[cayugabirds-l] Saturday birding

2016-04-16 Thread Jody W Enck
A small group of interested birders, including a youngster less than 10 
years-old, joined me for a beginner bird walks this morning down at Stewart 
Park.  By good fortune, we ran into Chris Tessaglia-Hymes who joined us for the 
whole hour.  I really appreciated his extra eyes and ears.  Overall, bird 
diversity and abundance was generally lower compared to two weeks ago when I 
last led a group down there.  Still, it is always interesting when first an 
immature Bald Eagle cruises by and lands in a tree across Fall Creek only to be 
spotted by an adult eagle.  The adult chased the younger bird from the tree and 
both grappled a bit before the adult seemingly settled the matter.  Later as we 
were ending, three Osprey came by and tried to harass the now perched adult 
eagle, but to little avail.

Driving home I saw the intrepid Tom Schullenburg looking for migrants high and 
low in the sky from the end of his driveway along Hanshaw road.  I’ll let him 
post his highlights if he is so moved.

In early afternoon, I did a half-hour stationary count in the woods beside my 
house and spotted a first-of-the-year-for-me Blue-headed Vireo hawking for 
insects.

If you are sitting inside reading this, you really should get outside and enjoy 
the day!
Jody


Jody W. Enck, PhD
Public Engagement in Science
Cornell Lab of Ornithology


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


Re: [cayugabirds-l] Saturday Birding

2015-03-09 Thread Chris R. Pelkie
I wonder if when the half of the duck’s brain is sleeping the opposite foot is 
kicking randomly like my sleeping dog does (and maybe I do it too!).

Or maybe this is akin to a screensaver: the duck keeps one leg kicking so it 
doesn’t freeze in place!

Just some random theories….
ChrisP
__

Chris Pelkie
Information/Data Manager; IT Support
Bioacoustics Research Program
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road
Ithaca, NY 14850

On Mar 8, 2015, at 08:11, Meena Madhav Haribal 
m...@cornell.edumailto:m...@cornell.edu wrote:

​Hi all,
 Yesterday , I too went looking for birds at IYC, but my goal was to observe 
behaviors. I arrived there and got out and from the top parking area I looked 
at the ducks in the bay and first thing I saw was T

What intrigued me most is how the ducks, geese and swans sleep. Some of them 
sleep with their eyes tucked inside the feathers and others with, only beak 
tucked inside the feathers and eyes outside.  I saw several hundreds of them 
asleep in the water. But many of them were spinning around.  Something similar 
I watched on Seneca River too where the sleeping mergansers were spinning 
around. They remained almost in the same location in spite of river flowing. So 
how do they do it?  At least mergansers I could see they were paddling slowly 
in spite of sleeping.  My conclusion was probably they paddle with one feet and 
thus they rotate round and round. Same thing happens if we paddle in one 
direction only in a canoe or kayak.  Anybody has any insight about the 
mechanism? It would be cool to learn.




Meena Haribal
Ithaca NY 14850
42.429007,-76.47111
http://www.haribal.org/
http://meenaharibal.blogspot.com/
Ithaca area moths: https://plus.google.com/118047473426099383469/posts
Dragonfly book sample pages: http://www.haribal.org/dragonflies/samplebook.pdf



--
Cayugabirds-L List Info:
Welcome and Basicshttp://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
Rules and Informationhttp://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
Subscribe, Configuration and 
Leavehttp://www.northeastbirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm
Archives:
The Mail 
Archivehttp://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
Surfbirdshttp://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
BirdingOnThe.Nethttp://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html
Please submit your observations to eBirdhttp://ebird.org/content/ebird/!
--


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


[cayugabirds-l] Saturday Birding

2015-03-08 Thread Meena Madhav Haribal
​Hi all,

 Yesterday , I too went looking for birds at IYC, but my goal was to observe 
behaviors. I arrived there and got out and from the top parking area I looked 
at the ducks in the bay and first thing I saw was TUFTED DUCK through 
binoculars. I spent some time watching it and as there was no else and I  could 
hear the ducks calling, I decided I want to record them. So I was getting ready 
with the equipment, when I saw a huge van with lots of stickers of Ibird and 
eBird  and full of Cornellites pulled ahead of me as I was still trying to get 
my recorder out. One by one all jumped out of the van some with large lenses 
and scopes, they all looked very professional. So my chance of quiet recording 
was foiled. So I decided I will stop by on the way back.


I headed up north. On the whim, I decided to go look at the Upper Taughannock  
Falls. And I was happy I did. It was an impressive sight with large pile of 
snow ice build up  and a tiny bit of water still flowing and making loud noise. 
I spent some time enjoying the view and was wondering how it would be when the 
snow melts!


