WILSON'S WARBLER, and CANADA
WARBLER.

 

Here is the more complete list:

 

1 EASTERN WOOD-PEWEE (singing constantly from the South knoll area, West of
the South ball field)

2 Least Flycatchers

1 Eastern Phoebe

1 Great Crested Flycatcher

3 EASTERN KINGBIRDS (in migration moving ENE, similar in height to the
migrating Blue Jays)

 

2 Warbling Vireos

1 PHILADELPHIA VIREO (heard and then observed singing from the maples at the
NE corner of the Hawthorn Orchard)

2-3 Red-eyed Vireos

 

15+ Blue Jays (a few locals, several in migration)

6-8 House Wrens

1 SWAINSON'S THRUSH (whisper-singing in ravine area to North of Hawthorn
Orchard)

1 Wood Thrush (on territory in Western portion of the South knoll area)

15+ Gray Catbirds

12 Cedar Waxwings

 

1 BLUE-WINGED WARBLER (at NE corner of the South knoll by the streamlet)

1 BREWSTER'S WARBLER (Golden-winged/Blue-winged Hybrid along North edge of
Hawthorn Orchard, near the large Oak tree)

3 TENNESSEE WARBLERS (2 early that took flight from a tall willow tree to
the ENE, later 1 singing in West portion of the Hawthorn Orchard)

12-15 Nashville Warblers

1 Northern Parula (by Meena in cottonwoods of South knoll area)

10-12 Yellow Warblers

3-4 Chestnut-sided Warblers (also near cottonwoods early, then in NE corner
of Hawthorn Orchard)

3+ Magnolia Warblers

4 Yellow-rumped Warblers (in South knoll area early, then flew off to ENE)

1 BLACKBURNIAN WARBLER (in NE area of Hawthorn Orchard)

1 BLACKPOLL WARBLER (in NW area of Hawthorn Orchard)

3-4 American Redstarts

2-3 OVENBIRDS (1 in South knoll area, 2 in Northern section of Hawthorn
Orchard)

1 NORTHERN WATERTHRUSH (calling and singing from streamlet by South knoll)

12-15 Common Yellowthroats

1 WILSON'S WARBLER (working West along South hedgerow of maples at NE corner
of Hawthorn Orchard)

1 CANADA WARBLER (also working West along South hedgerow of maples, into NE
corner of Hawthorn Orchard)

 

3-4 Scarlet Tanagers (all briefly stopping through as they continued
terrestrial migration to ENE)

8-10+ Song Sparrows

4-5 White-throated Sparrows

3 White-crowned Sparrows (in hedgerow at NW corner of South ball field)

8-10 Northern Cardinals

2-3 Rose-breasted Grosbeaks

4-5+ INDIGO BUNTINGS (2 males in NE section of Hawthorn Orchard, the rest as
calling flyovers)

2-3 Bobolinks

4-5 Eastern Meadowlarks

4-5 Baltimore Orioles

1 Purple Finch

4-6 American Goldfinches

 

Good birding!


Sincerely,
Chris T-H

 

--

Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes

TARU Product Line Manager and Field Applications Engineer

Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology

159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850

W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 607-254-1132

http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp

 

 


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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard - 5/12/2011 - 16 1/2 Warblers, Philly Vireo, Pewee, Swainson's Thrush

2011-05-12 Thread Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
After reviewing my pictures, I realized that I forgot to mention a couple of 
birds: two, grunting, Common Mergansers that were circling over the Hawthorn 
Orchard in the pre-dawn twilight, and I had flushed two Green Herons that had 
been roosting in the Hawthorn Orchard. The Green Herons had been roosting in 
the Western middle portion of the Hawthorn Orchard. This is the same location 
where I suspect the group of Green Herons arose from yesterday. Some crummy 
shots of some of my sightings from today are at this link (after the White-eyed 
Vireo):

https://picasaweb.google.com/cth4th/2011HawthornOrchardBirds#

Good birding!

Sincerely,
Chris T-H


On May 12, 2011, at 9:57 AM, Chris Tessaglia-Hymes wrote:

Since I was up early this morning, I decided to head over to the Hawthorn 
Orchard earlier than expected. I was there birding from 5:30am until 8:15am.

Highlights include: EASTERN WOOD-PEWEE, PHILADELPHIA VIREO, SWAINSON’S THRUSH, 
BREWSTER’S WARBLER, BLACKPOLL WARBLER, WILSON’S WARBLER, and CANADA WARBLER.

Here is the more complete list:

1 EASTERN WOOD-PEWEE (singing constantly from the South knoll area, West of the 
South ball field)
2 Least Flycatchers
1 Eastern Phoebe
1 Great Crested Flycatcher
3 EASTERN KINGBIRDS (in migration moving ENE, similar in height to the 
migrating Blue Jays)

2 Warbling Vireos
1 PHILADELPHIA VIREO (heard and then observed singing from the maples at the NE 
corner of the Hawthorn Orchard)
2-3 Red-eyed Vireos

15+ Blue Jays (a few locals, several in migration)
6-8 House Wrens
1 SWAINSON’S THRUSH (whisper-singing in ravine area to North of Hawthorn 
Orchard)
1 Wood Thrush (on territory in Western portion of the South knoll area)
15+ Gray Catbirds
12 Cedar Waxwings

1 BLUE-WINGED WARBLER (at NE corner of the South knoll by the streamlet)
1 BREWSTER’S WARBLER (Golden-winged/Blue-winged Hybrid along North edge of 
Hawthorn Orchard, near the large Oak tree)
3 TENNESSEE WARBLERS (2 early that took flight from a tall willow tree to the 
ENE, later 1 singing in West portion of the Hawthorn Orchard)
12-15 Nashville Warblers
1 Northern Parula (by Meena in cottonwoods of South knoll area)
10-12 Yellow Warblers
3-4 Chestnut-sided Warblers (also near cottonwoods early, then in NE corner of 
Hawthorn Orchard)
3+ Magnolia Warblers
4 Yellow-rumped Warblers (in South knoll area early, then flew off to ENE)
1 BLACKBURNIAN WARBLER (in NE area of Hawthorn Orchard)
1 BLACKPOLL WARBLER (in NW area of Hawthorn Orchard)
3-4 American Redstarts
2-3 OVENBIRDS (1 in South knoll area, 2 in Northern section of Hawthorn Orchard)
1 NORTHERN WATERTHRUSH (calling and singing from streamlet by South knoll)
12-15 Common Yellowthroats
1 WILSON’S WARBLER (working West along South hedgerow of maples at NE corner of 
Hawthorn Orchard)
1 CANADA WARBLER (also working West along South hedgerow of maples, into NE 
corner of Hawthorn Orchard)

3-4 Scarlet Tanagers (all briefly stopping through as they continued 
terrestrial migration to ENE)
8-10+ Song Sparrows
4-5 White-throated Sparrows
3 White-crowned Sparrows (in hedgerow at NW corner of South ball field)
8-10 Northern Cardinals
2-3 Rose-breasted Grosbeaks
4-5+ INDIGO BUNTINGS (2 males in NE section of Hawthorn Orchard, the rest as 
calling flyovers)
2-3 Bobolinks
4-5 Eastern Meadowlarks
4-5 Baltimore Orioles
1 Purple Finch
4-6 American Goldfinches

Good birding!

Sincerely,
Chris T-H

--
Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
TARU Product Line Manager and Field Applications Engineer
Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 607-254-1132
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp


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Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
TARU Product Line Manager and Field Applications Engineer
Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 607-254-1132
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp


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