[cayugabirds-l] Evening birds

2021-06-29 Thread Donna Lee Scott
Yesterday evening was graced by the songs of 3 Wood Thrush, 3 Carolina Wrens 
(1-2 babies), a Brown Thrasher, a Scarlet Tanager,
 x Baltimore Orioles, 2 Robins, 1 Red-eyed Vireo, at least 2 Catbirds, along 
with a glorious scarlet-sun sunset!

Donna Scott
Lansing
Sent from my iPhone

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


[cayugabirds-l] Evening birds

2021-06-09 Thread Donna Lee Scott
Birds before dusk last night included 5 Cedar Waxwings eating cherries, 2 Wood 
Thrush singing, 3 cowbirds, a Gray Catbird, 2 Cardinals, 2 B Orioles, a 
Yellow-billed Cuckoo, a Belted Kingfisher, & 2 Ospreys.

Ospreys flew east from the lake; one was carrying a skinny fish; this O was 
still shaking the water from its feathers, so had a rather uneven , bouncy 
flight for a minute!
The Os continued east over treetops & out of sight.
I wondered where they were headed.
Nearest nest tower is at entrance to power plant, about 1 -2 miles away.

Donna Scott
Lansing
Sent from my iPhone

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


[cayugabirds-l] Backyard birds

2021-05-22 Thread Donna Lee Scott
Eastern Wood Peewee, FOY
Red-eyed Vireo, FOY
Brown Thrasher
All singing.
Only Thrasher was seen.

Donna Scott
Lansing
Sent from my iPhone

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


[cayugabirds-l] Yard birds

2021-05-19 Thread Donna Lee Scott
FOY in my yard this morning-
Magnolia Warbler, foraging in pear tree blossoms;
Then, later,  as I was searching on high for the singing foy-yard Scarlet 
Tanager,
a foy-yard  Black-billed Cuckoo ‘coo-coo-ed’ from opposite end of yard!
It flew before I got on it; then I saw it zoom past again over RR track!

Meanwhile, the now regular ‘feeder/singing’ birds Orioles (B) , Rose-breasted 
Grosbeaks, & Gray Catbirds abound. Saw one Catbird carrying a long weed stem 
for probable nest.

Wood Thrush still singing in woods across road!

Donna Scott
Lansing
Sent from my iPhone

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


[cayugabirds-l] Woods birds

2021-05-11 Thread Donna Lee Scott
Heard and saw both a black and white warbler and “my” wood thrush in my woods 
this morning.

Donna Scott
Lansing
Sent from my iPhone

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


[cayugabirds-l] Evening birds

2021-05-08 Thread Donna Lee Scott
I was so lucky to see 2 beautiful Indigo Buntings nestled in thick Redbud 
blossoms in my front yard! What a color combo!

Then half an hour later, I saw 3 Orioles in the pretty, large, pinky-white 
Japonica bush blossoms
 - 1 adult male Orchard & 1 - 1st-year male Orchard, & a female Baltimore!
Lots of Baltimores here, all around.

No wonder all the grape jelly was gone when I got home after the Salt Point 
work party.
Gray Catbirds are eating it, too.
Time to buy a case.

Donna Scott
Lansing
Sent from my iPhone

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


[cayugabirds-l] FOY birds

2021-04-29 Thread Leigh Stivers
Thursday morning FOY birds : catbird, house wren, and blue-winged warbler!
Very birdy before the rain!

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

[cayugabirds-l] feeder birds

2021-04-06 Thread Colleen Richards
We have multiple feeders outside our kitchen windows, including a 1' x 2' 
windowsill extension platform. In the past hour, chickadees, junco, cardinals, 
song and fox sparrows, blue jay, mourning doves, white-breasted nuthatch, and a 
male red-winged blackbird have all sat just outside my window to eat. The 
goldfinches, house finches, starling, downy, and robin prefer the other feeders 
or mealworms on the ground. Colleen Richards 


Choose to be safer online.
Opt-in to Cyber Safety with NortonLifeLock.
Plans starting as low as $6.95 per month.*
https://store.netzero.net/account/showService.do?serviceId=nz-nLifeLock_source=mktg_medium=taglines_campaign=nzlifelk_launch_content=tag995=A23457

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

[cayugabirds-l] Lake birds/Lansing

2021-04-03 Thread Donna Lee Scott
For a weekend, It’s calm and quiet on the lake as I eat my lunch on my boat 
house deck.
 8 Common Loons have been ranged out around in front of me all the way over to 
the west shore. 2 more to the north, probably more.
I got to see one pattering on the water to take off and fly north -something 
you don’t see every day!

A pair each of Red- breasted & Common Mergansers, with a Kingfisher zipping 
back & forth.

A few Ring-billed gulls waiting to see if they can steal a goodie from the 
divers. Several Robins, Grackles & Red-winged Blackbirds on shore, too.
Grackles exploring the docks on top & underneath.
Meanwhile, up at the house, I have a whole herd of cowbirds!

Donna Scott
Lansing
Sent from my iPhone

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


RE: [cayugabirds-l] Female birds that sing

2021-03-12 Thread Mona Bearor
Thank you, I’ll pass your comments on to the local birders here in VA.
Mona
 
From: Jay McGowan [mailto:jw...@cornell.edu] 
Sent: Friday, March 12, 2021 10:23 AM
To: Mona Bearor 
Cc: CAYUGABIRDS-L 
Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Female birds that sing
 
Hi Mona,
Being conservative about that assumption is probably wise. It is worth noting 
that in eBird, the breeding code "S" has been changed to "Singing bird" to 
reflect our changing understanding of this behavior. If you're not seeing that, 
you may need to update your app.
 
Cheers,
Jay
 
On Fri, Mar 12, 2021 at 10:14 AM Mona Bearor mailto:conservebi...@gmail.com> > wrote:
I am wondering if there is a definitive list of North American bird species 
that have singing females.  If I can identify a singing bird by the song but 
don't see it I tend to think it is a male and in the past have reported it as 
such to eBird, with the exception of Northern Cardinal, I know the females 
cardinals will sing. I have seen the spreadsheet found at 
http://femalebirdsong.org/ but would be happy to find a list that did not 
require searching through almost 1200 species.  Anyone know of such a list?  
For now I am going to stop reporting any singing birds as male unless I see 
them sing and can positively ID sex of the bird.  I suspect others are having 
this problem as well and it does affect the reporting of breeding codes as all 
singing birds would have to be seen and sexed to report “singing male.”  Any 
thoughts?
 
Mona Bearor
Stuart’s Draft Hwy, Staunton, Virginia
 
 
--
Cayugabirds-L List Info:
 <http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME> Welcome and Basics
 <http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES> Rules and Information
 <http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm> 
Subscribe, Configuration and Leave
Archives:
 <http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html> The Mail 
Archive
 <http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds> Surfbirds
 <http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html> BirdingOnThe.Net
Please submit your observations to eBird <http://ebird.org/content/ebird/> !
--


 
-- 
Jay McGowan
Macaulay Library
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
jw...@cornell.edu <mailto:jw...@cornell.edu> 

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

Re: [cayugabirds-l] Female birds that sing

2021-03-12 Thread Jay McGowan
Hi Mona,
Being conservative about that assumption is probably wise. It is worth
noting that in eBird, the breeding code "S" has been changed to "Singing
bird" to reflect our changing understanding of this behavior. If you're not
seeing that, you may need to update your app.

Cheers,
Jay

On Fri, Mar 12, 2021 at 10:14 AM Mona Bearor 
wrote:

> I am wondering if there is a definitive list of North American bird
> species that have singing females.  If I can identify a singing bird by
> the song but don't see it I tend to think it is a male and in the past have
> reported it as such to eBird, with the exception of Northern Cardinal, I
> know the females cardinals will sing. I have seen the spreadsheet found at
> http://femalebirdsong.org/ but would be happy to find a list that did not
> require searching through almost 1200 species.  Anyone know of such a
> list?  For now I am going to stop reporting any singing birds as male
> unless I see them sing and can positively ID sex of the bird.  I suspect
> others are having this problem as well and it does affect the reporting of
> breeding codes as all singing birds would have to be seen and sexed to
> report “singing male.”  Any thoughts?
>
>
>
> Mona Bearor
>
> Stuart’s Draft Hwy, Staunton, Virginia
>
>
>
>
> --
> *Cayugabirds-L List Info:*
> Welcome and Basics 
> Rules and Information 
> Subscribe, Configuration and Leave
> 
> *Archives:*
> The Mail Archive
> 
> Surfbirds 
> BirdingOnThe.Net 
> *Please submit your observations to eBird
> !*
> --
>


-- 
Jay McGowan
Macaulay Library
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
jw...@cornell.edu

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

[cayugabirds-l] Female birds that sing

2021-03-12 Thread Mona Bearor
I am wondering if there is a definitive list of North American bird species
that have singing females.  If I can identify a singing bird by the song but
don't see it I tend to think it is a male and in the past have reported it
as such to eBird, with the exception of Northern Cardinal, I know the
females cardinals will sing. I have seen the spreadsheet found at
http://femalebirdsong.org/ but would be happy to find a list that did not
require searching through almost 1200 species.  Anyone know of such a list?
For now I am going to stop reporting any singing birds as male unless I see
them sing and can positively ID sex of the bird.  I suspect others are
having this problem as well and it does affect the reporting of breeding
codes as all singing birds would have to be seen and sexed to report
"singing male."  Any thoughts?
 
Mona Bearor
Stuart's Draft Hwy, Staunton, Virginia
 
 

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

Re: [cayugabirds-l] No Birds

2021-02-23 Thread Paul Schmitt
I agree with Marie and add that sometimes they find something better-
less wind exposure or richer food.My hummingbirds disappear for about 8
to 10 days each summer and I figure there is a temporary food source they
prefer.  The squirrels disappeared from the feeders here for about 5 days,
and then were back.

Paul Schmitt

On Tue, Feb 23, 2021 at 6:28 PM Marie P. Read  wrote:

> My bet would be the weather. Yesterday was cold and windy...birds are more
> hungry in those circumstances.
> Today it's much milder.
>
> Marie
>
> Marie Read Wildlife Photography
> 452 Ringwood Road
> Freeville NY  13068 USA
>
> e-mail   m...@cornell.edu
> Website: http://www.marieread.com
> AUTHOR of:
> Mastering Bird Photography: The Art, Craft, and Technique of Photographing
> Birds and Their Behavior
>
> https://rockynook.com/shop/photography/mastering-bird-photography/?REF=101/
>
>
> On Tue, Feb 23, 2021 at 5:24 PM Carl Steckler 
> wrote:
>
> Yesterday there were dozens of birds at my feeders. So many that I had to
> refill the seed cake feeders.
>
> Today I have not seen any birds at all.
>
> Very strange , any one have any ideas?
> Carl
> --
>
> --
> *Cayugabirds-L List Info:*
> Welcome and Basics 
> Rules and Information 
> Subscribe, Configuration and Leave
> 
> *Archives:*
> The Mail Archive
> 
> Surfbirds 
> BirdingOnThe.Net 
> *Please submit your observations to eBird
> !*
> --
>

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

Re: [cayugabirds-l] No Birds

2021-02-23 Thread Marie P. Read
My bet would be the weather. Yesterday was cold and windy...birds are more 
hungry in those circumstances.
Today it's much milder.

Marie

Marie Read Wildlife Photography
452 Ringwood Road
Freeville NY  13068 USA

e-mail   m...@cornell.edu
Website: http://www.marieread.com
AUTHOR of:
Mastering Bird Photography: The Art, Craft, and Technique of Photographing 
Birds and Their Behavior

https://rockynook.com/shop/photography/mastering-bird-photography/?REF=101/


On Tue, Feb 23, 2021 at 5:24 PM Carl Steckler 
mailto:simmshil...@gmail.com>> wrote:
Yesterday there were dozens of birds at my feeders. So many that I had to 
refill the seed cake feeders.

Today I have not seen any birds at all.

Very strange , any one have any ideas?
Carl
--


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

Re: [cayugabirds-l] No Birds

2021-02-23 Thread Todd Beeton
After a couple of weeks of nonstop action out at my feeders (I'm in Geneva)
it's been more than a week without a single bird. The high activity of
mostly sparrows, chickadees and a couple woodpeckers and nuthatches at my
feeders corresponded with flocks of robins and starlings that took over my
neighborhood thanks to some nearby berry trees. But they did all seem to
leave at once. I've changed the seed as well as the location of my suet
feeder, to no avail. The squirrels are quite content not to have the
competition. But I am similarly puzzled.

On Tue, Feb 23, 2021 at 5:24 PM Carl Steckler  wrote:

> Yesterday there were dozens of birds at my feeders. So many that I had to
> refill the seed cake feeders.
>
> Today I have not seen any birds at all.
>
> Very strange , any one have any ideas?
> Carl
> --
> *Cayugabirds-L List Info:*
> Welcome and Basics 
> Rules and Information 
> Subscribe, Configuration and Leave
> 
> *Archives:*
> The Mail Archive
> 
> Surfbirds 
> BirdingOnThe.Net 
> *Please submit your observations to eBird
> !*
> --
>


-- 
Todd Beeton
323-440-3350 (m)

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

[cayugabirds-l] No Birds

2021-02-23 Thread Carl Steckler
Yesterday there were dozens of birds at my feeders. So many that I had to
refill the seed cake feeders.

Today I have not seen any birds at all.

Very strange , any one have any ideas?
Carl

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

Re: [cayugabirds-l] Dead birds under the thistle feeder

2021-02-22 Thread Brad Walker
If you do find dead birds like this (if they're fresh and not freeze-dried
or damaged) you can store them in your freezer in plastic bag so they can
be donated to the Cornell Museum of Vertebrates the Cornell Lab of
Ornithology (when they eventually are open for the public again). I'm not
sure if there's any system in place currently for accepting specimens. If
you decide to store one, you should put a little slip of paper in the bag
that says the date, location, and how the bird died (or how you found it).
You don't have to worry about identifying the bird if you don't know what
it is. And freezer bags are always better, since they're made for keeping
things safe in a freezer.

--Brad

On Mon, Feb 22, 2021 at 10:29 AM Donna Lee Scott  wrote:

> Over a month ago, I found one dead Siskin under my backyard feeders.
> 16 others seemed fine & later moved on to somewhere else.
>
> Donna Scott
> Lansing
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> On Feb 22, 2021, at 9:56 AM, Wesley M. Hochachka  wrote:
>
> If the dead birds were siskins, redpolls, or goldfinches, my first
> reaction is that the birds died from salmonellosis, and potentially you
> might have observed these birds sitting motionless and incredibly puffed up
> near the bird feeder at some point before you found the dead bird on the
> ground.
>
> Salmonellosis outbreaks, which particularly hit siskins and redpolls, are
> an unfortunately predictable corollary of irruptions of these species.
> Taking down your thistle feeder to disperse the birds might reduce further
> transmission, but it's hard to tell because the birds could just start
> congregating (maybe in larger numbers) at some other bird feeder in the
> area.
>
> Wesley Hochachka
>
>
>
>
> -Original Message-
> From: bounce-125406737-3494...@list.cornell.edu <
> bounce-125406737-3494...@list.cornell.edu> On Behalf Of Patrizia Sione
> Sent: Monday, February 22, 2021 9:30 AM
> To: CAYUGABIRDS-L 
> Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Dead birds under the thistle feeder
>
> Hello all,
>
> In the course of the past 10 days, we have discovered a dead bird under a
> feeder in three separate occasions, the latest this morning.  No apparent
> injury.  The thistle is fresh (it goes pretty quickly) and we keep the
> feeders clean and sanitized. We called the Cornell hospital but they did
> not accept our request to have a necropsy conducted on the birds (we kept
> two of them in a sealed freezer bag  outside).  We have decals and nets
> outside our windows to prevent birds from hitting them.
>
> Any ideas about what could be causing this and how to prevent it from
> happening again?  It is the first time it has ever happened to us in the 10
> years we’ve lived in our present location, and all this time we’ve fed
> birds.
>
> Many thanks,
> Patrizia Sione
>
>
>
> --
>
> Cayugabirds-L List Info:
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm
>
> ARCHIVES:
> 1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
> 2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
> 3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html
>
> Please submit your observations to eBird:
> http://ebird.org/content/ebird/
>
> --
>
> --
>
> Cayugabirds-L List Info:
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm
>
> ARCHIVES:
> 1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
> 2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
> 3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html
>
> Please submit your observations to eBird:
> http://ebird.org/content/ebird/
>
> --
>
> --
> *Cayugabirds-L List Info:*
> Welcome and Basics <http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME>
> Rules and Information <http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES>
> Subscribe, Configuration and Leave
> <http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm>
> *Archives:*
> The Mail Archive
> <http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html>
> Surfbirds <http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds>
> BirdingOnThe.Net <http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html>
> *Please submit your observations to eBird
> <http://ebird.org/content/ebird/>!*
> --
>

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

Re: [cayugabirds-l] Dead birds under the thistle feeder

2021-02-22 Thread Donna Lee Scott
Over a month ago, I found one dead Siskin under my backyard feeders.
16 others seemed fine & later moved on to somewhere else.