Then, I headed to Sheldrake.  Sheldrake shore was littered with birds.  It 
seems that the large raft of Athya ducks have split into smaller groups all the 
way up to Varick where the ice edge is in the north.  I could see some were 
displaying, some sleeping, some diving actively and others doing nothing.  
Also, there were lots of swans all along the  edges and hundreds of Mergansers 
mostly Red-breasted and some Common.  I was looking for Red-necked Grebes and 
scoters.  I think I saw one Red-necked Grebe, which dove as soon as I saw it 
and then disappeared into water and I did not relocate it again. I also saw a 
CACKLING GOOSE among the Canada.


Then I headed to Seybolt Road in the hopes of relocating some winter rarities. 
I found several paired Horned Larks and several groups of Horned Larks feeding 
along the road. At Cayuga lake State park, I found a Merlin sitting as I passed 
by. I could not stop as another car was behind me. So I turned at a convenient 
location and headed back to get a better look at the Merlin. By the time I 
returned it was gone or I missed seeing it.

I returned the same way I had gone and stopped at the same locations to enjoy 
more of these birds. By the time I came back to IYC, which was hoping would be 
devoid of people, but there were three more cars parked. So I decided to call 
it a day.  As I was I just getting on Rt 89, I found Ann Mitchell heading 
towards IYC.


What intrigued me most is how the ducks, geese and swans sleep. Some of them 
sleep with their eyes tucked inside the feathers and others with, only beak 
tucked inside the feathers and eyes outside.  I saw several hundreds of them 
asleep in the water. But many of them were spinning around.  Something similar 
I watched on Seneca River too where the sleeping mergansers were spinning 
around. They remained almost in the same location in spite of river flowing. So 
how do they do it?  At least mergansers I could see they were paddling slowly 
in spite of sleeping.  My conclusion was probably they paddle with one feet and 
thus they rotate round and round. Same thing happens if we paddle in one 
direction only in a canoe or kayak.  Anybody has any insight about the 
mechanism? It would be cool to learn.


Also another thing which made me think was segregation of Athya ducks. How did 
they split into smaller groups? Is there any particular way they did it? Did 
the birds of the same summering/breeding location group into one group? Or was 
it  randomized? I think geese seem to have some kind of groups and when they 
are feeding or sleeping on the lake they are randomized but when they are 
taking off, specific individuals go off together. I watched this with the 
Sandhill Cranes in Bosque Del Apache as the family groups were taking off from 
the roost early morning, they would call to each other and wait for every one 
in the family to be ready to take off, mostly three or four birds and of them 
often one or two were juveniles. I have some videos of this behavior.

What fun it would be if we could geotag all the birds and learn what they are 
doing!


Now probably I am off to do some more birding!


Cheers

Meena



Meena Haribal
Ithaca NY 14850
42.429007,-76.47111
http://www.haribal.org/
http://meenaharibal.blogspot.com/
Ithaca area moths: https://plus.google.com/118047473426099383469/posts
Dragonfly book sample pages: http://www.haribal.org/dragonflies/samplebook.pdf




--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:

[cayugabirds-l] Saturday birding

2014-11-15 Thread Ann Mitchell
Today, Gary Kohlenberg and I went up the lake to Montezuma. Here is where we 
went and what we saw:

Myers - 3 species of gulls and mallards.

Long Point- 35 or so Common Loons, a probable Red-throated Loon, but not 100 
percent sure. 3 Pipits.

Montezuma Wildlife Drive - we saw every specie of duck except Canvasback, There 
were vast numbers of the other ducks. I picked out the only Pied-billed Grebe, 
although Gary thought he saw one at Bennings. We saw 3 species of Swans (cool). 
There were 2 Peregrine Falcons, 3 Bald Eagles, 1 Northern Harrier, and a 
Red-tailed Hawk. We also heard a Red-bellied Woodpecker. At Eaton March we saw 
the American Avocet. Dave Wheeler saw is eat a huge minnow the size of a 
finger. There was also a Dunlin in the same vicinity. We saw no Eared Grebe or 
Red-throated Loon. Also, lots of Coots were around.

East Road- Gary counted 60 Sandhill Cranes. There were 6 Ross's Geese divided 
in to 2 groups. Many Canada Geese. Some Cackling Geese were reported, but we 
didn't have the time to look for them. The ducks were Mallard, Black Duck, 
Pintail, American Wigeon. Don't know what else. Lots of Tundra Swans. We saw 1 
Dunlin and 3 unidentified shorebirds.