Donna Scott
Lansing
Sent from my iPhone

On Feb 22, 2021, at 9:56 AM, Wesley M. Hochachka 
mailto:w...@cornell.edu>> wrote:

If the dead birds were siskins, redpolls, or goldfinches, my first reaction is 
that the birds died from salmonellosis, and potentially you might have observed 
these birds sitting motionless and incredibly puffed up near the bird feeder at 
some point before you found the dead bird on the ground.

Salmonellosis outbreaks, which particularly hit siskins and redpolls, are an 
unfortunately predictable corollary of irruptions of these species.  Taking 
down your thistle feeder to disperse the birds might reduce further 
transmission, but it's hard to tell because the birds could just start 
congregating (maybe in larger numbers) at some other bird feeder in the area.

Wesley Hochachka




-Original Message-
From: 
bounce-125406737-3494...@list.cornell.edu<mailto:bounce-125406737-3494...@list.cornell.edu>
 
mailto:bounce-125406737-3494...@list.cornell.edu>>
 On Behalf Of Patrizia Sione
Sent: Monday, February 22, 2021 9:30 AM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L 
mailto:cayugabird...@list.cornell.edu>>
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Dead birds under the thistle feeder

Hello all,

In the course of the past 10 days, we have discovered a dead bird under a 
feeder in three separate occasions, the latest this morning.  No apparent 
injury.  The thistle is fresh (it goes pretty quickly) and we keep the feeders 
clean and sanitized. We called the Cornell hospital but they did not accept our 
request to have a necropsy conducted on the birds (we kept two of them in a 
sealed freezer bag  outside).  We have decals and nets outside our windows to 
prevent birds from hitting them.

Any ideas about what could be causing this and how to prevent it from happening 
again?  It is the first time it has ever happened to us in the 10 years we’ve 
lived in our present location, and all this time we’ve fed birds.

Many thanks,
Patrizia Sione



--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


RE:[cayugabirds-l] Dead birds under the thistle feeder

2021-02-22 Thread Wesley M. Hochachka
If the dead birds were siskins, redpolls, or goldfinches, my first reaction is 
that the birds died from salmonellosis, and potentially you might have observed 
these birds sitting motionless and incredibly puffed up near the bird feeder at 
some point before you found the dead bird on the ground.

Salmonellosis outbreaks, which particularly hit siskins and redpolls, are an 
unfortunately predictable corollary of irruptions of these species.  Taking 
down your thistle feeder to disperse the birds might reduce further 
transmission, but it's hard to tell because the birds could just start 
congregating (maybe in larger numbers) at some other bird feeder in the area.

Wesley Hochachka




-Original Message-
From: bounce-125406737-3494...@list.cornell.edu 
 On Behalf Of Patrizia Sione
Sent: Monday, February 22, 2021 9:30 AM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L 
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Dead birds under the thistle feeder

Hello all,

In the course of the past 10 days, we have discovered a dead bird under a 
feeder in three separate occasions, the latest this morning.  No apparent 
injury.  The thistle is fresh (it goes pretty quickly) and we keep the feeders 
clean and sanitized. We called the Cornell hospital but they did not accept our 
request to have a necropsy conducted on the birds (we kept two of them in a 
sealed freezer bag  outside).  We have decals and nets outside our windows to 
prevent birds from hitting them.  

Any ideas about what could be causing this and how to prevent it from happening 
again?  It is the first time it has ever happened to us in the 10 years we’ve 
lived in our present location, and all this time we’ve fed birds.

Many thanks,
Patrizia Sione



--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

Re: [cayugabirds-l] Dead birds under the thistle feeder

2021-02-22 Thread Michael Ludgate
There have some been problems with pesticides in birdfeed in the past
https://www.audubon.org/news/pesticides-bird-seed-scotts-miracle-gro-fined-125-million

Cheers,
-Mike :-)

*Michael Ludgate*
canaaninstitute.org 
607.227.0090 (c)

Quarantine photos; mostly from near our home https://adobe.ly/3fLCiU3



On Mon, Feb 22, 2021 at 9:30 AM Patrizia Sione  wrote:

> Hello all,
>
> In the course of the past 10 days, we have discovered a dead bird under a
> feeder in three separate occasions, the latest this morning.  No apparent
> injury.  The thistle is fresh (it goes pretty quickly) and we keep the
> feeders clean and sanitized. We called the Cornell hospital but they did
> not accept our request to have a necropsy conducted on the birds (we kept
> two of them in a sealed freezer bag  outside).  We have decals and nets
> outside our windows to prevent birds from hitting them.
>
> Any ideas about what could be causing this and how to prevent it from
> happening again?  It is the first time it has ever happened to us in the 10
> years we’ve lived in our present location, and all this time we’ve fed
> birds.
>
> Many thanks,
> Patrizia Sione
>
>
>
> --
>
> Cayugabirds-L List Info:
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm
>
> ARCHIVES:
> 1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
> 2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
> 3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html
>
> Please submit your observations to eBird:
> http://ebird.org/content/ebird/
>
> --

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

[cayugabirds-l] Dead birds under the thistle feeder

2021-02-22 Thread Patrizia Sione
Hello all,

In the course of the past 10 days, we have discovered a dead bird under a 
feeder in three separate occasions, the latest this morning.  No apparent 
injury.  The thistle is fresh (it goes pretty quickly) and we keep the feeders 
clean and sanitized. We called the Cornell hospital but they did not accept our 
request to have a necropsy conducted on the birds (we kept two of them in a 
sealed freezer bag  outside).  We have decals and nets outside our windows to 
prevent birds from hitting them.  

Any ideas about what could be causing this and how to prevent it from happening 
again?  It is the first time it has ever happened to us in the 10 years we’ve 
lived in our present location, and all this time we’ve fed birds.

Many thanks,
Patrizia Sione



--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

[cayugabirds-l] Field Birds

2021-02-08 Thread Suan Hsi Yong
With the sunny weather I decided to take the afternoon off and drive
around north of Lansing looking for field birds. With the high snow
depth they were pretty easy to encounter, foraging by roadsides and
flushing on approach. Those wanting to look for them, just drive
slowly along any of the less-traveled roads between big fields.

I stopped to photograph three main groups with different dynamics. The
first had about a dozen each of Horned Larks and Snow Buntings, and
they tended to hang out with their own species but loosely associated
with each other. This was somewhere along Conlon Road, I think (I need
to take better mental notes). Also had a Common Redpoll flock of about
a dozen somewhere here. The second group along Indian Field Road just
north of 90 was smaller, about a dozen Horned Larks with 3-4 Snow
Buntings and two Lapland Longspurs (lifers for me, actually). I'm
guessing because the Snow Bunting number was smaller, the group tended
to stay together more as one group. Before I left a lone Common
Redpoll also joined this group. The third group was a very large flock
of 100+ snow buntings around Fennel and Snushal Roads, big enough to
murmurate like starlings.

An interesting observation was that the smaller groups were more
approachable than the large flock. The common redpoll flock was most
approachable, while the smaller field bird flocks were a close second.
I'm guessing that the flushing dynamic of these flocks relates to a
single individual sounding an alarm that triggers the flush, and that
the large flock was more likely to have the one jumpy individual to
sound the alarm to trigger the flock to flush, but this is just
conjecture. Also, flushing behavior on foot vs. by car was noticeably
different: on foot they tended to fly farther away while in the car
they seemed to only flush a shorter distance. When the birds were
backlit I actually had trouble driving to the other side of the flock,
as I just kept pushing them down the road bit by bit -- I might have
had better luck if I drove by fast.

Finally, at Salt Point I flushed a/the continuing Killdeer from the beach.

Suan

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


[cayugabirds-l] lakeshore birds

2021-02-04 Thread Linda Post Van Buskirk
>From Rt 90, just north of Aurora

A good flock of mostly redheads; I was very pleased to see quite a few 
canvasbacks, some scaup, and some little ones that were obscured by the trees.  
An adult eagle few over.  Several minutes later, my collie alerted me to two 
immature eagles perched on the lakeshore trees.  The flock soon flew north.  
I'm assuming that the immatures were progeny of the pair that nests at Paine's 
Creek.

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

[cayugabirds-l] Winter Birds and Winter Birding

2020-12-29 Thread Mike Powers
Hi everyone,

I set out with a couple of friends to look for some of the rarities that
have been recently reported. In spite of this being 2020, coupled with
the brutal combination of freezing temps and steady breeze, we happily
found all of our target birds for the day.

On our way out of Watkins Glen we stopped by Fitzgerald Road where we found
approximately 250 COMMON REDPOLLS moving quickly (and constantly) through a
weedy field. The entire time we were searching there were two ROUGH-LEGGED
HAWKS circling, then occasionally perching but never long enough for us to
put a scope on them.

We arrived at the stone quarry on Hoster Road at 9:15 and as we were
getting out of our cars we spotted the GYRFALCON flying from the quarry to
the east. It spent a few minutes flying/soaring above the open field,
during that time we didn't dare lower our binoculars so no photos of this
gorgeous bird before it disappeared behind the treeline towards Seybolt
road. We were unable to refind it, but during our search we did come across
a BALD EAGLE, ROUGH-LEGGED and RED-TAILED HAWKS, and perhaps the most
surprising bird of the trip, a KILLDEER along Stahl Road.

Deciding to press our luck, we headed to Martin Road and found the SNOWY
OWL along the runway where others have reported it: near Winsock B,
hunkered down in the wind, looking like a white gallon jug that
occasionally blinked and turned its head.  We went into the airport's
parking lot for a slightly better, but at least closer view.

We didn't find much in the way of waterfowl on our trip down the west side
of Cayuga Lake, nor at our final stop at Clute Park in Watkins Glen.

A sincere thank you to everyone who has posted about their hits or misses,
and especially to those that helped me nail down specific details about how
to best approach finding these elusive birds. It turns out the third time
visiting Hoster Road was the charm for me . . . this was a great way to end
2020!

Cheers,
Mike

--
Mike Powers
Horseheads, NY

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

[cayugabirds-l] Montezuma birds this morning

2020-12-02 Thread Johnson, Alyssa
Hello all,

It was a very cold and blustery morning, but had good birding. Here are a few 
notes about my trip:

-I did not see any cranes at the Sandhill Crane Unit on Van Dyne Spoor Rd. Many 
ducks out in the distance! Hard to see with the snow. White-crowned sparrows 
were making some noise on the north side of the road (DEC). And lastly, an 
American Kestral on the power lines.

-Next, Knox Marsellus Marsh. At first I did not see any cranes on East Rd, and 
thought maybe they booked south with this cold and snow. But as I was getting 
out of my car, I heard them and about 100 flew in from a cornfield southwest of 
the road. Kind of behind those solar panels, if you're familiar with the area. 
They flew to Puddler Marsh, and I lost them in the tall vegetation. Also at 
this spot, had a Common Loon fly over! Definitely was not expecting that, I 
thought it was a Double-crested Cormorant at first.

-The refuge visitor center pool was where the action was at. We pulled in and 
counted 52 Sandhill Cranes right there in front. It was so cool! A Northern 
Harrier popped up too and gave a show in the wind. Right as we were leaving, a 
subadult Bald Eagle flew in pretty low, circled, kicked up some ducks, and went 
on it's way. We could hear and see swans deep in the Main Pool, but not well 
enough to ID or count.

The Wildlife Drive is now closed for the season. Andrea at the refuge put 
together a great FB post about what's open and what's not right now at 
Montezuma NWR. Here's the link to that: 
https://www.facebook.com/MontezumaNWR/photos/a.108438664332776/168733634969945/

Stay safe, healthy, and warm!

Alyssa

-
--
Alyssa Johnson
Environmental Educator
315.365.3588

Montezuma Audubon Center
PO Box 187
2295 State Route 89
Savannah, NY 13146
Montezuma.audubon.org


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

[cayugabirds-l] Yard birds

2020-10-31 Thread Carol Keeler
I got a rarity to my yard this morning- a fox sparrow!  I’m still getting one 
White Throat.  I have been getting a few Pine Siskins.  No Evening Grosbeaks 
yet.  I’m lucky to get any birds here with the roofers here many days.  They 
finished yesterday so maybe those Grosbeaks will finally show up.  I’m pleased 
to get the Fox Sparrow.

Sent from my iPad

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--



[cayugabirds-l] Neat birds at Stewart Park

2020-08-22 Thread Jody Enck
Hi All,
After a fun and productive morning birding out at Lindsay-Parson's Nature
Preserve (Coleman Lake has some of the best shorebird habitat in the county
right now), I stopped by Stewart Park around noon.  Lots of people and hot,
but some fun birds, too.  The Blue-winged Teal reported a couple days ago
by Jay McGowan was with the Mallards off-shore on the east side.  While
scoping through the ducks and gulls over there, I was slightly surprised to
spy 2 Pied-billed Grebes.  A couple of Spotted Sandpipers and a single
Least Sandpiper were along the shoreline down closer to the Boat House.
Among the willow branches at the waterline across Fall Creek from the Boat
House, I found a gorgeous, immature Black-crowned Night-heron.

I saw 40 species at Lindsay-Parsons, and I missed probably 5-6 species seen
by 3 other Cayuga Bird Club members who I ran into out there.

August is a great month to go birding.  Arguably, more birds now than at
any other time of year because of all the successful breeding.  Plus, lots
of post-breeding movements of birds into places where they can find food.
Fall migration is definitely underway for some species, especially
shorebirds.  I did not know that Coleman Lake had been partially drained to
repair the dike at the outlet.  Lots of good shorebird habitat there.  I
saw a pretty big number of Solitary Sandpipers, along with Spotted
Sandpipers, Killdeer, and a couple flocks of Least Sandpipers.

Go birding!



Jody W. Enck, PhD
Conservation Social Scientist, and
Founder of the Sister Bird Club Network
607-379-5940

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

[cayugabirds-l] Florida birds in NY

2020-08-09 Thread Donna Lee Scott
Hi Cayuga birders-

Wow, in a day & a 1/2 we have 3 different sp. of birds around here in NY that I 
last saw in South Florida in early March 2020 -
Imm. Little Blue Heron,
Black Vulture (they were trying to eat the black rubber off all the cars in the 
parking lot at the Everglades!),

& Swallow-tailed Kites (1 of which was seen sitting on a log near the surf on 
beach at Captiva Island in late Feb. Right after its rest in log, I saw it fly 
towards mainland.
 I guessed that it might have just flown in from across the Gulf of Mexico on 
its migration, which was happening right then, & found this big log to rest on!
I don’t ever see them at the beach in Fla, plus at this manicured beach, washed 
up trees are usually quickly taken away)!

Donna Scott
Lansing
Sent from my iPhone

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


[cayugabirds-l] Morning birds/bear

2020-06-21 Thread Donna Lee Scott
Scarlet tanager singing unseen in a tree. Rose breasted grosbeak, lots of B 
Orioles, (3 nests that I know of) here.
for the first time I remember, a juvenile gray-headed Red bellied woodpecker 
coming with parent to suet. Young one has learn to eat on the suet cage by 
itself.

Cat birds & orioles eating jars full of jelly. I hope they don’t get cavities 
w/ all that sugar. Flying squirrels & chipmunks eating jelly too.

Reported: small bear (yearling?) trying to pull down bird feeders in west hill 
area of ithaca. Seen by a few people.