Good Birding, Ann

Sent from my iPhone
--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--



[cayugabirds-l] Saturday birding: pipit, W-c Sparrow, Oregon Junco

2014-01-25 Thread Jay McGowan
Martha Fischer and I participated in the DEC waterfowl survey this morning
on the west side of Cayuga Lake from Taughannock Point up almost to Deans
Cove. We didn't find anything particularly noteworthy, but diversity wasn't
bad, and there were definitely more birds around (in that section anyway)
than this time last year. Sheldrake was the center of activity as usual,
with thousands of Canada Geese and moderate-sized scattered groups of
Redhead and Ring-necked Ducks with Canvasback and scaup mixed in, as well
as Bufflehead, goldeneye, and all three mergansers around the fringes, as
well as two NORTHERN PINTAIL and a single GADWALL. We saw a couple of
Mallard x black duck hybrids during the day, as well as an odd male-like
Mallard with brown on the face and female-like patches on the sides,
perhaps an intersex female. Photos here:
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S16507246

The most noteworthy birds of the morning, however, were not waterfowl.
Martha spotted two AMERICAN PIPITS foraging along the shoreline at Deans
Cove after our survey:
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S16503915
And as we drove along South Street in Ovid looking for Snowy Owls on our
way back to Ithaca (no luck), we flushed a juvenile WHITE-CROWNED SPARROW
off the side of the road:
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S16503904

After heading back to Ithaca and finding the immature GLAUCOUS GULL
sleeping on the ice (http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S16502642)
(likely the same bird that Bob McGuire had at the compost this morning), I
headed up the east side of the lake. Once again I found nothing noteworthy
on the waterfowl front, but while checking access points south of Union
Springs, I stumbled across a flock of tree sparrows and Dark-eyed Juncos on
Great Gully Cove/Fire Lane 8 that contained a female OREGON DARK-EYED
JUNCO. It stood out immediately as being much warmer and browner than the
other birds, even a couple of fairly brown female Slate-colored. The gray
hood was dark and very distinct, contrasting with the brown back and
pinkish-brown sides. They didn't allow close approach and disappeared after
a few minutes, but I managed a couple of mediocre pictures:
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S16507845


-- 
Jay McGowan
Macaulay Library
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
jw...@cornell.edu

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

[cayugabirds-l] Saturday birding highlights (sort of long)

2013-11-17 Thread Jody W Enck
Hello All,

  I am really not trying to compete with Ken Rosenberg for reporting 
neat birds (sorry, Ken, I couldn’t resist), but it just takes me a while to sit 
down at my computer to let other folks know about my experiences.  Anyway... 
perhaps the coolest birds I saw Saturday were a GOLDEN EAGLE and a NELSON’S 
SPARROW.

  I was birding an area that overlaps substantially (or even entirely) 
with Tom Schulenberg’s home patch.  If you put a dot at the intersection of 
Freese and Hanshaw Roads northeast of Ithaca, and draw a circle of about a mile 
radius around it, you get the picture of where I was birding.  Besides 
encompassing my own residence, I like this circle because it includes patches 
of woods (some rather contiguous with others allowing for some substantial 
amount of forested habitat from early successional stages up to woods that 
might be have at least 60-70 years worth of growth).  It also has agricultural 
fields (corn and soybean in particular) that have recently been harvested and 
are attracting lots of waterfowl and loafing gulls.  It includes the Freese 
Road garden plots and similar grassy and old field habitats.  It also includes 
a section of Fall Creek, the little pond at Liddel Bee Lab and the wetlands at 
the Lab of Ornithology.

  I set out Saturday about 9am with the express purpose of trying to 
see if the NELSON’S SPARROW was still hanging around the little pond by the bee 
lab on Freese Road.  It had been reported just the day before, so I thought 
there was a good chance that I might run into it if I was careful and 
persistent.  I have to admit that I did look for this bird with my sons the day 
that Tom first reported it (it is only a half mile from my house).  I thought 
my fledgling birder boys might enjoy trying to see a bird that they had never 
encountered before.  I am fairly certain that I got two glimpses of the bird 
with enough diagnostic field marks to say that I saw the bird that day, but the 
only looks my boys got were of a small brownish bird, twice jumping up out of 
the tall dead grass, flying about ten feet, and diving back into cover.

  So, yesterday I headed straight to the pond area.  It is becoming 
fairly easy to see where others are looking for the bird because of the human 
foot prints in the mud and the little paths that are now meandering through the 
tall, dead grass.  I really didn’t want to put on a one-man drive through the 
grass in an attempt to flush the bird for a quick view.  So, I surveyed the 
area from a little distance and decided to walk in to the bank of the pond and 
sit against one of the bluebird/tree swallow boxes to see if I could hear or 
see this sparrow without flushing it.