Donna Scott
Lansing
Sent from my iPhone

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


Re: [cayugabirds-l] molting birds question

2020-05-13 Thread Peter Saracino
Very interesting!
Thank you Anne.
Yeah - these redwings around my house are losing head feathers NOW - and
not post-breeding.
Pete Sar

On Wed, May 13, 2020, 3:01 PM  wrote:

> I will just offer the observation made several times while studying
> nesting redwinged blabkbirds at the Cornell ponds that no males arrived
> with bald heads but quite a few
> Showed missing patches during EARLy breeding season while disputes were
> common. At least once a fully feathered banded male had a down and out
> fight, flew off but was back trying to retake his territory the next
> day...with a bald spot.
>
> Whatever other explanations may pertain, male-male fights contribute I
> feel sure.
> Balding blue jays show up after breeding during post-juvenile and post
> breeding molts, I agree. Have seen. Not just their heads look ratty.
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> On May 13, 2020, at 12:20 PM, Peter Saracino 
> wrote:
>
> Thanks!
> Pete Saracino
>
> On Wed, May 13, 2020, 9:27 AM Tim Gallagher  wrote:
>
>> Here's a link to a piece they ran a few years ago on the Lab of
>> Ornithology website:
>> https://www.allaboutbirds.org/news/i-have-a-bald-bird-at-my-feeder-is-it-sick/
>>
>> <https://www.allaboutbirds.org/news/i-have-a-bald-bird-at-my-feeder-is-it-sick/>
>> I have a bald bird at my feeder. Is it sick? - All About Birds
>> <https://www.allaboutbirds.org/news/i-have-a-bald-bird-at-my-feeder-is-it-sick/>
>> We receive many inquiries about bald birds, especially Blue Jays and
>> Northern Cardinals. In late summer and fall, when a bird molts, it usually
>> grows and replaces its feathers gradually, but occasionally a bird loses
>> all the feathers on its head at once. This is particularly true of Blue
>> Jays, m ...
>> www.allaboutbirds.org
>>
>>
>> --
>> *From:* bounce-124627147-10557...@list.cornell.edu <
>> bounce-124627147-10557...@list.cornell.edu> on behalf of Peter Saracino <
>> petersarac...@gmail.com>
>> *Sent:* Tuesday, May 12, 2020 4:58 PM
>> *To:* Linda Clark Benedict 
>> *Cc:* CAYUGABIRDS-L 
>> *Subject:* Re: [cayugabirds-l] molting birds question
>>
>> Thanks for the info. Must be so m.j e as re molting non-essential
>> feathers?
>>
>> On Tue, May 12, 2020, 2:37 PM Linda Clark Benedict 
>> wrote:
>>
>> We had a bald rose-breasted grosbeak at our feeder.
>>
>> On Mon, May 11, 2020, 3:35 PM Peter Saracino 
>> wrote:
>>
>> Hi folks.
>> Recently I have seen one "bald" redwing on a tray feeder and another that
>> was nearly bald. Now I see what appears to be an adult Oriole "losing" some
>> of the black on its head. Is it normal for these birds to molt some of
>> their non-flight feathers at this time of year?
>> Thanks for the help.
>> Pete Sar
>> --
>> *Cayugabirds-L List Info:*
>> Welcome and Basics <http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME>
>> Rules and Information <http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES>
>> Subscribe, Configuration and Leave
>> <http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm>
>> *Archives:*
>> The Mail Archive
>> <http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html>
>> Surfbirds <http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds>
>> BirdingOnThe.Net <http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html>
>> *Please submit your observations to eBird
>> <http://ebird.org/content/ebird/>!*
>> --
>>
>> --
>> *Cayugabirds-L List Info:*
>> Welcome and Basics <http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME>
>> Rules and Information <http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES>
>> Subscribe, Configuration and Leave
>> <http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm>
>> *Archives:*
>> The Mail Archive
>> <http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html>
>> Surfbirds <http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds>
>> BirdingOnThe.Net <http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html>
>> *Please submit your observations to eBird
>> <http://ebird.org/content/ebird/>!*
>> --
>>
> --
> *Cayugabirds-L List Info:*
> Welcome and Basics <http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME>
> Rules and Information <http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES>
> Subscribe, Configuration and Leave
> <http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm>
> *Archives:*
>

Re: [cayugabirds-l] molting birds question

2020-05-13 Thread anneb . clark
I will just offer the observation made several times while studying nesting 
redwinged blabkbirds at the Cornell ponds that no males arrived with bald heads 
but quite a few
Showed missing patches during EARLy breeding season while disputes were common. 
At least once a fully feathered banded male had a down and out fight, flew off 
but was back trying to retake his territory the next day...with a bald spot. 

Whatever other explanations may pertain, male-male fights contribute I feel 
sure.  
Balding blue jays show up after breeding during post-juvenile and post breeding 
molts, I agree. Have seen. Not just their heads look ratty. 

Sent from my iPhone

> On May 13, 2020, at 12:20 PM, Peter Saracino  wrote:
> 
> Thanks! 
> Pete Saracino
> 
>> On Wed, May 13, 2020, 9:27 AM Tim Gallagher  wrote:
>> Here's a link to a piece they ran a few years ago on the Lab of Ornithology 
>> website: 
>> https://www.allaboutbirds.org/news/i-have-a-bald-bird-at-my-feeder-is-it-sick/
>> 
>> I have a bald bird at my feeder. Is it sick? - All About Birds
>> We receive many inquiries about bald birds, especially Blue Jays and 
>> Northern Cardinals. In late summer and fall, when a bird molts, it usually 
>> grows and replaces its feathers gradually, but occasionally a bird loses all 
>> the feathers on its head at once. This is particularly true of Blue Jays, m 
>> ...
>> www.allaboutbirds.org
>> 
>> 
>> From: bounce-124627147-10557...@list.cornell.edu 
>>  on behalf of Peter Saracino 
>> 
>> Sent: Tuesday, May 12, 2020 4:58 PM
>> To: Linda Clark Benedict 
>> Cc: CAYUGABIRDS-L 
>> Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] molting birds question
>>  
>> Thanks for the info. Must be so m.j e as re molting non-essential feathers?
>> 
>> On Tue, May 12, 2020, 2:37 PM Linda Clark Benedict  
>> wrote:
>> We had a bald rose-breasted grosbeak at our feeder.
>> 
>> On Mon, May 11, 2020, 3:35 PM Peter Saracino  wrote:
>> Hi folks.
>> Recently I have seen one "bald" redwing on a tray feeder and another that 
>> was nearly bald. Now I see what appears to be an adult Oriole "losing" some 
>> of the black on its head. Is it normal for these birds to molt some of their 
>> non-flight feathers at this time of year?
>> Thanks for the help.
>> Pete Sar
>> --
>> Cayugabirds-L List Info:
>> Welcome and Basics
>> Rules and Information
>> Subscribe, Configuration and Leave
>> Archives:
>> The Mail Archive
>> Surfbirds
>> BirdingOnThe.Net
>> Please submit your observations to eBird!
>> --
>> --
>> Cayugabirds-L List Info:
>> Welcome and Basics
>> Rules and Information
>> Subscribe, Configuration and Leave
>> Archives:
>> The Mail Archive
>> Surfbirds
>> BirdingOnThe.Net
>> Please submit your observations to eBird!
>> --
> 
> --
> Cayugabirds-L List Info:
> Welcome and Basics
> Rules and Information
> Subscribe, Configuration and Leave
> Archives:
> The Mail Archive
> Surfbirds
> BirdingOnThe.Net
> Please submit your observations to eBird!
> --

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

Re: [cayugabirds-l] molting birds question

2020-05-13 Thread Peter Saracino
Thanks!
Pete Saracino

On Wed, May 13, 2020, 9:27 AM Tim Gallagher  wrote:

> Here's a link to a piece they ran a few years ago on the Lab of
> Ornithology website:
> https://www.allaboutbirds.org/news/i-have-a-bald-bird-at-my-feeder-is-it-sick/
>
> <https://www.allaboutbirds.org/news/i-have-a-bald-bird-at-my-feeder-is-it-sick/>
> I have a bald bird at my feeder. Is it sick? - All About Birds
> <https://www.allaboutbirds.org/news/i-have-a-bald-bird-at-my-feeder-is-it-sick/>
> We receive many inquiries about bald birds, especially Blue Jays and
> Northern Cardinals. In late summer and fall, when a bird molts, it usually
> grows and replaces its feathers gradually, but occasionally a bird loses
> all the feathers on its head at once. This is particularly true of Blue
> Jays, m ...
> www.allaboutbirds.org
>
>
> --
> *From:* bounce-124627147-10557...@list.cornell.edu <
> bounce-124627147-10557...@list.cornell.edu> on behalf of Peter Saracino <
> petersarac...@gmail.com>
> *Sent:* Tuesday, May 12, 2020 4:58 PM
> *To:* Linda Clark Benedict 
> *Cc:* CAYUGABIRDS-L 
> *Subject:* Re: [cayugabirds-l] molting birds question
>
> Thanks for the info. Must be so m.j e as re molting non-essential feathers?
>
> On Tue, May 12, 2020, 2:37 PM Linda Clark Benedict 
> wrote:
>
> We had a bald rose-breasted grosbeak at our feeder.
>
> On Mon, May 11, 2020, 3:35 PM Peter Saracino 
> wrote:
>
> Hi folks.
> Recently I have seen one "bald" redwing on a tray feeder and another that
> was nearly bald. Now I see what appears to be an adult Oriole "losing" some
> of the black on its head. Is it normal for these birds to molt some of
> their non-flight feathers at this time of year?
> Thanks for the help.
> Pete Sar
> --
> *Cayugabirds-L List Info:*
> Welcome and Basics <http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME>
> Rules and Information <http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES>
> Subscribe, Configuration and Leave
> <http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm>
> *Archives:*
> The Mail Archive
> <http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html>
> Surfbirds <http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds>
> BirdingOnThe.Net <http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html>
> *Please submit your observations to eBird
> <http://ebird.org/content/ebird/>!*
> --
>
> --
> *Cayugabirds-L List Info:*
> Welcome and Basics <http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME>
> Rules and Information <http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES>
> Subscribe, Configuration and Leave
> <http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm>
> *Archives:*
> The Mail Archive
> <http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html>
> Surfbirds <http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds>
> BirdingOnThe.Net <http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html>
> *Please submit your observations to eBird
> <http://ebird.org/content/ebird/>!*
> --
>

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

Re: [cayugabirds-l] molting birds question

2020-05-13 Thread Tim Gallagher
Here's a link to a piece they ran a few years ago on the Lab of Ornithology 
website: 
https://www.allaboutbirds.org/news/i-have-a-bald-bird-at-my-feeder-is-it-sick/
[https://www.allaboutbirds.org/news/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/norcarBald_RohiniMehta_2_pre12-539x500.jpg]<https://www.allaboutbirds.org/news/i-have-a-bald-bird-at-my-feeder-is-it-sick/>
I have a bald bird at my feeder. Is it sick? - All About 
Birds<https://www.allaboutbirds.org/news/i-have-a-bald-bird-at-my-feeder-is-it-sick/>
We receive many inquiries about bald birds, especially Blue Jays and Northern 
Cardinals. In late summer and fall, when a bird molts, it usually grows and 
replaces its feathers gradually, but occasionally a bird loses all the feathers 
on its head at once. This is particularly true of Blue Jays, m ...
www.allaboutbirds.org



From: bounce-124627147-10557...@list.cornell.edu 
 on behalf of Peter Saracino 

Sent: Tuesday, May 12, 2020 4:58 PM
To: Linda Clark Benedict 
Cc: CAYUGABIRDS-L 
Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] molting birds question

Thanks for the info. Must be so m.j e as re molting non-essential feathers?

On Tue, May 12, 2020, 2:37 PM Linda Clark Benedict 
mailto:lbenedic...@gmail.com>> wrote:
We had a bald rose-breasted grosbeak at our feeder.

On Mon, May 11, 2020, 3:35 PM Peter Saracino 
mailto:petersarac...@gmail.com>> wrote:
Hi folks.
Recently I have seen one "bald" redwing on a tray feeder and another that was 
nearly bald. Now I see what appears to be an adult Oriole "losing" some of the 
black on its head. Is it normal for these birds to molt some of their 
non-flight feathers at this time of year?
Thanks for the help.
Pete Sar
--
Cayugabirds-L List Info:
Welcome and Basics<http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME>
Rules and Information<http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES>
Subscribe, Configuration and 
Leave<http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm>
Archives:
The Mail 
Archive<http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html>
Surfbirds<http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds>
BirdingOnThe.Net<http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html>
Please submit your observations to eBird<http://ebird.org/content/ebird/>!
--
--
Cayugabirds-L List Info:
Welcome and Basics<http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME>
Rules and Information<http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES>
Subscribe, Configuration and 
Leave<http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm>
Archives:
The Mail 
Archive<http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html>
Surfbirds<http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds>
BirdingOnThe.Net<http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html>
Please submit your observations to eBird<http://ebird.org/content/ebird/>!
--

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

Re: [cayugabirds-l] molting birds question

2020-05-12 Thread Peter Saracino
Thanks for the info. Must be so m.j e as re molting non-essential feathers?

On Tue, May 12, 2020, 2:37 PM Linda Clark Benedict 
wrote:

> We had a bald rose-breasted grosbeak at our feeder.
>
> On Mon, May 11, 2020, 3:35 PM Peter Saracino 
> wrote:
>
>> Hi folks.
>> Recently I have seen one "bald" redwing on a tray feeder and another that
>> was nearly bald. Now I see what appears to be an adult Oriole "losing" some
>> of the black on its head. Is it normal for these birds to molt some of
>> their non-flight feathers at this time of year?
>> Thanks for the help.
>> Pete Sar
>> --
>> *Cayugabirds-L List Info:*
>> Welcome and Basics 
>> Rules and Information 
>> Subscribe, Configuration and Leave
>> 
>> *Archives:*
>> The Mail Archive
>> 
>> Surfbirds 
>> BirdingOnThe.Net 
>> *Please submit your observations to eBird
>> !*
>> --
>>
>

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

Re: [cayugabirds-l] molting birds question

2020-05-12 Thread Linda Clark Benedict
We had a bald rose-breasted grosbeak at our feeder.

On Mon, May 11, 2020, 3:35 PM Peter Saracino 
wrote:

> Hi folks.
> Recently I have seen one "bald" redwing on a tray feeder and another that
> was nearly bald. Now I see what appears to be an adult Oriole "losing" some
> of the black on its head. Is it normal for these birds to molt some of
> their non-flight feathers at this time of year?
> Thanks for the help.
> Pete Sar
> --
> *Cayugabirds-L List Info:*
> Welcome and Basics 
> Rules and Information 
> Subscribe, Configuration and Leave
> 
> *Archives:*
> The Mail Archive
> 
> Surfbirds 
> BirdingOnThe.Net 
> *Please submit your observations to eBird
> !*
> --
>

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

[cayugabirds-l] molting birds question

2020-05-11 Thread Peter Saracino
Hi folks.
Recently I have seen one "bald" redwing on a tray feeder and another that
was nearly bald. Now I see what appears to be an adult Oriole "losing" some
of the black on its head. Is it normal for these birds to molt some of
their non-flight feathers at this time of year?
Thanks for the help.
Pete Sar

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

Re: [cayugabirds-l] Dawn birds

2020-05-03 Thread anneb . clark
FOY oriole just arrived also and a catbird was quietly exploring scrubby places 
outside my window earlier!  The mounting house wren tensions are audible. I 
think another 2 males might be on site. Look like bees chasing. 

Sent from my iPhone

> On May 3, 2020, at 7:26 AM, Donna Lee Scott  wrote:
> 
> FOY baltimore orioles & catbird singing! Oriole sitting in sun atop a tall 
> tree. What a gorgeous spring sight!
> Brown thrasher singing across road. 
> Kingfisher chattering by. 
> 
> Lake getting to minor flood stage. 
> 
> Donna Scott
> Lansing
> Sent from my iPhone
> --
> Cayugabirds-L List Info:
> Welcome and Basics
> Rules and Information
> Subscribe, Configuration and Leave
> Archives:
> The Mail Archive
> Surfbirds
> BirdingOnThe.Net
> Please submit your observations to eBird!
> --

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

[cayugabirds-l] Dawn birds

2020-05-03 Thread Donna Lee Scott
FOY baltimore orioles & catbird singing! Oriole sitting in sun atop a tall 
tree. What a gorgeous spring sight!
Brown thrasher singing across road.
Kingfisher chattering by.