  Of course I ended up flushing birds just getting to the bluebird/tree 
swallow box.  One of these was a largish sparrow with a longish, more or less 
rounded tail, that seemed relatively dark on the top side (do you like my 
scientific descriptions?).  Perhaps a lingering SONG SPARROW.  Another bird was 
smaller, plumper, but not fat, and not interested in flushing nearly as far as 
the first bird (which went well over 40 yards before diving back into cover).  
This second bird only would go about five to eight feet before hiding again.  
This bird decidedly was not the Nelson’s sparrow, however, as I did see it well 
enough to know it had a very clean, unmarked throat and breast, and a mostly 
unmarked face, with a couple, broad brownish stripes on its head, and a 
light-colored bill.  The rational birder in me was saying to pay attention to 
the fact that it is mid November, and that this must be a juvenile 
White-crowned sparrow.  But the guy looking at the bird through 10x binoculars 
at about 12 feet, kept saying that this bird is way too small and simply not 
the right proportions.  Plus, the face, including the entire area around the 
eyes and auriculars was unmarked in my view of the bird.  This birder in me 
kept asking the question, why can’t this be a really late Field Sparrow?  
American Tree Sparrow also jumped into the rational side of my brain, and the 
shape and size of this bird was much more similar to that than a White-crowned 
for sure.  Still, the bill was all one shade of light (not two-toned like the 
rational birder in me would expect with a Tree Sparrow), and I did have a 
decent, straight-on (albeit brief) view of the breast, and saw nothing that 
looked remotely like a breast spot.  The inquisitive trait in me certainly was 
piqued with this bird, but certainly was not ”peaked” in that I never felt like 
I was satisfied with figuring out what that bird really was.  A second sparrow 
spp. in my notebook.

I flushed a third sparrow just getting to the place I wanted to sit 
down to watch.  This little lighter brownish job (LLBJ) also only went about 10 
feet at grass-top level before diving back into cover.  I couldn’t really 
notice anything else about this bird at 

[cayugabirds-l] Saturday birding

2013-11-02 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
I did a leisurely day of birding around Tompkins County today.  Highlights 
include:

A continuing NORTHERN WATERTHRUSH in the bog on Purvis Rd, south of Dryden 
Lake.  I had this bird a couple of weeks ago, and considered that a late date.  
But, I figured I'd try again today, and it was still there.  I heard its 
distinctive call note before the bird itself appeared to be photographed.  I 
will post on my Picasa site soon.

Two cold Killdeer were in a wet tractor rut where I expected snipe, in the 
field east of the south end of West Lake Rd near Dryden Lake.

A long crow watch at the Cornell compost by the Game Farm turned up only 4 
tagged crows, a couple of Fish Crows, an increasing number of Herring Gulls, 
and a single Lesser Black-backed Gull (a near-adult sporting a black bill with 
a yellow quarter tip).  Turkey Vulture numbers were down to about 20.  Plenty 
of Red-tailed Hawk action kept clearing the piles.  Lesser Black-back was in 
groups loafing on the hill; viewing for species was better from Stevenson Rd 
than in the compost area.

A single male Purple Finch was with House Finches at the corner of Warren and 
Bluegrass Lane.  I did not find anything interesting on Bluegrass, despite 
Tom's sparrows.

A stomp through the north side of the community gardens on Freese Rd turned up 
a bunch of House Sparrows, lots of American Goldfinches, a few White-throated 
Sparrows, a good number of Song Sparrows, and a single Fox Sparrow.

The light was bad for photographing birds today, but the countryside is really 
beautiful right now. We do live in a beautiful place!

Kevin

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

[cayugabirds-l] Saturday birding in and out of the Basin

2013-04-13 Thread Jay McGowan
Hi all,
Livia and I started out in Dryden this morning but ended up going around
the lake. Highlights were EVENING GROSBEAKS at the Confers on Hammond Hill;
the beautiful and cooperative AMERICAN AVOCET along the lakeshore in Geneva
(photos soon), along with Red-necked Grebe, Surf and White-winged scoter,
Bonaparte's Gulls, and many Common and one Forster's tern offshore from the
same area; 2 UPLAND SANDPIPERS at the Empire Farm Days fairgrounds in
Seneca Falls (don't forget they still would like birders to call ahead); a
mostly winter plumage AMERICAN GOLDEN-PLOVER with many Pectoral Sandpipers,
both yellowlegs, and dozens of Bonaparte's Gulls in the Kip Island Fields,
the flooded fields on either side of the thruway visible from Rt. 90 just
west of the village of Montezuma. Waterfowl diversity was good most of the
places we went, including Montezuma, but we didn't find anything other than
the usual species there. A gray fox running across Warren Road on the drive
home was a nice surprise as well.

Cheers,
Jay

-- 
Jay McGowan
Macaulay Library
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
jw...@cornell.edu

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

[cayugabirds-l] Saturday birding, Ithaca to Union Springs

2013-01-06 Thread nutter.dave
Some friends and I had a great day of birding yesterday. Our itinerary included Stewart Park, East Shore Park, a shrike search, Ladoga and Myers point, a quest for winter field birds, the Wells College boathouse and the bluffs to the south, the ponds and Frontenac Park in Union Springs, and watching for Short-eared Owls on our way home. Highlights:SNOW GOOSE - 2 among Canadas from bluffs south of Aurora; 1 among Canadas from Frontenac ParkCACKLING GOOSE - 1 among Canadas at Stewart ParkTUNDRA SWAN - 1 near  on ice edge at Stewart Park; dozens flying in distance from Frontenac ParkGADWALL - several places on lake; best seen on ponds in Union SpringsAMERICAN WIGEON- several places on lake; best seen on ponds in Union SpringsNORTHERN PINTAIL - 1 male among Mallards at Ladoga south of Myers Point, an area with many gunners, so look quickGREEN-WINGED TEAL - 1 or 2 males on Mill Pond in Union SpringsREDHEADS - raft off Stewart Park ousted by guys in a boat; small numbers various places on lake; best seen on Union Springs pondsCANVASBACK - one male among RedheadsWHITE-WINGED SCOTER - 1 distantly viewed from East Shore ParkBUFFLEHEAD - several places on the lake including Stewart ParkCOMMON GOLDENEYE - most places on the lake but numerous and seen best at Stewart ParkHOODED MERGANSER -a few,best seen at Stewart ParkCOMMON MERGANSER -a few,best seen at Stewart ParkRUDDY DUCK - a few, best seen at Stewart Park and East Shore Park*RING-NECKED PHEASANT - 1 male at Atwater Rd  NYS-34B by old Agway, town of Genoa. First 2013 report in Cayuga Lake Basin and it's not even within sight of the game farm!WILD TURKEY - 30+ in field near hundreds of Canada Geese on Fenner Rd in Lansing a short distance east of NYS-34BCOMMON LOONS - small numbers several places on Cayuga LakePIED-BILLED GREBE - 4 together from East Shore ParkHORNED GREBE - 2 from East Shore Park, 11 from Wells College boathouse including a group of 8; 3 from Frontenac ParkRED-NECKED GREBE - 1 continuing at Stewart Park and East Shore ParkDOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANT -- 1 seen distantly from East Shore ParkGREAT BLUE HERON - 1 flying west fairly low just offshore at Stewart ParkTURKEY VULTURE - several in the South Lansing areaROUGH-LEGGED HAWK - 1 light morph atop the lone oak south of Burdick Hill Rd in LansingAMERICAN COOT - large flocks south of Finger Lakes Marine (south of Myers Point Park) and off Frontenac ParkNORTHERN FLICKER - flew to distant tree viewed from Cayuga Vista DriveNORTHERN SHRIKE - still cooperative on wires and hedgerow along Cayuga Vista Drive off East Shore Drive (NYS-34), Lansing. We were unsuccessful by Equine Drug Testing building by the airport and on Sheldon and Scofield RoadsAMERICAN CROW - individual with strange gray dewlap-like growths on chin at #278 Davis Rd, LansingEASTERN BLUEBIRD - 1 male trying to feed on sumac on Lansingville Rd just south of Davis Rd, LansingNORTHERN MOCKINGBIRD - 1 in hedgerow along Cayuga Vista; 3 on Cherry Road, 1 defending sumac on Lansingville Rd south of Davis Rd, all in LansingAMERICAN TREE SPARROW - feeders and rural Lansing roadsides, largest groupon Fenner Rd west of Davis RdWHITE-THROATED SPARROW - among many American Tree Sparrows  Dark-eyed Juncos on Fenner Rd west of Davis Rd, LansingWHITE-CROWNED SPARROW - among a fewAmerican Tree Sparrowson Lansingville Rd just south of Davis Rd, LansingDARK-EYED JUNCO - feeders andrural roadsides, largest groupon Fenner Rd west of Davis Rd, LansingHOUSE SPARROW - several atop spruces on Myers Rd north of Salmon Creek, year bird for Ann Mitchell who was sick on New Year's Day--Dave Nutter
--
Cayugabirds-L List Info:
Welcome and Basics
Rules and Information
Subscribe, Configuration and Leave
Archives:
The Mail Archive
Surfbirds
BirdingOnThe.Net
Please submit your observations to eBird!
--


Re: [cayugabirds-l] Saturday birding, Ithaca to Union Springs

2013-01-06 Thread bob mcguire
A couple of additions to Dave's list of Saturday birding:

LAPLAND LONGSPUR (seen by a few - not all - of us) in a flock of some  
200 Snow Buntings/ Horned Larks at the corner of Davis  Jerry Smith  
Rds, lansing.
SNOW BUNTING several flocks. one along Lansingville Rd just south of  
Davis Rd. another on a manure spread just south of the old Triangle  
Diner.
SONG SPARROW half a dozen along Davis Rd, south of J. Smith Rd.