Lake getting to minor flood stage.

Donna Scott
Lansing
Sent from my iPhone

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


[cayugabirds-l] FOY birds in Newfield

2020-05-01 Thread Laura J. Heisey
This morning I have my FOY Rose-breasted Grosbeak, House Wren and Blue-headed 
Vireo in the yard and woods-edges.

Hummingbird feeder and oranges are out but not visited yet.

Laura
Newfield

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

[cayugabirds-l] Maine birds for masks

2020-04-19 Thread Laurie Roe
https://www.etsy.com/listing/757836384/eastern-bluebirdcloudberry-birds-and?ref=shop_home_active_6=1

-In case anyone is sewing masks or knows someone who will make them
one..scroll down the site to see all the choices. Enjoy!

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

[cayugabirds-l] FOY birds

2020-04-08 Thread Laura Stenzler
Hi all,
 Today on our property on Hunt Hill Rd.  we had our first of year (FOY) 
chipping and fox sparrows as well as northern flicker. Plus, there has been a 
pair of hooded mergansers on our pond all day. We think the female has chosen 
the owl/duck box that is hanging over our driveway as her nest site. We hope so!
   Laura

Laura Stenzler
l...@cornell.edu
--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--



[cayugabirds-l] Yellow birds

2020-02-27 Thread Bard Prentiss


The yellow birds are back. Seems early for goldfinches to moult. 
Best,  
Bard 

 Bard Prentiss 
(607)882-0504

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


[cayugabirds-l] Black Birds

2020-02-26 Thread Carl Steckler
They are back. I had a huge flock of Redwings, Grackles and Starlings
descend on my feeders this afternoon.

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

Re: [cayugabirds-l] Weird birds

2020-01-05 Thread Gary Kohlenberg
Some of these lists have been from California :) This has been going on for 
quite some time and I keep thinking we have rarities to chase, but no such luck.
Gary

On Jan 4, 2020, at 10:06 PM, Dave Nutter  wrote:

 When I first saw one of these lists I thought someone was playing games, and 
I got annoyed. But after seeing several lists from different observers listing 
birds from various parts of the world but nominally all observed in Stewart 
Park, it is clear to me that all these lists are mislabeled due to the same 
innocent error which more likely due to some glitch in the system than to 
something the observer has done. Until the folks at eBird figure out why this 
happens and fix the problem, I see no point in getting mad. Instead, it’s fun 
to try to figure out where in the world the list was actually made, based on 
the ranges of the different species. I recognized several bird names from Costa 
Rica on one list, and by going back to the list after the location was 
corrected, I found out I was correct. We should get prizes for how close our 
guesses are.

- - Dave Nutter

On Jan 4, 2020, at 2:06 PM, Candace E. Cornell 
mailto:cec...@gmail.com>> wrote:

sBird lists the New Zealand bird reports as originating from Stewart Park! 
There were also erroneous Osprey sightings a few weeks ago.
Candace

On Sat, Jan 4, 2020 at 1:50 PM Carol Keeler 
mailto:carolk...@adelphia.net>> wrote:

Why are we getting these weird e bird reports from Tompkins county that have 
birds that aren’t found here?  It makes a mockery of e bird reports.
Sent from my iPad

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

--
Cayugabirds-L List Info:
Welcome and Basics
Rules and Information
Subscribe, Configuration and 
Leave
Archives:
The Mail 
Archive
Surfbirds
BirdingOnThe.Net
Please submit your observations to eBird!
--
--
Cayugabirds-L List Info:
Welcome and Basics
Rules and Information
Subscribe, Configuration and 
Leave
Archives:
The Mail 
Archive
Surfbirds
BirdingOnThe.Net
Please submit your observations to eBird!
--

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


Re: [cayugabirds-l] Weird birds

2020-01-04 Thread Dave Nutter
When I first saw one of these lists I thought someone was playing games, and I 
got annoyed. But after seeing several lists from different observers listing 
birds from various parts of the world but nominally all observed in Stewart 
Park, it is clear to me that all these lists are mislabeled due to the same 
innocent error which more likely due to some glitch in the system than to 
something the observer has done. Until the folks at eBird figure out why this 
happens and fix the problem, I see no point in getting mad. Instead, it’s fun 
to try to figure out where in the world the list was actually made, based on 
the ranges of the different species. I recognized several bird names from Costa 
Rica on one list, and by going back to the list after the location was 
corrected, I found out I was correct. We should get prizes for how close our 
guesses are.

- - Dave Nutter

> On Jan 4, 2020, at 2:06 PM, Candace E. Cornell  wrote:
> 
> sBird lists the New Zealand bird reports as originating from Stewart Park! 
> There were also erroneous Osprey sightings a few weeks ago.
> Candace
> 
>> On Sat, Jan 4, 2020 at 1:50 PM Carol Keeler  wrote:
>> 
>> Why are we getting these weird e bird reports from Tompkins county that have 
>> birds that aren’t found here?  It makes a mockery of e bird reports.
>> Sent from my iPad
>> 
>> --
>> 
>> Cayugabirds-L List Info:
>> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
>> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
>> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm
>> 
>> ARCHIVES:
>> 1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
>> 2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
>> 3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html
>> 
>> Please submit your observations to eBird:
>> http://ebird.org/content/ebird/
>> 
>> --
>> 
> 
> --
> Cayugabirds-L List Info:
> Welcome and Basics
> Rules and Information
> Subscribe, Configuration and Leave
> Archives:
> The Mail Archive
> Surfbirds
> BirdingOnThe.Net
> Please submit your observations to eBird!
> --

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

Re: [cayugabirds-l] Weird birds

2020-01-04 Thread Candace E. Cornell
sBird lists the New Zealand bird reports as originating from Stewart Park!
There were also erroneous Osprey sightings a few weeks ago.
Candace

On Sat, Jan 4, 2020 at 1:50 PM Carol Keeler  wrote:

>
> Why are we getting these weird e bird reports from Tompkins county that
> have birds that aren’t found here?  It makes a mockery of e bird reports.
> Sent from my iPad
>
> --
>
> Cayugabirds-L List Info:
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm
>
> ARCHIVES:
> 1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
> 2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
> 3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html
>
> Please submit your observations to eBird:
> http://ebird.org/content/ebird/
>
> --
>
>

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

[cayugabirds-l] Weird birds

2020-01-04 Thread Carol Keeler


Why are we getting these weird e bird reports from Tompkins county that have 
birds that aren’t found here?  It makes a mockery of e bird reports.
Sent from my iPad

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--



RE: [cayugabirds-l] Angry birds (Am robins!)

2019-10-27 Thread Deb Grantham
As this article says, it's a survival food -- poor people learned to eat it and 
like it. Lots of good food and cooking originates that way.

Deb


-Original Message-
From: bounce-124056804-83565...@list.cornell.edu 
 On Behalf Of Magnus Fiskesjo
Sent: Sunday, October 27, 2019 10:30 AM
To: Stanley Scharf ; Regi Teasley 

Cc: darlingtonbets ; Maryfaith Miller 
; anneb.cl...@gmail.com; 
bluewing-gr...@googlegroups.com; CAYUGABIRDS-L 
Subject: RE: [cayugabirds-l] Angry birds (Am robins!)


Looking up a picture of American pokeweed, I am surprised to see on Wikipedia 
it is the same as poke sallet, a k a poke salad, which is a food, that has even 
been described as a "Long-Standing Staple" food for humans, esp. in the US 
South, https://www.saveur.com/poke-sallet
... and Tony Joe White's song “Polk Salad Annie,” covered by Elvis, turns on 
the gathering, cooking, eating, and sucking on leftovers, of this same "poke 
salad." (The song seems to suggest it grows in places where alligators thrive). 

--
Magnus Fiskesjö, PhD
Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, Cornell University McGraw 
Hall, Room 201. Ithaca, NY 14853, USA
E-mail: magnus.fiske...@cornell.edu, or: n...@cornell.edu

Affiliations at Cornell University, WWW:
Anthropology Department, anthropology.cornell.edu/faculty/ Southeast Asia 
Program (SEAP), seap.einaudi.cornell.edu/faculty_directory
East Asia Program (EAP), eap.einaudi.cornell.edu/faculty_directory
CIAMS (Archaeology), ciams.cornell.edu/people/ Cornell Institute for Public 
Affairs (CIPA), cipa.cornell.edu/academics/fieldfaculty.cfm

From: bounce-124056725-84019...@list.cornell.edu 
[bounce-124056725-84019...@list.cornell.edu] on behalf of Stanley Scharf 
[stanley.sch...@gmail.com]
Sent: Sunday, October 27, 2019 9:09 AM
To: Regi Teasley
Cc: darlingtonbets; Maryfaith Miller; anneb.cl...@gmail.com; 
bluewing-gr...@googlegroups.com; CAYUGABIRDS-L
Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Angry birds (Am robins!)

The most notable act occurred in Burlington, New Jersey, at the 1738 
Philadelphia Yearly Meeting of Quakers. Dressed as a soldier, he concluded a 
diatribe against slavery, quoting the Bible saying that all men should be equal 
under God, by plunging a sword into a Bible containing a bladder of blood-red  
'Pokeberry juice', which spattered over those nearby.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Benjamin_Lay


On 10/26/19, Regi Teasley  wrote:
> Thank you for this information.
>
> Regi
>
>
> What good is a house if you don’t have a tolerable planet to put it in?
> Henry David Thoreau
>
>> On Oct 26, 2019, at 12:53 PM, darlingtonbets 
>> 
>> wrote:
>>
>> 
>> A number of years ago, I asked poisonous plant expert, John 
>> Kingsbury, about pokeweed. He's a retired professor of botany from 
>> Cornell and was lecturer in phytotoxicology at Cornell's Vet. 
>> College. And author of "Deadly Harvest," an excellent book on poisonous 
>> plants.
>>
>> He told me that a group of medical researchers who were studying 
>> pokeweed, and handling the plant, all developed leukemia-like 
>> symptoms. (I don't know what happened after that. Did they recover, 
>> once they stopped handling it?)
>>
>> He recommended wearing gloves, if handling the plant. I think he said 
>> that the berries were the least toxic part of the plant.
>>
>> Just because a plant is toxic to humans, of course, doesn't mean it 
>> should be destroyed, just that people should be cautious in using, 
>> handling or eating it.  And many plants that are toxic to humans are 
>> fine for birds and other animals.  Pokeweed is a beautiful, 
>> interesting plant. Just don't eat it or handle it without gloves.
>> Betsy
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
>>
>> ---- Original message 
>> From: Maryfaith Miller 
>> Date: 10/26/19 12:08 PM (GMT-05:00)
>> To: anneb.cl...@gmail.com
>> Cc: Regi Teasley , 
>> bluewing-gr...@googlegroups.com, CAYUGABIRDS-L 
>> 
>> Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Angry birds (Am robins!)
>>
>> I have used pokeweed berries in my forest kindergarten class to dye 
>> wool an intensely beautiful shade of purple. 5-6-7 year olds, 
>> harvested, crushed, boiled over a campfire and stirred the pot full 
>> of wool roving and pokeweed berries. My students love knowing which 
>> plants are deadly poisonous. I have taught them a lot about 
>> mushrooms, and all of them can identify a destroying angel, jack 
>> o'lanterns, etc. Knowledge is power, and children love having this 
>> knowledge. They know where all the pokeweed plants are at Lime Hollow and 
>> love to inform people about them.
>>
>

RE: [cayugabirds-l] Angry birds (Am robins!)

2019-10-27 Thread Deb Grantham
Fascinating!


-Original Message-
From: bounce-124056725-83565...@list.cornell.edu 
 On Behalf Of Stanley Scharf
Sent: Sunday, October 27, 2019 9:09 AM
To: Regi Teasley 
Cc: darlingtonbets ; Maryfaith Miller 
; anneb.cl...@gmail.com; 
bluewing-gr...@googlegroups.com; CAYUGABIRDS-L 
Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Angry birds (Am robins!)

The most notable act occurred in Burlington, New Jersey, at the 1738 
Philadelphia Yearly Meeting of Quakers. Dressed as a soldier, he concluded a 
diatribe against slavery, quoting the Bible saying that all men should be equal 
under God, by plunging a sword into a Bible containing a bladder of blood-red  
'Pokeberry juice', which spattered over those nearby.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Benjamin_Lay









On 10/26/19, Regi Teasley  wrote:
> Thank you for this information.
>
> Regi
>
>
> What good is a house if you don’t have a tolerable planet to put it in?
> Henry David Thoreau
>
>> On Oct 26, 2019, at 12:53 PM, darlingtonbets 
>> 
>> wrote:
>>
>> 
>> A number of years ago, I asked poisonous plant expert, John 
>> Kingsbury, about pokeweed. He's a retired professor of botany from 
>> Cornell and was lecturer in phytotoxicology at Cornell's Vet. 
>> College. And author of "Deadly Harvest," an excellent book on poisonous 
>> plants.
>>
>> He told me that a group of medical researchers who were studying 
>> pokeweed, and handling the plant, all developed leukemia-like 
>> symptoms. (I don't know what happened after that. Did they recover, 
>> once they stopped handling it?)
>>
>> He recommended wearing gloves, if handling the plant. I think he said 
>> that the berries were the least toxic part of the plant.
>>
>> Just because a plant is toxic to humans, of course, doesn't mean it 
>> should be destroyed, just that people should be cautious in using, 
>> handling or eating it.  And many plants that are toxic to humans are 
>> fine for birds and other animals.  Pokeweed is a beautiful, 
>> interesting plant. Just don't eat it or handle it without gloves.
>> Betsy
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
>>
>>  Original message 
>> From: Maryfaith Miller 
>> Date: 10/26/19 12:08 PM (GMT-05:00)
>> To: anneb.cl...@gmail.com
>> Cc: Regi Teasley , 
>> bluewing-gr...@googlegroups.com, CAYUGABIRDS-L 
>> 
>> Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Angry birds (Am robins!)
>>
>> I have used pokeweed berries in my forest kindergarten class to dye 
>> wool an intensely beautiful shade of purple. 5-6-7 year olds, 
>> harvested, crushed, boiled over a campfire and stirred the pot full 
>> of wool roving and pokeweed berries. My students love knowing which 
>> plants are deadly poisonous. I have taught them a lot about 
>> mushrooms, and all of them can identify a destroying angel, jack 
>> o'lanterns, etc. Knowledge is power, and children love having this 
>> knowledge. They know where all the pokeweed plants are at Lime Hollow and 
>> love to inform people about them.
>>
>>  But this is a bird list, and the question is about bird 
>> behavior...I'd love to hear about the OP's question re American Robin 
>> aggression if anyone knows more about that.
>> Maryfaith Decker Miller
>>
>> On Sat, Oct 26, 2019 at 11:38 AM  wrote:
>>> And I am living proof that eating young pokeweed is not deadly. We 
>>> didn’t use 3 waters either, although drained it.
>>> But I am NOT suggesting everyone try it. Young spinach causes less panic.
>>> Or try lambs quarters.
>>> Anne
>>> Sent from my iPhone
>>>
>>> On Oct 26, 2019, at 9:56 AM, Regi Teasley  wrote:
>>>
>>>> I understand Pokeweed is poisonous to humans.  Your thoughts on 
>>>> keeping these plants?
>>>>
>>>> Regi
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> What good is a house if you don’t have a tolerable planet to put it in?
>>>> Henry David Thoreau
>>>>
>>>>> On Oct 26, 2019, at 9:01 AM, anneb.cl...@gmail.com wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>> 
>>>>> This morning I have a large number of robins all age/sexes 
>>>>> foraging on my productive pokeweed berries and scratching leaves 
>>>>> AND chasing each other hard and long.  More athletic long chases 
>>>>> than I am used to associating with robins.
>>>>>
>>>>> They are not just chasing around the berries although I watched 
>>>>> some head lowered face offs ( before a chase) on the fence near pokeweed

RE: [cayugabirds-l] Angry birds (Am robins!)