And I just came home from a walk on the E Ithaca Recreation Way. No  
Screech-Owl, but two calling CAROLINA WRENS between the nut grove   
the fish lab.

Bob McGuire
On Jan 6, 2013, at 2:05 PM, nutter.d...@me.com nutter.d...@me.com  
wrote:

 Some friends and I had a great day of birding yesterday. Our  
 itinerary included Stewart Park, East Shore Park, a shrike search,  
 Ladoga and Myers point, a quest for winter field birds, the Wells  
 College boathouse and the bluffs to the south, the ponds and  
 Frontenac Park in Union Springs, and watching for Short-eared Owls  
 on our way home. Highlights:

 SNOW GOOSE - 2 among Canadas from bluffs south of Aurora; 1 among  
 Canadas from Frontenac Park
 CACKLING GOOSE - 1 among Canadas at Stewart Park
 TUNDRA SWAN - 1 near  on ice edge at Stewart Park; dozens flying in  
 distance from Frontenac Park
 GADWALL - several places on lake; best seen on ponds in Union Springs
 AMERICAN WIGEON - several places on lake; best seen on ponds in  
 Union Springs
 NORTHERN PINTAIL - 1 male among Mallards at Ladoga south of Myers  
 Point, an area with many gunners, so look quick
 GREEN-WINGED TEAL - 1 or 2 males on Mill Pond in Union Springs
 REDHEADS - raft off Stewart Park ousted by guys in a boat; small  
 numbers various places on lake; best seen on Union Springs ponds
 CANVASBACK - one male among Redheads
 WHITE-WINGED SCOTER - 1 distantly viewed from East Shore Park
 BUFFLEHEAD - several places on the lake including Stewart Park
 COMMON GOLDENEYE - most places on the lake but numerous and seen  
 best at Stewart Park
 HOODED MERGANSER - a few, best seen at Stewart Park
 COMMON MERGANSER - a few, best seen at Stewart Park
 RUDDY DUCK - a few, best seen at Stewart Park and East Shore Park
 *RING-NECKED PHEASANT - 1 male at Atwater Rd  NYS-34B by old Agway,  
 town of Genoa. First 2013 report in Cayuga Lake Basin and it's not  
 even within sight of the game farm!
 WILD TURKEY - 30+ in field near hundreds of Canada Geese on Fenner  
 Rd in Lansing a short distance east of NYS-34B
 COMMON LOONS - small numbers several places on Cayuga Lake
 PIED-BILLED GREBE - 4 together from East Shore Park
 HORNED GREBE - 2 from East Shore Park, 11 from Wells College  
 boathouse including a group of 8; 3 from Frontenac Park
 RED-NECKED GREBE - 1 continuing at Stewart Park and East Shore Park
 DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANT -- 1 seen distantly from East Shore Park
 GREAT BLUE HERON - 1 flying west fairly low just offshore at Stewart  
 Park
 TURKEY VULTURE - several in the South Lansing area
 ROUGH-LEGGED HAWK - 1 light morph atop the lone oak south of Burdick  
 Hill Rd in Lansing
 AMERICAN COOT - large flocks south of Finger Lakes Marine (south of  
 Myers Point Park) and off Frontenac Park
 NORTHERN FLICKER - flew to distant tree viewed from Cayuga Vista Drive
 NORTHERN SHRIKE -  still cooperative on wires and hedgerow along  
 Cayuga Vista Drive off East Shore Drive (NYS-34), Lansing. We were  
 unsuccessful by Equine Drug Testing building by the airport and on  
 Sheldon and Scofield Roads
 AMERICAN CROW - individual with strange gray dewlap-like growths on  
 chin at #278 Davis Rd, Lansing
 EASTERN BLUEBIRD - 1 male trying to feed on sumac on Lansingville Rd  
 just south of Davis Rd, Lansing
 NORTHERN MOCKINGBIRD - 1 in hedgerow along Cayuga Vista; 3 on Cherry  
 Road, 1 defending sumac on Lansingville Rd south of Davis Rd, all in  
 Lansing
 AMERICAN TREE SPARROW - feeders and rural Lansing roadsides, largest  
 group on Fenner Rd west of Davis Rd
 WHITE-THROATED SPARROW - among many American Tree Sparrows  Dark- 
 eyed Juncos on Fenner Rd west of Davis Rd, Lansing
 WHITE-CROWNED SPARROW - among a few American Tree Sparrows on  
 Lansingville Rd just south of Davis Rd, Lansing
 DARK-EYED JUNCO - feeders and rural roadsides, largest group on  
 Fenner Rd west of Davis Rd, Lansing
 HOUSE SPARROW - several atop spruces on Myers Rd north of Salmon  
 Creek, year bird for Ann Mitchell who was sick on New Year's Day