2019-10-27 Thread Magnus Fiskesjo

Looking up a picture of American pokeweed, I am surprised to see on Wikipedia 
it is the same as poke sallet, a k a poke salad, which is a food, that has even 
been described as a "Long-Standing Staple" food for humans, esp. in the US 
South, https://www.saveur.com/poke-sallet
... and Tony Joe White's song “Polk Salad Annie,” covered by Elvis, turns on 
the gathering, cooking, eating, and sucking on leftovers, of this same "poke 
salad." (The song seems to suggest it grows in places where alligators thrive). 

--
Magnus Fiskesjö, PhD
Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, Cornell University
McGraw Hall, Room 201. Ithaca, NY 14853, USA
E-mail: magnus.fiske...@cornell.edu, or: n...@cornell.edu

Affiliations at Cornell University, WWW:
Anthropology Department, anthropology.cornell.edu/faculty/
Southeast Asia Program (SEAP), seap.einaudi.cornell.edu/faculty_directory
East Asia Program (EAP), eap.einaudi.cornell.edu/faculty_directory
CIAMS (Archaeology), ciams.cornell.edu/people/
Cornell Institute for Public Affairs (CIPA), 
cipa.cornell.edu/academics/fieldfaculty.cfm

From: bounce-124056725-84019...@list.cornell.edu 
[bounce-124056725-84019...@list.cornell.edu] on behalf of Stanley Scharf 
[stanley.sch...@gmail.com]
Sent: Sunday, October 27, 2019 9:09 AM
To: Regi Teasley
Cc: darlingtonbets; Maryfaith Miller; anneb.cl...@gmail.com; 
bluewing-gr...@googlegroups.com; CAYUGABIRDS-L
Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Angry birds (Am robins!)

The most notable act occurred in Burlington, New Jersey, at the 1738
Philadelphia Yearly Meeting of Quakers. Dressed as a soldier, he
concluded a diatribe against slavery, quoting the Bible saying that
all men should be equal under God, by plunging a sword into a Bible
containing a bladder of blood-red  'Pokeberry juice', which spattered
over those nearby.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Benjamin_Lay


On 10/26/19, Regi Teasley  wrote:
> Thank you for this information.
>
> Regi
>
>
> What good is a house if you don’t have a tolerable planet to put it in?
> Henry David Thoreau
>
>> On Oct 26, 2019, at 12:53 PM, darlingtonbets 
>> wrote:
>>
>> 
>> A number of years ago, I asked poisonous plant expert, John Kingsbury,
>> about pokeweed. He's a retired professor of botany from Cornell and was
>> lecturer in phytotoxicology at Cornell's Vet. College. And author of
>> "Deadly Harvest," an excellent book on poisonous plants.
>>
>> He told me that a group of medical researchers who were studying pokeweed,
>> and handling the plant, all developed leukemia-like symptoms. (I don't
>> know what happened after that. Did they recover, once they stopped
>> handling it?)
>>
>> He recommended wearing gloves, if handling the plant. I think he said that
>> the berries were the least toxic part of the plant.
>>
>> Just because a plant is toxic to humans, of course, doesn't mean it should
>> be destroyed, just that people should be cautious in using, handling or
>> eating it.  And many plants that are toxic to humans are fine for birds
>> and other animals.  Pokeweed is a beautiful, interesting plant. Just don't
>> eat it or handle it without gloves.
>> Betsy
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
>>
>> ---- Original message 
>> From: Maryfaith Miller 
>> Date: 10/26/19 12:08 PM (GMT-05:00)
>> To: anneb.cl...@gmail.com
>> Cc: Regi Teasley , bluewing-gr...@googlegroups.com,
>> CAYUGABIRDS-L 
>> Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Angry birds (Am robins!)
>>
>> I have used pokeweed berries in my forest kindergarten class to dye wool
>> an intensely beautiful shade of purple. 5-6-7 year olds, harvested,
>> crushed, boiled over a campfire and stirred the pot full of wool roving
>> and pokeweed berries. My students love knowing which plants are deadly
>> poisonous. I have taught them a lot about mushrooms, and all of them can
>> identify a destroying angel, jack o'lanterns, etc. Knowledge is power, and
>> children love having this knowledge. They know where all the pokeweed
>> plants are at Lime Hollow and love to inform people about them.
>>
>>  But this is a bird list, and the question is about bird behavior...I'd
>> love to hear about the OP's question re American Robin aggression if
>> anyone knows more about that.
>> Maryfaith Decker Miller
>>
>> On Sat, Oct 26, 2019 at 11:38 AM  wrote:
>>> And I am living proof that eating young pokeweed is not deadly. We didn’t
>>> use 3 waters either, although drained it.
>>> But I am NOT suggesting everyone try it. Young spinach causes less panic.
>>> Or try lambs quarters.
>>> Anne
&

Re: [cayugabirds-l] Angry birds (Am robins!)

2019-10-27 Thread Stanley Scharf
The most notable act occurred in Burlington, New Jersey, at the 1738
Philadelphia Yearly Meeting of Quakers. Dressed as a soldier, he
concluded a diatribe against slavery, quoting the Bible saying that
all men should be equal under God, by plunging a sword into a Bible
containing a bladder of blood-red  'Pokeberry juice', which spattered
over those nearby.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Benjamin_Lay









On 10/26/19, Regi Teasley  wrote:
> Thank you for this information.
>
> Regi
>
>
> What good is a house if you don’t have a tolerable planet to put it in?
> Henry David Thoreau
>
>> On Oct 26, 2019, at 12:53 PM, darlingtonbets 
>> wrote:
>>
>> 
>> A number of years ago, I asked poisonous plant expert, John Kingsbury,
>> about pokeweed. He's a retired professor of botany from Cornell and was
>> lecturer in phytotoxicology at Cornell's Vet. College. And author of
>> "Deadly Harvest," an excellent book on poisonous plants.
>>
>> He told me that a group of medical researchers who were studying pokeweed,
>> and handling the plant, all developed leukemia-like symptoms. (I don't
>> know what happened after that. Did they recover, once they stopped
>> handling it?)
>>
>> He recommended wearing gloves, if handling the plant. I think he said that
>> the berries were the least toxic part of the plant.
>>
>> Just because a plant is toxic to humans, of course, doesn't mean it should
>> be destroyed, just that people should be cautious in using, handling or
>> eating it.  And many plants that are toxic to humans are fine for birds
>> and other animals.  Pokeweed is a beautiful, interesting plant. Just don't
>> eat it or handle it without gloves.
>> Betsy
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
>>
>> ---- Original message ----
>> From: Maryfaith Miller 
>> Date: 10/26/19 12:08 PM (GMT-05:00)
>> To: anneb.cl...@gmail.com
>> Cc: Regi Teasley , bluewing-gr...@googlegroups.com,
>> CAYUGABIRDS-L 
>> Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Angry birds (Am robins!)
>>
>> I have used pokeweed berries in my forest kindergarten class to dye wool
>> an intensely beautiful shade of purple. 5-6-7 year olds, harvested,
>> crushed, boiled over a campfire and stirred the pot full of wool roving
>> and pokeweed berries. My students love knowing which plants are deadly
>> poisonous. I have taught them a lot about mushrooms, and all of them can
>> identify a destroying angel, jack o'lanterns, etc. Knowledge is power, and
>> children love having this knowledge. They know where all the pokeweed
>> plants are at Lime Hollow and love to inform people about them.
>>
>>  But this is a bird list, and the question is about bird behavior...I'd
>> love to hear about the OP's question re American Robin aggression if
>> anyone knows more about that.
>> Maryfaith Decker Miller
>>
>> On Sat, Oct 26, 2019 at 11:38 AM  wrote:
>>> And I am living proof that eating young pokeweed is not deadly. We didn’t
>>> use 3 waters either, although drained it.
>>> But I am NOT suggesting everyone try it. Young spinach causes less panic.
>>> Or try lambs quarters.
>>> Anne
>>> Sent from my iPhone
>>>
>>> On Oct 26, 2019, at 9:56 AM, Regi Teasley  wrote:
>>>
>>>> I understand Pokeweed is poisonous to humans.  Your thoughts on keeping
>>>> these plants?
>>>>
>>>> Regi
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> What good is a house if you don’t have a tolerable planet to put it in?
>>>> Henry David Thoreau
>>>>
>>>>> On Oct 26, 2019, at 9:01 AM, anneb.cl...@gmail.com wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>> 
>>>>> This morning I have a large number of robins all age/sexes foraging on
>>>>> my productive pokeweed berries and scratching leaves AND chasing each
>>>>> other hard and long.  More athletic long chases than I am used to
>>>>> associating with robins.
>>>>>
>>>>> They are not just chasing around the berries although I watched some
>>>>> head lowered face offs ( before a chase) on the fence near pokeweed.
>>>>>
>>>>> Anne
>>>>> Sent from my iPhone
>>>>> --
>>>>>
>>>>> Cayugabirds-L List Info:
>>>>> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
>>>>> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
>>>>> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeav

Re: [cayugabirds-l] Angry birds (Am robins!)

2019-10-26 Thread Regi Teasley
Thank you for this information.  

Regi


What good is a house if you don’t have a tolerable planet to put it in?  Henry 
David Thoreau

> On Oct 26, 2019, at 12:53 PM, darlingtonbets  wrote:
> 
> 
> A number of years ago, I asked poisonous plant expert, John Kingsbury, about 
> pokeweed. He's a retired professor of botany from Cornell and was lecturer in 
> phytotoxicology at Cornell's Vet. College. And author of "Deadly Harvest," an 
> excellent book on poisonous plants. 
> 
> He told me that a group of medical researchers who were studying pokeweed, 
> and handling the plant, all developed leukemia-like symptoms. (I don't know 
> what happened after that. Did they recover, once they stopped handling it?)  
> 
> He recommended wearing gloves, if handling the plant. I think he said that 
> the berries were the least toxic part of the plant. 
> 
> Just because a plant is toxic to humans, of course, doesn't mean it should be 
> destroyed, just that people should be cautious in using, handling or eating 
> it.  And many plants that are toxic to humans are fine for birds and other 
> animals.  Pokeweed is a beautiful, interesting plant. Just don't eat it or 
> handle it without gloves.
> Betsy
> 
> 
> 
> 
> Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
> 
>  Original message 
> From: Maryfaith Miller 
> Date: 10/26/19 12:08 PM (GMT-05:00)
> To: anneb.cl...@gmail.com
> Cc: Regi Teasley , bluewing-gr...@googlegroups.com, 
> CAYUGABIRDS-L 
> Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Angry birds (Am robins!)
> 
> I have used pokeweed berries in my forest kindergarten class to dye wool an 
> intensely beautiful shade of purple. 5-6-7 year olds, harvested, crushed, 
> boiled over a campfire and stirred the pot full of wool roving and pokeweed 
> berries. My students love knowing which plants are deadly poisonous. I have 
> taught them a lot about mushrooms, and all of them can identify a destroying 
> angel, jack o'lanterns, etc. Knowledge is power, and children love having 
> this knowledge. They know where all the pokeweed plants are at Lime Hollow 
> and love to inform people about them.
> 
>  But this is a bird list, and the question is about bird behavior...I'd love 
> to hear about the OP's question re American Robin aggression if anyone knows 
> more about that.
> Maryfaith Decker Miller
> 
> On Sat, Oct 26, 2019 at 11:38 AM  wrote:
>> And I am living proof that eating young pokeweed is not deadly. We didn’t 
>> use 3 waters either, although drained it. 
>> But I am NOT suggesting everyone try it. Young spinach causes less panic. Or 
>> try lambs quarters. 
>> Anne 
>> Sent from my iPhone
>> 
>> On Oct 26, 2019, at 9:56 AM, Regi Teasley  wrote:
>> 
>>> I understand Pokeweed is poisonous to humans.  Your thoughts on keeping 
>>> these plants?
>>> 
>>> Regi
>>> 
>>> 
>>> What good is a house if you don’t have a tolerable planet to put it in?  
>>> Henry David Thoreau
>>> 
>>>> On Oct 26, 2019, at 9:01 AM, anneb.cl...@gmail.com wrote:
>>>> 
>>>> 
>>>> This morning I have a large number of robins all age/sexes foraging on my 
>>>> productive pokeweed berries and scratching leaves AND chasing each other 
>>>> hard and long.  More athletic long chases than I am used to associating 
>>>> with robins. 
>>>> 
>>>> They are not just chasing around the berries although I watched some head 
>>>> lowered face offs ( before a chase) on the fence near pokeweed. 
>>>> 
>>>> Anne 
>>>> Sent from my iPhone
>>>> --
>>>> 
>>>> Cayugabirds-L List Info:
>>>> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
>>>> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
>>>> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm
>>>> 
>>>> ARCHIVES:
>>>> 1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
>>>> 2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
>>>> 3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html
>>>> 
>>>> Please submit your observations to eBird:
>>>> http://ebird.org/content/ebird/
>>>> 
>>>> --
>>>> 
>> 
>> --
>> Cayugabirds-L List Info:
>> Welcome and Basics
>> Rules and Information
>> Subscribe, Configuration and Leave
>> Archives:
>> The Mail Archive
>> Surfbirds
>> BirdingOnThe.Net
>> Please submit your observations to eBird!
>> --
> 
> --
> Cayugabirds-L List Info:
> Welcome and Basics
> Rules and Information
> Subscribe, Configuration and Leave
> Archives:
> The Mail Archive
> Surfbirds
> BirdingOnThe.Net
> Please submit your observations to eBird!
> --

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

Re: [cayugabirds-l] Angry birds (Am robins!)

2019-10-26 Thread Chris R. Pelkie
Agreed! I have some pokeweed growing behind the shed, no intention of removing 
(or tasting) it. I went to wiki initially to see if the toxins were 
intoxicating Anne’s robins but there’s no obvious support for that from this 
plant. I have seen robins et al get ripped on late season “raisins” from wild 
cherry so wondered if that was similar.

[Btw, I worked for Dr John many moons ago as a barely passable cook and 
carpenter assistant building the lab on Appledore Island when he was director 
of Isles of Shoals.]

___
Chris Pelkie
Data Manager; IT Support
Center for Conservation Bioacoustics
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road
Ithaca, NY 14850
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp/

On Oct 26, 2019, at 12:54, darlingtonbets 
mailto:darlingtonb...@gmail.com>> wrote:

just that people should be cautious in using, handling or eating it.  And many 
plants that are toxic to humans are fine for birds and other animals.  Pokeweed 
is a beautiful, interesting plant. Just don't eat it or handle it without 
gloves.
Betsy

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


Re: [cayugabirds-l] Angry birds (Am robins!)