  --Dave Nutter
 --
 Cayugabirds-L List Info:
 Welcome and Basics
 Rules and Information
 Subscribe, Configuration and Leave
 Archives:
 The Mail Archive
 Surfbirds
 BirdingOnThe.Net
 Please submit your observations to eBird!
 --


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) 

Re: [cayugabirds-l] Saturday birding, Ithaca to Union Springs

2013-01-06 Thread John and Fritzie Blizzard
It should be noted that a hunt club in the King Ferry area gets released 
pheasants. Several yrs. ago I found one with a cheepie leg band that had been 
hit  killed by a car. I took it to a conservation office in Cortland  was 
told Cornell provided the birds for the club. 

Fritzie

From: bob mcguire 

*RING-NECKED PHEASANT - 1 male at Atwater Rd  NYS-34B by old Agway, town of 
Genoa. First 2013 report in Cayuga Lake Basin and it's not even within sight of 
the game farm!
--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

[cayugabirds-l] Saturday birding

2012-12-09 Thread Meena Haribal
Hello all,



I went around lake and some parts of Ithaca with a friend who is visiting 
Ithaca.



At Buttermilk Falls, saw one Red-breasted Nuthatch. In the inlet there were 
lots of Common Mergansers close to Rt 89. At Sheldrake, a large raft of Canada 
Geese, two Common Loons and a flock of 15+ Buffleheads and nothing much else.



At Cayuga Lake State Park, a huge flock of Canada Geese landed while we were 
there and a snow geese skein of about 300 birds seemed heading south. A little 
later we saw flocks of Snow geese flying to west side of the lake and seemed to 
be coming from Muckland. So we headed to Muckland/East Road.



At East road, there were at least 400 Tundra Swans most seemed sleeping in the 
afternoon. 22 Sandhill cranes in three different groups. Again we saw thousands 
of Snow Geese flying overhead heading south west. A little later many landed on 
the water. There was one goose in flight which was substantially smaller, which 
I think probably was a Ross's Goose, but after it landed it was difficult to 
see it. At least one, possibly two Bald Eagles were around.



Along the drive up to seven Kestrel and 10 + Red-tailed Hawks were seen in 
various locations. Near Ovid a pair of Eastern Blue birds crossed the road. 
Three different No. Mockingbirds were also seen, one of them made us drive 
around an additional two miles as I wanted to make sure it was not a shrike.



On Lake Ridge Road a flock of Horned Larks flew over us, but they kept 
continued going, so could not sift through to see if there were anything else 
in the flock.



Finally, at the triangle piece of land on Triphammer Road we did see the flock 
of Common Redpolls, one had a very distinct pink wash on the breast. A little 
later Stuart pulled up. So with his scope could see them much better.  They 
were skittish, but if you waited they came close enough to see them.



Cheers

Meena





Meena Haribal
Ithaca NY 14850
http://haribal.org/
http://meenaharibal.blogspot.com/


--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

[cayugabirds-l] Saturday Birding

2011-11-26 Thread bob mcguire
I spent the morning in the Southern Highlands - Madison County -  
primarily looking for winter finches. On Muller Hill Rd, just downhill  
and west of the four corners I ran into a small group (3) of Red  
Crossbills. Initially they flew overhead, then returned after a short  
period in response to my playback. They remained for a couple of  
minutes, calling from the tops of Norway spruces. Given the distance,  
the fact that I had only binoculars, and that I was concentrating on  
recording, I did not get a sense of male/female/juvenile. As luck  
would have it, I ran into Matt Young later in the morning. Listening  
to my recording, he was able to determine that they were Type 1.


Otherwise, the area was rather quiet. Lots of Red-breasted Nuthatches  
and Chickadees, a few Blue Jays and Goldfinches. And lots of red  
squirrels. Matt reported Siskins and Purple Finches. I had neither.


From there I drove south to the Pharsalia area and walked North Road  
where it crosses the CCC Truck Road. Again, it was relatively quiet -  
not even a lot of gun shots. More Nuthatches, Chickadees, Blue Jays.  
And a fly-over Northern Harrier and Red-tailed Hawk. AND three more  
Red Crossbills. This time briefly at the top of even taller spruces,  
and only for less than a minute - about the time it took for a really  
noisy ATV to trundle on past down the road.


The cone crop looks good, especially the Norways, larch, and white  
spruces. it will be interesting to see what develops there this winter.


Bob McGuire



--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--


[cayugabirds-l] Saturday Birding Trip -- Southern Highlands

2011-02-20 Thread grosb...@clarityconnect.com
Hello all,

Yesterday 5 brave birders, 3 from the Cayuga Bird Club and 2 from the
Cortland-Lime Hollow Bird Club, 
joined me for some birding of the Southern Highlands. Obviously the
conditions were far less than 
optimum with the snow and high winds. At times ground blizzard conditions
occurred, but we 
continued on. Fortunately, despite the weather conditions, the birds were
very cooperative.  The 
driving was very slow but we did eventually arrive at Shackham Rd
Fabius/Truxton, Morgan Hill State 
Forest at 8:45. Upon arrival we could hear lots of Evening Grosbeaks, and
within a few minutes we were 
surrounded by ~40 EVENING GROSBEAKS and a flock ~100 COMMON REDPOLLS with 1
good GREATER 
COMMON REDPOLL seen by all. 

We then decided to continue on towards DeRuyter for some birding instead of
back-tracking to 
Summerhill. At Dr. Coon Ln (formerly Coon Tree Ln) we had a flock of ~60
COMMON REDPOLLS with one 
good female HOARY REDPOLL seen by most. We didn't get to see all the needed
traits, but this bird 
noticeably stood out each time it was viewed. Within 5-6 minutes of
watching the redpolls an ADULT 
MALE COOPER'S HAWK came in and grabbed a redpoll not more than 25-30 feet
away.

The next stop was Hunt Rd where we had a really nice roadside flock of ~35
HORNED LARKS and ~25 
SNOW BUNTINGS. It was nice to view them from the warm confines of our
vehicles. Since this was a 
location I often get multiple Lapland Longspurs, we checked for one but
could not turn one up. The 
Hunt Rd feeders were surprisingly quiet except for a dozen Goldfinches and
other common birds. 
Around the corner on East Lake Rd we turned up another flock of 20 HORNED
LARKS and 30 SNOW 
BUNTINGS, but again we could not find a Lappy. One funny moment did happen
on East Lake when 
checking the field birds --the manure spreader came along and started
spreading just up wind of us -
-of course it sent us all running away laughing. We did not thoroughly
check all the spreads in the 
area, since some locations were not conducive to pulling over. 

A quick stop at the Mechanic Street feeders in DeRuyter turned up some more
goldfinches and redpolls. 
It was hard to see many of the birds so we continued on to Paradise Hill
where we had 40+ EVENING 
GROSBEAKS, 30 COMMON REDPOLLS (another good candidate for a Hoary but it
was hard to be sure 
because it was up in the tree puffed out), 1 RED-BREASTED NUTHATCH and 1
BARRED OWL --
unfortunately most of us did not see the Barred Owl before it flew.

It was a fun day and enjoyed by all despite the crazy weather.--a day to be
remembered.  A big thanks 
goes out to the brave souls that joined me!

cheers,
Matt 


mail2web LIVE – Free email based on Microsoft® Exchange technology -
http://link.mail2web.com/LIVE



--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html
3) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--



[cayugabirds-l] Saturday birding

2010-01-16 Thread alm9413
Gary and I went to Syracuse this A.M. to see the Yellow-throated Warbler,  
and after 1.5 hour's, we finally saw it.  The bird showed up for a bit,  
foraging at a very quick pace and then it moved on. We could have stood  around 
for another 1 and 1/2 hours, but we were rather cold by then.  After  
leaving the warbler, we came across a diner that had a great variety of  
breakfast foods. Fantastic food!. Ithaca should have a diner like  that. The 
birding 
down the east side of the lake was great also! We  saw Horned Grebes, but 
have to come back for Eared Grebes.
Best, Ann Mitchell
Ithaca

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html
3) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

Re: [cayugabirds-l] Saturday birding

2010-01-16 Thread Gary Kohlenberg




Ann and I also saw a juvenile Glaucous Gull at Stewart Park this
afternoon. I presume it may be the same one previously reported. 
The diner Ann spoke of is the "New York Style Diner" on Brighton Ave.
about one block south of Thurber St. I know Steve Fast would be curious
;).
Gary


alm9...@aol.com wrote:

  
  
  
  Gary and I went to Syracuse this A.M. to see the Yellow-throated
Warbler, and after 1.5 hour's, we finally saw it. The bird showed up
for a bit, foraging at a very quick pace and then itmoved on. We could
have stood around for another 1 and 1/2 hours, but we were rather cold
by then. After leaving the warbler, we came across a diner that had a
great variety of breakfast foods. Fantastic food!.Ithaca should havea
diner like that.The birding down the east side of the lakewas great
also! We saw Horned Grebes, but have to come back for Eared Grebes.
  Best, Ann Mitchell
  Ithaca