2019-10-26 Thread darlingtonbets
A number of years ago, I asked poisonous plant expert, John Kingsbury, about 
pokeweed. He's a retired professor of botany from Cornell and was lecturer in 
phytotoxicology at Cornell's Vet. College. And author of "Deadly Harvest," an 
excellent book on poisonous plants. He told me that a group of medical 
researchers who were studying pokeweed, and handling the plant, all developed 
leukemia-like symptoms. (I don't know what happened after that. Did they 
recover, once they stopped handling it?)  He recommended wearing gloves, if 
handling the plant. I think he said that the berries were the least toxic part 
of the plant. Just because a plant is toxic to humans, of course, doesn't mean 
it should be destroyed, just that people should be cautious in using, handling 
or eating it.  And many plants that are toxic to humans are fine for birds and 
other animals.  Pokeweed is a beautiful, interesting plant. Just don't eat it 
or handle it without gloves.BetsySent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
 Original message From: Maryfaith Miller 
 Date: 10/26/19  12:08 PM  (GMT-05:00) To: 
anneb.cl...@gmail.com Cc: Regi Teasley , 
bluewing-gr...@googlegroups.com, CAYUGABIRDS-L  
Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Angry birds (Am robins!) I have used pokeweed 
berries in my forest kindergarten class to dye wool an intensely beautiful 
shade of purple. 5-6-7 year olds, harvested, crushed, boiled over a campfire 
and stirred the pot full of wool roving and pokeweed berries. My students love 
knowing which plants are deadly poisonous. I have taught them a lot about 
mushrooms, and all of them can identify a destroying angel, jack o'lanterns, 
etc. Knowledge is power, and children love having this knowledge. They know 
where all the pokeweed plants are at Lime Hollow and love to inform people 
about them. But this is a bird list, and the question is about bird 
behavior...I'd love to hear about the OP's question re American Robin 
aggression if anyone knows more about that.Maryfaith Decker MillerOn Sat, Oct 
26, 2019 at 11:38 AM  wrote:And I am living proof that 
eating young pokeweed is not deadly. We didn’t use 3 waters either, although 
drained it. But I am NOT suggesting everyone try it. Young spinach causes less 
panic. Or try lambs quarters. Anne Sent from my iPhoneOn Oct 26, 2019, at 9:56 
AM, Regi Teasley  wrote:I understand Pokeweed is poisonous 
to humans.  Your thoughts on keeping these plants?RegiWhat good is a house if 
you don’t have a tolerable planet to put it in?  Henry David ThoreauOn Oct 26, 
2019, at 9:01 AM, anneb.cl...@gmail.com wrote:This morning I have a large 
number of robins all age/sexes foraging on my productive pokeweed berries and 
scratching leaves AND chasing each other hard and long.  More athletic long 
chases than I am used to associating with robins. They are not just chasing 
around the berries although I watched some head lowered face offs ( before a 
chase) on the fence near pokeweed. Anne Sent from my iPhone--Cayugabirds-L List 
Info:http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOMEhttp://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULEShttp://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htmARCHIVES:1)
 http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html2) 
http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds3) 
http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.htmlPlease submit your observations 
to eBird:http://ebird.org/content/ebird/--
--
Cayugabirds-L List Info:
Welcome and Basics
Rules and Information
Subscribe, Configuration and Leave
Archives:
The Mail Archive
Surfbirds
BirdingOnThe.Net
Please submit your observations to eBird!
--


--
Cayugabirds-L List Info:
Welcome and Basics
Rules and Information
Subscribe, Configuration and Leave
Archives:
The Mail Archive
Surfbirds
BirdingOnThe.Net
Please submit your observations to eBird!
--
--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


Re: [cayugabirds-l] Angry birds (Am robins!)

2019-10-26 Thread Maryfaith Miller
I have used pokeweed berries in my forest kindergarten class to dye wool an
intensely beautiful shade of purple. 5-6-7 year olds, harvested, crushed,
boiled over a campfire and stirred the pot full of wool roving and pokeweed
berries. My students love knowing which plants are deadly poisonous. I have
taught them a lot about mushrooms, and all of them can identify a
destroying angel, jack o'lanterns, etc. Knowledge is power, and children
love having this knowledge. They know where all the pokeweed plants are at
Lime Hollow and love to inform people about them.

 But this is a bird list, and the question is about bird behavior...I'd
love to hear about the OP's question re American Robin aggression if anyone
knows more about that.
Maryfaith Decker Miller

On Sat, Oct 26, 2019 at 11:38 AM  wrote:

> And I am living proof that eating young pokeweed is not deadly. We didn’t
> use 3 waters either, although drained it.
> But I am NOT suggesting everyone try it. Young spinach causes less panic.
> Or try lambs quarters.
> Anne
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> On Oct 26, 2019, at 9:56 AM, Regi Teasley  wrote:
>
> I understand Pokeweed is poisonous to humans.  Your thoughts on keeping
> these plants?
>
> Regi
>
>
> *What good is a house if you don’t have a tolerable planet to put it in?
> Henry David Thoreau*
>
> On Oct 26, 2019, at 9:01 AM, anneb.cl...@gmail.com wrote:
>
> 
> This morning I have a large number of robins all age/sexes foraging on my
> productive pokeweed berries and scratching leaves AND chasing each other
> hard and long.  More athletic long chases than I am used to associating
> with robins.
>
> They are not just chasing around the berries although I watched some head
> lowered face offs ( before a chase) on the fence near pokeweed.
>
> Anne
> Sent from my iPhone
> --
>
> Cayugabirds-L List Info:
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm
>
> ARCHIVES:
> 1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
> 2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
> 3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html
>
> Please submit your observations to eBird:
> http://ebird.org/content/ebird/
>
> --
>
> --
> *Cayugabirds-L List Info:*
> Welcome and Basics 
> Rules and Information 
> Subscribe, Configuration and Leave
> 
> *Archives:*
> The Mail Archive
> 
> Surfbirds 
> BirdingOnThe.Net 
> *Please submit your observations to eBird
> !*
> --
>

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

Re: [cayugabirds-l] Angry birds (Am robins!)

2019-10-26 Thread anneb . clark
And I am living proof that eating young pokeweed is not deadly. We didn’t use 3 
waters either, although drained it. 
But I am NOT suggesting everyone try it. Young spinach causes less panic. Or 
try lambs quarters. 
Anne 
Sent from my iPhone

> On Oct 26, 2019, at 9:56 AM, Regi Teasley  wrote:
> 
> I understand Pokeweed is poisonous to humans.  Your thoughts on keeping these 
> plants?
> 
> Regi
> 
> 
> What good is a house if you don’t have a tolerable planet to put it in?  
> Henry David Thoreau
> 
>> On Oct 26, 2019, at 9:01 AM, anneb.cl...@gmail.com wrote:
>> 
>> 
>> This morning I have a large number of robins all age/sexes foraging on my 
>> productive pokeweed berries and scratching leaves AND chasing each other 
>> hard and long.  More athletic long chases than I am used to associating with 
>> robins. 
>> 
>> They are not just chasing around the berries although I watched some head 
>> lowered face offs ( before a chase) on the fence near pokeweed. 
>> 
>> Anne 
>> Sent from my iPhone
>> --
>> 
>> Cayugabirds-L List Info:
>> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
>> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
>> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm
>> 
>> ARCHIVES:
>> 1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
>> 2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
>> 3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html
>> 
>> Please submit your observations to eBird:
>> http://ebird.org/content/ebird/
>> 
>> --
>> 

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

Re: [cayugabirds-l] Angry birds (Am robins!)

2019-10-26 Thread anneb . clark
Yup everyone, I am fully aware of the toxicity of pokeweed and allow a nice big 
plant to grow up where I can see it fruit every year without any problems. 

There are many berries toxic to humans out there. And toxic plants. But they 
feed birds and other wildlife. Pokeweed berries are especially used by birds 
around this time. 

Sent from my iPhone

> On Oct 26, 2019, at 9:56 AM, Regi Teasley  wrote:
> 
> I understand Pokeweed is poisonous to humans.  Your thoughts on keeping these 
> plants?
> 
> Regi
> 
> 
> What good is a house if you don’t have a tolerable planet to put it in?  
> Henry David Thoreau
> 
>> On Oct 26, 2019, at 9:01 AM, anneb.cl...@gmail.com wrote:
>> 
>> 
>> This morning I have a large number of robins all age/sexes foraging on my 
>> productive pokeweed berries and scratching leaves AND chasing each other 
>> hard and long.  More athletic long chases than I am used to associating with 
>> robins. 
>> 
>> They are not just chasing around the berries although I watched some head 
>> lowered face offs ( before a chase) on the fence near pokeweed. 
>> 
>> Anne 
>> Sent from my iPhone
>> --
>> 
>> Cayugabirds-L List Info:
>> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
>> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
>> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm
>> 
>> ARCHIVES:
>> 1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
>> 2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
>> 3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html
>> 
>> Please submit your observations to eBird:
>> http://ebird.org/content/ebird/
>> 
>> --
>> 

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

Re: [cayugabirds-l] Angry birds (Am robins!)

2019-10-26 Thread Regi Teasley
I understand Pokeweed is poisonous to humans.  Your thoughts on keeping these 
plants?

Regi


What good is a house if you don’t have a tolerable planet to put it in?  Henry 
David Thoreau

> On Oct 26, 2019, at 9:01 AM, anneb.cl...@gmail.com wrote:
> 
> 
> This morning I have a large number of robins all age/sexes foraging on my 
> productive pokeweed berries and scratching leaves AND chasing each other hard 
> and long.  More athletic long chases than I am used to associating with 
> robins. 
> 
> They are not just chasing around the berries although I watched some head 
> lowered face offs ( before a chase) on the fence near pokeweed. 
> 
> Anne 
> Sent from my iPhone
> --
> 
> Cayugabirds-L List Info:
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm
> 
> ARCHIVES:
> 1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
> 2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
> 3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html
> 
> Please submit your observations to eBird:
> http://ebird.org/content/ebird/
> 
> --
> 

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

Re: [cayugabirds-l] Angry birds (Am robins!)

2019-10-26 Thread Chris R. Pelkie
For the record, don’t try this at home! Poke berries are very toxic to humans 
and many other mammals though some foxes, mice,etc are resistant, as are many 
songbirds that distribute the seeds after ingestion. Make sure your kids do NOT 
ingest these.
Poke leaves are made edible only after three separate boilings in fresh water. 
See wiki for details.

___
Chris Pelkie
Data Manager; IT Support
Center for Conservation Bioacoustics
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road
Ithaca, NY 14850
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp/

On Oct 26, 2019, at 09:00, 
"anneb.cl...@gmail.com" 
mailto:anneb.cl...@gmail.com>> wrote:


This morning I have a large number of robins all age/sexes foraging on my 
productive pokeweed berries and scratching leaves AND chasing each other hard 
and long.  More athletic long chases than I am used to associating with robins.

They are not just chasing around the berries although I watched some head 
lowered face offs ( before a chase) on the fence near pokeweed.

Anne
Sent from my iPhone
--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


[cayugabirds-l] Angry birds (Am robins!)

2019-10-26 Thread anneb . clark


This morning I have a large number of robins all age/sexes foraging on my 
productive pokeweed berries and scratching leaves AND chasing each other hard 
and long.  More athletic long chases than I am used to associating with robins. 

They are not just chasing around the berries although I watched some head 
lowered face offs ( before a chase) on the fence near pokeweed. 

Anne 
Sent from my iPhone
--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--



[cayugabirds-l] Forest birds in Shindagin Hollow

2019-07-06 Thread Jody Enck
Hi All,
The birds are almost as thick as the gnats in Shindaggin Hollow State
Forest.  I was there Thursday morning and again today.  I observed about 30
species total over the two days, including a substantial number of recently
fledged birds.  Got to see my two target species -- Mourning Warbler on
Thursday, and Canada Warbler today.  And, saw a pair of Broad-winged Hawks.

If you want to see these species and more with the Cayuga Bird Club next
February on our trip to Costa Rica, please check out the club website for
more information.  Holbrook travel is highlighting our trip in the
e-newsletter this month.

https://mail.google.com/mail/u/1/#inbox/WhctKJVRPKkZNvNTnhVNzfGlWfDkWQMzPfNMLsjkSPrCZrsWrgmhdqBkrPdtWrrFBCHkfbG


Jody

Jody W. Enck, PhD
Conservation Social Scientist, and
Founder of the Sister Bird Club Network
607-379-5940

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

[cayugabirds-l] New birds

2019-05-03 Thread Laura Stenzler
New birds on our property today: common yellowthroat, ovenbird, yellow warbler 
and black-throated green warbler. 
Hunt Hill Rd, Dryden. 
Laura

Laura Stenzler
l...@cornell.edu
--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--



[cayugabirds-l] Returning birds

2019-05-02 Thread Ken Haas
Yesterday, here at my Alder Pond home outside Mecklenberg, I had FOY Baltimore 
Oriole, and this morning I saw FOY Yellow Warbler, FOY Rose-breasted Grosbeak 
and FOY Ovenbird. Four Wood Thrushes were singing in the woods. They just 
returned a couple of days ago. It’s like the song says, “Spring is bustin’ out 
all over”.

Ken Haas


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--



[cayugabirds-l] FOY birds

2019-04-30 Thread Leigh Stivers
Had my FOY Wood Thrush this morning (at least 2 individuals) and FOY Oven
Bird!
Nice birdy morning!

Leigh

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

[cayugabirds-l] New birds for my new yard list

2019-04-23 Thread Annette Nadeau
Since this is my first spring in Trumansburg since I left Brooktondale, I'm
starting a new yard list.

Just had a RED-SHOULDERED HAWK "making lazy circles in the sky" as it
headed NW.

As I watchef the hawk, my FOY HOUSE WREN started singing.

It's like beginning birding all over again, though I miss my "country"
birds that we won't have here in the village.

Annette

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

Re: [cayugabirds-l] Feeder birds

2018-11-13 Thread Regi Teasley
Why isn’t there much wild food?

Thanks,
Regi



Pray for the dead and fight like hell for the living.   Mother Jones

> On Nov 13, 2018, at 2:34 PM, Bard Prentiss  wrote:
> 
> Two Fridays ago Matt Young 
> stoped by for a visit. In the course of our chatting he mentioned that unlike 
> last year this’ll be a good year for feeder birds since there isn’t much wild 
> food. WOW was he right. In the last few days my feeders in Dryden village 
> have been visited by countless   Chickadees tufted tit mice. Downey and Harry 
> wood peckers small flocks of pine Siskins and. Gold finches. Several each of 
> white and red breasted nuthatches pairs of Carolina wren bousefinch and red 
> belly woodpeckers several morning doves and probably a lot more that slips my 
> mind. Some year. 
> Waiting for evening and blue grosbeaks. 
> 
> Best
> Bard 
> km
> Bard Prentiss 
> (607)882-0504
> --
> 
> Cayugabirds-L List Info:
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm
> 
> ARCHIVES:
> 1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
> 2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
> 3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html
> 
> Please submit your observations to eBird:
> http://ebird.org/content/ebird/
> 
> --
> 

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

[cayugabirds-l] Feeder birds

2018-11-13 Thread Bard Prentiss
Two Fridays ago Matt Young 
stoped by for a visit. In the course of our chatting he mentioned that unlike 
last year this’ll be a good year for feeder birds since there isn’t much wild 
food. WOW was he right. In the last few days my feeders in Dryden village have 
been visited by countless   Chickadees tufted tit mice. Downey and Harry wood 
peckers small flocks of pine Siskins and. Gold finches. Several each of white 
and red breasted nuthatches pairs of Carolina wren bousefinch and red belly 
woodpeckers several morning doves and probably a lot more that slips my mind. 
Some year. 
Waiting for evening and blue grosbeaks. 

Best
Bard 
km
Bard Prentiss 
(607)882-0504
--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--



Re: [cayugabirds-l] Missing birds

2018-06-19 Thread Geo Kloppel
Hi Cathy,

Hmmm... I see a lot of barn swallows around number 400 Gunderman right now, so 
it seems that what you’re experiencing is not a neighborhood-wide phenomenon.

Also see some House Sparrows up here, and the ubiquitous Starlings. Competitors 
for nest boxes.

-Geo

> On Jun 19, 2018, at 3:10 PM, Cathy Darrow  wrote:
> 
> Prompted by the Swallow related posts a few days ago, I want to add the 
> complete lack of tree swallows and barn swallows at our house. This is in 
> Danby, Gunderman and Jersey Hill Road where there is lots of open fields that 
> hay is the crop. There is no spraying just spreading of lime and fertilizer. 
> This spring there were a few barn swallows which appeared to be looking for 
> the usual nesting places but then they were seen no more. And the numbers 
> have been decreasing for a few years. 
> Now the tree swallows, 3 or 4 showed up and two were seen working around 
> their usual nest box for a few days, when we found one dead inside the box 
> and none others seen since. I say the rest were probably smart but we are 
> feeling sad cause I feel they have been the major insect controller for our 
> yard over the many years when there have been many, many tree swallows over 
> and around our pond. Last year the numbers were down to a dozen maybe. 
> Hoping for something to turn around. 
> Cathy
> 
> 
>> 
> 
> 
> --
> 
> Cayugabirds-L List Info:
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm
> 
> ARCHIVES:
> 1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
> 2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
> 3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html
> 
> Please submit your observations to eBird:
> http://ebird.org/content/ebird/
> 
> --
> 

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--



[cayugabirds-l] Missing birds

2018-06-19 Thread Cathy Darrow
Prompted by the Swallow related posts a few days ago, I want to add the 
complete lack of tree swallows and barn swallows at our house. This is in 
Danby, Gunderman and Jersey Hill Road where there is lots of open fields that 
hay is the crop. There is no spraying just spreading of lime and fertilizer. 
This spring there were a few barn swallows which appeared to be looking for the 
usual nesting places but then they were seen no more. And the numbers have been 
decreasing for a few years. 
Now the tree swallows, 3 or 4 showed up and two were seen working around their 
usual nest box for a few days, when we found one dead inside the box and none 
others seen since. I say the rest were probably smart but we are feeling sad 
cause I feel they have been the major insect controller for our yard over the 
many years when there have been many, many tree swallows over and around our 
pond. Last year the numbers were down to a dozen maybe. 
Hoping for something to turn around. 
Cathy


> 


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--



[cayugabirds-l] Squirrels, birds and a previous thread

2018-06-08 Thread AB Clark
Sat and watched a white pine and its neighboring small maple, as the sun 
disappeared.  At least three little phantom shapes were working the trees, 
especially the pine.  One or more was/were  red squirrels and I think one was a 
chipmunk but maybe all were red squirrels (young?  to be so close together?).  
In any case, they did a very thorough job of running along branches to the 
tips, including the one where a robin built in May and apparently lost the nest 
contents soon thereafter.  The nest is now on the ground.  

That they find (and eat) bird nest contents is no accident…these little guys 
looked practiced and spatially efficient.

Anne

Anne B Clark
147 Hile School Rd
Freeville, NY 13068
607-222-0905
anneb.cl...@gmail.com






--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

[cayugabirds-l] Morning birds

2018-05-04 Thread Donna Lee Scott
Yellow Warbler, Gray Catbirds, male B Oriole, & Chipping & White Throated 
Sparrows, as well as a bunch of female RW Blackbirds in yard w usual males & 
Brown headed Cowbirds. Saw female Rose Breasted Grosbeak yesterday afternoon.
Also C. Loons & DC Cormorants on lake.

Donna Scott
Lansing
Sent from my iPhone

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


[cayugabirds-l] Yard birds

2018-04-20 Thread Geo Kloppel
West Danby enjoyed a bright sunrise. There was hardly a cloud in the sky for a 
short period this morning. I had Fox Sparrows singing from all directions, a 
couple of Hermit Thrushes drinking or bathing or foraging at the pond outlet, 
Wood Ducks on the pond, a Brown Thrasher rummaging under the shrubs, c. 50 
Juncos at the feeders, a lone Pine Siskin, a few Golden-crowned Kinglets, a 
Phoebe, etcetera.

-Geo

Tupper Road
West Danby
--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--



[cayugabirds-l] New birds

2018-04-19 Thread Carol Keeler
Well, the Chipping Sparrows finally made it to Auburn.  I had two this morning. 
I still have American Tree Sparrows and Juncos.  For the second time ever I had 
a Fox Sparrow.  I’ve been watching for both birds.  I’ve had quite a few Song 
Sparrows for quite awhile.  I also have three male Purple Finches, plus one 
female that have become regulars at the feeders.
Yesterday, the Osprey from the cell phone tower down the street on rt. 20 flew 
over.  It’s back!  I also nearly got run over by a Cooper’s Hawk chasing a 
grackle.  I was out filling the feeders.  I don’t think the grackle got caught. 
 I could feel them zoom by.  


Sent from my iPad

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--



[cayugabirds-l] Montezuma birds today

2018-04-10 Thread psaracin
 Some cool birds observed today (4/10/18) during part one of weekly survey of 
the Montezuma Refuge:1 Common Moorehen on Main Pool4 Great Egrets at Tschache 
Pool1 Greater Yellowlegs at Seneca FlatsHundreds of tree swallows perched on 
marsh vegetation at May's Point Pool.Migration IS underway!!Jackie BakerPete 
Saracino.
Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


  
--
Cayugabirds-L List Info:
Welcome and Basics
Rules and Information
Subscribe, Configuration and Leave
Archives:
The Mail Archive
Surfbirds
BirdingOnThe.Net
Please submit your observations to eBird!
--

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


[cayugabirds-l] snow birds

2018-04-06 Thread Asher Hockett
Lots of activity here in South Danby this morning: scads of GOFI, quite a
few Pine Siskins, juncos, various woodpeckers including our regular female
Pileated, a few Robins calling, Mourning Doves, and Bluejays, one imitating
a Red-shouldered Hawk.

-- 
asher

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

[cayugabirds-l] feeder birds

2018-03-22 Thread Asher Hockett
Continuing at our feeders are a small flock of Purple Finches, both sexes,
consuming black oil sunflower seeds, and a half dozen Pine Siskins on the
niger socks. This in addition to the goldfinches and juncos and doves in
profusion along with a few chickadees, nuthatches, and titmice.

Red-bellied, downy, hairy, and a lone female Pileated Woodpecker are eating
suet. The neighborhood ravens are getting talkative.

-- 
asher

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

[cayugabirds-l] feeder birds

2017-12-15 Thread Bard Prentiss

Hi all,
I have a mature white throated sparrow , perhaps 2 or  3  almost constantly at 
my feeder . Last year an immature one spent the winter with me. Also unusual 
for me I have several immature common grackles eating me out of house and home.

Bard


j
Bard V. Prentiss
27 East Main Street
Dryden, NY 13053
bvanwoer...@gmail.com
607-844-4691





--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--



[cayugabirds-l] Small birds

2017-11-16 Thread Donna Lee Scott
Little Birds Sale !

Proceeds donated to Cornell Lab of Ornithology

At Lifelong Crafts Gala, 119 W. Court St., Ithaca
In back of old library, just west of Cayuga St.

Fri. Nov. 17, 10 - 4 / Sat. Nov. 18, 10 - 12:30

100s of little birds:
rare, antique, silver, bone, brass, glass, pewter, ceramic, tiny, 
one-of-a-kind, cutsie, unusual.

Great gifts - a bird for everyone!

Seller: Donna Scott

Donna L. Scott
535 Lansing Station Road
Lansing, NY 14882
607-533-7228, 607-379-1694
d...@cornell.edu


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

[cayugabirds-l] Not birds--Painted lady butterfly obs across Eastern US

2017-09-24 Thread AB Clark
Both Cayuglists are noting the painted lady explosion.  

And interestingly, if you type "painted lady butterfly" into a search engine 
right now, you will find that there are “wow—all the painted ladies” reports 
from Minnesota, Jamestown, and many more places.  What kind of synchrony is 
this?


Anne B Clark
147 Hile School Rd
Freeville, NY 13068
607-222-0905
anneb.cl...@gmail.com






--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

[cayugabirds-l] Montezuma birds

2017-08-26 Thread M Miller
Had a vew birds of interest at the refuge (didn’t go on Knox-Marsellus hike). 
Had a Wilson's phalarope along with pectoral, semi-palmated, & least sandpipers 
(and a couple unidentified as of yet). Also had both yellowlegs & Semipalmated 
plovers, all at Benning Marsh.

Esker Brook trail was very quiet, but did find red-eyed vireo, GC flycatcher, 
wood thrush, Wilson's warbler, Am redstart, eastern pewee & rusty blackbird 
(most near the north end of the trail).

Mark Miller

Sent from Windows Mail


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


Re: [cayugabirds-l] local birds - nothing exceptional here!

2017-07-29 Thread Alicia
Today on the Ravine Trail in the National Forest there were three 
separate groups of Ovenbirds moving together & making continual chip 
calls: two groups of three birds and one of four. They were surprisingly 
bold and would land quite near (w/i 6') of my dog and me, still making 
chip notes.  I'm guessing they were groups of fledglings since in June 
the Ovenbirds there were a lot more cautious.  Did not hear or see any 
BT Greens, which also usually breed there - there were many males on 
territory in spring - but maybe they have dispersed already.


We had Carolina Wrens year 'round at our house in Ovid (Seneca Basin) 
since we bought it in May 1990, until Feb 2015 when the prolonged cold 
spell wiped out not only ours but probably over 90% of the ones that had 
settled in S. Seneca County in the last 25 years.  However they are 
prolific little birds and the territories are slowly refilling.  Earlier 
this month, a male was shepherding fledglings through our yard and they 
all were feasting on spiders and insects in the brush piles we keep for 
that purpose.  The fledglings aren't apparent anymore but he has 
continued to sing here daily, often answered by the female chattering, 
and finally last week I found half of a Carolina Wren eggshell in our 
lane - first sign of nesting here since Sept 2014.


Robins, Phoebes, M. Doves, & GC Flycatcher all fledged broods earlier 
this year. In the past week Catbirds, Cardinals, Titmice, WB Nuthatches, 
and Downy, Hairy & Pileated woodpeckers all have been feeding (or 
avoiding) begging fledglings.  Screetch owls didn't nest in our yard 
this year but we have been hearing bounce calls the past few nights so 
perhaps one or two is prospecting for territory.  The adult bald eagles 
aren't fishing in our cove any more - their nest apparently was on the 
west side of Seneca Lake and they would fly all the way across with the 
fish they caught! - but we are seeing more juvenile eagles now.


Missing nesters this year include B. Orioles (first time ever we haven't 
had at least one pair nesting in the yard); RB Woodpecker (ditto); RT 
Hummingbirds (finally saw FOY three weeks ago but instead of several 
regular visitors all spring & summer, we have what seems to be a single 
unusually shy female/immature coming to the trumpet vine, fuchsia & 
other flowers planted specifically for them); and Wood Thrush (we heard 
some occasionally thru May & June so they may be nesting nearby but not 
here).  Up the road there seem to be no Indigo Buntings when usually 
there are many, and only a single male E. Meadowlark with his harem, 
instead of the usual two or three males.  Chipping Sparrows also seem to 
be down and the Grasshopper Sparrow that was there last year did not 
return.  OTOH, it has been an exceptional year for Barn Swallows there 
with two dozen swooping around now.


Overall we have had no unusual nesting birds and are missing several of 
the regulars for the first time.  Not sure why - there doesn't seem to 
have been any significant habitat change in the area.


Alicia



On 7/29/2017 5:31 PM, Kevin J. McGowan wrote:
>
> There hasn't been much local birding information on this list for a 
> while. I admit that I'm as guilty as anyone of not posting my 
> sightings. I get most of my "hot bird info" from my hourly email eBird 
> "needs list" updates for the county. It's an awesome tool, but it's 
> not as friendly as CayugaBirds. (Just as an aside, Steve Kelling 
> created both of these forums!!)
>
>
> So, here are some of my recent observations and thoughts.
>
>
> There are lots of baby birds out there right now. I'm hearing 
> hatch-year bird calls everywhere I go. Also, young warblers seem to be 
> on the move right now. We've had lots of young Yellow Warblers around 
> the Lab trails this week, and most of there were NOT produced on the 
> local grounds. This was an oddly Yellow-Warbler-free year in Sapsucker 
> Woods. As far as I know, there were NO breeding pairs around the Lab 
> pond this year. So it seems that newly-produced warblers are 
> dispersing. I had some nice encounters with hatch-year Blue-winged and 
> Chestnut-sided warblers today, and I heard young warbler chips and 
> zeeps in lots of places while driving around town.
>
>
> My weekly crow census at the Cornell compost facility on Stevenson Rd 
> turned up a single Herring Gull amongst the approximately 500 
> Ring-billed Gulls (only present in the last few weeks). Also, a single 
> SOLITARY SANDPIPER foraging along the drainage ponds. A PEREGRINE 
> FALCON of undetermined age (man, they fly fast!!) came through and 
> flushed just about everything.
>
>
> A few shorebirds are being reported at Myers Point, and a respectable 
> report of the transitional male RUFF came in this week from the main 
> drive at Montezuma.  So, get out there and find some birds. And let us 
> know what you find.
>
>
> Kevin
>
>
> --
> *Cayugabirds-L List Info:*
> Welcome and Basics 

Re: [cayugabirds-l] local birds

2017-07-29 Thread Donna Lee Scott
My afternoon walk in my second and third growth woods didn't yield the bounty 
of birds of Geo's woodlands, but I heard a PEEWEE, a CARDINAL & a SCARLET 
TANAGER. Also saw a female DOWNY WOODPECKER softly pecking a tree, as well as a 
freshly discarded pure white egg shell.
My yard w/ feeders has several species, too, including regular ROSE BREASTED 
GROSBEAKS & CAROLINA WRENS. Most mornings I hear an OSPREY chirping over the 
lake shore.

Donna Scott
Lansing
Sent from my iPhone

On Jul 29, 2017, at 5:32 PM, Kevin J. McGowan 
> wrote:


There hasn't been much local birding information on this list for a while. I 
admit that I'm as guilty as anyone of not posting my sightings. I get most of 
my "hot bird info" from my hourly email eBird "needs list" updates for the 
county. It's an awesome tool, but it's not as friendly as CayugaBirds. (Just as 
an aside, Steve Kelling created both of these forums!!)


So, here are some of my recent observations and thoughts.


There are lots of baby birds out there right now. I'm hearing hatch-year bird 
calls everywhere I go. Also, young warblers seem to be on the move right now. 
We've had lots of young Yellow Warblers around the Lab trails this week, and 
most of there were NOT produced on the local grounds. This was an oddly 
Yellow-Warbler-free year in Sapsucker Woods. As far as I know, there were NO 
breeding pairs around the Lab pond this year. So it seems that newly-produced 
warblers are dispersing. I had some nice encounters with hatch-year Blue-winged 
and Chestnut-sided warblers today, and I heard young warbler chips and zeeps in 
lots of places while driving around town.


My weekly crow census at the Cornell compost facility on Stevenson Rd turned up 
a single Herring Gull amongst the approximately 500 Ring-billed Gulls (only 
present in the last few weeks). Also, a single SOLITARY SANDPIPER foraging 
along the drainage ponds. A PEREGRINE FALCON of undetermined age (man, they fly 
fast!!) came through and flushed just about everything.


A few shorebirds are being reported at Myers Point, and a respectable report of 
the transitional male RUFF came in this week from the main drive at Montezuma.  
So, get out there and find some birds. And let us know what you find.


Kevin

--
Cayugabirds-L List Info:
Welcome and Basics
Rules and Information
Subscribe, Configuration and 
Leave
Archives:
The Mail 
Archive
Surfbirds
BirdingOnThe.Net
Please submit your observations to eBird!
--

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


Re: [cayugabirds-l] local birds

2017-07-29 Thread Geo Kloppel
Forgot to mention that one of my nest boxes fledged a brood of Chickadees in 
June, and then a couple of weeks ago I spotted a pair of Chickadees 
refurbishing it. Now it contains a full clutch of eggs.

-Geo
--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--



Re: [cayugabirds-l] local birds

2017-07-29 Thread Geo Kloppel
At least one Broad-winged Hawk fledgling has been around my yard for several 
days, calling to be fed. Species that breed down in the valley below me have 
begun making (post-breeding) appearances up here: Kingfishers, Great Crested 
Flycatchers, Yellow-throated Vireo. I've noticed Wood Peewees moving around 
too. The local Barred Owls are moderately vocal.

No bears have visited me this season, so I'm still feeding sunflower seeds, and 
like others, I have had a flush of young Rose-breasted Grosbeaks and Purple 
Finches (and Towhees), the produce I guess of nests that were situated close 
just to take advantage of this resource. I got so used to the calls of young 
RBGBs that their absence was really noticeable when I visited Labrador Pond and 
Clark Reservation on Wednesday afternoon. No sunflower feeders at either 
location, that I could see, but the swamp milkweed is really gorgeous now, and 
monarchs obviously love it! The little Nature Center at Clark Reservation has 
such a lovely garden that I was sorry there was no one around to compliment.

A few days ago I scouted for a practical (if arduous) route by which I could 
get my kayak out to the open water in Michigan Hollow Marsh. Probably won't 
yield any surprises, but if I don't do it this year, when the the water is so 
high, will I _ever_?

-Geo

> On Jul 29, 2017, at 5:31 PM, Kevin J. McGowan  wrote:

> .  So, get out there and find some birds. And let us know what you find.

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

[cayugabirds-l] local birds

2017-07-29 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
There hasn't been much local birding information on this list for a while. I 
admit that I'm as guilty as anyone of not posting my sightings. I get most of 
my "hot bird info" from my hourly email eBird "needs list" updates for the 
county. It's an awesome tool, but it's not as friendly as CayugaBirds. (Just as 
an aside, Steve Kelling created both of these forums!!)


So, here are some of my recent observations and thoughts.


There are lots of baby birds out there right now. I'm hearing hatch-year bird 
calls everywhere I go. Also, young warblers seem to be on the move right now. 
We've had lots of young Yellow Warblers around the Lab trails this week, and 
most of there were NOT produced on the local grounds. This was an oddly 
Yellow-Warbler-free year in Sapsucker Woods. As far as I know, there were NO 
breeding pairs around the Lab pond this year. So it seems that newly-produced 
warblers are dispersing. I had some nice encounters with hatch-year Blue-winged 
and Chestnut-sided warblers today, and I heard young warbler chips and zeeps in 
lots of places while driving around town.


My weekly crow census at the Cornell compost facility on Stevenson Rd turned up 
a single Herring Gull amongst the approximately 500 Ring-billed Gulls (only 
present in the last few weeks). Also, a single SOLITARY SANDPIPER foraging 
along the drainage ponds. A PEREGRINE FALCON of undetermined age (man, they fly 
fast!!) came through and flushed just about everything.


A few shorebirds are being reported at Myers Point, and a respectable report of 
the transitional male RUFF came in this week from the main drive at Montezuma.  
So, get out there and find some birds. And let us know what you find.


Kevin


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

[cayugabirds-l] Recent birds: Willet, terns, Least Bittern

2017-06-19 Thread Jay McGowan
On Friday I took the Macaulay Library sound recording workshop crew to a
few lake sites in the rain. Recording was mostly slow, but we found a few
cool birds, including two rare-in-summer FORSTER'S TERNS with a group of
COMMON TERNS at Myers Point (http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S37619488)
and a WESTERN WILLET sleeping on the white lighthouse jetty off Stewart
Park (http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S37624263). Others saw the
Willet later in the morning but it was gone by the evening. I thought it
was a nice testament to the growing prowess of our group that, despite the
distance and the fact that the bird only gave a SINGLE call, at least three
people were able to make an audio recording of it!

Montezuma on Saturday returned mostly expected species, although the
ACADIAN FLYCATCHER continues on Carncross Road (and Livia and I had a
second Acadian there giving call notes the Friday before, perhaps now a
pair). No sign of the Little Blue Heron, although it was quite shimmery by
the time we gave it a good scan. The PROTHONOTARY WARBLERS on Armitage Road
were hard to get good looks at, but a few participants saw the female
entering a nest box on the south side of the road.

Finally, following up on a lead from Michael Huffaker from last weekend,
this afternoon Livia and I were able to refind a LEAST BITTERN in the
cattails at the south end of Dryden Lake by kayak:
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S37688862

-- 
Jay McGowan
Macaulay Library
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
jw...@cornell.edu

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

[cayugabirds-l] Yard birds/hummers

2017-06-14 Thread Donna Lee Scott
Even tho I have cut back on the volume of bird seeds provided, I still have 
interesting birds here. I have seen both female & male HUMMINGBIRDS at their 
feeder, as well as a DOWNY WOODPECKER mother feeding a baby at the bark butter 
log. Regular customers are the many A GOLDFINCHES eating nyjer seed.
 I think the WHITE BREASTED NUTHATCH is feeding a baby both suet & sunflower 
seeds.
CATBIRDS enjoy suet too.

Also saw 2 BLUE JAY babies w/short tails interacting with parent birds in tree 
outside my porch.
BROWN THRASHERS active across road & a small hawk (Sharpie or Coopers) zoomed 
thru the yard after a bird that it missed catching.

Most mornings I hear 1 or 2 OSPREYS chirping down near the water! Lotsa 
GRACKLES both in yard & on beach.
Baby ducks include 6 COMMON MERGS & 4 MALLARDS.

& I still hear the 2 WOOD THRUSHES singing in woods along w/ the occasional A. 
REDSTART!

Donna Scott
Lansing/by Cayuga L.
Sent from my iPhone

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


Re: [cayugabirds-l] Morning birds

2017-04-27 Thread Nancy Tonachel Gabriel
Driving up the lower part of Stone Quarry Road, we caught a great view of a 
brightly red-topped Pileated woodpecker getting breakfast from a small tree 
right at the road's edge.

--
Cayugabirds-L List Info:
Welcome and Basics
Rules and Information
Subscribe, Configuration and 
Leave
Archives:
The Mail 
Archive
Surfbirds
BirdingOnThe.Net
Please submit your observations to eBird!
--


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

[cayugabirds-l] Morning birds

2017-04-27 Thread Donna Lee Scott
At 7:30 am a mature BALD EAGLE took off from one of my beach cliff trees & flew 
south.
A few minutes later while I was standing on my second story deck, I heard a 
BELTED KINGFISHER calling & flying north to south over lake edge, then over my 
head towards the woods east of my house. It called the whole time it was flying 
over the woods, south to north., eventually circling around back to lake shore.
Then soon it flew the same big circle over the woods, & back to lake again.
I wondered if it is looking for a suitable bank in which to make a nesting 
burrow.

Donna Scott
Lansing/Cayuga Lake
Sent from my iPhone

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


[cayugabirds-l] spring birds

2017-04-06 Thread Donna Lee Scott
Handsome EASTERN TOWHEE and possibly 2 FIELD SPARROWS at my ground bird food 
area just now.
Field Sparrows scared away by squirrel before I could really study them, but 
there was definitely no dark spot on their chests as for Tree Sparrows. Bill 
looked pink.

I have often had Tree Sparrows here until recently.

Donna Scott

Lansing Station Road
Lansing, NY
East Shore, Cayuga Lake


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

[cayugabirds-l] New Birds

2017-04-03 Thread bob mcguire
I spent last night at Marten’s Tract in order to record the various ducks 
feeding/courting there. A major bonus of being there in the evening, then at 
first light this morning, was the encounter with several recently-returned 
birds.

An AMERICAN BITTERN called several times from the reeds along the south dike at 
Marten’s. I flushed a WILSON’S SNIPE from the marsh straight east from the 
parking area. There was a SWAMP SPARROW singing along Carncross Road, and four 
GREATER YELLOWLEGS feeding at the edge of the flooded cornfield there.

The most amazing sight was a massive flock of blackbirds that flew over the 
marsh at dusk to roost in the trees along the river next to Howland Island. I 
tried to count as they flew over - and got lost. My best guestimate was 10,000 
birds (which prompted eBird to remark that that was the “high count” for that 
location!)

On the way home this morning I stopped to scan the lake from the Aurora 
Boathouse. Along with some 35 Common Loons, there was a single RED-NECKED GREBE 
fairly far out.

Bob McGuire
--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--



Re: [cayugabirds-l] Feeder birds

2017-03-15 Thread John Confer
On southern end of Hammond Hill, four Fox Sparrow seen at once at our feeder, 
but no White-throats nor Song. Several dozen junco, but fewer goldfinch than in 
recent past. Over 100 b'birds: mostly red-wings, several grackles, 1 cowbird, 
and a few starlings


Sitting at the window in this weather beats going out to watch starving birds.


John



From: bounce-121336216-25065...@list.cornell.edu 
<bounce-121336216-25065...@list.cornell.edu> on behalf of Peter 
<psara...@rochester.rr.com>
Sent: Wednesday, March 15, 2017 1:11 PM
To: Dave Nutter; CayugaBirds-L b
Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Feeder birds

I have a song sparrow as well Dave.along with 2 white throats (of
different flavors) along with lots of blackbirds (red wings, grackles,
starlings) and a female cardinal eating suet!!

Stay warm all. Can Spring be far away?
Pete Sar


On 3/14/2017 10:30 PM, Dave Nutter wrote:
> I, too, did some feeder-watching this afternoon. I was hoping for a Fox 
> Sparrow, a species which I saw in my yard a few years back during a late 
> heavy snowstorm. My hopes were raised briefly by what turned out to be a Song 
> Sparrow, which eventually fed on a suet/seed block, a behavior I hadn't seen 
> before. I guess that bird must innovate to stay fed.
>
> I also saw an Icterid which I expected to be a local Red-winged Blackbird, 
> since they have been in the area and even sung from my yard, where they nest. 
> Instead it turned out to be a Rusty Blackbird, a new species for my yard, 
> although there is a bit of woods and wetland adjacent. I think it was 
> visiting feeders at my neighbor's.
>
> --Dave Nutter
> --
>
> Cayugabirds-L List Info:
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm
Cayugabirds-L Subscribe, Configuration, and Leave 
Instructions<http://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm>
www.northeastbirding.com
Cayugabirds-L – Subscribe, Configuration and Leave . Cayugabirds-L is an email 
list (the List) focused on the discussion of birds and birding in the Finger 
Lakes ...



>
>
> ARCHIVES:
> 1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
cayugabirds-l - The Mail 
Archive<http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html>
www.mail-archive.com
cayugabirds-l Thread; Date ; Earlier messages; Messages by Date 2017/01/04 Re: 
[cayugabirds-l] Help with list serve Donna Lee Scott



> 2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
> 3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html
>
> Please submit your observations to eBird:
> http://ebird.org/content/ebird/
[http://ebird.org/content/ebird/wp-content/uploads/sites/55/SPTA_rating.jpg]<http://ebird.org/content/ebird/>

eBird<http://ebird.org/content/ebird/>
ebird.org
Please join us in congratulating Chloe Marshall of Castro, Chile, winner of the 
February 2017 eBird Challenge, sponsored by Carl Zeiss Sports Optics.



>
> --
>
>
>
> -
> No virus found in this message.
> Checked by AVG - www.avg.com<http://www.avg.com>
[http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/6b/AVG_wordmark.png/220px-AVG_wordmark.png]<http://www.avg.com/>

AVG 2017 | FREE Antivirus & TuneUp for PC, Mac, Android<http://www.avg.com/>
www.avg.com
Download FREE antivirus and malware protection. Tune up your PC, Mac and 
Android devices for peak performance. Surf safely and privately, wherever you 
are.



> Version: 2016.0.8007 / Virus Database: 4756/14117 - Release Date: 03/14/17
>
>
>
>


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

Re: [cayugabirds-l] Feeder birds

2017-03-15 Thread Peter
I have a song sparrow as well Dave.along with 2 white throats (of 
different flavors) along with lots of blackbirds (red wings, grackles, 
starlings) and a female cardinal eating suet!!


Stay warm all. Can Spring be far away?
Pete Sar


On 3/14/2017 10:30 PM, Dave Nutter wrote:

I, too, did some feeder-watching this afternoon. I was hoping for a Fox 
Sparrow, a species which I saw in my yard a few years back during a late heavy 
snowstorm. My hopes were raised briefly by what turned out to be a Song 
Sparrow, which eventually fed on a suet/seed block, a behavior I hadn't seen 
before. I guess that bird must innovate to stay fed.

I also saw an Icterid which I expected to be a local Red-winged Blackbird, 
since they have been in the area and even sung from my yard, where they nest. 
Instead it turned out to be a Rusty Blackbird, a new species for my yard, 
although there is a bit of woods and wetland adjacent. I think it was visiting 
feeders at my neighbor's.

--Dave Nutter
--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm


ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--



-
No virus found in this message.
Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
Version: 2016.0.8007 / Virus Database: 4756/14117 - Release Date: 03/14/17







--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


[cayugabirds-l] Feeder birds

2017-03-14 Thread Dave Nutter
I, too, did some feeder-watching this afternoon. I was hoping for a Fox 
Sparrow, a species which I saw in my yard a few years back during a late heavy 
snowstorm. My hopes were raised briefly by what turned out to be a Song 
Sparrow, which eventually fed on a suet/seed block, a behavior I hadn't seen 
before. I guess that bird must innovate to stay fed. 

I also saw an Icterid which I expected to be a local Red-winged Blackbird, 
since they have been in the area and even sung from my yard, where they nest. 
Instead it turned out to be a Rusty Blackbird, a new species for my yard, 
although there is a bit of woods and wetland adjacent. I think it was visiting 
feeders at my neighbor's. 

--Dave Nutter
--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--



[cayugabirds-l] yard birds

2017-02-16 Thread Bard Prentiss
Hi Alll,
This morning I was visited by two quite special, to me, yard birds.  First a 
Brown Creeper appeared in a the tree near my feeders. it stayed in the yard for 
about 10 minutes. An hour or so later a Carolina Wren showed up.  It only 
stayed for a minute or so and didn't visit the suet feeders which were in use 
by E. Starlings. I'm hopeful it will return soon.

Best,
Bard

Bard V. Prentiss
27 East Main Street
Dryden, NY 13053
bvanwoer...@gmail.com
607-882 0504





--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--



[cayugabirds-l] Field birds, Holden Rd. Lansing

2017-01-08 Thread Gary Kohlenberg
There is a nice mixed flock of Horned Larks, Snow Buntings and Lapland 
Longspurs on Holden Rd. in Lansing next to the grey house with the red metal 
roof. They're feeding in the grassy field by the drainage ditch around the 
house.


US-NY-Lansing-52-74 Holden Rd - 42.5983x-76.5227


Gary

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


[cayugabirds-l] Yard birds

2016-10-24 Thread W. Larry Hymes
Have had some interesting birds at our feeders recently.  We've had a 
CHIPPING SPARROW every day since Thursday.  Yesterday a first-winter 
male ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAK stopped by briefly.  This morning there was 
a juvenile male RED-WINGED BLACKBIRD feeding on the ground with the 
other birds.  It disappeared when a COOPER'S HAWK flew in and took one 
of the mourning doves.  It hasn't returned.


Larry

--


W. Larry Hymes
120 Vine Street, Ithaca, NY 14850
(H) 607-277-0759, w...@cornell.edu



--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


[cayugabirds-l] yard birds

2016-05-22 Thread Dave Nutter
I made the most of being grounded today. When I went outside for gardening 
instructions, the first thing I heard was a vague warbler song from the mature 
spruce tree in the neighbors' yard. Forty-five minutes of procrastination 
yielded one second of view of a new bird for the cumulative yard list: a male 
CAPE MAY WARBLER, which was also new for this year for me in the Cayuga Lake 
Basin. Maybe I'll recognize its song now, though I still consider it vague. 
From time-to-time throughout the day I heard the singing again, and I stared at 
the tree for signs of movement. Five hours later (during which I was also 
somewhat productive) I was rewarded with an extended view of the bird. It 
crawls around the interior of the tree, neither at the very top, nor on the 
tips of branches, and it doesn't fly much or far, but it sure is beautiful.



As a bonus in the meantime I also heard a SCARLET TANAGER singing from the 
trees atop the cliff across the street.



After supper on the back porch, I suggested watching the spruce tree again in 
case the Cape May or some other warbler was still there. Laurie was only 
indoors briefly to get a jacket against the chill, but during that time, 7:30pm 
to be precise, a COMMON NIGHTHAWK flew over going somewhat erratically north 
east. It was high enough to be out of the shadow of West Hill, and it looked 
tan in the sunshine, with the white stripes near the wingtips easily visible 
through binoculars.

--Dave Nutter

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

[cayugabirds-l] Yard birds

2016-05-19 Thread Geo Kloppel
This morning I've got multiple CAPE MAY and BAY-BREASTED WARBLERS (both sexes) 
in my spruces on Tupper Road (West Danby). Hard to count, but maybe 10-12 
individuals between them. Tennessee Warblers continue too.

-Geo


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--



[cayugabirds-l] migrating birds react to street level lights

2016-05-18 Thread AB Clark
I thought that this Conservation Mag article would be of interest to those on 
Cayuga and Bluewing lists, since it relates both to the nocturnal migrant calls 
people hear and raises some questions about why.  Despite the url, I am not 
sure we can conclude they are disoriented by them.  

http://conservationmagazine.org/2016/04/even-porch-lights-can-disorient-migratory-birds/

Here is the published article on which the write-up is based:
Watson, M. J., Wilson, D. R., & Mennill, D. J. (2016). Anthropogenic light is 
associated with increased vocal activity by nocturnally migrating birds. The 
Condor, 118(2), 338-344. DOI: 10.1650/CONDOR-15-136.1 
.

If anyone wants the actual Condor article, I can send.  The link will give you 
the abstract, but not the whole paper.


Anne
--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

  1   2   3   >